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Eugene/Spring/Rose/Alb/Corv News Releases for Sun. Aug. 14 - 9:04 am
Sat. 08/13/22
Missing Person Investigation
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/13/22 1:10 PM

UPDATE: Delmagene “Dallas” Smith and Charlize Gibson have been located and are no longer considered missing. 

On Thursday, June 11, 2022, deputies learned that Smith had been spotted at her place of employment in Riddle. Deputies contacted her and conducted an interview. Smith denied having any knowledge of Gibson's whereabouts. 

Further investigation revealed that Smith and Gibson had in fact been together. Deputies located Gibson later in the evening and returned to her guardian. 

On Friday, June 12, 2022, deputies spoke with Smith again who confirmed she had been with the juvenile and was untruthful when she previously provided statements to deputies. Smith was taken into custody and transported to the Douglas County Jail where she was lodged for Custodial Interference in the First Degree. 

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DOUGLAS COUNTY, Ore. - The Douglas County Sheriff's Office is searching for 20-year-old Delmagene “Dallas” Elvira Smith, who has been reported as missing. 

Smith was last seen leaving her residence in the evening hours of August 7, 2022. Her vehicle was located abandoned out Cow Creek Road on August 8, 2022. It is believed that Smith could be in the company of her 15-year-old cousin, Charlize Gibson, who is the subject of a runaway juvenile case taken by the Roseburg Police Department. 

Smith prefers the name “Dallas” and is described as 5'4", 248lbs with green eyes and brown hair. Her clothing description is unknown. 

Gibson is described as 5'03", 135lbs, with brown hair with red highlights and brown eyes. She was last known to be wearing a backless white and black shirt, long jean shorts, and black high-top shoes.

If you have any information as to the whereabouts of Smith or Gibson, please contact the Douglas County Sheriff's Office at (541) 440-4471 refrencing case #22-3326. 


Carjacking Leads to Attempted Kidnapping of Infant, Suspect in Custody
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/13/22 9:31 AM

JCSO Case 22-4662

SHADY COVE, Ore. - A suspect is in the Jackson County Jail today after attempting to steal a car with an infant inside. Jackson County Sheriff’s Office (JCSO) deputies responded to a carjacking and attempted kidnapping at the Shady Cove Chevron gas station yesterday morning at 1045.

The suspect stole the victim’s running vehicle parked with her 1-year-old child inside. A few feet away the mother saw what was happening and ran to the car, opening the driver’s door and pleading with him to stop so she could get her child out. Knowing the infant was in the car he still attempted to flee with the mother hanging on the outside of the door. The mother fought with the suspect and was able to get him to stop in the middle of Hwy 62. The suspect fled the scene and JCSO deputies and a K-9 unit began to track him. He was located hiding under a tarp at the 21500 block of Hwy 62 and arrested.

The suspect, Jason Lee Cheatham, 33, of Bend, is charged with unlawful use of a motor vehicle, two counts of second-degree kidnapping, two counts of recklessly endangering, first-degree robbery, second-degree disorderly conduct, and harassment. He is lodged in the Jail under several Measure 11 felony charges and is not eligible for pre-trail release. Further information will come from the Jackson County District Attorney’s office.


Fatal Crash Highway 238 -- Josephine County
Oregon State Police - 08/13/22 6:53 AM

On August 10, 2022, at about 2:45 PM, Oregon State Police (OSP) Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle crash on Highway 238 near milepost 4. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Toyota Camry, operated by, Braden Hales, age 34, from Williams, pulled out onto Highway 238 from Jaynes Drive and into the path of a northbound Ford F250 pickup, operated by Ed DeVos, age 56, from Williams.  The vehicles crashed and came to rest on the shoulder of the roadway. 

Hales was pronounced deceased at the scene by emergency personnel.  A juvenile passenger in the Toyota Camry received non-life threatening injuries and was transported to Rogue Reginal Medical Center.  DeVos was not injured. 

OSP was assisted by Josephine County Sheriff's Office, Mercy Flights, Rural Metro Battalion 5 and ODOT.

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Fri. 08/12/22
LCSO Case #22-4447 -- Search Warrant -- Internet Child Sex Crimes Suspect Arrested (Photo)
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/12/22 3:14 PM
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Lane County Sheriff’s Office detectives received information yesterday from the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children and Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force indicating that 31 year old Kelsey Meta Boren had been uploading child pornography to the internet. 

LCSO detectives applied for and were granted a warrant to search Boren’s residence in the 87000blk of Norman Ave. in Veneta for evidence related to the child sex crimes.  The warrant was executed at about 8:00pm.  During the execution of the warrant, deputies discovered additional evidence indicating that Boren has utilized the internet on numerous occasions to distribute and exchange pornographic images of children.  Additional evidence was discovered indicating that Boren has also engaged in creating child pornography and uploaded it to the internet. 

Boren is an employee of the Fern Ridge School District. The Fern Ridge School District is aware of the allegations and is cooperating with investigators.  Boren was arrested and transported to the Lane County Jail where she faces charges including six counts of Encouraging Child Sex Abuse in the 1st Degree, six counts of Encouraging Child Sex Abuse in the 2nd Degree, and one charge of Using a Child in Display of Sexually Explicit Conduct.  No children known to Boren through her employment have been identified as victims at this point. 

Anyone with information about this case or other victims of Boren’s behavior are asked to contact Lane County Sheriff’s Office detectives at 541-682-4150 opt. 1. 




Attached Media Files: 2022-08/6111/156729/Crime_Scene_Logo.jpg

Dia de la Familia Days highlight culture and provide family fun at The Oregon State Fair (Photo)
Oregon State Fair - 08/12/22 2:28 PM
Tortilla painting at Dia de la Familia
Tortilla painting at Dia de la Familia
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/7055/156720/thumb_Tortilla_Art_Family.jpg

Free with Fair Admission August 28 and September 4

[SALEM, OR] The Oregon State Fair – happening August 26 through September 5 – is proud to announce Dia de la Familia, two days highlighting Hispanic culture and providing entertainment for the entire community, presented by O’Reilly Auto Parts.

“We have put together two fun-filled days of bilingual and bicultural entertainment and activities that will unite us on each Sunday of the Fair, August 28 and September 4,” says Kim Grewe-Powell, Oregon State Fair and Exposition Center CEO. “Enjoy musical entertainment from Grupo La Chomba and Los Humildes, plus play Loteria, the Mexican bingo game, or get creative with Tortilla Art - all FREE with your Fair Admission.”

Dia de la Familia is happening Sunday, August 28 and Sunday September 4, at the Spirit of Oregon Stage. All entertainment and activities are free with your Fair Admission. 

Dia de La Familia entertainment schedule

Sunday August 28
Spirit of Oregon Stage / Free with Fair Admission

10:00 am - 11:00 am / Recorded Music

11:00 am - 11:30 am / Danza Huehca Omeyecan

11:50 am - 12:45 pm / Mariachi Sangre Azul

1:15 pm - 2:15 pm / Pachanga Band - Salsa/Cumbia

2:45 pm - 3:30 pm / The Boondock Boys

4:00 pm - 5:30 pm / Super Encanto Band

6:00 pm - 7:30 pm / El Bajio

8:00 pm - 9:30 pm / La Chomba

9:40 pm - 10:00 pm / Fire Finale

All Day / Loteria games and Tortilla Art

 

Jaripeo Espectacular in the Pavilion

Sunday, August 28
2:00 pm - Pavilion / Free with Fair Admission
The first Dia de la Familia will feature a thrilling Jaripeo Espectacular Rodeo at 2:00 pm in the Pavilion. Jaripeo Espectacular features La Impotente Banda Tierra Kora, bull riding, Ixtapa Dancing Horses, and Dancing in the Dirt. Pavilion events are free with your Fair Admission but they are first-come, first-served, while space lasts. Visitors can guarantee entry and early admission to any Pavilion event by purchasing a $5 Fast Pass for that day.

 

Sunday September 4
Spirit of Oregon Stage / Free with Fair Admission

11:00 am - 11:30 am / Ollin Yollitzly - Aztec Dance

11:45 am - 12:30 pm / Ballet Folklorico Mexico En La Piel Academia

12:50 pm - 1:50 pm / Sin Documentos

2:10 pm - 3:10 pm / Cara O Cruz Band

3:30 pm – 4:30 pm / The Boondock Boys

4:50 pm - 6:00 pm / Los Volcanes de Eddie Rodriquez

6:25 pm - 8:00 pm / Los Humildez Hermanos Ayala

8:20 pm - 9:30 pm / DJ Sonido Facinador & Robot

9:40 pm - 10:00 pm / Fire Finale

All Day / Loteria games and Tortilla Art

 

La Adictiva concert in the L.B. Day Amphitheater

Sunday, September 4
7:00 pm L.B. Day Amphitheater / Paid Concert ticket
In addition to the free events happening during Dia de la Familia, tickets are now on sale for the Mexico music sensation, La Adictiva, performing at the L.B. Day Amphitheater on Sunday September 4 at 7:00 pm. Paid concert tickets include Free Fair Admission. La Adictiva has earned a reputation as seasoned veterans of the regional Mexican music world and have become radio and chart staples, as well as a touring sensation not just in Mexico, but in the United States. La Adictiva has been nominated for multiple Latin Grammy Awards and numerous Billboard Latin Music Awards, Premio Lo Nuestro Awards, and Latin American Music Awards. 

Fair links

Tickets: (Fair/Carnival/Concerts/Fast Pass/Parking)  https://oregonstatefair.org/tickets
Newsletter: (latest news and contests)  https://oregonstatefair.org/newsletter
Media Kit: (with image downloads)  https://oregonstatefair.org/business-center/media-kit/

 

About the Fair
The Oregon State Fair is a public/private entity owned by the people of Oregon. The Fair began in 1861 in Oregon City. In 1862, the Fair moved to the Oregon State Fairgrounds in Salem, the State Capitol. The Oregon State Fair and Exposition Center hosts thousands of visitors from all over the world each year, with premier concerts, art, culture, rides, agricultural exhibits, and livestock exhibits. Throughout the year, the Fair and Expo Center works with multiple agencies to help facilitate emergency and disaster response needs. For more information, visit oregonstatefair.org or contact us at info@oregonstatefair.org 

 

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Días de La Familia resaltan la cultura y brindan diversión familiar 
Gratis con Entrada a la Feria, 28 de Agosto y 4 de Septiembre

[SALEM, OR] La Feria Estatal de Oregon - Sucediendo 26 de Agosto al 5 de Septiembre, se enorgullece en anunciar de Día de la Familia, dos días que destacan la cultura Hispana y brindan entretenimiento a toda la comunidad, presentados por O'Reilly Auto Parts.

“Hemos reunidos dos días llenos de diversión de entretenimiento y actividades bilingues y biculturales que nos unirán en cada domingo de la Feria, el 28 de Agosto y el 4 de Septiembre,” dice Kim Grewe-Powell, CEO del Oregon State Fair and Exposition Center. "Disfrute del entretenimiento musical del Grupo La Chomba y Los Humildes, ademas de jugar a la Lotería, el juego de bingo Mexicano o sea creativo con Tortila Art, Gratis con su Entrada a la Feria."

El Día de la Familia se llevará a cabo el Domingo de Agosto y el Domingo 28 de Agosto y el Domingo, 4 de Septiembre en el Spirit of Oregon Stage. Todo el entretenimiento y las actividades son gratuitas con su Entrada. Horario de animación del Día de la Familia.

De de la Familia sucede el Domingo, 28 de Agosto y el 4 de Septeimbre el la Spirit of Oregon Etapa, todo el entretenmiento y las actividades son gratuitas con su entrada.

 

Dia de La Familia Entertainment

Domingo, 28 de Agosto

Spirit of Oregon Etapa/ Gratuitos con su entrada a la feria

10:00 am – 11:00 am / Música Grabada

11:00 am – 11:30 am / Danza Huecha Omeyecan

11:50 am – 12:45 pm / Mariachi Sangre Azul

1:15 pm – 2:15 pm / Pachanga Band – Salsa/Cumbia

2:45 pm – 3:30 pm / Los Boondock Boys

4:00 pm – 5:30 pm / Super Encanto Banda

6:00 pm – 7:30 pm / El Bajo

8:00 pm – 9:30 pm / La Chomba

9:40 pm – 10:00 pm / Fire Finale

All Day / Lotería ames y arte de la tortilla

 

Jaripeo Espectacular en el Pabellón

Domingo, 28 de Agosto

2:00 pm / Entrada gratuita a la Feria

El primer Día de la Familia contará con un emocionante Jaripeo Espectacular Jaripeo a las 2:00 pm en el Pabellón.

Jaripeo Espectacular presenta La Impotente Banda Tierra Kora, monta de toros, Ixtapa baile de caballos, y baile en la tierra. Los eventos del Pabellón son gratuitos con su entrada a la feria, pero son por orden de llegada, por orden de llegada, mientras duren los espacios. Los visitantes pueden garantizar la entrada y la entrada temprana a cualquier evento de Pabellón, comprar un pase rápido de $5

Domingo, 4 de Septiembre 
Spirit of Oregon/ Entrada gratuita a la Feria

11:00 am - 11:30 am / Ollin Yollitzly - Danza Azteca

11:45 am - 12:30 pm / Ballet Folklorico Mexico En La Piel Académia 

12:50 pm – 1:50 pm / Sin Documentos

2:10 pm – 3:10 pm / Cara O Cruz Banda

3:30 pm – 4:30 pm / Los Boondock Boys

4:50 pm – 6:00 pm / Los Volcanes de Eddie Rodriguez

6:25 pm – 8:00 pm / Los Humildez Hermanos Ayala

8:20 pm – 9:30 pm / DJ Sonido Facinador y Robot

9:40 pm - 10:00 pm / Fire Finale

Todo el dia/Lotería ames y arte de la tortilla

 

La Adictiva concerto en el Anfiteatro L.B.

Domingo, 4 de Septiembre 
7:00 pm L.B. Día Amphiteaer/entrada paga para el concierto 

Además de los eventos gratuitos que tienen lugar durante de Día de la Familia, los boletos ya están a la venta para la entradas a la sensación de la música Mexicana. La Adictiva, actuando en el Anfiteatro L.B. el Domingo de Septiembre a las 7:00 pm. Las entradas pagadas para el concerto incluyen entrada gratuita a la Feria. La Adictiva se han ganado unable reputación como veteranos experimentados del mundo de la Música Regional Mexicana y se han convertido en elementos básicos de la radio y las listas, así como en una sensación de gira no sólo en México, sin en los Estados Unidos. La Adictiva ha sido nominada para múltiples premios Grammy Latinos y numerosos Premios Lo Nuestro y Premios de la música Latinoamericanos


Acerca de la Feria del Estado de Oregon:

La Feria Estatal de Oregon es una entidad pública/privada propiedad de la gente de Oregon. La Fiera comenzó en 1861 en Oregon City. En 1862, la Feria se trasladó al Recinto Ferial del Estado de Oregon en Salem, el Capitolio del Estado. La Feria Estatal de Oregon y Esposicion Central recibe a miles de visitantes de todo el mundo cada año, con conciertos de primer nivel, arte, cultura, ríos, exhibiciones agrícolas y exhibiciones de ganado. A lo largo del año, el Centro de Ferias y Exposiciones trabaja con múltiples agencias para ayudar a facilitar las necesidades de repuesta a emergencias y desastres. Para obtener más información, visite oregonstatefair.org o contáctenos en info@oregonstatefair.org


 

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Attached Media Files: Tortilla painting at Dia de la Familia , Tortilla Art is a free activity at Dia de la Familia

Field Training Officer (FTO) Training Development Workgroup Meeting Scheduled 8-16-22
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 08/12/22 2:05 PM

FIELD TRAINING OFFICER (FTO)

TRAINING DEVELOPMENT WORKGROUP

MEETING SCHEDULED

 

Notice of Regular Meeting

The DPSST FTO Training Development Workgroup will meet on August 16, 2022, in the Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. For further information, please contact Marsha Morin at 503-378-2155.

Streamed Live on Facebook @

 https://www.facebook.com/DPSSTOregon

1.     Administrative Statement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law. This meeting is being streamed live on Facebook and recorded in the form of minutes. Discussion of issues will only be conducted by workgroup members. Please be mindful of comments and side conversations.

2.     Introductions

3.     Overview of FTO Certification Discussions

Presented by Jim deSully and Marsha Morin

  • FTO Certification Workgroup Purpose
  • Governor’s Police Training and Standards Taskforce Report
  • Summary of Field Training Officer Workgroup Discussions
  • Purpose of DPSST Field Training Manuals

4.     FTO Training Development Workgroup

Presented by Jim deSully

  • Workgroup Purpose
  • Framework Discussion
  • Curriculum Development Discussion
  • Identifying Training Topics
  • Additional Discussion Topics

5.     Implementation Discussion Topics

Presented by Jim deSully and Marsha Morin

  • Transitioning or Recognizing Current Field Training Officers
  • Fiscal Impact Considerations

6.     Workgroup Meeting Schedule

 


Oregon State Police SW Drug Enforcement Team make illegal marijuana bust- Jackson County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 08/12/22 12:25 PM
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On August 11, 2022, the Oregon State Police Southwest Region Drug Enforcement team, assisted by the Interagency Marijuana Enforcement Team (IMET) of the Medford Police Department and Jackson County Sheriff’s Office, served three related illegal marijuana search warrants in Jackson County.  The investigation was the result of evidence obtained that marijuana was being illegally exported from Oregon on the black market.  After the operation was concluded, a total of 11,416 illegal marijuana plants and approximately 500-pounds of processed marijuana which was packaged for export, were seized.

The first location was in the 1200 block of Yankee Creek Rd. Eagle Point, was a large illegal marijuana cultivation farm where 5,024 illegal marijuana plants contained in twenty-six large greenhouses, in addition to the approximately 500-pounds of processed marijuana, were seized and destroyed. 

Simultaneously, two additional search warrants were served in the 100 block of Trout Way, Medford, on two industrial warehouses which contained sophisticated, illegal indoor hydroponic marijuana growing operations. A total of 6,392 illegal marijuana plants were seized and destroyed.

The investigation is ongoing and no further information is available at this time.




Attached Media Files: 2022-08/1002/156723/Yankee_Creek_Grow.JPG , 2022-08/1002/156723/Yankee_Creek_Grow-_3.JPG , 2022-08/1002/156723/Yankee_Creek_Grow-_2.JPG

UPDATE - Oregon Department of Human Services announces that Charlie Gibson has been found
Oregon Department of Human Services - 08/12/22 10:17 AM

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division, is thankful for the community support to find Charlie Gibson. 

Charlie Gibson, age 15, is a child who went missing from Roseburg, Oregon on Aug. 3. They were found Aug. 11.

Sometimes when a child is missing they may be in significant danger and ODHS may need to locate them to assess and support their safety. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and assess their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. 

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Oregon Division of Financial Regulation: Insurance companies not using state wildfire risk map
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 08/12/22 10:10 AM

Aug. 12, 2022

Salem – Insurance companies in Oregon did not use, and currently have no plans to use, the state wildfire risk map in their decision-making, according to data released today by the Oregon Division of Financial Regulation. 

During informal discussions before the state wildfire risk map was released, insurers told the division they were not planning on using the map. Once concerns were raised during public listening sessions on the new map, the division put out a formal data call to all relevant insurers doing business in Oregon to confirm they were not using or planning to use the state wildfire risk map for underwriting or rating decisions. A data call is a formal inquiry that insurers are required by law to answer truthfully.

Underwriting is the process an insurance company uses to determine the risk of offering or renewing an insurance product to a consumer. Rating is the process to determine the amount of premium to be paid to insure a risk such as a home. 

The data call asked the following:

  • Does the company use the state wildfire map for rating or underwriting?
  • Does the company use the state wildfire map for any other purposes?
  • Does the company plan to use the state wildfire map for any purpose in the future?

All of the insurers responded that they do not use the map for rating and underwriting and have no plans to use it for rating and underwriting. In addition, the division has not received any new proposed rate filings that include the state wildfire map as a rating factor. The division does not set rates or determine what rates should be; however, all rates used by insurance companies in Oregon must be filed with the division for review. The filing must include the methodology used to develop rates and the proposed rates must be actuarially justified, adequate, not excessive, and nondiscriminatory.

“This confirms what we knew: Insurance companies are not using the state wildfire risk map,” said Oregon Insurance Commissioner Andrew Stolfi. “Insurance companies have been using their own risk maps and other robust risk management tools to assess wildfire risk for years in making rating and underwriting decisions. We believe there has been confusion between decisions based on insurers’ continued use of their own tools, including their own risk maps, and the discussions on the new state wildfire risk map. We encourage insurers and agents to be careful in how they describe underwriting and rating decisions.

“We are here to protect consumers from any misinformation and welcome any documentation consumers have from insurance companies identifying that the map was used to influence underwriting or rating decisions. We also encourage homeowners to contact our consumer advocates with questions or concerns about changes to their policy.”

Consumers can contact the Division of Financial Regulation’s consumer advocacy hotline at 888-877-4894 (toll-free). Consumers can also file a complaint online at dfr.oregon.gov.

Also this week, the division issued a homeowners insurance guide to help people better understand how insurance companies determine whether to offer and renew insurance policies and set their rates. The division also issued a bulletin informing insurance agents that no insurers are using the state map for underwriting or rating decisions and reminding them that it is a violation of the Oregon Insurance Code to share false or misleading information.

“The unfortunate reality is that wildfire risk has increased in Oregon, especially over the past few years, and companies are responding to that,” Stolfi said. “One option for people who are canceled or nonrenewed is to work with an insurance agent, who can help you find a policy that fits your needs. There are nearly 150 companies offering homeowners insurance in Oregon, so we encourage those affected by wildfire risk to search across several different companies and to contact our consumer advocates if they need help.” 

For more information on wildfires and insurance, go to https://dfr.oregon.gov/insure/home/storm/Pages/wildfires.aspx.

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The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit dfr.oregon.gov and dcbs.oregon.gov.




Attached Media Files: Bulletin for insurance agents , Homeowner insurance guide

Fatal Crash Highway 95 -- Malheur County
Oregon State Police - 08/12/22 8:52 AM

On Wednesday August 10, 2022, at about 3:45 PM, Oregon State Police (OSP) Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle crash on Highway 95 near milepost 59.   

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Mitsubishi SUV, operated by, Derric Williams, age 27, from Fort McDermitt NV, was southbound and for unknown reasons crossed into the on-coming lane.  The Mitsubishi SUV crashed into a northbound Peterbilt Semi-truck, operated by Danell Vincent-Moore, age 58, from Lincoln Park, Michigan.   

Williams was pronounced deceased at the scene by emergency personnel.  Vincent-Moore was un-injured in the crash. 

Four passengers in the Mitsubishi SUV, two adults and two children, sustained undisclosed injuries and were transported via air ambulance to hospitals in Boice, ID. 

Highway 95 was closed for about five (5) hours. 

OSP Troopers are continuing the investigation into the cause(s) of the crash. 

OSP was assisted by ODOT, Treasure Valley Ambulance, Jordan Valley Ambulance, and a BLM Fire Crew.   

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Media Advisory: Event Aims to Build Solidarity for Abortion Justice
Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon - 08/12/22 8:41 AM

A family-friendly event Sunday in Eugene will bring together reproductive freedom supporters to take action, listen, learn, heal and build power for abortion justice.
 

Abortion Justice Field Day will take place from noon-4pm at Skinner Butte Park, 248 Cheshire Ave. Supporting organizations include Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon, Pro-Choice Oregon, ACLU of Oregon, Western States Center, Coalition for Communities of Color, Next Up, Northwest Abortion Access Fund and Latino Network.
 

After a decades-long fight, this summer the U.S. Supreme Court revoked the constitutional right to abortion by overturning Roe v. Wade. While we are outraged, we refuse to be swallowed by despair. It’s time for us to build the future we want — centered on community care, liberation and self-determination. By building power for the multi-generational fight in front of us, another world is possible. 
 

Our movement is enriched by the efforts of many community organizations and mutual aid groups. Abortion Justice Field Day will be an opportunity for activists to build solidarity and deepen connections with these vital networks, movement organizers, mutual aid networks, care providers and healers. Activities will include food, music, play, body work, games and engaging in initiatives that support the needs of our communities.
 

Together, we have the power to stand up against abortion bans and reclaim our rights, impact change and build a better, bolder, more inclusive future where all of us can live the life of our choosing in safety and peace.


Governor's Commission on the Law Enforcement Medal of Honor - Open Vacancies
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 08/12/22 8:28 AM

The Governor’s Commission on the Law Enforcement Medal of Honor has two open vacancies looking to be filled

 

Governor’s Commission on the Law Enforcement Medal of Honor Application– Click here

For further information regarding the Workday application process, please visit View Job Posting Details - Workday (myworkday.com). Please note that you may need to create an account if not already in Workday.

Please forward this statement and application link to members of your organization or other individuals you would recommend. 

Here is some additional information about this Commission.

The Governor's Commission on the Law Enforcement Medal of Honor consists of seven members appointed by the Governor.

  • A representative of the Governor’s office;
  • A representative of the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training;
  • A representative of the Oregon Association of Chiefs of Police;
  • A representative of the Oregon State Sheriffs’ Association;
  • A representative of a statewide organization of police officers;
  • A representative of a statewide organization of peace officers; and 
  • A surviving family member of a law enforcement officer killed in the line of duty. 

Members serve a four-year term at the pleasure of the Governor. A member of the commission is not entitled to compensation and expenses as provided in ORS 176.262.

This Commission shall:

  • Adopt rules establishing qualifications for nomination as a recipient of the Law Enforcement Medal of Honor and the Law Enforcement Medal of Ultimate Sacrifice;
  • Meet at least once every six months to consider candidates for nomination for the Law Enforcement Medal of Honor and the Law Enforcement Medal of Ultimate Sacrifice; and 
  • Nominate candidates for the Law Enforcement Medal of Honor and the Law Enforcement Medal of Ultimate Sacrifice.

Commission meetings will in Salem at DPSST and commission members will be able to participate remotely by phone or computer. All meetings are public meetings. 

This announcement was prepared by the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training on behalf of the Governor’s Commission on the Law Enforcement Medal of Honor.

We thank you for your time and assistance.


Thu. 08/11/22
OHA introduces new monkeypox (hMPXV) website
Oregon Health Authority - 08/11/22 4:48 PM

August 11, 2022

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, Jonathan.N.Modie@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA introduces new monkeypox (hMPXV) website

PORTLAND, Ore. – Oregon Health Authority today launched a new website dedicated to helping people in Oregon learn more about the ongoing monkeypox outbreak that has affected 89 countries and 49 states as of Aug. 10.

The new website includes information for the public, clinicians, public health and community organizations; the website is also available in Spanish.

Anyone can get monkeypox. However, during the current outbreak, most cases have been detected among gay or bisexual men or men who report having sex with other men. Monkeypox is spread primarily through close, skin-to-skin contact, which may include sex, cuddling, massage and kissing.

To protect yourself and others, be aware of your health. Monkeypox may start with fever, achiness or sore throat, but may also start with just a rash or sores. If you're feeling sick and notice any new rashes – especially on the genitals or around the anus – avoid close, skin-to-skin contact and talk to a health care provider (or call 211 if you don't have one).

Let your provider know, before the appointment, that you think you might have monkeypox and cover any lesions you have. Ask your provider about monkeypox testing. Even if you are not in a high-risk category, but you think that your symptoms or rash are concerning for monkeypox, talk to your provider. Testing may be recommended for you.

The new monkeypox website includes a weekly summary of case data and will be updated on Wednesdays.

As of Aug. 10, 95 people have tested positive for monkeypox in Oregon. Cases have been reported in Clackamas (3), Columbia (1), Coos (1), Lane (17), Marion (1), Multnomah (57) and Washington (15) counties.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.


08-11-22 Commissioners Honor Bill Crenshaw as Volunteer of the Month (Photo)
Douglas Co. Government - 08/11/22 4:30 PM
Sr Vol Month August
Sr Vol Month August
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/6789/156708/thumb_Bill_Crenshaw_Volunteer_of_the_Month_Photo.jpg

DOUGLAS COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

August 11, 2022

 

Commissioners Honor Bill Crenshaw as Volunteer of the Month

 

            (Douglas County, Ore.)  Douglas County Commissioners, Tim Freeman, Chris Boice and Tom Kress were honored to present Bill Crenshaw with the Douglas County Senior Services Volunteer of the Month award for August 2022, at their weekly business meeting on Wednesday, August 10.

 

“One of the most fun things I have the privilege of doing as a County Commissioner is recognizing the special people who volunteer in our Senior Services programs. Bill Crenshaw is absolutely invaluable to Douglas County. He’s a real fixture here at the Douglas County Courthouse as a greeter and also as a volunteer at our senior dining sites. We are thankful for all the ways he serves seniors in our community.” – Commissioner Tom Kress, liaison Commissioner to Douglas County Senior Services.

 

            Jeanne Wright, Director of Douglas County Senior Services, nominated Bill as a Douglas County Senior Services Volunteer of the Month. She said, “Bill is ‘Mr. Sunshine.’  He has served our department in almost every capacity, from the chair in the reception area of our office to serving as chair of our Senior Services Advisory Council. He is a priceless component to our programs because he is such a great listener. He provides valuable and timely feedback on issues that concern older adults, which allows our team the opportunity to address them proactively.  Bill truly enjoys helping people.  He has dedicated his time in retirement to not only volunteering for Douglas County Senior Services, but also in lending a hand wherever it is needed.”

 

In addition to his role as a greeter at the Douglas County Courthouse, Bill faithfully attends and helps at our Bistro Sixty Glide Senior Dining Site several times a month.  He also assists in distributing information about the services provided by Douglas Senior Services Department in the Glide and eastern Douglas County communities. As a member of our Senior Services Advisory Council, Bill helps to promote the program by inviting older adults to attend meetings or encouraging them to join the Council as a way to ensure positive outcomes for those participating in the programs offered for seniors locally. 

 

Bill retired from Roseburg Forest Products (RFP) in 2003 after a remarkable 40-year career.  He started at the plant in Dixonville and worked his way up through the ranks to supervisor, eventually taking on the role of Safety Director at the Dillard Plywood Plant.  Soon after retiring from RFP, Bill answered a call for help from the Roseburg Senior Center (RSC).  He served on the Board of Directors for RSC for 19 years, 8 of them as the treasurer, before retiring recently to spend more time with his family. When he is not helping others with a ride to church or greeting folks with a friendly face when they walk in the doors of the Douglas County Courthouse, Bill enjoys playing pinochle with friends and has always loved to travel. 

 

Bill said, “I really enjoy visiting with people, but I’ve always been drawn to older folks. I never tire of hearing their individual stories. Each one of them is special. I’m glad I can be a friendly face and I want all to feel welcome.” 

 

            Our Bistro Sixty Senior Dining Sites prepare meals on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays at our seven rural dining site locations in Glide, Glendale, Reedsport, Riddle, Sutherlin, Winston and Yoncalla. Senior Services staff know there are others in our communities who could benefit from their Meals on Wheels delivery program and/or meals at their Bistro Sixty Senior Dining Sites.  If residents know of friends or family who are unable to drive, need assistance with daily living activities, would benefit from hot meal delivery or need other assistance, they are encouraged to call the Aging & Disabilities Resource Connection in the Douglas County Senior Services Department at (541) 440-3677 or by sending an email to c@co.douglas.or.us">adrc@co.douglas.or.us

 

            Douglas County’s seven rural Senior Dining Sites and Meals on Wheels programs are managed by Douglas County Senior Services Department staff, but are successful because of the dedication of volunteers like Bill. To get involved with Douglas County Bistro Sixty Senior Dining Sites and Meals on Wheels programs or to learn more about volunteer opportunities, contact Darla Hilburn at the Douglas County Senior Services Department via email at dahilbur@co.douglas.or.us or by calling (541) 440-3677.

 

            Thank you, Bill! You truly are “Mr. Sunshine!”




Attached Media Files: Sr Vol Month August

Health Care Workforce Committee to meet August 17 via Zoom meeting
Oregon Health Authority - 08/11/22 4:27 PM

August 11th, 2022

Contact: Liz Gharst, 971.666.2476 eth.a.gharst@dhsoha.state.or.us">elizabeth.a.gharst@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Marc Overbeck, 503.689.5321, c.overbeck@dhsoha.state.or.us">marc.overbeck@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Health Care Workforce Committee to meet August 17 via Zoom meeting

What: A public meeting of the Health Care Workforce Committee

When: Wednesday, August 17th, 9:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Public comment will be taken at 9:05-9:15 a.m.

Where: Virtual Meeting Only. The public can join remotely via Zoom or a conference line. To join via Zoom:

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1619616758?pwd=ZlRMSWJnd3ZsRG5EWlM0bnREeFJyQT09

One tap mobile (iPhone) +16692545252,,1619616758#,,,,455480#

Agenda: Presentation and Discussion: Nursing Workforce Study, Discussion: Licensing Boards Included in Health Care Reporting Program Statute, Other Topics of Interest/Discussion.

For more information, please visit the Workforce Committee’s website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/hpa/hp-hcw/pages/index.aspx

The Workforce Committee welcomes hearing from community members on the matters discussed by the committee and its other bodies, and other topics the public wishes the committee to consider.  you wish to offer public comment, we appreciate you letting Marc Overbeck know in advance of the meeting, at c.overbeck@dhsoha.state.or.us">marc.overbeck@dhsoha.state.or.us. Advance notice is not required in order to offer public comment at the meeting.  

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jaime Taylor at 503.689.7926, 711 TTY, jaime.taylor@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Missing child alert -- Charlie Gibson is missing and is believed to be in danger (Photo)
Oregon Department of Human Services - 08/11/22 4:05 PM
Smith
Smith
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/973/156706/thumb_Smith.jpg

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division, asks the public to help find Charlie Gibson, age 15, a child in foster care who went missing from Roseburg, Oregon on Aug. 3. Charlie, who uses they/them pronouns, is believed to be in danger.

ODHS asks the public for help in the effort to find Charlie and to contact 911 or local law enforcement if they believe they see them.

Charlie frequents Canyonville, Oregon as well as the Cow Creek area in southern Douglas County. It is likely that Charlie is with two adults: Delmagene Smith, who uses they/them pronouns and prefers to use the first names Dallas or Shawn; and David Allen Laird, who uses he/him pronouns. Smith and Laird may be attempting to travel out of state with Charlie, possibly to Texas. 

Preferred name: Charlie Gibson
Legal name: Charlize Gibson
Pronouns: They/them
Date of birth: Sept. 8, 2006
Height: 5-feet-3
Weight: 135 pounds
Hair: Brown with red highlights
Eye color: Brown
Other identifying information: Charlie was last seen wearing a backless white and black shirt, long jean shorts and black high-top shoes.
Roseburg Police Department Case #22-3764
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children #1457593

Sometimes when a child is missing they may be in significant danger and ODHS may need to locate them to assess and support their safety. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and assess their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. 

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Attached Media Files: Smith , Charlie Gibson

Jury Convicts Florida Man for Using a Minor to Produce Sexually Explicit Material
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 08/11/22 3:30 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A federal jury in Portland found a New Smyrna Beach, Florida man guilty today for video recording himself sexually abusing a child he met on social media and sharing the abuse video with others online.

Michael Wayne Lyon, 39, was found guilty of using a minor to produce a visual depiction of sexually explicit conduct.

According to court documents and trial testimony, in October 2017, Lyon began exchanging messages online with a 13-year-old child. He first claimed to be 15 years old and later “confessed” to be being 17. Lyon’s conversations with the child quickly turned sexually explicit and he convinced the child to send him naked photos of herself. After Lyon admitted to being in his 30s, the child tried to end their communication. Lyon persisted, continued contacting the child, and, in March 2018, travelled to the Pacific Northwest to meet the child.

Fearing for the safety of her family, the child agreed to meet Lyon. After traveling from Seattle to Oregon in a rented vehicle, Lyon took the child to a hotel near her residence where he sexually assaulted her. Lyon video recorded himself abusing the child and later shared the video online with several of the child’s friends and acquaintances. The child’s brother and mother captured a recording of the video before it disappeared and notified law enforcement. Local authorities interviewed the child’s parents and several other witnesses, but did not pursue the case further.

From 2018 through 2020, Lyon continued contacting the child and created multiple social media accounts to avoid the child’s repeated attempts to block him. Lyon’s messages became increasingly threatening and, later, openly violent. In October 2020, he threatened to kill the child and her family. Soon after, the child’s mother reported Lyon’s abuse and threats to the FBI. 

On December 11, 2020, Lyon was charged by federal criminal complaint and an arrest was issued. Nine days later, he was arrested by local law enforcement in Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania and turned over to the FBI. Lyon has remained in federal custody since his arrest.

On February 2, 2021, a federal grand jury in Portland returned a two-count indictment charging Lyon with cyberstalking and using a minor to produce a visual depiction of sexually explicit conduct.

Lyon faces a maximum sentence of 35 years in federal prison with a 15-year mandatory minimum sentence, a $500,000 fine and a life term of supervised release.

“In trials involving the sexual abuse of children, jurors are tasked with taking in and reviewing a horrendous set of facts. In this case, the young witness took the stand to tell the jury the details of what happened in her own words. The law enforcement community recognizes the courage it takes to go to police and to face an abuser at trial. Because of this strong young witness, the defendant was brought to justice, making our communities and children safer,” said Natalie Wight, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

“Michael Lyon displayed horrific and disturbing behavior victimizing an innocent child over and over again,” said William Brooks, Assistant Special Agent in Charge of the FBI Portland Field Office. “The FBI and our law enforcement partners work every day to shut down child predators and deliver justice for victims. While this verdict effectively ends Mr. Lyon’s ability to sexually exploit children, the damage caused by this crime can linger for a lifetime for the victim. The FBI remains constant in our commitment to provide resources for victims to assist in the healing process.”

This case was investigated by FBI Portland’s Child Exploitation Task Force (CETF).

It was prosecuted by Pamela Paaso and Suzanne Miles, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

Anyone who has information about the physical or online exploitation of children are encouraged to call the FBI at 1-800-CALL-FBI (1-800-225-5324) or submit a tip online at tips.fbi.gov.

The FBI CETF conducts sexual exploitation investigations, many of them undercover, in coordination with federal, state and local law enforcement agencies. CETF is committed to locating and arresting those who prey on children as well as recovering and assisting victims of sex trafficking and child exploitation.

This case was brought as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative launched in May 2006 by the Justice Department to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse. For more information about Project Safe Childhood, please visit www.justice.gov/psc.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council has now approved BHRNs in 33 counties for drug treatment and recovery services
Oregon Health Authority - 08/11/22 2:49 PM

August 11, 2022

Media contact: Timothy Heider, 971-599-0459,

timothy.heider@dhsoha.state.or.us

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council has now approved BHRNs in 33 counties for drug treatment and recovery services

The Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council (OAC) approved Behavioral Health Resource Networks (BHRNs) in two more county regions, covering Klamath and Lane counties, Wednesday, August 10.

The OAC has now approved BHRNs in 33 out of 36 counties.

The new approvals represent an investment of more than $35.5 million, bringing the total BHRN funding to approximately $186.7 million. To date, nearly $229 million has been allocated in support of Measure 110, including Access to Care (ATC) grant funding.

OHA has developed a statewide map visualization that shows the BHRNs that have been approved for funding (in orange), along with those that have been selected by the OAC (in blue) and are in negotiations for funding approval.

See OHA’s robust new dashboard showing the BHRN approval and funding progress to date. OHA will continue to provide frequent updates on the funding process.

BHRN data gathering will take “phased approach”

The OAC has adopted guidelines for data reporting by the established BHRNs. A full description of what is required, along with sample reports in English and Spanish, can be found under “Grantee Resources” on the Measure 110 webpage.  

Other M110 funds to be disbursed

A three-month extension was offered to ATC grantees through Sept. 30, 2022.

Twenty-eight of the original 66 recipients received first-round extensions for a total of $5,725,054.93. Fifty-four of the original 66 recipients requested second-round extensions; of those, 41 were found eligible for additional funds totaling $4,356,343.

The additional funds are in the process of being disbursed, bringing the total ATC funds to be disbursed to approximately $41.6million. 

These funds will prevent a lapse of funding or interruption of service for grantees while the OAC continues to review and approve applications. 

ATC grantees comprise 70 substance use treatment programs that provide treatment, housing, vocational training and other life-changing support services. 

Read more about Measure 110

Background: In November 2020, Oregon voters passed Measure 110, the Drug Addiction Treatment and Recovery Act of 2020, which became effective Dec. 4, 2020, to better serve people actively using substances or diagnosed with a substance use disorder. In July 2021, the legislature passed SB 755, which amended the act and made it more feasible to implement.

People who provide drug treatment and recovery services and advocates for criminal justice reform wrote Measure 110 in response to the high rate of drug addiction and overdoses in Oregon, and the disproportionate impact of those outcomes on Oregon’s communities of color.

Their goal was to establish a more equitable and effective approach to substance use disorder. OHA is working with the OAC to develop a first-in-the-nation health-based approach to substance use and overdose prevention system, which is more helpful, caring and cost-effective than punishing and criminalizing people who need help.

####


 


OHA Releases 2021 CCO Metrics Report
Oregon Health Authority - 08/11/22 2:29 PM

August 11 2022

Media Contact: Liz Gharst, eth.a.gharst@state.or.us">elizabeth.a.gharst@state.or.us, 971-666-2476

OHA Releases 2021 CCO Metrics Report

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) released the 2021 Coordinated Care Organization (CCO) Metrics Report, showing the results of Oregon’s Quality Incentive Program. The program rewards CCOs for improving the quality of care provided to Oregon Health Plan members. This program is one of several key health system transformation mechanisms for achieving Oregon’s health equity goal and vision for better health, better care and lower costs.

Although the COVID-19 public health emergency continued and the Delta variant drove surges in hospitalizations and deaths, performance on CCO incentive metrics began to rebound in 2021 after sharp declines in 2020.

The report shows an encouraging return to a focus on increasing quality, consistent with the Metrics and Scoring Committee’s decisions about 2021 benchmarks. Normally, the committee sets incentive metric benchmarks that are aspirational goals to encourage ongoing improvement. To balance ongoing quality improvement needs with concerns about the pandemic’s pressures on the health care system, however, the committee set significantly lower benchmarks for 2021, after suspending benchmarks entirely for 2020 due to the public health emergency.

CCOs earned substantial bonuses for performance on the metrics. The 2021 Quality Pool for CCO incentive metrics was almost $235 million, representing 3.75% of the total amount all CCOs were paid in 2021. The share of these bonus funds that each CCO earned depends on the number of members it serves and its performance on the 14 incentive metrics.

“After the initial shock of 2020, this report shows CCOs regaining ground in 2021,” said OHA’s Interim State Medicaid Director Dana Hittle. “Despite ongoing challenges, we saw CCOs improve over 2020 performance on most of these key measures of care for Oregon Health Plan members. This is very positive progress.”

Report highlights

In sharp contrast to 2020, statewide performance in 2021 showed improvement on most of the 14 incentive measures. The exceptions were two immunizations measures, which worsened for both children and adolescents, and the measure of drug and alcohol screening and referrals, which improved for the screening rate but worsened for the referrals rate. This report contains both encouraging trends and areas for improvement.

  • Oral health measures regained substantial ground in 2021. Preventive dental services improved by 25.9% over 2020 in ages 1 to 5 and 17.1% in ages 6 to 14. Oral evaluations for adults with diabetes improved by 21.7%.
  • The rate of CCO members who receive postpartum care after giving birth continued to improve in 2021, up 5.6% from 2020. The postpartum period is an important time for physical recovery; addressing pregnancy spacing and family planning needs; managing chronic conditions that may have been exacerbated during pregnancy; providing breastfeeding support; and ensuring mental health.
  • Improvements are needed in rates of youth immunizations, which are down 7.7% for adolescents and 8.3% for immunizations received by the child’s second birthday. Because these measures include a “look back” for immunizations received in previous years, they continue to be affected by disruptions in preventive care that occurred earlier in the pandemic.

In 2021, the Health Equity measure: Meaningful access to health care services for persons with limited English proficiency was incentivized for the first time, following extensive development work by a public workgroup and other partners. The measure’s goal is to achieve meaningful access to health care services for all CCO members through quality communication and language access services, as well as the delivery of culturally responsive care. Additional metrics to incentivize upstream, systems-level changes are included in the 2022 and 2023 CCO incentive metrics sets and will be reported in future years.

For highlights of statewide performance, snapshots of CCO performance, and details on how much each CCO earned through the Quality Incentive Program, visit the OHA Health Policy and Analytics website. A dashboard coming this fall will include additional measures, with options to explore breakouts of statewide and CCO performance by race, ethnicity and language.


Fatal Crash Highway 293 -- Wasco County
Oregon State Police - 08/11/22 12:12 PM

On August 10, 2022, at about 6:30 PM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Highway 293 near milepost 8. 

Preliminary investigation revealed a Chevrolet Cobalt, operated by an unknown adult male, was southbound and for unknown reasons left the roadway going down an embankment where it crashed into a tree.  The final resting spot of the crash was on private property.  The unknown adult male and an unknown adult female passenger were declared deceased at the scene by emergency personnel. 

The crash was reported to emergency personnel by a landowner who found the vehicle on his property.  It is unknown when the crash happened.  It was learned that the involved vehicle had been reported stolen earlier in the day from Fossil. 

Troopers are attempting to identify both occupants.

OSP was assisted by Shaniko Fire, Jefferson County Fire, ODOT and several landowners. 

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BPA finances still strong with one quarter left in FY 2022
Bonneville Power Administration - 08/11/22 11:55 AM

Strong market prices continue to bolster BPA’s net secondary revenues

Portland, Oregon – Three quarters through the fiscal year, the Bonneville Power Administration expects to finish the year with higher than expected net revenues, primarily driven by net secondary sales. BPA’s current net revenue forecast is $836 million compared to a rate case net revenue forecast of $178 million.

Both BPA’s Power and Transmission business lines are expected to finish fiscally stronger than originally projected. 

“Bonneville continues to reap the benefits of higher than normal market prices for power and an almost ideal volume and runoff shape to the river,” said Administrator and CEO John Hairston. “If this trend continues through the remaining three months, this will be BPA’s strongest financial year since 2006.”

The new $836 million net revenue forecast has grown $270 million since BPA’s mid-year forecast. 

With just three months remaining in the fiscal year, it looks highly likely that BPA’s reserves distribution clause will activate for both Power and Transmission. The RDC is a process for determining the distribution of financial reserves to purposes determined by the administrator.  The process, outlined in the General Rate Schedule Provisions, states the administrator determines what part, if any, will be applied to debt reduction, incremental capital investment, rate reduction, or any other purposes. 

BPA’s financial reserves are now projected to be $1.594 billion at year’s end. Power Services financial reserves for risk are projected at 243 days cash on hand, and Transmission Services reserves for risk are projected at 159 days cash on hand. BPA’s financial policy sets the maximum days cash on hand with no RDC at 120 days. As of now, that would mean a $500 million RDC for Power Services and a $72 million RDC for Transmission Services. 

“We are pleased to be in this position of very strong top-line and bottom-line financial performance that will likely lead to the reserves distribution clause triggering for both Power and Transmission and be able to pass back the benefits of this solid financial year in some form to our customers,” said Chief Financial Officer Marcus Harris. 

While most of the financial news for BPA is overwhelmingly positive, inflation, higher interest rates, supply chain constraints and the start of a new water year loom. 

“Barring an unexpected setback, this year looks like it will be among BPA’s financially strongest,” said Harris. “However, we start this process over in October. A new fiscal year will bring a new set of opportunities and challenges and requires a refocus to again manage the bottom lines of both the Power and Transmission business lines.”

BPA’s full third quarterly business review is available at Quarterly Business Review - Bonneville Power Administration (bpa.gov)  

About BPA
The Bonneville Power Administration, headquartered in Portland, Oregon, is a nonprofit federal power marketer that sells wholesale, carbon-free hydropower from 31 federal dams in the Columbia River Basin. It also markets the output of the region’s only nuclear plant. BPA delivers this power to more than 140 Northwest electric utilities, serving millions of consumers and businesses in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, western Montana and parts of California, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming. BPA also owns and operates more than 15,000 circuit miles of high-voltage power lines and 261 substations, and provides transmission service to more than 300 customers. In all, BPA provides nearly a third of the power generated in the Northwest. To mitigate the impacts of the federal dams, BPA implements a fish and wildlife program that includes working with its partners to make the federal dams safer for fish passage. It also pursues cost-effective energy savings and operational solutions that help maintain safe, affordable, reliable electric power for the Northwest. www.bpa.gov 

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Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council holds public meetings in August
Oregon Health Authority - 08/11/22 10:59 AM

August 11, 2022

Media contact: Aria Seligmann, 503-910-9239, ia.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us">aria.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council holds public meetings in August

What: Public meetings of the Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council.

Agenda: The council will finalize approval of BHRN applications. Agendas will be posted on the Oversight and Accountability Council web page prior to each meeting.

When/Where:

Virtual meetings are Wednesdays from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.

Aug. 17: https://youtu.be/wi7JYWRQqoQ

Aug. 24: https://youtu.be/fcDyn3NUzq8

Aug. 31: https://youtu.be/rkDujcMo_Hk

Purpose: The Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council (OAC) oversees the establishment of Behavioral Health Resource Networks throughout Oregon. The OAC holds regular meetings to accomplish the necessary steps to fund and set up the networks.

Read more about the OAC. Read more about Measure 110.

Questions? Contact e110@dhsoha.state.or.us">OHA.Measure110@dhsoha.state.or.us

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jessica Carroll at 503-580-9883, 711 TTY or roll@dhsoha.state.or.us">jessica.a.carroll@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


 


Task Force Busts Black-Market Marijuana Grow; Destroys 16k Plants; Watermasters Discover One Million Gallons Water Used Illegally, Code Enforcement Issues $180k Fine (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/11/22 10:53 AM
grow
grow
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/6186/156685/thumb_IMG_3758~photo.JPG

IMET Case 22-7347

 

MEDFORD, Ore. – Illegal Marijuana Enforcement Team (IMET) detectives served a search warrant on a marijuana grow site yesterday morning near the 9000 block of Hillcrest Road east of Medford. The property contained approximately 16,827 illegal cannabis plants in 87 “hoop-style” greenhouses, taking up 5 1/2 acres of the property. Jackson County Sheriff’s Office (JCSO) deputies, Oregon State Police (OSP) Rogue Area Drug Enforcement (RADE) detectives, and Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) assisted with the warrant service. On scene, one subject was detained, interviewed, and released. Detectives identified the primary suspects and charges are pending from the Jackson County District Attorney’s office. 

 

This case was the result of a nine-month long investigation of an illegal/black market marijuana growing operation. There was no licensing for any type of cannabis growing, handling, or processing at this location. Jackson County Code Enforcement responded to the scene to conduct an independent investigation. Code Enforcement issued citations totaling $180,000 for 87 non-permitted greenhouse structures, failing to obtain marijuana production approval, non-permitted electrical, solid waste, and camping within a marijuana production area.

 

Oregon Water Resources Department District 13 Watermasters discovered multiple water violations on the property including two illegal wells, and an illegal pond. Watermasters estimated that the black-market marijuana grow illegally consumed roughly 25,000 gallons of water per day, for a total of 1,009,620 gallons over the last 40 days. This amount of water would fill 50 average sized swimming pools. This conservative estimation is based upon each of the 16,827 plants using roughly 1 1/2 gallons per day with the average age of the plants being approximately 40 days. Watermasters issued a Notice of Violation (NOV) to the responsible parties for the appropriation of ground water for irrigation and storage at an illegal commercial operation. Water violations of this kind are subject to both civil and criminal penalties.

 

While regulatory agencies investigate permitted cannabis operations, IMET is focusing on the black-market marijuana trade in the Rogue Valley. IMET is a multi-agency task force funded by a grant from the Oregon Criminal Justice Commission. The task force includes personnel from JCSO, Medford Police Department, HSI, Code Enforcement, Watermasters, and the DA’s Office. 

 

Investigations are open and ongoing with detectives working additional leads. No further information is currently available for release.

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Attached Media Files: grow , Shower , Skid Steer 2 , Skid Steer 1 , JCSO Patrol , Illegal Well , Living Conditions 4 , Living Conditions 3 , Living Conditions 2 , Illegal Pond , Generator , Chemicals 2 , OSP , Chemicals , Living Conditions 1

08-11-22 TEMPORARY CLOSURE NOTICE - Boat Ramp, East Parking Lot at Amacher County Park (Photo)
Douglas Co. Government - 08/11/22 10:46 AM
DC Parks
DC Parks
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/6789/156684/thumb_douglas-county-rocky_small.png

DOUGLAS COUNTY PARKS DEPARTMENT

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

August 11, 2022

 

TEMPORARY CLOSURE NOTICE

Boat Ramp, East Parking Lot at Amacher County Park

 

(Douglas County, Ore.) Beginning on Monday, August 22, 2022, the Douglas County Parks Department will temporarily close the boat ramp and adjacent parking lot on the east side of the railroad trestle at John P. Amacher County Park.  The closure is necessary in order to complete a much needed improvement project that involves the repaving of the parking lot, installation of new curbs, new stormwater catch basins and striping of parking spots.  The project is expected to take about six weeks to complete.  The tentative project timeline is August 22, 2022 thru September 30, 2022.  As with any construction or road project, unforeseen delays due to weather, equipment and material availability could possibly extend the anticipated project timeline.

 

We understand that our park is a popular destination for boaters, rafters, fishermen, picnickers, nature enthusiasts and campers, so we wanted to let park patrons know that it is our goal to have the rest of Amacher Park, including the campground, day use area, pavilion, trails, and parking lots west of the railroad trestle open and accessible for park patrons.  However, please note that there might be short periods of time when the contractor will need to close other areas of the park in order to complete their work.  We ask that patrons please be patient and courteous to workers and obey the posted closure signs until the project has been completed. 

 

We also want to encourage those wishing to float the river or fish off the river banks or kayak in the area to utilize access points near the day use area during the project period.  In addition, during the ramp closure, boaters are encouraged to select an alternate facility that will fit your needs amongst our large inventory of Douglas County Parks with boat ramps.

 

In addition to Parks Department funds approved by the Douglas County Board of Commissioners, the project is being funded in part with grants from the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Oregon State Marine Board and the Umpqua Fisherman’s Association.  The total project cost will be roughly $800,000.

 

John P. Amacher County Park and Campground is located along the banks of the North Umpqua River about 6 miles north of Roseburg.  It sits adjacent to the Winchester Bridge at 5750 NE Stephens Street in Winchester, Oregon.  The county park offers day use recreational opportunities like boating, fishing, swimming, rafting, picnicking, hiking, walking and a pavilion for events.  The Campground has 20 full hook -up and 10 non-hook up campground site accommodations with showers and restrooms. It is a great park become your home base to experience what central Douglas County has to offer. 

 

The Douglas County Parks Department appreciates the public’s patience as they continue to improve your recreational experience in our county parks. For more information, or to locate a park, campground or boat ramp near you, log onto the Douglas County Parks Department’s page on the Douglas County, Oregon Government Website at: https://douglascounty-oregon.us/265/Parks.

 

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Contact Tamara Howell, Douglas County Emergency Communications & Community Engagement Specialist (PIO)(541) 670-2804 cell - (541) 957-4896 office - tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us




Attached Media Files: DC Parks

UPDATE - Oregon Department of Human Services announces that Davin Moore has been found
Oregon Department of Human Services - 08/11/22 10:45 AM

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division, is thankful for the community support to find Davin Moore. 

Davin Moore, age 14, is a child who went missing from Hermiston on Aug. 5. He was found Aug. 10. 

Sometimes when a child is missing they may be in significant danger and ODHS may need to locate them to assess and support their safety. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and assess their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. 

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Public Notice - Douglas County Fire District No. 2 Regular Board Meeting
Douglas Co. Fire Dist. No.2 - 08/11/22 10:42 AM

BOARD REGULAR MEETING NOTICE

The Board of Directors of Douglas County Fire District No. 2 will hold its Regular Board meeting at DCFD#2 Fire Station 655 at 6000 Garden Valley Rd. Roseburg, OR on Tuesday, August 16, 2022, at 4:00 p.m. To comply with House Bill 2560, those that wish to participate can attend through videoconferencing or telephonically. If you plan on attending the meeting, please call the business office at 541-673-5503 during normal business hours prior to 2:00pm on Tuesday, August 16, 2022, for instructions. 

The Board agenda to include but not limited to:

  1. SDAO Board Practices Assessment
  2. Elect Officers of the Board 
  3. Monthly Financials
  4. Annexation Request
  5. Select Legal Counsel

The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities.  A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting to DCFD #2 at 673-5503.


UPDATE: Missing child alert -- Oakley Miller is missing and believed to be at risk (Photo)
Oregon Department of Human Services - 08/11/22 10:38 AM
Remington Miller
Remington Miller
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/973/156529/thumb_Remington_Miller.jpg

UPDATE - This alert has been updated to include new information that: 

  • McKinzie Simonis is believed to be traveling with Oakley Miller in a silver Mitsubishi Lancer with Washington license plates.
  • They are suspected to be in Union or Baker County.

(Salem) – Oakley Miller, age 3-months, went missing with his mother McKinzie Simonis from La Grande, Oregon on Aug. 3. The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division believes that Oakley may be at risk and is searching for him to assess his safety.

McKinzie Simonis is believed to be traveling with Oakley Miller in a silver Mitsubishi Lancer with Washington license plates. They are believed to be in Union County or Baker County, including the Oregon cities of North Powder, Halfway and Huntington. 

McKinzie Simonis and Oakley may be with Oakley’s father, Remington Miller. 

ODHS asks the public to help in the effort to find Oakely. Anyone who suspects they have information about the location of Oakley or McKinzie Simonis should call 911, local law enforcement or the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline at 1-855-503-SAFE (7233)

Name: Oakley Miller
Pronouns: He/him
Date of birth: April 25, 2022
Hair: Blonde 
Eye color: Blue
Other identifying information: Oakley is a young infant who is likely with his mother, McKinzie Simonis.
Union County Sheriff’s Office Case #SO220612
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children #1457364

Sometimes when a child is missing they may be in significant danger and ODHS may need to locate them to assess and support their safety. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and assess their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. 

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Attached Media Files: Remington Miller , Oakley Miller , Oakley Miller and McKinzie Simonis

The Dog Ate My Scratch-it (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 08/11/22 10:37 AM
2022-08/4939/156680/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg
2022-08/4939/156680/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/4939/156680/thumb_OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg

Aug. 11, 2022 – Salem, Ore. – Officials at the Oregon Lottery have seen Lottery tickets in many different states. Washed in a pair of jeans, dropped in a mud puddle, and even run over by cars. But earlier this week was a first.

The Oregon Lottery received a letter with a torn-up ticket and a picture of two dogs. That’s right, the dogs ate the Lottery ticket.

Nathan and Rachael Lamet of Salem sent the damaged ticket to the Lottery with a note and a picture of their two Alaskan Klee Kias, “Apple” and “Jack.” The Lamets have owned the dogs since they were puppies, “Apple” is 11 months old and “Jack” is two years old. 

“For some reason we left the ticket on the ottoman and they decided it was delicious,” said Rachel Lamet. “I went to bed and when I woke up it was eaten to the point that I thought it was unable to be checked. But my husband thought it was hilarious and someone might get a good laugh at at the very least. He said it’s for sure a winner.”

Oregon Lottery personnel didn’t roll over, and fetched all the pieces of the ticket and were able to put the ticket back together, and soon realized Nathan was right. The “delicious” $3 Pharaoh’s Gold Crossword was an $8 winner.

When the Lamets found out they had won, and the check was being mailed to them, they couldn’t believe it was actually a winning ticket.

“That’s too funny,” Rachael said. “We are definitely getting more chew toys, they go through a lot. We love them, but they are crazy sometimes.”

The Oregon Lottery does mail-in claims so players can send in their winning tickets through the mail. Usually these claims are processed and paid within 10 business days. 

Lottery officials recommend that you always sign the back of your tickets with each Oregon Lottery game you play, to ensure you can claim any prize you may win. In the event of winning a jackpot, players should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. And above all, make sure the ticket is out of reach of any furry friends!

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned nearly $14 billion for economic development, public education, Outdoor School, state parks, Veteran Services, and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org  




Attached Media Files: 2022-08/4939/156680/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg , 2022-08/4939/156680/OL_LOGO_HORZ.jpg , Apple and Jax, the two dogs. , The winning $8 ticket. , The letter the Lamets sent in with their "doggie treat" ticket.

BLM announces new opportunity for partnerships to support management of wild horses and burros
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 08/11/22 10:21 AM

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Bureau of Land Management is announcing new grants available to public and private partners to help support the agency’s mission to manage and protect wild horses and burros. The funding opportunity is open to local and state governments, tribes, other federal agencies and non-profit organizations. 

 

“The BLM is excited to continue our efforts at working collaboratively with institutions of education, non-profit organizations and other government agencies to manage and protect wild horses and burros on public lands,” said Holle’ Waddell, BLM Wild Horse and Burro Division Chief. “Whether it’s to help improve habitat quality, find good homes for our living legends, or apply birth control on the range, I encourage the broader wild horse and burro community to seriously consider this opportunity to partner with the BLM on these important actions.” 

 

This is the second year that the BLM has invited proposals for wild horse and burro projects through a new streamlined and centralized funding opportunity. Grant sizes will range from $1,000 to $50,000. 

 

An example of an on-going project awarded through the previous funding opportunity can be found in Oregon, where a public-private partnership helps dart difficult-to-reach wild horses with a birth-control vaccine. Thanks to the collaboration with local non-profit partner High Desert Strategies, 150 wild horses have been treated on public lands in eastern Oregon, which is slowing herd growth and reducing the need to remove animals to address overpopulation. 

 

Partnerships formed through this funding opportunity will support critical activities important to the management of wild horses and burros. Proposed off-range projects will be accepted until October 31, 2022 and could include activities such as facilitating the placement of excess animals into private care or providing educational opportunities to the public. Projects to support on-range activities, such as building habitat improvements or applying fertility control to wild horses and burros, can be submitted November 1, 2022 to January 31, 2023. 

 

Proposals to care for excess wild horses and burros in off-range facilities and proposals to fund research are not eligible under this funding opportunity. 

 

Applicants may propose to partner with BLM field, district state and national offices. Interested applicants are encouraged to contact the relevant BLM subject matter expert identified in the funding opportunity notice to discuss the type of projects that may be possible, and whether they would meet the requirements under this funding opportunity.

 

To learn more or for instructions on how to submit an application, visit the Notice of Funding Opportunity on Grants.gov

 

-BLM-

 

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 western states, including Alaska, on behalf of the American people. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. Our mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations.


Tangent Fire donates Tender 72 to Gates Fire
Tangent Rural Fire District - 08/11/22 10:00 AM

It has been two years since the disastrous fires struck the communities in the Santiam Canyon. It is important for us to remember that these communities are still facing the challenges of rebuilding, and continually need our support. The challenges the local fire departments of Gates, Mill City, Detroit and Idhana are facing today will continue into the future. 

Tangent Fire had the opportunity to pass on to Gates Fire their Tender 72. This tender needed some work to get it ready for more years of usefulness. So, a shout-out goes to the neighboring districts who helped with the needed repairs. This is a reminder of how our fire district families help each other in times of need. 

On July 26, 2022 interim chief of Tangent Fire Jim Stearns, Board President John Dunn and Director Paul Strombeck had the opportunity to meet at Gates Fire with their Board President Alexis Winn, Lt. Burt Hagen and EMT Jacob Rothrock. At this time, Tender 72 was officially presented to Gates Fire. This will be a great addition to their fire service.

Board President, Tangent Fire

John Dunn


Oregon Community Foundation Invests $1 Million in Visionary Oregon Arts and Culture Projects Through 2022 Creative Heights Initiative (Photo)
Oregon Community Foundation - 08/11/22 9:30 AM
2022 Warm Springs Community Action Team_5_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation
2022 Warm Springs Community Action Team_5_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/6858/156666/thumb_2022_Warm_Springs_Community_Action_Team_5_Courtesy_of_Oregon_Community_Foundation.jpg

Oregon Community Foundation Invests $1 Million in Visionary Oregon Arts and Culture Projects Through 2022 Creative Heights Initiative

Fourteen Grantees Working to Celebrate Culture, Preserve History and Build Community in Oregon 

 

Portland, Ore. – Thursday, August 11, 2021 – Oregon Community Foundation (OCF) announced today that the foundation will invest $1 million in visionary Oregon arts and culture projects through OCF’s 2022 Creative Heights Initiative. 

 

Many of this year’s Creative Heights grantees are elevating cultural voices, shining a light on little-known history and launching significant new structures for artists to thrive. 

 

“We are deeply honored to receive a Creative Heights grant from Oregon Community Foundation to commission and produce Nu Nah-Hup: Sacajawea’s Story,” said Lisa Lipton, Executive Director, Opera Theater Oregon. “We are so fortunate to be guided by Sacajawea’s descendent, Rose Ann Abrahamson. Working together to share Sacajawea’s story through opera will help preserve her Agai-Dika / Lemhi Shoshone language as well as celebrate her Indigenous perspective and contributions.”

 

OCF’s 2022 Creative Heights awards support projects by visionary artists and arts and culture organizations that are working to celebrate culture, preserve history and build community in Oregon. 

 

“We’re thrilled to announce this group of 2022 Creative Heights awards. These artist-driven projects represent some of the most ambitious and important proposals that we’ve ever seen,” said Jerry Tischleder, Senior Program Officer, Arts and Culture, Oregon Community Foundation. “We’re grateful for the incredible work that artists across Oregon are creating to spark the connection and inspiration that bring communities together.”

 

Following is a snapshot of just a few of the extraordinary projects that OCF is supporting with the 2022 Creative Heights Initiative:

Joshua Caraco and Tumelo Michael MoloiLane Arts Council

$100,000 2022 Creative Heights Grant

To develop a musical theater performance using elements of Tumelo Michael Moloi's personal journey growing up in South Africa to living on a farm in Junction City as a medium to connect the struggle against apartheid in South Africa to the US Civil Rights and Black Lives Matter movements.

 

“This Creative Heights grant from Oregon Community Foundation will allow us to bring ideas we have talked about for years out into the world,” said co-lead artist Joshua Caraco. “We hope it will bring perspective and help foster global understanding and support. We also want to create art that people can't wait to tell their friends about.”

 

Opera Theater Oregon / Rose Ann Abrahamson

$100,000 2022 Creative Heights Grant

For Rose Ann Abrahamson's Nu Nah-Hup: Sacajawea's Story, which reimagines the extraordinary Shoshone woman who was a crucial member of the historic 1804-1806 Lewis and Clark Expedition, from her  Agai-Dika / Lemhi Shoshone Indigenous perspective in a new opera-theater work.

 

“Sacajawea’s story will be told with some of the most amazing music in the world,” said Rose Ann Abrahamson, great-great-grandniece of Sacajawea. “To be able to share her voice and the stories of her people through opera, ‘Oose’ from the bottom of our hearts.” 

 

[Editor Notes: Oose: Gratitude and thanks. Thank you, twice. Photo available. Photo caption: Rose Ann Abrahamson and Justin Ralls at the Sacajawea Education, Interpretive and Cultural Center in Salmon, Idaho – the ancestral homeland of the Agai-Dika / Lemhi Shoshone people. August, 2021. Photo credit: Courtesy of Opera Theater Oregon and Oregon Community Foundation.]

 

Warm Springs Community Action Team / LaRonn Katchia

$72,500 2022 Creative Heights Grant

To write, film, and edit a full-length documentary entitled "A Bridge to the Future," by Warm Springs tribal member LaRonn Katchia that captures the transformation of community in the de-/re-construction of the 125-year-old Warm Springs (BIA) Commissary - a symbol of a tribal community claiming a new future.

 

“With the Creative Heights grant from Oregon Community Foundation, we will be able to tell our story, transforming the oldest building on the Warm Springs reservation into a business incubator to help tribal entrepreneurs thrive,” said LaRonn Katchia, Filmmaker, Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs. “It is important to help build our economy within the reservation and to document this journey through an authentic indigenous lens.”

 

A complete list of all 14 2022 Creative Heights grantees can be found online, in OCF’s Press Room.

 

OCF’s Creative Heights initiative provides opportunities for artists and culture bearers to stretch their creative capacity, share new works and test new ideas. The initiative has invested roughly $1 million per year since 2014, encompassing 112 projects across a range of visual art, dance, folk and traditional arts, film/video/media, literary arts, museum exhibitions, humanities projects, music, theater and performance arts, history and heritage projects, and multidisciplinary artistic works.

 

About Oregon Community Foundation

Oregon Community Foundation (OCF) works with donors and volunteers to award grants and scholarships to every county in Oregon. From 2020 to 2021, OCF distributed more than $560 million, supporting more than 4,000 nonprofits and 6,000 students. With OCF, individuals, families, businesses, and organizations create charitable funds that meet the needs of diverse communities statewide. Since its founding in 1973, OCF has distributed more than $2 billion toward advancing its mission to improve lives for all Oregonians. For more information, please visit: oregoncf.org.

 

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Attached Media Files: 2022 Creative Heights Grants List_Oregon Community Foundation , OCF Arts and Culture_2022 Creative Heights Grants_FINAL News Release_08 11 2022 , 2022 Warm Springs Community Action Team_5_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation , 2022 Warm Springs Community Action Team_1_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation , Rose Ann Abrahamson-Desecdant of Sacajawea_Courtesy of Opera Theater Oregon and Oregon Community Foundation , Rose Ann Abrahamson-Desecdant of Sacajawea_Courtesy of Opera Theater Oregon and Oregon Community Foundation , Joshua Caraco and Tumelo Michael Moloi_2_Courtesy of Lane Arts Council and Oregon Community Foundation , Joshua Caraco and Tumelo Michael Moloi_1_Courtesy of Lane Arts Council and Oregon Community Foundation , Creative Heights 2022_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation

Board of Forestry hosts virtual special public meeting on Aug. 24
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/11/22 9:29 AM

SALEM, Ore. — The Oregon Board of Forestry will hold a virtual special meeting starting at 8 a.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 24. The meeting will be livestreamed on the department’s YouTube channel.

The board’s business agenda includes:

  • Private Forest Accord overview and author comments
  • Private Forest Accord rulemaking discussion
  • 2023-2025 Agency budget development

View the agenda and board meeting details.

Live testimony is available for decision item #2 - Private Forest Accord rulemaking discussion and item #3 - 2023-2025 Agency budget development. 

Sign-up is required and instructions to provide live testimony are available online. Sign-up closes Friday, Aug. 19 at 5 p.m. Written comments can be submitted before or up to Aug. 24 to oardofforestry@odf.oregon.gov">boardofforestry@odf.oregon.gov, with the appropriate agenda item included with the submission.

Accommodations for people with disabilities, and special materials, services, or assistance can be arranged by calling ODF’s Public Affairs Office at least 72 hours in advance of the meeting at 503-945-7200 or by email at estryinformation@odf.oregon.gov">forestryinformation@odf.oregon.gov.

The Oregon Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. Responsibilities include appointing the State Forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon’s 30-million-acre forestland base. Read more information about the board.


Reminder: Media briefing on monkeypox (hMPXV) today at 11 a.m.
Oregon Health Authority - 08/11/22 9:19 AM

August 11, 2022

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, jonathan.n.modie@dhsoha.state.or.us

Reminder: Media briefing on monkeypox (hMPXV) today at 11 a.m.

PORTLAND, Ore. — Oregon Health Authority’s Zoom media briefing on monkeypox (hMPXV) in Oregon is today (Aug. 11) at 11 a.m.

Dean Sidelinger, M.D., health officer and state epidemiologist at OHA, will join Patrick Luedtke, M.D., Lane County’s senior public health officer, and Katie Cox, executive director of The Equi Institute, to give an update on the state’s response to the outbreak and reporting of cases in Oregon, and take questions.

Interested reporters can join via Zoom at this link. A livestream also is available via YouTube at this link.

 


Registration is Live for SOLVE's Beach & Riverside Cleanup!
SOLVE - 08/11/22 9:11 AM

 

For Immediate Release

 

Oregonians Encouraged to Sign Up for SOLVE’s Statewide 

Beach & Riverside Cleanup, September 17

 

 

Downloadable image: 

SOLVE volunteer takes in the views of the coastline while collecting litter.

https://solveoregon.my.salesforce.com/sfc/p/1I000002vkol/a/8W000001pUKx/u_uaU.XTfDGCtKDd38R_PYSolsae4GtCwLLZPR.IGZU

Portland, Ore., August 11, 2022 – Come together with thousands of Oregonians on Saturday, September 17, for SOLVE’s Beach & Riverside Cleanup, in partnership with the Oregon Lottery. Volunteer registration is now live, and all Oregonians, from Astoria to Brookings, Pendleton to Sunriver, are encouraged to sign up for this statewide cleanup event. 

For nearly four decades, SOLVE has hosted the annual Beach & Riverside Cleanup. With the support of SOLVE, community leaders and partner organizations host restoration events, urban litter cleanup projects, and beach cleanups. Each volunteer project is aimed at caring for one of Oregon’s most precious resources, our water, from source to sea.

Thanks to the efforts of over 3,000 dedicated volunteers who participated in last year’s Beach & Riverside Cleanup, over 60,385 pounds of trash and marine debris were removed, and 32,717 square feet of invasive plants were cleared.

Removing invasive plant species, nurturing native plants, and collecting litter are all easy ways volunteers can positively impact Oregon’s water quality.

Each piece of litter collected removes the possibility of it entering a nearby river, waterway, or storm drain, where it can eventually make its way to the sea and contribute to our global marine debris crisis. Invasive plant species crowd out native plants and typically have shallow roots, leading to increased erosion and poor water filtration. 

Since 1969, SOLVE has been mobilizing volunteers to restore and preserve Oregon’s natural spaces,” says Oregon Lottery Director, Barry Pack. “The Oregon Lottery is proud to continue supporting SOLVE’s Beach & Riverside Cleanup. Now more than ever, it’s important for Oregonians to come together for a common cause. SOLVE’s Beach & Riverside Cleanup provides the perfect opportunity.

Interested community members are encouraged to visit solveoregon.org to see a list of volunteer projects and sign up. To create a culture of sustainability around litter cleanups, it is suggested that you bring your own reusable gloves, buckets, and safety vests. The Beach & Riverside Cleanup is a great way to bond with family members, coworkers, and neighbors, all while collectively giving back to some of Oregon’s most beautiful places. Join the action today at solveoregon.org.

SOLVE’s Beach & Riverside Cleanup is in partnership with the Oregon Lottery, with additional support from Metro, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, Oregon Department of Transportation, Onpoint Community Credit Union, Rogue Ales & Spirits, Chevron, Fred Meyer, Bamboo Sushi, Clean Water Services, City of Beaverton, Next Adventure, and Deep Blue Pacific Wind.

About SOLVE
SOLVE is a statewide non-profit organization that brings Oregonians together to improve our environment and build a legacy of stewardship. Since 1969, the organization has grown from a small, grassroots group to a national model of volunteer action. Today, SOLVE mobilizes and trains tens of thousands of volunteers of all ages across Oregon to clean and restore our neighborhoods and natural areas, and build a legacy of stewardship for our state. Visit solveoregon.org for more information. 

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Oregon approved to issue an additional $46 million in Pandemic EBT food assistance to 80,000 young children
Oregon Department of Human Services - 08/11/22 9:07 AM

Need to know: 

  • Families who receive Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits and have young children may receive additional food benefits for their children this Fall.
  • Oregon will provide approximately $46 million in additional food assistance for 80,000 young children.
  • These food benefits will be issued in Fall 2022 with the exact dates yet to be determined.
  • These additional food benefits are part of the Pandemic EBT (P-EBT) program, a temporary COVID-19 program meant to provide additional food support for children whose access to adequate and quality food may have been impacted by COVID-19.  

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS) received approval from the federal government to provide additional food benefits for young children whose families received Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits between September 2021 and May 2022. 

These additional food benefits will provide approximately $46 million in additional food assistance for 80,000 young children in Oregon. The additional food benefits will be issued to families’ existing EBT cards in Fall 2022, with the exact dates yet to be determined.

“We are grateful to be able to provide these additional food benefits to families with young children in Oregon,” said Jana McLellan, interim director of the ODHS Self-Sufficiency Programs. “As communities continue to be impacted by COVID-19 and the rising cost of food, we know that many families are experiencing hardship and are struggling to get enough healthy food for themselves and their children. We encourage anyone who is struggling to meet their basic needs to contact our partners at 211, the Oregon Food Bank and their local Community Action Agency for support during this difficult time.”

Eligibility for P-EBT food benefits

  • Families must have received SNAP benefits at any time between September 2021 and May 2022.
  • Children in the family who were age 5 and under at any time during this period are eligible to receive additional food benefits. 
  • Families will receive the additional food benefits for every month during this period that:
    • One or more children in their household were ages 5 and younger 
    • The family was receiving SNAP benefits.

Eligible families will receive an extra $63 food benefit per child on their EBT card for every month the children were ages 5 or younger and their family was receiving SNAP benefits. Families can receive up to $567 in additional food benefits for each child who is eligible.

These additional food benefits are part of the Pandemic EBT (P-EBT) program, a temporary COVID-19 program meant to provide additional food support for children whose access to adequate and quality food may have been impacted by COVID-19. 

Families whose EBT card has been lost or stolen should call the toll-free replacement card line at 1-855-328-6715 to request a replacement card as soon as possible. The replacement line is open Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Visit pebt.oregon.gov for more information about the P-EBT program.

P-EBT does not replace any child nutrition program already offered and families are encouraged to continue to participate in meal programs in their communities.  

P-EBT food benefits are issued in addition to regular SNAP benefits including emergency allotments that are also being issued due to the impact of COVID-19. P-EBT benefits are not considered in a public charge test.

Resources to help meet basic needs

About SNAP

Administered by ODHS, SNAP is a federal program that provides food assistance to approximately 1 million eligible, low-income families and individuals in Oregon, including many older adults and people with disabilities. Oregonians in need can apply for benefits, including SNAP, child care, cash assistance and Medicaid. Learn more at https://govstatus.egov.com/or-dhs-benefits. For local resources in your area, such as food or shelter, please call 2-1-1 or reach out to the state’s Aging and Disability Resource Connection (ADRC) at 1-855-ORE-ADRC or 1-855-673-2372.


Death of Wildland Firefighter Assigned to the Big Swamp Fire (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/11/22 9:07 AM
REACH Air Medical Helicopter arrives at the Roseburg Regional Airport with Wildland Firefighter Collin Hagan's body.
REACH Air Medical Helicopter arrives at the Roseburg Regional Airport with Wildland Firefighter Collin Hagan's body.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/5204/156670/thumb_FF_Hagan.jpg

DOUGLAS COUNTY, Ore. – The Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, jointly with the United States Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management, is saddened to announce the passing of a wildland firefighter assigned to the Big Swamp Fire near Oakridge, Oregon. 

On Wednesday, August 10, 2022, shortly after 12:30 pm, 9-1-1 dispatchers received information regarding a wildland firefighter that was critically injured after being struck by a tree. Umpqua Valley Ambulance and REACH Air Medical Services were dispatched to the scene. Despite lifesaving efforts by EMS personnel assigned to the fire, the firefighter, 27-year-old Collin Hagan of Toivola, Michigan succumbed to his injuries. Hagan was a wildland firefighter assigned to the Craig Interagency Hotshot Crew based out of Craig, Colorado. 

Once the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office and Douglas County Medical Examiner’s Office were notified, Hagan’s body was flown from the Toketee Airstrip to the Roseburg Regional Airport by REACH Air Medical Services helicopter. Firefighters from the Bureau of Land Management, United States Forest Service, Roseburg Fire Department and Douglas County Fire District #2 stood together to honor Hagan as his body arrived and was transferred to the care of a funeral service provider. The firefighters then provided an honor escort to the funeral home.

“It is a sad day in public safety.” Sheriff John Hanlin said. “On behalf of the men and women of the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, I extend my heartfelt sympathies to Firefighter Hagan’s family, friends, co-workers and all who knew this brave young man.”
 




Attached Media Files: REACH Air Medical Helicopter arrives at the Roseburg Regional Airport with Wildland Firefighter Collin Hagan's body.

Tip of The Week For August 15, 2022- Recognizing and Reporting Drug Activity (Photo)
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/11/22 6:57 AM
2022-08/5490/156665/Reporting_Drug_Activity.PNG
2022-08/5490/156665/Reporting_Drug_Activity.PNG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/5490/156665/thumb_Reporting_Drug_Activity.PNG

  TIP OF THE WEEK

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Date:          August 11, 2022                                  

Contact:      Sheriff Curtis Landers

                   541-265-0654

                   lcsheriff@co.lincoln.or.us

 

RECOGNIZING AND REPORTING DRUG ACTIVITY

Drug activity exacts a significant toll on everyone in our society, not just drug abusers, their families and friends. This problem can contribute to homelessness, crime, problems at school and the workplace, as well as healthcare costs. Some of the impacts include: 

  • Illness from short & long term drug use; injury or death from overdoses. 
  • Increased crime and fear of crime causing people to withdraw from community life. 
  • Traffic hazards due to impaired driving. 
  • Abuse and neglect of children, seniors and pets; aggravation of domestic violence; assaults and drug-related homicides. 
  • Damage to property from neglect, contamination, fires, explosions and theft of services such as electricity and water.
  • Contamination of natural areas. 
  • Livability impacts such as trash, noise and other issues.

There are a number of signs listed below that indicate drug activity at a location. When there are only one or two signs, the explanation may not be related to illegal activity. For example, frequent visits to a house may be attributable to a large and sociable family or a resident who is operating a legitimate business out of the home. 

Getting to know your neighbors and the routines of the neighborhood will help you better define what is going on and understand the activities in your neighborhood. When you observe a number of the following activities present at a location, this may reveal that you are seeing illegal drug activity. 

Possible signs that in combination may indicate drug sales: 

  • There are numerous short visits to the location by people in vehicles, on bicycles and/or on foot. 
  • Money or small packages are exchanged. 
  • The suspected dealer approaches parked vehicles, pedestrians or bicyclists and engages in brief encounters with the driver, passenger or pedestrian. 
  • Cars frequently drive slowly by the location. 
  • Visitors park their cars a few blocks away and walk to the location.
  • Visitors bring personal property such as electronic devices and leave without them. 
  • People appear to be acting as lookouts. For example, one person may wait outside while another enters the home. 
  • Occupants and/or visitors display behaviors that may include aggression, hyperactivity, paranoia, irritability or other odd behaviors. 
  • Shades or blinds are constantly drawn even though a house is occupied. 
  • Unusually extensive security measures are taken at a house. 
  • Visitors knock on a neighbor’s door mistaking it for the suspicious house. 
  • Drug paraphernalia is found at or near the location, such as: very small zip-lock plastic baggies; small bundled or twisted pieces of cellophane; small pieces of balloon; hypodermic needles and needle caps; small glass vials or pipes; or small pieces of Brillo pads. 
  • The neighborhood is experiencing elevated levels of crime in the surrounding area, such as burglaries, car prowls and identity theft. 

Any information you can provide to the authorities that will prevent further drug activity is absolutely helpful. The following are a few details that will ensure your anonymous tip is as effective as possible. If you have the information, try to include:

  • The address where you suspect drug activity
  • Full names of the people you suspect
  • Related vehicles’ color, make, model, license plate
  • When people come and go, how long they stay, how often they appear
  • Information about any packages being exchanged
  • If the location is a house, provide the name (or names) of people living there
  • Are there children? Dogs?
  • Is there anything else authorities should know about the location?

Suspicious activity alone does not mean the police can shut down an alleged drug house. Only after law enforcement has gathered enough reliable information about a problem location will they possibly be able to obtain a search warrant to enter the premises and look for evidence that could lead to prosecution.

For more information and tips, visit our website at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and “Like” us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.




Attached Media Files: 2022-08/5490/156665/081122_Reporting_Drug_Activity.pdf , 2022-08/5490/156665/Reporting_Drug_Activity.PNG

Fatal Crash US 199 -- Josephine County
Oregon State Police - 08/11/22 5:42 AM

On Wednesday August 10, 2022, at about 4:55 PM, Oregon State Police (OSP) Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle crash on US 199 near milepost 6. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a southbound Ford 550 pickup operated by, Robert Clair, age 31, from Grants Pass, crossed the center line of the highway and struck a northbound Harley Davidson motorcycle operated by, Johnny Porter, age 45, from Cave Junction.  Porter was ejected from the motorcycle and was pronounced deceased at the scene by emergency personnel. Clair was not injured in the crash. 

US 199 was closed for about one hour. 

OSP was assisted Josephine County Sheriff’s Office, ODOT, AMR, Rural Metro Fire and Grants Pass Fire.

###


Wed. 08/10/22
OSFM to pre-position resources in Deschutes, Klamath counties this week
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 08/10/22 5:46 PM

SALEM, Ore. – Recent lightning and the elevated threat of wildfire in Central and Southern Oregon have prompted the Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal to pre-position two structural task forces of firefighters and equipment in Deschutes and Klamath counties over the coming week. 

A task force from Marion County will mobilize Thursday morning, Aug. 11. These firefighters will be pre-positioned in Deschutes County. The task force is made up of 13 firefighters, four engines, and one water tender. On Saturday, August 13, a task force from Benton County will mobilize and be pre-positioned in Klamath County. This task force consists of 14 firefighters, four engines, and one water tender. These resources will be pre-positioned for 72 hours and may stay longer if needed. The task forces will be on the ground to add additional firefighting capacity if a brush or wildfire breaks out.

These task forces will be the second and third task forces mobilized this year for a pre-positioning assignment. 

“Oregon experienced significant lightning over the last 24 hours, and with rising temperatures returning the next few days, the potential for holdover fires is there,” Oregon State Fire Marshal Mariana Ruiz-Temple said. “We’re using the power of the Oregon Fire Mutual Aid System (OFMAS) to move resources and add capacity to respond to any fire that may spark. Our goal is to keep fires small and away from communities.”

Pre-positioning resources is just one of the tools the OSFM has as part of its Response Ready Oregon initiative. These resources will bolster any initial fire attack or allow a quick response to other emerging incidents in the state. These firefighters and equipment are not assigned to a specific incident but are an added resource to increase the state’s readiness if there is a fire.  

The OSFM is not mobilizing any incident management teams (IMTs). The teams are ready to go if they are needed.

With hot weather returning, the OSFM encourages all Oregonians to be aware of the dry conditions and take necessary precautions to avoid sparking a human-caused fire. The OSFM asks all Oregonians to be vigilant, and if they spot a fire, report it immediately.

ABOUT RESPONSE READY OREGON

The OSFM’s Response Ready Oregon initiative was created to help bolster capacity and modernize wildfire response within the Oregon Fire Mutual Aid System (OFMAS). The goal of Response Ready Oregon is to attack fires while they are small and keep them out of communities.

###


Media briefing on monkeypox (hMPXV) tomorrow at 11 a.m.
Oregon Health Authority - 08/10/22 5:25 PM

August 10, 2022

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, jonathan.n.modie@dhsoha.state.or.us

Media briefing on monkeypox (hMPXV) tomorrow at 11 a.m.

PORTLAND, Ore. — Oregon Health Authority will host a Zoom media briefing at 11 a.m. tomorrow – Thursday, Aug. 11 – to discuss the latest on monkeypox (hMPXV) in Oregon.

Dean Sidelinger, M.D., health officer and state epidemiologist at OHA, will join Patrick Luedtke, M.D., Lane County’s senior public health officer, and Katie Cox, executive director of The Equi Institute, to give an update on the state’s response to the outbreak and reporting of cases in Oregon, and take questions.

Interested reporters can join via Zoom at this link. A livestream also is available via YouTube at this link.

###


OHA releases biweekly COVID-19 reports
Oregon Health Authority - 08/10/22 5:18 PM

August 10, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, COVID19.media@odhsoha.oregon.gov">orCOVID19.media@odhsoha.oregon.gov

OHA releases biweekly COVID-19 reports

The COVID-19 Biweekly Data Report, released today, shows a slight decrease in COVID-19-related hospitalizations and deaths. 

Oregon Health Authority (OHA) reported 15,716 new cases of COVID-19 from July 24 to Aug. 6, a 15.4% decline from the previous biweekly total of 18,567.  

During the two-week period of July 24 to Aug. 6, test positivity was 13.0%, down slightly from 13.8% in the previous two-week period. 

Today’s COVID-19 Biweekly Congregate Care Setting Outbreak Report shows 206 active outbreaks in care facilities, senior living communities and congregate care living settings with three or more confirmed COVID-19 cases or one or more COVID-19-related deaths. 

Cases by ZIP code update

Today, OHA published updates to the Oregon COVID-19 Cases by ZIP Code dashboard report. Case rates were updated using 2020 data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey. OHA had previously been using 2010 U.S. Census Bureau data to calculate rates. This aligns OHA’s reporting of COVID-19 cases by ZIP code with people vaccinated with at least one dose of any COVID-19 vaccine by ZIP code.

Newly added filters let users explore data by county and urban/rural ZIP code designation. Changes to color coding better show the skewed distribution of case rates. Previously, case counts and case rates were not displayed for populations under 1,000 people. Case counts and case rates are now displayed for ZIP Code Tabulation Areas with 50 or more people. Case counts from ZIP codes with fewer than 10 cases, or with a case rate of 50,000 per 100,000 or more, will be reported in aggregate. This dashboard report will continue to be published weekly on Wednesdays. 

OHA updates dashboard on case demographics and disease severity

This week, the COVID-19 Case Demographic and Disease Severity dashboard will be removing and archiving the “Disease Severity” tab. Because case interviews are no longer required due to limited capacity, data used on the “Disease Severity” tab, such as underlying conditions, are no longer collected. The tab will be removed from the dashboard.

For a comprehensive overview of COVID-19 infections and underlying conditions, please refer to the updates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, published on June 17 and July 8.

An archive of “Disease Severity” tab can be found here. The “Case Demographics” and “Severity Trends” tabs will continue to be updated weekly.


08-10-22 Commissioners Issue Proclamation for National Farmers Market Week (Photo)
Douglas Co. Government - 08/10/22 4:15 PM
DC Farmers Markets
DC Farmers Markets
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/6789/156653/thumb_8-10-22_DC_Farmers_Markets.jpg

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

August 10, 2022

 

Commissioners Issue Proclamation for National Farmers Market Week

 

            (Douglas County, Ore.) Douglas County Board of Commissioners Tim Freeman, Chris Boice and Tom Kress issued a proclamation today at the Weekly Business Meeting calling upon all citizens of Douglas County to observe National Farmers Market Week.  The proclamation was presented by Commissioner Boice, on behalf of the Board and acknowledged that, “Douglas County recognizes the importance of expanding the agricultural and handcrafted marketing opportunities that assist and encourage the next generation of farmers, ranchers and artisans; generating farm and small business income to help stimulate business development and job creation, and building community connections through rural and urban linkages.” A copy of the live video presentation can be found on the Douglas County Government Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/DouglasCountyeGovernment.

 

The Commissioners celebrated the bountiful harvest, amazing crafts and beautiful music available at all eleven of our Douglas County Farmers Markets (see complete list below).  Commissioner Boice presented National Farmers Market Week proclamation certificates to Glide Farmers Market: Rebeccah Dunnavant, Market Manager and Dunnavant Baked Goods (Vendor) and Sarah Talcott, Talcott Ranch (Vendor); Umpqua Valley Farmers Market: Chris VanDyke, Market Manager and Local Fixe (Vendor), Richelle Olson, Humble Heart Farm (Vendor) and Joe Ross, local musician; and the Myrtle Creek Farmers Market: Amanda Puls, Market Manager and Two Birdz (Vendor). 

 

I wanted to thank all those that came out today to receive the proclamations, as well as all of the people out there in our community that are a part of our local Farmers Markets. We recognize that it takes someone to organize these markets, and often times it is a labor of love with little to no pay to do the organizational part.  We wanted to say a special thank you to all the market managers for the extra work they do to make sure these markets continue to happen,” commented Commissioner Freeman. 

 

Check out the Farmers Markets in Douglas County:


 

Canyonville Farmers Market

Seven Feathers Casino Resort parking lot

146 Chief Miwaleta Lane, Canyonville

9:30 am-1:30 pm • Wednesdays • May-December

http://www.canyonvillefarmersmarket.org/

https://www.facebook.com/CanyonvilleFarmersMarket

 

Drain Farmer And Artisan Market

308 N. First St., Drain • Lot next to Ray’s Food Place

10 am-2 pm • Saturdays • June-August

https://www.facebook.com/Drain-Farmers-Market-113327013740677/

 

Glide Farmers Market

Glide Community Center • 20062 N. Umpqua Hwy, Glide

10 am-1 pm • Tuesdays • Late May to early October

https://www.facebook.com/Glide-Farmers-Market-202852260113552

 

Lookingglass Brewery Market

Lookingglass Brewery, 192 S.E. Main St., Winston

4-7 pm • Wednesdays • April-September

https://www.facebook.com/lookingglassbrewery/

 

Lookingglass Farmers Market

Lookingglass Grange • 7426 Lookingglass Road

2:30-5:30 pm • Thursdays • Early April to mid-December

https://www.facebook.com/LookingglassGrange927Oregon

 

Melrose Farmers Market

Melrose Grange • 3811 Melrose Road, Roseburg

4-7 pm • Tuesdays • May-October

https://www.facebook.com/groups/331761805099606/

 

Myrtle Creek Farmers Market

Elks Lodge overflow parking lot

106 S. Main St., Myrtle Creek

9 am-1 pm • Saturdays • April-October

https://www.facebook.com/groups/478710847207463/

 

Porter Creek Mercantile Market

116 Haven Lane, Tenmile

42 Connect Pick Up

11 am-2 pm • Thursday, Friday & Saturday • Year Round

https://www.facebook.com/groups/204939537508533/

https://www.facebook.com/Porter-Creek-Mercantile-Market-Place-101998795805603/

 

Reedsport Farmers Market

Old Town Reedsport

392 Fir Ave., Reedsport

10 am-4 pm • Fridays • June-October

http://www.oldtownreedsport.com/

 

Sutherlin Farmers Market

150 S. Willamette St., Sutherlin

Corner of Willamette & Everett Streets

2-6 pm • Thursdays • Early April-October

https://www.facebook.com/SutherlinFarmersMarket

 

Umpqua Valley Farmers Market

1771 W. Harvard Ave., Roseburg

9 am-1 pm • Saturdays • Outdoors year round

http://www.uvfarmersmarket.com/

https://www.facebook.com/UmpquaValleyFarmersMarket


 

 

The U.S. Department of Agriculture proclaimed the first National Farmers Market Week in August 1999, and this year over 8,600 farmers markets across the nation, including 130 farmers markets in Oregon and 11 farmers markets in Douglas County will celebrate National Farmers Market Week from August 7-13, 2022.  The proclamation presented today is a reminder to our residents to get out and support our 11 local farmers markets in Canyonville, Drain, Glide, Winston, Lookingglass, Melrose, Myrtle Creek, Tenmile, Reedsport, Sutherlin and Roseburg.

 

###

 

Media Contact:     Tamara Howell, Douglas County Emergency Communications & Community Engagement Specialist, Douglas County Public Affairs Office | Office: (541) 957-4896 | Cell: (541) 670-2804 | Email: tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us

 

(Proclamation and Photo Collage Attached.  Individual photos available upon request)

 

Douglas County Proclamation Project

Douglas County Commissioners, Tim Freeman, Chris Boice and Tom Kress recognized that the pandemic traumatized our country, state and county on so many levels.  The impact was not only felt physically, but also mentally, emotionally and financially. The Commissioners collectively decided to start this series of ‘kudos’ proclamations, and are dedicated to recognizing people that have continued to do good things in our community despite the challenges of the past two years.   They plan to continue to highlight the amazing, often selfless work being done in order to encourage our residents to do the same.  The incredible stories being told during our proclamation events shine a huge spotlight on the amazing people and organizations in Douglas County.  We want to focus on what really matters, our people. So far this year, the Commissioners have issued 26 proclamations and honored over 735 Douglas County individuals as a part of our Proclamation Project.  They hope you will join them in supporting, thanking and perhaps volunteering to help these wonderful individuals and service organizations, so we can come together to rekindle and restore our sense of community, our faith in others and the joy that makes Douglas County the best place to live, work and play. 




Attached Media Files: DC Farmers Markets , Collage Farmers Market Week , Farmers Market Proclamation

Upcoming Distracted Driving Enforcement Operations Planned Heading into Labor Day Weekend (Photo)
Lincoln City Police - 08/10/22 4:10 PM
2022-08/6142/156652/Dont_Text_And_Drive.gif
2022-08/6142/156652/Dont_Text_And_Drive.gif
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/6142/156652/thumb_Dont_Text_And_Drive.gif

In the weeks leading up to Labor Day Weekend, the Lincoln City Police Department will be utilizing traffic safety grant funds to put extra patrol officers on duty specifically looking to enforce Distracted Driving laws. The emphasis for the officers working these enhanced enforcement operations is to find and stop drivers who are distracted by talking or texting on their cell phones, or using other electronic devices while they are operating their vehicle. It is imperative for drivers to maintain focus on the task of safely driving their vehicle and not let anything divert their attention from that task. Drivers talking or texting on their phone while driving are not able to fully focus on driving causing them to be more likely to become involved in a crash because their attention is diverted from the road. 

The Lincoln City Police Department last utilized the Distracted Driving Grant funds in April 2022. Five enhanced enforcement operations were conducted resulting in 21 citations being issued for distracted driving along with 5 citations issued for speeding, 1 citation issued for Driving While Suspended and 8 citations being issued for other violations including 1 for Careless Driving. 

Our goal for these operations is simple: to increase the safety of the citizens and visitors of Lincoln City by keeping distracted drivers off the roadways and preventing crashes that can cause injuries and cost lives. These grant funds were made possible through the Oregon Department of Transportation and Oregon Impact.

Submitted By:

Lieutenant Jeffrey G. Winn




Attached Media Files: 2022-08/6142/156652/Dont_Text_And_Drive.gif

Statement: OHA, DCBS require health insurers to cover administration of monkeypox (hMPXV) vaccinations
Oregon Health Authority - 08/10/22 4:08 PM

Aug. 10, 2022

Media contact:

Erica Heartquist, 503-871-8843, ica.J.Heartquist@dhsoha.state.or.us">Erica.J.Heartquist@dhsoha.state.or.us

Statement: OHA, DCBS require health insurers to cover administration of monkeypox (hMPXV) vaccinations

Oregon insurers are now required to cover the cost of monkeypox (hMPXV) vaccination administration for their health plan members in Oregon, based on a declaration of a disease outbreak from Oregon Health Authority.

According to federal and state health officials, monkeypox (hMPXV) vaccines are safe and effective tools to protect people from monkeypox (hMPXV) infection, reduce how long symptoms last, and make the disease less severe (including preventing serious complications and even fatalities). The monkeypox (hMPXV) vaccines are vital prevention measures that also can slow the spread of monkeypox and eventually bring this outbreak to an end.

While Oregon awaits additional federal vaccination supplies, state health officials want to ensure that everyone who is at risk for the virus has simple, affordable access to the two vaccines available for monkeypox (hMPXV). The new insurance coverage requirement removes financial barriers to vaccination, such as requiring people to pay costs of administering the vaccines.

State Health Officer Dr. Dean Sidelinger said, “We know more vaccines are coming from the federal government. We’re doing everything we can to keep people safe and encourage people to take common sense precautions – like getting vaccinated when they’re eligible and supplies are available – so we can all prevent monkeypox from spreading.”

Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS) has issued a bulletin further detailing the requirements for health insurers. It is available at https://dfr.oregon.gov/laws-rules/Documents/Bulletins/bulletin2022-04.pdf.

The number of cases of monkeypox (hMPXV) in Oregon stands at 89, as of Aug. 8, and that number is expected to rise as access to testing increases. There are no treatments specifically for monkeypox (hMPXV), although antivirals may help people with, or at risk for, severe monkeypox (hMPXV) disease or complications from the virus.

Click here to read the declaration of a disease outbreak from Oregon Health Authority.


 


988 Crisis System Advisory Workgroup Steering Committee holds public meeting August 11, 2022
Oregon Health Authority - 08/10/22 1:32 PM

August 10, 2022

Media contact: Dean Carson, 503-348-9233, son2@dhsoha.state.or.us">dean.carson2@dhsoha.state.or.us

Program contact: Bella Bradford, 971-209-0209, 988SC@odhsoha.oregon.gov (meeting information or accommodation)

988 Crisis System Advisory Workgroup Steering Committee holds public meeting August 11, 2022

What: A public meeting of the 988 Crisis System Advisory Workgroup (CSAW) Steering Committee. CSAW provides the space for people and families with lived experience in the behavioral health system to guide the design, implementation and policies of 988 and a broader crisis response system.

Agenda: The steering committee will receive updates on the rollout of 988 and provide feedback on proposed new rules pertaining to Community Based Mobile Crisis Intervention Services. The agenda is posted on the 988 Crisis System Advisory Workgroup Steering Committee web page.

When: Thursday, Aug. 11, noon to 2 p.m. (Public comment period from 1:50-2 p.m.)

Where: Virtual Meeting Only. The public can join remotely via Zoom or a conference line. To join via Zoom:

Join ZoomGov Meeting 

Meeting ID: 160 828 4580

Passcode: 024796

Dial by your location

+1 669 254 5252 US (San Jose)

+1 646 828 7666 US (New York)

Purpose: House Bill 2417 (2021) directs the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) to implement an improved behavioral health crisis system. OHA recognizes that many individuals and families with lived experience and from disproportionately affected communities have experienced adverse impacts of the crisis response system due to systemic and historical social injustice. The 988 CSAW Steering Committee refines and moves forward recommendations of the larger workgroup to ensure the new system is grounded in equity and centered on the needs of the people who will access it.

Read more about the 988 CSAW Steering Committee. Read more about the Behavioral Health Crisis Response System and 988.

Questions? Contact 988SC@odhsoha.oregon.gov.

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Gina Schulze at 503-551-6409, 711 TTY or .schulze@dhsoha.state.or.us">gina.b.schulze@dhsoha.state.or.us.


Water and Drought
Oregon Values and Beliefs Center - 08/10/22 1:09 PM

From July 8–16, 2022, the Oregon Values and Beliefs Center conducted a statewide survey of Oregonians to explore how they feel about water and drought in Oregon. Results were also compared to responses from a July 2021 OVBC survey[1] in order to examine changes over time. A description of the methodology used for the research is provided below. 

The question numbers in this document correspond with the survey questionnaire (Q25A-G,Q26). Due to rounding, the percentages reported below may not add to 100% or compare exactly to the percentages for the same question in the annotated questionnaire or tabs.     

Oregonians Want a Quicker Response to Drought

https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/Cities-and-towns-in-Oregon-need-to-move-quicker-to-address-the-drought-3-300x300.png 300w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/Cities-and-towns-in-Oregon-need-to-move-quicker-to-address-the-drought-3-150x150.png 150w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/Cities-and-towns-in-Oregon-need-to-move-quicker-to-address-the-drought-3-768x768.png 768w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/Cities-and-towns-in-Oregon-need-to-move-quicker-to-address-the-drought-3-512x512.png 512w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/Cities-and-towns-in-Oregon-need-to-move-quicker-to-address-the-drought-3.png 1200w" sizes="100vw" width="1024">

A strong majority of Oregonians agree that cities and towns in Oregon need to move quicker to address drought (67%). While still a strong majority, this is actually an 11-point drop from the 78% who said quicker action was needed last year (Q25F).

  • 75% of people with at least a bachelor’s degree want local government to address water and drought more quickly, compared to 65% of those with some college education and 61% of those with a high school diploma or less.
  • Between July of 2021 and July of 2022, the percentage of people living in the Willamette Valley who say quicker action is needed saw a particularly large drop, from 79% in 2021 to 63% in 2022.

Paying for Infrastructure Improvements to Address Drought

Oregonians are almost evenly split between those who are willing to pay more in order to support drought-related infrastructure improvements and those who are not (49% to 40%) (Q25G).

  • About 2-out-of-3 democrats say they’d be willing to pay more (65%), compared to about one-in-three Republicans (35%). Independents fall somewhere in the middle at 42%.
  • Despite drastically different weather kicking off the summer, Oregonians are only slightly less willing to pay more in fees or taxes to pay for water and drought-related improvements, although the decrease did move it out of majority support, from 55% in 2021 to 49% in 2022.

Differing Views on Water Based on Area of Residence

https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/There-is-enough-water-in-Oregon-to-meet-current-needs-2-300x300.png 300w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/There-is-enough-water-in-Oregon-to-meet-current-needs-2-150x150.png 150w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/There-is-enough-water-in-Oregon-to-meet-current-needs-2-512x512.png 512w" sizes="100vw" width="600">

Although nearly half of Oregonians agree there is enough water in Oregon to meet current needs (48%), 37% disagree with this and 15% are unsure (Q25A).

Those who live in the Willamette Valley are more likely than those living in the Tri-County area or the rest of the state to say Oregon has enough water (54% compared to 46-47%).

 

In 2021, 56% of Oregonians believe Oregon had enough water to meet current needs, but in 2022, that number dipped below 50% to 48%. The percentage of Oregonians who do not believe there is enough water in Oregon rose just slightly, from 34% in 2021 to 37% in 2022, but those who said they don’t know rose from 10% to 15%.

Men are more likely than women to believe we have enough water (56% compared to 42%), but men and women are both less confident there’s enough water this year compared to last year (63% to 50%).

Thoughts on Public Agencies’ Drought Management

Oregonians aren’t overly impressed with public agencies’ water supply management during droughts, but more people rate their performance as good (42%) than not (32%). More than a quarter aren’t sure whether or not public agencies are managing water supplies well (26%) (Q25D).

  • Men are more likely than women to say water is being managed well (men: 47%; women: 37%), but not because women say it’s being managed poorly. In fact, women and men say water is not being managed well at exactly the same rate (32%), but nearly the same number of women say they don’t know how well water’s being managed (31% for women; 21% for men).
  • There’s been very little change in Oregonians’ opinions of government water management between 2021 and 2022 with just 4% fewer saying public agencies are managing water supplies effectively during droughts.

Thoughts on the Agricultural Industry’s Conservation Methods

People don’t have a good feel for whether Oregon’s agricultural industry is taking decisive action to conserve water during droughts. 37% of Oregonians agree that decisive action is being taken, but nearly as many say they don’t know (34%), and only slightly fewer disagree (29%) (Q25B).

  • People living outside the Willamette Valley and Tri-County areas, where agriculture is more prevalent, are more likely to say decisive action is being taken to conserve water during drought (42%), especially compared to residents of the Tri-County area (32%; Willamette Valley: 39%).+
  • Oregonians who have not completed a four-year degree are much more likely than their peers with at least a bachelor’s degree to say the agricultural industry is taking decisive action (41%-42% vs. 26%).
  • People’s opinions of agricultural water conservation during drought have remained stable between July 2021 (41%) and July 2022 (37%).

Do We Have Enough Water to Meet Future Needs?

https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/There-is-enough-water-in-Oregon-to-meet-future-needs-2-300x300.png 300w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/There-is-enough-water-in-Oregon-to-meet-future-needs-2-150x150.png 150w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/There-is-enough-water-in-Oregon-to-meet-future-needs-2-512x512.png 512w" sizes="100vw" width="600">

Only 36% of Oregonians think Oregon has enough water to meet future needs, and nearly half (46%) disagree (Q25C). 

People living in the Willamette Valley are more optimistic than those in other areas that we have enough water to meet future needs. 41% of Willamette Valley residents agree we have enough water for the future, while an identical 34% in the Tri-County area and in the rest of the state feel the same way.

Among Oregonians outside the Willamette Valley, nearly half say we do not have enough water for future needs (Tri-County: 48%; Rest of State: 49%).

 

In 2021, Oregonians were much more evenly split between believing Oregon does (42%) or does not (45%) have enough water to meet future needs.

Are Everyday Oregonians Doing Enough to Conserve Water?

Just barely more than a quarter of Oregon residents think the general public is doing enough to conserve water during droughts (28%), and twice as many disagree (56%) (Q25E).

  • Those who live in the Willamette Valley are more confident those who live in the Tri-County area or other areas of the state that Oregonians are conserving water effectively (34% compared to 26%-27%).
  • Republicans (41%) are nearly twice as likely as Democrats (21%) to agree that the general public is conserving water effectively. As is often the case, those who are not registered with one of the two major parties fall somewhere between (28%), but in this instance their level of agreement is more similar to Democrats than Republicans.
  • This is the only statement which more Oregonians agreed with in 2022 than in 2021, although only by one percentage point (27% in 2021; 28% in 2022).

The Voices of Local Oregonians

While many Oregonians feel okay about the current water supply in Oregon, many are worried about the future and think more needs to be done. Other Oregonians are feeling the effects of limited water supplies in their communities. Oregonians are also concerned about water being wasted on things they see as unnecessary (Q26).

“The land and water are overused and under maintained properly. Looking at the prehistory, before Europeans, people did not permanently live in one place. The areas in Eastern and Southern Oregon were place people passed through or were only here for harvesting natural foods. This land and water were not created for long term residency. As we can clearly see by the wells going dry just south of us.” 

Woman, age 55-64, Klamath County, Native American, American Indian, or Alaska Native.

“I live on a well and it gets a bit rough come August, yet another home is being built on our hill with no discussion by the county as to whether the area can handle another home.”

Man, age 65-74, Benton County, white

 

“Our home uses a well for our water and we feel pretty secure that we have lots of water but I know at any time our well could dry up. We are moderately careful with water but I’m certain we could do more to conserve water.”

Woman, age 55-64, Linn County, white

 

“Irrigation districts have a very difficult, controversial task of directing our water resources. There are many factors behind their decisions that stand on precedent, and while some of it is good, I think it’s time to reframe the norm given where our water levels are and are likely to be in coming years. We can’t continue with business as usual, or our rivers won’t be able to recover.”

Non-binary or gender non-conforming and trans, age 18-29, Deschutes County, white

 

“We need to immediately prioritize life-giving uses of water and end the use for cosmetic (e.g. lawn)purposes. We need to incentivize lawn replacements and end HOA/CC&R/nuisance violations for brown lawns. We need to streamline statewide standards for rainfall capture irrigation systems and grey water systems” 

Woman, age 30-44, Curry County, white

 

“The rainfall in Oregon isn’t the only water source, river water that flows from other states into Oregon need to be protected too.”

Man, age 18-29, Josephine County, white

 

“Small farmers are really hurting in my area of Oregon to maintain needed water supplies while a huge amount of water goes to unnecessary places (e.g. golf courses/resorts)” 

Woman, age 30-44, Deschutes County, white

 

“Farmers and ranchers have pushed to have water storage built only to have it taken away or restricted.”

Man, age 55-64, Marion County, white

 

 “I lived in the desert in the Southwest and paid 1/3 as much as here for water and used 3 times as much water. Oregon lunacy at work as always.” 

Woman, age 45-54, Multnomah County, Asian

 

“It would be nice to ensure that the current water supplies are being managed properly taking all needs into consideration. Landowners should have more rights to the water that falls onto or comes from their property as long as they are not abusing it.”

Woman, age 45-54, Jackson County, Black or African American and white

 

“My towns water costs provide little incentive to conserve, plus it’s over priced”

Man, age 45-54, Wasco County, white

 

Demographic Trends

Identifying What Unites Us, Understanding What Divides Us

Reported below are statistically significant subgroup differences between BIPOC and white Oregonians, urban and rural Oregonians, and age groups.  Many of these differences are not major and are presented to inform public education and communications initiatives.  

OVBC surveys currently use aggregated data to analyze the opinions of BIPOC residents in comparison to the opinions of residents who identify as white and not another race. BIPOC residents are not a monolith; the grouping represents a wide diversity of races and ethnicities. The findings included in this memo should not be construed such that all people of color are believed to share the same opinions. Disaggregated race data will be provided when sample sizes permit reliability.

White Oregonians are much more pessimistic than Black, Indigenous and other Oregonians of color when it comes to water management and drought.

  • 60% of BIPOC Oregonians say cities and towns need to act more quickly to address water issues and drought, compared to 70% of white Oregonians (Q25F). 
    • In 2021, percentage difference between BIPOC and white Oregonians who agreed was not statistically significant (BIPOC: 74%; white: 79%), but the 14-point drop among BIPOC Oregonians widened that gap.
    • In 2022, one-in-five BIPOC residents say they don’t know if cities and towns in Oregon need to move quicker to address the drought (20%, compared to 15% white).
  • Similar to their feelings about the need for quicker intervention, there was a larger drop in the percentage of BIPOC Oregonians who say they’d be willing to pay more to fund drought-related infrastructure improvements (Q25G). 
    • 52% of BIPOC residents were willing to pay more in 2021, compared to 44% in 2022. The percentage of white residents who agreed to pay more dropped by half as many percentage points, keeping support for additional funding just barely above 50% and, again, widening the gap in the percentage of BIPOC and white Oregonians who agree with the statement (white residents: 51%).
  • A slim majority of BIPOC residents are confident Oregon has enough water to meet our current needs (53%), but only 46% of white Oregonians agree (Q25A).
    • 29% of BIPOC residents say there is not enough water to meet current needs, compared to 40% of white residents.
  • BIPOC Oregonians are also slightly more likely than their white peers to believe Oregon has enough water to meet future needs, but not by a statistically significant margin (BIPOC: 40%; white: 34%) (Q25C).
    • White Oregonians are, however, significantly more likely to say there is not enough water for future needs (48% compared to 39% of BIPOC).
  • A similar number of BIPOC and white Oregonians agree that Oregon’s public water agencies manager water effectively during droughts (45% and 42%, respectively), but significantly more white Oregonians disagree (34%) than BIPOC Oregonians (27%) (Q25D).
    • A large segment of the population say they’re not sure. In fact, more BIPOC Oregonians say they don’t know (28%) than say public agencies are not managing water effectively (27%).
  • Oregonians are pretty pessimistic about the general public’s efforts at water conservation. Nearly half of BIPOC Oregonians (49%) and nearly six-in-ten white Oregonians (59%) do not think the general public is doing a good job (Q25E).
  • 2021 to 2022 saw a particularly drastic drop in the number of 18-29-year-olds who say cities and towns need to address drought more quickly, with 75% agreeing in 2021 and 56% agreeing in 2022 (Q25F).
  • Around six-in-ten Oregonians aged 65+ are willing to pay more in taxes and fees to address drought (57%-62%) but fewer than half of those under 65 agree (44%-47%) (Q25G).
  • A majority of 18-44-year-olds (52-54%) and those 75 and older (52%) agree that Oregon has enough water for current needs, but fewer than half of 45-74-year-olds agree (39%-48%) (Q25A).
  • Oregonians aged 18-44 are more likely to give water conservation among the general public a positive review (32%-36% compared to 21-28%) (Q25E).
    • More than 60% of Oregonians aged 45 and up disagree, saying the public is not doing a good job (62%-64%), and more than 50% of those aged 30-44 say the same (52%).
  • Uncertainty about water and water management is a persistent theme among all but the oldest age groups.
    • In most cases, 8%-10% more Oregonians in younger age groups are unsure than Oregonians aged 65 and older.
    • While a higher degree of uncertainty is common among 18-29-year-olds, comparatively higher levels of uncertainty about water are found among 30-44-year-olds and even 45-54-year-olds. For example, 18%-19% of those between the ages of 18 and 54 (and even 15% of those aged 55-64) aren’t sure whether there’s enough water in Oregon to meet current needs, while only 7% of those 65 and older aren’t sure (Q25A).
    • Only agricultural efforts to conserve water showed similar levels of uncertainty across age groups (30%-39%) (Q25B).
  • Urban residents are much more likely than rural residents to say cities and towns need to act more quickly to address water issues and drought (74% vs. 61%), and are more willing to help fund drought-related infrastructure improvements (urban: 55%; rural: 40%) (Q25F,Q25G).
    • Rural residents are more likely to say they are not willing to pay more fees or taxes to fund infrastructure improvements (45% vs. 34%) (Q25G).
    • It’s worth noting that rural residents are less likely to be incorporated into cities and towns, and therefore less likely to be served by city government and infrastructure.
  • Last year, more than half the residents of all areas of Oregon agreed there was enough water in Oregon to meet current needs, with the highest percentage among rural Oregonians (58%) and lowest among urbanites (53%). By 2022, however, the percentage from rural areas who agree dropped 10 points to 48%, compared to just a 3-point drop in urban areas (50%).
  • Oregonians from urban areas are more likely than those from rural areas to say public agencies are managing water effectively during drought (urban: 47%; rural: 34%). A plurality of those in rural areas do not think water is being managed effectively (39%; urban: 27%) (Q25D).

 

Methodology: The online survey consisted of 1,572 Oregon residents ages 18+ and took approximately 15 minutes to complete. Respondents were contacted by using professionally maintained online panels. In gathering responses, a variety of quality control measures were employed, including questionnaire pre-testing, validation, and real-time monitoring of responses. To ensure a representative sample, demographic quotas were set, and data weighted by area of the state, gender, age, and education.

Statement of Limitations: Based on a 95% confidence interval, this survey’s margin of error for the full sample ±2.5%. Due to rounding or multiple answer questions, response percentages may not add up to 100%.




Attached Media Files: OVBC July 2022 Crosstabs , OVBC July 2022 Annotated Questionnaire

Public Health Advisory Board Accountability Metrics Subcommittee meets Aug. 25 via Zoom
Oregon Health Authority - 08/10/22 12:02 PM

August 10, 2022

Media Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, Jonathan.N.Modie@dhsoha.state.or.us

Public Health Advisory Board Accountability Metrics Subcommittee meets Aug. 25 via Zoom

What: A public meeting of the Accountability Metrics Subcommittee of the Public Health Advisory Board.

Agenda: Approve April and June meeting minutes; finalize metrics selection criteria, hear from local public health committees on communicable disease and environmental health metrics.  

When: Thursday, Aug. 25, 2-4 p.m. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: Via Zoom meeting. Members of the public may join remotely by phone at 669-254-5252; meeting ID 160 116 1415; or by computer, tablet or smartphone by launching this Zoom link: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1601161415?pwd=Tmd1dHhXcGppd0VHOStZY3lOKy80dz09.

Background: Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan. The Accountability Metrics Subcommittee develops recommendations about public health quality measures for the board's consideration.

For more information, see the board's website.

Program contact: Sara Beaudrault, 971-645-5766, a.beaudrault@state.or.us">sara.beaudrault@state.or.us

###

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact: Sara Beaudrault at 971-645-5766, 711 TTY, or a.beaudrault@state.or.us">sara.beaudrault@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


08-09-22 Local Veterans Little and Barnett Honored with Prestigious National Award (Photo)
Douglas Co. Government - 08/10/22 12:02 PM
Freeman, Little and Barnett
Freeman, Little and Barnett
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/6789/156641/thumb_07-31-22_LOH-Bronze_Freeman-Little-Barnett.jpg

DOUGLAS COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

August 9, 2022 

 

Local Veterans Little and Barnett Honored with Prestigious National Award

 

(Douglas County, Ore.) Douglas County Commissioners Tim Freeman, Chris Boice and Tom Kress are elated to announce that not one, but two local Douglas County Veterans recently received National Awards.  Commissioner Tim Freeman was honored to be invited to as a special guest for an award ceremony in Ashland, Oregon for the National Chapel of Four Chaplain’s Legion of Honor Bronze Medallion Award presentation for Douglas County resident, Chief Warrant Officer James S. Little (U.S. Navy Retired). The Bronze Medallion is the Second Highest Honor and is presented annually to a very select group of individuals in the United States by the Four Chaplains Memorial Foundation.  The medallion is bestowed only to individuals who have made extraordinary contributions to the well-being of others at the State, Regional or National level, and whose very life epitomizes the spirit of the sacrifice of the Four Chaplains.  Unbeknownst to Commissioner Freeman and other invited guests, a second Legion of Honor Bronze Medallion Award was presented to another Douglas County resident, 1st Sergeant Jim Barnett (U.S. Marine Corps Retired) that same evening. 

 

James S. Little was nominated for the prestigious award by Commissioner Tim Freeman, Mary Newman-Keyes, the Douglas County Veterans Service Director, and Staff Sergeant John Pierson (U.S. Air Force Retired), Member of the Douglas County Veterans Advisory Committee and President of Military Honors by the Pipes (a non-profit organization that plays bagpipes for military funerals at no cost to the families).  He was nominated by the trio for his lifetime of selfless service to our country and to his fellow veterans.

 

Little proudly served our county for three decades as a Nuclear Weapons Specialist in the United States Navy (1960-1991).  During his distinguished Navy career, he received 29 service medals and ribbons, as well as various letters of appreciation and commendation.  Paramount to his career was the Meritorious Service Medal, which was awarded to him by the President of the United States, for his outstanding non-combat service to the United States of America.  Since retiring from the Navy, Little has humbly dedicated his life to volunteer work on behalf of his fellow servicemen and women.  As a prolific writer, he has utilized his writing talent in his advocacy work for veterans, and in publishing a memoir chronicling his adventures in the United States Navy, entitled, “Brotherhood of Doom: Memoirs of a Navy Nuclear Weaponsman.” While his military career was spent mostly shrouded in secrecy, the significant contributions he achieved while serving in the military, and now in retirement honorably serving the veteran community, are no secret. In support of the trio’s nomination, they illustrated four of Little’s distinguished accomplishments that garnered national attention for his noble and selfless leadership working with local veterans groups on the Veterans Cremains Project, the Unclaimed Baby Cremains Project, Save Our Roseburg VA Campaign and the Roseburg State Veterans Home Project. He continues working with the group on their mission to ensure that no veteran is ever left behind, and in working with state legislators to change state laws pertaining to unclaimed cremains. Little has never wavered in his dutiful leadership to our local veteran community.  His efforts on the Save our Roseburg VA Campaign resulted in the passing of a resolution by the Oregon State Legislature in support of restoring Roseburg VAMC to a full-service hospital.  Little has received the local Chapel of Four Chaplain’s Legion of Honor Award and is a Master of Ceremonies, presenter & co-organizer of the Legion of Honor Award Program in Roseburg with Jim Barnett.  Additionally, he serves on the Douglas County Veterans Advisory Committee and is a local Representative at Oregon Department of Veterans Affairs advisory meetings.  Little is an active member of Douglas County Veterans Forum, Vietnam Veterans Affairs, American Legion, Veterans of Foreign Wars, Fleet Reserve Association, Douglas County Vet Net, Award Winning Roseburg Veterans Day Parade, Annual Memorial Day Ceremony, Oregon National Guard events for 7th Battalion 158th Regiment Charlie Company, Remembering America’s Heroes & Living History Days, and the annual wreath laying at Roseburg National Cemetery. He also officiates, attends and assists with numerous Military Honors Services, advocates on behalf of Roseburg National Cemetery and coordinates Stand Down events for Roseburg and Medford and so much more.  Little is affectionately known in the community as the “Veterans Advocate, Advocate” 

 

Little is a true champion for other veterans.  His impact on veterans and our community is incredibly profound. He leaves people and organizations stronger, and better, because of his influence. His insight and knowledge are matched only by his honorable and generous heart. Selflessly tenacious, dutifully conscientious, relentlessly industrious, Little’s charisma and lionhearted approach to life epitomizes the spirit of the sacrifice of the Four Chaplains,” proudly stated Commissioner Tim Freeman. 

 

Jim Barnett was nominated for the prestigious award by T.J. Morgan, National Junior Vice Commandant and Corporate Treasurer for the National Marine Corps League.  He was nominated for his service to our country, commitment to the United States Marine Corps (USMC) and for the work he has done for fellow veterans. 

 

Barnett entered the USMC at the age of 17 with four of his best friends, shortly after the Korean War broke out. They attended boot camp together in San Diego.  Although he was too young for combat, he was enlisted and assigned to the Naval brig in San Diego for guard duty.  Barnett proudly served our country for 20 years in the USMC and is a veteran of the Korean and Vietnam wars. He served as a drill instructor for the ROTC program at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana, and has also worked as a Marine recruiter. It is amazing to note that he still keeps in touch with his past students and continues to honor them for their success.  Barnett, who is nearly 90 is still very active with his brethren in the USMC and in his community.  In support of the nomination, he was recognized for his accomplishments and efforts in fundraising and establishing two major USMC National Memorial Monuments at the National Museum of the Marine Corps in Quantico, Virginia, and for spearheading the campaign to create and place a memorial in Roseburg in honor of Major General Marion Carl, a highly decorated ace pilot for the USMC who was tragically killed during a home invasion in Glide in 1998.  The memorial, which Barnett was instrumental in helping to raise $35,000 for, was placed at the Roseburg Regional Airport and includes a bronze likeness of the Major General. He made sure that the cement foundation of the memorial contained soil from each of the battlegrounds over which Carl fought.  Another noteworthy project for Barnett was the coordination, fundraising and installation of the life-size military uniform memorial enclosure at the American Legion Post #16.  The 18½ foot enclosure features various military uniforms from all branches of the military.  He has also received the local Chapel of Four Chaplain’s Legion of Honor Award, the Marine of the Year Award from the Marine Corps League and is a Master of Ceremonies, presenter & co-organizer of the Legion of Honor Award Program in Roseburg with Jim Little.  Additionally, Barnett is an active member of the Marine Corps League, Drill Instructors West Coast Association, Toys for Tots Annual Program, American Legion Post #16, Veterans of Foreign Wars, Vietnam Veterans of America, Remembering America’s Heroes & Living History Days, Annual wreath laying at Roseburg National Cemetery event and many others.  He enjoys working on and sharing Korean War history with various groups all over the United States, traveling everywhere supporting USMC events and fundraisers and stopping by USMC Base Camp Pendleton to visit his USMC brothers on the drill field.  Also, it goes without saying that his famous USMC Museum in his home is second to none.  His collection of over 1,500 pieces of Marine Corps memorabilia from coins to posters to bulldogs is made complete with boxes filled with soil collected from every USMC base in the world, as well as all the major World War II battlefields. 

 

Jim Barnett is one of the finest servant leaders I know. Throughout Jim’s time in the USMC, during his time as a teacher for Notre Dame ROTC program and in retirement has given back 100-fold to his community and beyond,” stated TJ Morgan. “It was my honor to nominate Jim Barnett for this award. His country, his fellow Marines and the Marine Corps League are all proud to call him ours.

 

Dignitaries traveled from the Chapel of Four Chaplains Memorial Foundation office in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to present the prestigious Legion of Honor Bronze Medallion Award to both Jim Little and Jim Barnett.  Representing the Chapel of the Four Chaplains and presenting the award was Lieutenant Colonel Kirk Michelson (U.S. Army Retired) and Master Sergeant William Kaemmer (U.S. Army Retired), who is the Director of Four Chaplains Memorial Foundation.  The event was held at Dana Campbell Vineyards in Ashland, Oregon.  Vineyard owners and event hosts were Patrick Dana Flannery Senior Chief (US Navy Retired) & Paula Campbell Brown 2 Star Admiral (US Navy Retired).  The event was sponsored by Umpqua Bank’s Medford Community and Business Baking Center and also included presentation of Four Chaplains special recognition awards to David’s Chair, whose mission is, “to enrich the lives of mobility impaired people with independence and freedom by empowering them to engage in outdoor activities they previously were unable to, free of charge.”  Also attending the ceremonious event were Commissioner Tim Freeman’s wife Angelia; Jim Barnett’s wife Ann; Jim Little’s wife, Carmen Little and Kellie Trenkle, Douglas County Public Affairs Specialist.  Of special note, Commissioner Freeman, Mary Newman-Keyes, John Pierson, Ann Barnett and Carmen Little are also past recipients of the annual local Legion of Honor Award in Roseburg.  For more information about the Four Chaplains and the Legion of Honor, log onto their website at http://fourchaplains.org/.

 

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Media Contact:     Tamara Howell, Douglas County Emergency Communications & Community Engagement Specialist Office (541) 957-4896 | Cell (541) 670-2804 | Email tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us

Photos Attached.  Additional photos available upon request.

  1. William Kaemmer pictured with Bronze Medallion recipients Jim Barnett and Jim Little, and Commissioner Tim Freeman.
  2. Commissioner Tim Freeman, wife Angelia; Jim Little and wife, Carmen and Jim Barnett and wife Ann.

 




Attached Media Files: Freeman, Little and Barnett , Kaemmer, Barnett, Little and Commissioner Freeman

Umpqua Bank Charitable Foundation Awards Community Grants to 62 Nonprofits Across Five States
Umpqua Bank - 08/10/22 9:00 AM

In its second of three community grant funding rounds in 2022, the Umpqua Bank Charitable Foundation, a 501(c)(3) organization of Umpqua Bank, a subsidiary of Umpqua Holdings Corporation (NASDAQ: UMPQ), awarded 62 community grants to local nonprofits across its five-state footprint totaling $336,500.

Umpqua’s community grants support nonprofit organizations across Ore., Wash., Idaho, Calif. and Nev. and are part of the Bank’s overall foundation and corporate giving program that has invested more than $13.5 million since the Foundation was formed in 2014.

“Through our Community Grants program, it’s our honor to partner with and support these nonprofits serving a critical role in expanding access to services and economic opportunity,” shared Randy Choy, Umpqua Bank vice president of community giving and managing director of the Umpqua Bank Charitable Foundation. “Through private, public and nonprofit collaborations, we can achieve tremendous collective impact.”

These nonprofits, selected from among hundreds of applicants in the second of three grant cycles in 2022, demonstrated a steadfast commitment to serving low-to-moderate-income populations in at least one of eight categories: family engagement and resiliency; financial competency; housing stability and home ownership; college, career or technical readiness; entrepreneurship and business expansion; vibrant and equitable neighborhoods; technical and digital connectivity; and small business support and financial guidance.

The next deadline for community grant applications is 5 p.m. PT on Fri., Sept. 2, 2022. Learn more at www.UmpquaBank.com/Community.

The following recipients received grants between $5,000-10,000:

OREGON

OrganizationCounty
All Hands RaisedMultnomah
Assistance League of Klamath BasinKlamath
Boys & Girls Club of SalemMarion & Polk
Centro Cultural De CondadoWashington
College Possible OregonColumbia
Family Access Network FoundationDeschutes
Girl Scouts of Ore. and SW Wash.Clackamas
Habitat for HumanityLinn & Lane
Hollywood Senior CenterMultnomah
LatinoBuilt FoundationWashington
Olalla CenterLincoln
Outside InMultnomah
Portland YouthbuildersMultnomah
Project 48Multnomah
Raphael HouseMultnomah
Remake TalentJackson
Store to DoorMultnomah
VertueLabMultnomah

WASHINGTON

OrganizationCounty
Blue Mountain Action Council, Inc. Walla Walla
Boys & Girls Clubs of SW Wash.Clark
Communities RiseKing
ConnectionsGrays Harbor
Degrees of ChangePierce
Distributive Education Clubs of AmericaGrant
Exodus HousingPierce
First StorySpokane
Foundation for Private Enterprise EducationPierce
Habitat for Humanity, Inc.Whatcom
King County Library System FoundationKing
Kulshan Community Land TrustWhatcom
Orion IndustriesSnohomish
Seattle Cares Mentoring MovementKing
Share, Inc.Clark
Skills, Inc.King
Solid Ground WashingtonKing
Swan Vocational EnterprisesYakima
Tacoma Arts LivePierce
Your Money MattersKing

CALIFORNIA

OrganizationCounty
10000 DegreesSonoma
2-1-1 Humboldt Information and Resource CenterHumboldt
APA Family Support ServicesSan Francisco
BALANCE (Consumer Credit Counseling of San Francisco)Alameda
Boys & Girls Clubs of Contra CostaContra Costa
Business for Good San DiegoSan Diego
California Asian Pacific Chamber of Commerce FoundationSacramento
CASA El DoradoEl Dorado
Community Vision Capital & ConsultingFresno
Conservation Corps North Bay, Inc. Marin
Dress for Success San FranciscoSanta Clara
Grid AlternativesSan Joaquin
Junior Achievement of SacramentoSacramento
Junior Achievement of San Diego CountySan Diego
Sacramento Childrens HomeSacramento
Southeast Asian Community CenterSan Francisco
St. Johns Healthcare FoundationVentura
Up Valley Family Centers of Napa CountyNapa
Yolo Crisis Nursery, Inc.Yolo

IDAHO

OrganizationCounty
Cascade Jr/Sr High SchoolValley
Life’s Kitchen, Inc.Ada
Wyakin Warrior FoundationAda

NEVADA

OrganizationCounty
Northern Nevada Children’s Cancer FoundationWashoe
Rebuilding Together Northern Nevada, Inc.Washoe

About Umpqua Bank
Umpqua Bankheadquartered in Roseburg, Ore., is a subsidiary of Umpqua Holdings Corporation and operates in Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon and Washington. Umpqua Bank has been recognized for its innovative customer experience and banking strategy by national publications including The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, BusinessWeek, Fast Company and CNBC. The company has been recognized for eight years in a row on FORTUNE magazine's list of the country's "100 Best Companies to Work For," and was recently named by The Portland Business Journal the Most Admired Financial Services Company in Oregon for the 17th consecutive year. In addition to its retail banking presence, In addition to its retail banking presence, Umpqua Bank also owns Financial Pacific Leasing, Inc., a nationally recognized commercial finance company that provides equipment leases to businesses. 


Public hearings scheduled for Certified Burn Manager program rules
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/10/22 8:18 AM

SALEM, Ore.—Public hearings are scheduled August 23–25 to gather feedback on an administrative rules package establishing the Certified Burn Manager program authorized by Oregon Revised Statue 526.360 and reemphasized under Senate Bill 762 (2021). This program will provide people with training and certification to conduct prescribed burns that cross property boundaries and reduce individual liability when following program criteria.

See the notice of proposed rulemaking for draft rule language for Oregon Administrative Rules 629-042-1000 to 629-042-1070. 

Comment can be made at any of the virtual public meetings below:

(Note: Each meeting has a separate Zoom link)

Comments can also be sent to 762.rulemaking@odf.oregon.gov">sb762.rulemaking@odf.oregon.gov until 5 p.m. on August 31, 2022.

The Board of Forestry approved the public hearing process for the proposed rule package, Oregon Administrative Rules 629-042-1000 to 629-042-1070, during their July 20 meeting. The department consulted with a rulemaking advisory committee (RAC) to draft the proposed rules. The RAC included representatives from the Oregon Prescribed Fire Council, Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, Confederated Tribes of Grande Ronde, Associated Oregon Loggers, The Nature Conservancy, Oregon Forest Industries Council, Oregon Small Woodlands Association, Oregon State University and Sustainable Northwest.


Plan taking shape to remove abandoned and derelict vessels from Oregon waterways
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 08/10/22 8:16 AM

Plan taking shape to remove abandoned and derelict vessels from Oregon waterways 

The State Land Board on Tuesday heard an update on plans to request $40 million to remove hazardous vessels and continue collaborative work with partners and communities 

CHARLESTON, Ore. – Removing abandoned and derelict vessels from Oregon’s waterways will be a focus in coming months, state officials said on Tuesday. 

In June, the State Land Board directed the Department of State Lands to request $40 million in general funds during the state budget process to address the hundreds of commercial and recreational vessels littering Oregon’s waterways.

Abandoned and derelict vessels are a serious threat to waterway health and safety, said DSL Director Vicki Walker, creating both environmental and navigational hazards.

For years, DSL has been working with state, federal, and local partners to clean up and remove vessels. Collaborative efforts have resulted in removing hazardous vessels from waterways, said Walker, but lack of a statewide abandoned and derelict vessel program with dedicated funding has meant ongoing impact to the Common School Fund. Since 2017, the Common School Fund has expended $12.9 million removing commercial and recreational vessels from public waterways.

“Oregon’s schoolkids foot the bill for cleaning up abandoned and derelict vessels,” Walker said.  “Every dollar spent cleaning up these messes is a dollar out of the classroom.”

During Tuesday’s State Land Board meeting, DSL outlined how the $40 million in general funds would be used, with emphasis on removing the 19 known commercial vessels of concern statewide, as well as hundreds of recreational vessels. Read the removal plan memo.

DSL is currently working with federal, state, and local partners to remove four commercial vessels from waterways. Emergency removal of the Tourist No. 2, a former river ferry built in the 1920s, is underway in Astoria. Pollutants have been removed from the vessel, Walker said, but the vessel’s poor condition, proximity to a fuel dock and the navigational channel, and the continued impact of tides on the vessel’s structural integrity present an imminent threat to public health and safety. 

“Not taking action to remove this hazard from the water is not an option,” she said.  “But Oregon’s schoolchildren are paying yet again to clean up a mess created by an irresponsible vessel owner. The Department will take every action to recoup the more than $1 million this cleanup will cost.” 

Collaborative work is also continuing to remove the Sakarissa, Alert, and Tiffany, three vessels the Land Board in June directed the Department to address. The goal is to have all three vessels removed from the Columbia River by the end of 2022.

Walker emphasized the importance of collaboration to successfully remove these and other vessels – and the importance of engaging widely to refine the resources requested for the upcoming 2023-25 biennium.

“This is complex work, and the importance of ongoing collaboration to identify problems, priorities, and solutions cannot be understated,” she said. “DSL is committed to working with legislators, state and federal agencies, local governments, ports, and other partners to develop long-term comprehensive solutions for addressing abandoned and derelict vessels.” 


Other State Land Board News

The State Land Board on Tuesday also appointed Dr. Karina Nielsen to the Oregon Ocean Science Trust; approved transferring management of about 5,000 acres of school forestlands from the Oregon Department of Forestry to DSL; approved a quitclaim deed exchange to clarify land ownership along the Willamette River in Benton County; and approved a permanent easement for the replacement of the Youngs River Road Bridge in Clatsop County. Additional information about these agenda items is available in the meeting packet. Meeting video is available on DSL’s YouTube Channel.


DPSST Applicant Review Committee Meeting Cancelled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 08/10/22 7:55 AM

APPLICANT REVIEW COMMITTEE

MEETING CANCELLED

 

Notice of Meeting Cancellation

The Applicant Review Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training meeting scheduled for August 24th, 2022, at 10:00 a.m. has been cancelled.
 

The next Applicant Review Committee meeting is scheduled for September 28th, 2022, at 10:00 a.m.

 


Tue. 08/09/22
Oregonians Urged to Contact 811 Before Digging (Photo)
Oregon Utility Notification Center - 08/09/22 11:59 PM
Live line hit during excavation
Live line hit during excavation
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/6929/156628/thumb_Electric_line_hit.jpg

This Thursday, August 11 (8/11), is National 811 Day. Also known as National Safe Digging Day, the observance exists to raise awareness about contacting 811 before beginning a digging or excavation project. The Oregon Utility Notification Center, which oversees the statewide call or click before you dig program, is reminding Oregonians that using the free service can save money and lives.

“None of us have x-ray vision to see underground utilities before breaking ground, and we know there are a lot of construction and home improvement projects happening this time of year,” said Josh Thomas, Executive Director of the Oregon Utility Notification Center. “National Safe Digging Day is a perfect time to remind everyone to contact 811 first so they don’t have to call 911.” 

Oregon 811, also known as the Oregon Utility Notification Center, was created by the Oregon Legislature back in 1995 to prevent damage to underground utilities and enhance public safety. The free service is available by calling 811 or going to Oregon811.com. By requesting a locate, homeowners and businesses can have their dig site marked with color-coded spray paint to avoid hitting underground pipes and wires.

The most well-known incident in Oregon happened about six years ago involving a destructive gas explosion at the corner of 23rd and Glisan in downtown Portland. It injured eight people and caused an estimated $14 million in damages. Just last year, there were 922 reported damages to underground utilities in Oregon, and most were preventable.

According to the Common Ground Alliance, the estimated annual cost of damages to underground utilities nationally is $30 billion. Nearly two out of five U.S. homeowners dig without requesting the free 811 service beforehand. The 811 center is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, for homeowners, contractors, and professional excavators. Requests must be made two business days before a project but not more than 10 days in advance.

“It is always a smart idea to plan ahead and request utility locates to know what’s below before digging,” said Thomas. “Using our free service is one of the easiest ways you can prevent service interruptions, costly repairs, environmental damage, injuries and worse.”

For more information about the Oregon Utility Notification Center or the statewide Oregon 811 system, go to Oregon811.com.

# # #




Attached Media Files: Live line hit during excavation , Electric line hit at splice , Overlapping underground utilities , Digging with shovel , National 811 Day graphic - August 11

Traffic Team investigates fatal collision involving train, pedestrian -- FINAL UPDATE -- (Photo)
Salem Police Department - 08/09/22 6:03 PM
View of Union Pacific rail line which runs north and south
View of Union Pacific rail line which runs north and south
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/1095/156471/thumb_salem-police_smp22017171_view-of-Union-Pacific-rail-line-which-runs-north-and-south.jpg

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

DATE: August 9, 2022

 

Traffic Team investigates fatal collision involving train, pedestrian

Victim’s family located thanks to help from the public

 

Update 08/09/2022 | 6:00 p.m.

Next of kin notification in this incident has been completed thanks to help from the public.

“We appreciate all the assistance we received which made notification to Mr. Crossman’s family possible,” said Sgt. Scott Kofoid of the Salem Police Traffic Team. Members of the public provided tips and information from various types of Internet and genealogy searches.

We are also grateful to the news outlets who helped by sharing information about our need to locate Mr. Crossman’s family. 

# # #

 

Request for assistance to locate victim’s family

 

Update 08/08/2022 | 12:00 p.m.

The victim in this incident is identified as Wesley James Crossman, age 55. 

Salem Police Traffic Team investigators have been unable to locate Mr. Crossman’s direct family to notify them of his death.

If you know Mr. Crossman and know his family, or have a way to contact them, please call the Traffic Team at 503-588-6293.

Thank you.

# # #

 

Originally published 08/02/2022 | 3:00 p.m.

Salem, Ore. — An early morning collision along the Union Pacific (UP) rail line in southeast Salem resulted in a fatality.

Emergency responders were called to the area of 14th and Hines STS SE just after 6:00 a.m. today on the report of a train striking a man walking along the railroad tracks. 

The Salem Police Traffic Team’s preliminary investigation indicates the person was walking along the track as the northbound train approached. The rail crew sounded the horn and attempted to stop the train but could not avoid the collision. The man was declared deceased at the scene.

The name of the decedent will not be released pending notification to the family.

Due to the length of the train, traffic impacts occurred where the UP tracks cross at about the 1400 block of Hines ST SE and also at McGilchrist ST SE where the line runs parallel to Pringle RD SE. The train was released from the scene by UP officials at approximately 11:00 a.m.

# # #




Attached Media Files: View of Union Pacific rail line which runs north and south , View of Union Pacific rail line at McGilchrist ST SE , View of Union Pacific rail line south from Hines ST SE

Sheriff's Office Seeks Information Related to Shooting (Photo)
Benton Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/09/22 5:09 PM
2022-08/1505/156625/Press_Release_Facebook.jpg
2022-08/1505/156625/Press_Release_Facebook.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/1505/156625/thumb_Press_Release_Facebook.jpg

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The Benton County Sheriff’s Office (BCSO) is seeking information related to an investigation regarding a shooting they responded to on Sunday, August 7, 2022, at approximately 1:20 a.m.


Corvallis Regional Communication Center received a 9-1-1 call made by a 44-year-old male resident who said he was bleeding from his shoulder, possibly from a gunshot, but he wasn’t sure what happened because no windows were broken in his residence.


The Corvallis Fire Department responded to the 2100 block of NE Merloy Ave, Corvallis, and learned the male had a non-life-threatening gunshot wound and transported him to a local hospital.


A preliminary investigation by Benton County Sheriff’s Office Detectives revealed the victim was standing in his studio apartment when a bullet penetrated an exterior wall and lodged in his left shoulder. A search was conducted in the surrounding area, but a suspect was not located.


Benton County Sheriff’s Office personnel continue to investigate this incident. Any residents in the surrounding neighborhoods with exterior camera recordings or anyone that observed anything unusual that may be of evidentiary value are encouraged to notify BCSO.


Future updates may be provided as they become available. Based on the investigation to date, the Benton County Sheriff’s Office has no information to believe there is a threat to the public.


The Benton County Sheriff’s Office asks anyone who has additional information please email acting in capacity Captain Chris Duffitt, at is.Duffitt@co.benton.or.us">Chris.Duffitt@co.benton.or.us or call 541-766-6858. Arrangements can be made for information to be shared privately. Anyone wishing to remain anonymous may also submit tips to 541-573-8477 (TIPS).
XXX




Attached Media Files: 2022-08/1505/156625/Press_Release_Facebook.jpg

Community Information Exchange (CIE) Workgroup to meet August 16
Oregon Health Authority - 08/09/22 4:37 PM

August 9, 2022

Contact: Liz Gharst, 971.666.2476, eth.a.gharst@dhsoha.state.or.us">elizabeth.a.gharst@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Kiari Chao, 503.931.3053, i.chao@dhsoha.state.or.us">kiari.chao@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Community Information Exchange (CIE) Workgroup to meet August 16

What: The regular public meeting of the Community Information Exchange (CIE) Workgroup.

When: August 16, 12:30pm to 3:00pm

Where: By webinar and conference line only. The public may join remotely through a webinar and conference line:

Agenda: Welcome (12:30-12:40); Review HITOC Feedback (12:40-1:00); CIE Engagement: Community-based Organization (CBO) Survey & Interviews; 10-Minute Break (2:00-2:10); Public Comment Period 1 (2:10-2:15); Check in: Recommendations to Support CBOs in CIE (2:15-2:35); Where are we now? – Plans for remainder of 2022 (2:35-2:50); Public Comment Period 2 (2:50-2:55); Closing Remarks and Meeting Adjourn (2:55-3:00)

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/OHIT-HITOC/Pages/CIEworkgroup.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • CART (live captions)
  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact OHIT.Info@dhsoha.state.or.us or call 503-373-7859 at least 48 hours before the meeting. OHA will make every effort to provide services for requests made closer to the meeting.


Oregon Veteran Volunteer Program to Host Virtual Training in August
Ore. Department of Veterans' Affairs - 08/09/22 2:48 PM

The Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs is seeking volunteers for its Veteran Volunteer Program who are interested in serving aging veterans in their own communities by helping veterans learn how to access potential earned benefits and resources. 

The goal of this program is to equip volunteers with information so they can help educate and connect veterans — primarily, seniors — to their earned benefits and other potential resources. 

Volunteers work closely with the Veteran Volunteer Coordinator and the accredited local veteran service officer or tribal veteran service officer in their area, locating veterans who may need assistance accessing their benefits in long-term care facilities, senior centers, libraries, mobile home parks, and retirement communities, or wherever people gather. 

The program is open to anyone 18 years or older. Volunteers are asked to commit to serving eight to 10 hours per month. A background check will be performed (at no cost to the volunteer) before the volunteer is permitted to work with veterans. If you enjoy working with the aging population and want to make a difference in the lives of veterans, you are encouraged to apply. 

The next training is scheduled for interested volunteers in Morrow, Umatilla, Union, Wallowa, Baker counties and will be held virtually from 9 a.m. to noon August 17 and 18. Please note interested volunteers must attend both days to complete the training.

In order to attend this training or learn more about this program, interested persons must fill out the online interest form at www.oregonvetvolunteer.com  or contact Veteran Volunteer Coordinator Mark Newell by phone (971-720-8911) or email (anVolunteer@odva.oregon.gov">ODVA_VeteranVolunteer@odva.oregon.gov) by 4 p.m. August 15. 

Established in 1945, the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs is dedicated to serving Oregon’s diverse veteran community that spans five eras of service members. ODVA administers programs and provides special advocacy and assistance in accessing earned veteran benefits across the state. Learn about veteran benefits and services, or locate a local county or tribal veteran service office online at https://oregon.gov/odva.

# # #




Attached Media Files: Oregon Volunteer Program Flyer

Nurse Staffing Advisory Board, Civil Monetary Penalty Committee meets virtually Aug. 10
Oregon Health Authority - 08/09/22 1:28 PM

August 9, 2022

Media Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, Jonathan.N.Modie@dhsoha.state.or.us

Nurse Staffing Advisory Board, Civil Monetary Penalty Committee meets virtually Aug. 10

What: The Nurse Staffing Advisory Board, Civil Monetary Penalty Committee is holding its seventh meeting.

Agenda:

  • Review the meeting agenda
  • Review changes to the draft CMP Decision-making tool
    • Provide feedback on incorporated changes
    • Vote to recommend tool to the NSAB
  • Discuss CMP report for NSAB
    • Recommend changes
    • Vote to move CMP report to the NSAB
  • Summarize action items and next steps

The agenda will be available on www.healthoregon.org/nursestaffing

When: Aug. 10, 2-3 p.m.

Where: Please register for this meeting to receive meeting login information:

https://www.zoomgov.com/meeting/register/vJIscu6rrzsrHMEO7DtRh0u_3a0hiWOybH8

Background: The Nurse Staffing Advisory Board advises Oregon Health Authority on the administration of Oregon’s nurse staffing laws; identifies trends, opportunities and concerns related to nurse staffing; makes recommendations to OHA based on those trends, opportunities and concerns; and reviews the enforcement powers and processes under Oregon’s nurse staffing laws.

Program contact: Kimberly Voelker

ox.nursestaffing@odhsoha.oregon.gov">Mailbox.nursestaffing@odhsoha.oregon.gov

###

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Kimberly Voelker, MPH at 971-803-0914, 711 TTY or erly.n.voelker@dhsoha.state.or.us">kimberly.n.voelker@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


OSP Fish & Wildlife seeking public assistance in identifying the person(s) responsible for killing an antelope- Baker County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 08/09/22 1:16 PM
2022-08/1002/156600/SP22203156-Antelope.jpg
2022-08/1002/156600/SP22203156-Antelope.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/1002/156600/thumb_SP22203156-Antelope.jpg

UPDATE

After receiving information from the public, F&W Troopers were able to determine this was a legal harvest and the meat was removed from the carcass in accordance with the wildlife laws.  The buck antelope was harvested utilizing a Special Qualified Disabled Veteran Tag. Oregon State Police Fish & Wildlife Division personnel are no longer seeking the public’s assistance regarding this matter. 

###

Previous Release:

On August 5, 2022, OSP Fish & Wildlife Troopers received information from a citizen who found an antelope carcass on BLM property between Mother Lode Road and Skinner Lane in Keating, OR.

OSP Fish & Wildlife Troopers responded to the scene and found the butchered carcass of an antelope with the head removed. Troopers determined the antelope was likely killed sometime during the first week of August.  In addition to the unlawful take, Troopers also determined meat was left to waste. 

The first controlled antelope season in this area, the 462 Pine Cr-Keating hunt is August 13-21, 2022. 

The Oregon State Police Fish & Wildlife Division is asking for public assistance in identifying the person(s) responsible for killing the antelope in the Keating Wildlife Management Unit. Anyone with information about this case is urged to call the Oregon State Police via the Tip-line at 1-800-452-7888, OSP (677), or email TIP@osp.oregon.gov  Please, reference case number SP22203156. 

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators

The Turn in Poachers (TIP) program offers preference points or cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation, to a suspect, for the unlawful killing of wildlife, and or waste of big game. Cash rewards can also be awarded for turning in people who destroy habitat, illegally obtain licenses/tags, and for the unlawful lending/borrowing of big game tags. Learn more: https://www.oregon.gov/osp/programs/fw/Pages/tip.aspx

 

PREFERENCE POINT REWARDS:

5 Points-Mountain Sheep

5 Points-Rocky Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

 

 Oregon Hunters Association (OHA) Cash Rewards:

$1,000 Bighorn Sheep, Mountain Goat, and Moose

$500 Elk, Deer, and Antelope

$300 Bear, Cougar, and Wolf

$300 Habitat Destruction

$200 - Illegally obtaining Oregon hunting or angling license or tags

$200 - Unlawful Lending/Borrowing Big Game Tag(s)

$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl

$100 Game Birds or Furbearers

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish

 

Oregon Wildlife Coalition (OWC) Cash Rewards:

Birds

$500 Hawk, Falcon, Eagle, Owl, Osprey

All other protected avian species: see category below for listed species 

Mammals

$500 Cougar, Bobcat, Beaver (public lands only), Black bears, Bighorn Sheep, Marten, Fisher, Sierra Nevada Red Fox

Species listed as “threatened" or “endangered" under state or federal Endangered Species Act (excludes fish) 

$1,000 (e.g. wolf, wolverine, kit fox, red tree vole, Canada lynx, sea otter, Columbian white-tailed deer, California brown pelican, western snowy plover, California least tern, northern spotted owl, marbled murrelet, short-tailed albatross, streaked horned lark, yellow-billed cuckoo, leatherback sea turtle, olive ridley sea turtle, Oregon spotted frog, green sea turtle, loggerhead sea turtle)

 




Attached Media Files: 2022-08/1002/156600/SP22203156-Antelope.jpg

OSP Fish and Wildlife Seeking Public Assistance in Identifying Person(s) responsible for killing a Wolf -- Baker County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 08/09/22 1:02 PM
2022-08/1002/156618/20220805_112257.jpg
2022-08/1002/156618/20220805_112257.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/1002/156618/thumb_20220805_112257.jpg

The Oregon State Police Fish & Wildlife Division is seeking the public’s assistance in locating the person(s) responsible for shooting and killing a wolf in the Pine Creek Wildlife Management Unit. 

On August 5, 2022, Fish and Wildlife Troopers received information from ODFW that a collared wolf, OR112, may be deceased at a location just off of Forest Service RD 66, between Twin Lakes and Fish Lake. This location is approximately 7 miles north of Halfway, OR. 

Fish & Wildlife Troopers and ODFW personnel responded to the area and located a deceased wolf over the embankment of the 66 RD.  The wolf had injuries consistent with having been shot by a firearm.  The wolf, known as OR112 was a two year old gray-collared female that was part of the Keating Pack.  Troopers believe the wolf was shot and killed on the morning of August 4, 2022.

The Oregon Wildlife Coalition and conservation partners are offering to pay an $11,500 reward that leads OSP F&W Troopers to an arrest and/or citation stemming from this incident.     

Anyone with information regarding this case is urged to contact OSP through the Turn in Poachers (TIP) hotline at 1-800-452-7888 or OSP (677), or email TIP@osp.oregon.gov Reference case number SP22201971. 

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators 

The Turn in Poachers (TIP) program offers preference points or cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation, to a suspect, for the unlawful killing of wildlife, and or waste of big game. Cash rewards can also be awarded for turning in people who destroy habitat, illegally obtain licenses/tags, and for the unlawful lending/borrowing of big game tags. Learn more: https://www.oregon.gov/osp/programs/fw/Pages/tip.aspx

 PREFERENCE POINT REWARDS:

5 Points-Mountain Sheep

5 Points-Rocky Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

 Oregon Hunters Association (OHA) Cash Rewards:

$1,000 Bighorn Sheep, Mountain Goat, and Moose

$500 Elk, Deer, and Antelope

$300 Bear, Cougar, and Wolf

$300 Habitat Destruction

$200 - Illegally obtaining Oregon hunting or angling license or tags

$200 - Unlawful Lending/Borrowing Big Game Tag(s)

$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl

$100 Game Birds or Furbearers

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish

Oregon Wildlife Coalition (OWC) Cash Rewards:

Birds

$500 Hawk, Falcon, Eagle, Owl, Osprey

All other protected avian species: see category below for listed species 

Mammals

$500 Cougar, Bobcat, Beaver (public lands only), Black bears, Bighorn Sheep, Marten, Fisher, Sierra Nevada Red Fox

Species listed as “threatened" or “endangered" under state or federal Endangered Species Act (excludes fish) 

$1,000 (e.g. wolf, wolverine, kit fox, red tree vole, Canada lynx, sea otter, Columbian white-tailed deer, California brown pelican, western snowy plover, California least tern, northern spotted owl, marbled murrelet, short-tailed albatross, streaked horned lark, yellow-billed cuckoo, leatherback sea turtle, olive ridley sea turtle, Oregon spotted frog, green sea turtle, loggerhead sea turtle) 




Attached Media Files: 2022-08/1002/156618/20220805_112257.jpg

First quarter 2022 data show rapid growth in operating expenses impacting hospital operating margins
Oregon Health Authority - 08/09/22 12:36 PM

August 9, 2022

Media Contact: Liz Gharst, eth.a.gharst@state.or.us">elizabeth.a.gharst@state.or.us, 971-666-2476

First quarter 2022 data show rapid growth in operating expenses impacting hospital operating margins

Data released by the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) show hospitals across the state are struggling with sharp growth in operating expenses. This has impacted operating margins throughout the state, resulting in over half of Oregon’s hospitals reporting operating losses on the quarter.  

Net patient revenue (NPR) was $3.78 billion in the first quarter of 2022, an 8.2% increase from the first quarter of 2021. Total operating revenue was $4.13 billion in the first quarter of 2022, a 10.9% increase from the first quarter of 2021. An additional round of CARES Act funding, which began distribution in late December of 2021, contributed to the revenue growth.

While revenue was up compared with the first quarter of 2021, the rate of revenue growth is slowing. Net patient revenue amounts have been effectively flat from the second quarter of 2021 through the first quarter of 2022.

All in all, hospitals finished the first quarter with $103.5 million in operating losses. This sharp decline in margin is attributed to the equally sharp growth in expenses, particularly payroll expenses.

“OHA recognizes rising personnel expenses are a growing concern for Oregon’s hospitals,” said Dave Baden, OHA chief financial officer. “Anecdotally, we hear that temporary staffing costs made up a large portion of the increased expense. We hope that with a return to normal staffing some of the expense growth will taper off.”

Total operating expense grew $559.1 million compared with the first quarter of 2021, a 15.2% increase. Payroll was the largest contributor to this growth, accounting for $330 million (59%) of the increase. Statewide, payroll was up 23.4% compared with the first quarter of 2021, while at the same time the total number of payroll hours worked was down 2.5%.

All hospital types faced expense challenges, and operating expense growth was similar across all hospital types in Oregon.

OHA receives hospital financial data 90 days after a calendar quarter ends. Based on conversations with various hospital leaders, ongoing struggles with expense growth and hospital staffing is expected to persist through the second quarter and into the fall.

“Everyone was aware that the pandemic was likely to have long lasting effects on our health care system and cause challenges for institutions like hospitals,” added Baden. “In the wake of these data and the picture they paint of the hospital financial situation, OHA will be monitoring closely to ensure that Oregon patients’ experiences continue to be the same.”

Note: Shriner’s Children is excluded from this analysis due to its status as a charity children’s hospital and its resulting unique financials.  


Healthier Together Oregon Report Highlights Accomplishments
Oregon Health Authority - 08/09/22 12:34 PM

Aug. 9, 2022

Media contact:

Erica Heartquist, 503-871-8843, ica.J.Heartquist@dhsoha.state.or.us">Erica.J.Heartquist@dhsoha.state.or.us

Healthier Together Oregon Report Highlights Accomplishments

PORTLAND, Ore.— Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has released an annual progress report for Healthier Together Oregon (HTO), the State Health Improvement Plan. HTO is a strategic plan to advance health equity for six priority populations: communities of color, tribal communities, people with low income, people who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and/or questioning, intersex, asexual, Two-Spirit, or other ways people choose to self-identify (LGBTQIA2S+), people with disabilities, immigrants and refugees and people living in rural areas.

The report showcases efforts during the first year of implementation and highlights a multitude of accomplishments. Communities and government agencies made equity-centered changes to direct more resources to communities most affected by historic injustices. Policymakers in Salem passed historic investments and legislative changes that serve HTO objectives; and examples of each are highlighted throughout the report.

“A 30-page report cannot possibly collate all that happened across Oregon to advance the strategies and priorities identified in HTO, but it helps provide just a few shining examples of what this type of health equity-centered work can and does look like,” said Christy Hudson, Cross sector and strategic initiatives coordinator for Oregon Health Authority.

HTO relies on a collective impact approach, which requires broad partnership for success. The strategies in the plan are organized into eight implementation areas: equity and justice, healthy communities, housing and food, healthy families, healthy youth, workforce development, behavioral health and technology and health.  HTO is also a tool for equitable recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic. This plan builds off the individual and community resilience demonstrated in response to COVID-19.

 “This annual report lifts up examples of work from a time that will be remembered for generations — between September 2020 and December 2021. During that time, people in Oregon endured a lot. And yet, our assets have never been stronger,” said Connie Dillinger, PartnerSHIP member.

The PartnerSHIP is a community steering committee for HTO. The PartnerSHIP is a group of 20 community representatives that provide statewide perspectives from priority populations and those who implement community health improvement plans. PartnerSHIP members provide direction and decision making about the plan.

To read the entire report in English, click here.

To read the entire report in Spanish, click here.

For more information about Healthier Together Oregon, Oregon's 2020-2024 State Health Improvement plan, visit https://healthiertogetheroregon.org.

OHA is looking for trusted community partners across the state. We are also looking for partners from across different sectors to help move this work forward.


Oregon Lottery Wins National Award for Multi-cultural Outreach Program (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 08/09/22 10:49 AM
Lottery logo
Lottery logo
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At the recent National Council on Problem Gambling Conference, the Oregon Lottery was recognized for its multi-cultural outreach responsible gaming program.

Each year the National Council on Problem Gambling honors individuals and organizations from across the US and the world for their work on problem gambling and responsible gambling. 

The Oregon Lottery won for their “Coping with Problem Gambling” campaign which utilized statewide digital and print media platforms. With the population in Oregon growing and becoming more diverse, Oregon Lottery’s leadership says it is crucial for the Lottery to be culturally relevant to all Oregonians.

“We make it a priority to translate our digital content messaging, and our website in Spanish, our second most spoken language in Oregon,” said Oregon Lottery Responsible Gaming Program Manager Krystal Smith. “Topics translated include things like playing responsibly, problem gambling resources and help for others impacted by gambling behaviors.”

Over 600 individuals worldwide attended the oldest and largest annual conference on gambling addiction and responsible gambling. Now in its 36th year, the event brings together individuals and organizations working on prevention, education, treatment, responsible gambling, regulation, research, and recovery. This year’s event was held in Boston.

“The best way we have found is to connect with people is through content and messaging that resonates with them,” said Smith. “The Oregon Lottery Problem and Responsible Gaming overarching strategy is to connect with problem gamblers when and where they need it most. We also provide help to anyone impacted by someone else's gambling. This is fundamental to how we operate and sell Oregon Lottery products. We know our products come with risk, and we have a responsibility to help people when they need it.”

Oregon Lottery proceeds provide funding for free, confidential, and effective problem gambling treatment programs statewide. Since 1992, over $120 million in Lottery funds has been directed to fund problem gambling treatment and prevention. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

About the National Council on Problem Gambling

The National Council on Problem Gambling (NCPG) is neutral on legalized gambling. Based in Washington DC, NCPG is the only national nonprofit organization that seeks to minimize the economic and social costs associated with gambling addiction. If you or someone you know may have a gambling problem, contact the National Problem Gambling Helpline, which offers hope and help without stigma or shame. Call or text 1-800-GAMBLER or visit www.ncpgambling.org/chat.  Help is available 24/7 – it is free and confidential.

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Attached Media Files: Lottery logo

Benton County outreach campaign urges wildfire prevention & preparedness (Photo)
Benton Co. Government - 08/09/22 10:13 AM
2022-08/4171/156612/benton-county-logo-horizontal-full-color-cmyk.jpg
2022-08/4171/156612/benton-county-logo-horizontal-full-color-cmyk.jpg
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In August, Benton County is partnering with the Oregon Department of Forestry, City of Corvallis, Corvallis Police Department, Benton County Sheriff’s Office, and the Benton County Health Department for a wildfire awareness and outreach campaign to share information about prevention, creating defensible space, evacuation and alerts, evacuation shelters and wildfire health concerns. 

 

“Recent wildfires have proved that it has never been more important to prepare ourselves, our families, and our communities for wildfire,” said Benton County Emergency Manager Bryan Lee. “We are encouraging community members to prevent and prepare for wildfire.  One way to do that is by creating defensible space around your home.”

 

The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) encourages the public to practice wildfire prevention at home by creating defensible space. Recommendations have been established for three zones that including the immediate, intermediate, and extended zones. Actions such as removing dead leaves, debris, and pine needles from your roof and gutters and moving flammable material away from wall exteriors – mulch, flammable plants, leaves and needles, firewood piles, and anything that can burn will minimize the likelihood of flames or surface fire touching the home or any attachments. 

 

Protection Unit Forester Leo Williamson from the Oregon Department of Forestry Philomath Unit said preparing for and preventing wildfire takes a coordinated effort that includes the public and government agencies working together.

 

“Daily, our fire crews and cooperators stress the importance of preparedness so we are ready to respond quickly and suppress fires on the landscape. We encourage the community to embrace the same attitude in how they approach preparing themselves for a wildfire event,” explained Williamson. “It goes beyond having a go bag and an evacuation plan. Creating defensible space that includes maintaining good clearance on your driveway for emergency vehicle access is an important piece to that puzzle to protect your home from wildfire.”

 

Learn more about how to create defensible space and other prevention measures around your home at: https://keeporegongreen.org/prevent-wildfires/at-home/

 

Benton County is an Equal Opportunity-Affirmative Action employer and does not discriminate on the basis of disability in admission or access to our programs, services, activities, hiring and employment practices. This document is available in alternative formats and languages upon request. Please call Cory Grogan at 541-745-4468 or email pioinfo@co.benton.or.us

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2022-08/4171/156612/benton-county-logo-horizontal-full-color-cmyk.jpg , 2022-08/4171/156612/Lawnmower.png , 2022-08/4171/156612/14561_KOG_Smoking.png , 2022-08/4171/156612/14561_KOG_Defensible.png , 2022-08/4171/156612/14561_KOG_Debris.png

Oregon Community Foundation Issues $8.7 Million in Community Grants to 371 Nonprofits, Prioritizing Historically Underserved Communities (Photo)
Oregon Community Foundation - 08/09/22 9:40 AM
United Way of Southwestern Oregon_1_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation.jpg
United Way of Southwestern Oregon_1_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation.jpg
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Oregon Community Foundation Issues $8.7 Million in Community Grants to 371 Nonprofits, Prioritizing Historically Underserved Communities

OCF donors step up with $2.4 million to help meet recovery needs

Portland, Ore. – August 9, 2022 – Oregon Community Foundation (OCF) announced today it is awarding over $8.7 million in new community grants including $2.4 million in donor funds to directly support community grant requests from 371 nonprofit organizations throughout the state. Prioritized grants are being issued to community organizations serving disproportionately impacted communities in Oregon, including communities of color and under-resourced rural communities. The awards will benefit communities and neighbors living in all 36 Oregon counties.

 

“Due to significant demand, it was clear that we would not be able to fund every critical funding request from the Community Grants program alone. Donors from every part of our state stepped forward to help close the gap of ongoing needs of communities” said Kirsten Kilchenstein, Chief Philanthropy Officer, Oregon Community Foundation. “The generosity of OCF donors clearly signals that they want their communities to thrive. This level of collaborative and responsive grantmaking affirms that we can do so much more for Oregon when we work together.” 

 

“There is so much unmet need in the Santiam Canyon and surrounding community that has escalated after the wildfires, COVID and with increasing inflation,” said Lee Wipper, who advises on OCF grantmaking from the Doris J. Wipper Fund, established through her late mother’s estate plan. “It's humbling and a privilege to support these requests, and I love the idea of different funds joining forces to fulfill the grants.”

 

“Many of our youth are struggling to grow up in an ever changing and, at times, chaotic world,” said donor Kathie Eckman of Bend, Oregon. “Joining resources with Oregon Community Foundation from our family's donor advised funds was a given for us along with our deep appreciation and support for the Boys & Girls Clubs of Bend with their youth and community focus.” 

 

Historic Volume of Community Grant Requests in 2022 Reflects Depth of Need

OCF’s Community Grants Program received an historic 960 applications representing $24.5 million in requests from Oregon nonprofits in 2022. The volume of applicants reveals the ongoing needs of communities recovering from past crises in Oregon and struggling to meet ongoing needs. “OCF’s 2022 Community Grant recipients reflect the responsive nature of a diverse base of nonprofits from every part of the state,” said John Chang, Senior Program Officer, Oregon Community Foundation, Oregon. 

“We recognize the significant role nonprofits have in meeting ongoing and emerging needs in Oregon. Their deep roots in the communities they serve is critical, especially during this recovery period.”

 

OCF maintained a strong commitment to supporting historically underserved populations and awarded 61% of the grants to smaller, nimble nonprofits meeting key community needs. Selected grantees include nonprofits providing arts, cultural and educational programs, and those focused on equity, health, housing and human services. 

 

Following is a small sampling of some of the 371 organizations in Oregon receiving 2022 Community Grants and donor funding from OCF. [A complete list of all 371 of the 2022 Community Grant recipients, organized by region, can be found in OCF’s online Press Room.]

 

Boys & Girls Club of Warm Springs, $20,000 OCF Community Grant

(Via Boys & Girls Clubs of Snohomish County

To expand the Healthy Kids Initiative to Native youth attending the Warm Springs Boys & Girls Club.

“Warm Springs youth are vibrant, strong and deserving of the same opportunities that other communities can access,” said Bill Tsoukalas, Executive Director, Boys & Girls Clubs of Snohomish County. “Support from Oregon Community Foundation allows us to provide enhanced services to the youth of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs completely free of charge, while implementing crucial academic success, STEM and healthy lifestyles programming.”

 

Bohemia Food Hub, $28,000 OCF Community Grant 

To install safety upgrades on kitchen equipment, translate kitchen materials, and provide a funding match for a food truck.

“Bohemia Food Hub has developed an ecosystem for entrepreneurs from under-served groups to explore food business ideas at low risk, with resources in place to support them,” said Kim Johnson, Owner. “Oregon Community Foundation’s Community Grant will allow us to further professionalize our infrastructure; install safety upgrades to donated equipment; and develop multilingual onboarding materials, kitchen manuals and equipment guides.”    

 

High Desert Partnership, $20,000 OCF Community Grant 

To support coordination and program development of the Youth Community Collaborative for Harney County and Burns Paiute youth.

“The Community Grant from Oregon Community Foundation will help support a full time, dedicated coordinator to grow High Desert Partnership’s youth programming opportunities in Harney County,” said Brenda Smith, Ph.D., Executive Director. “This funding will support more students in career level internships, more entrepreneur students paired with mentors and build a natural resource-based summer internship program to include Burns Paiute Tribe youth as well as non-tribal youth."

 

Josephine County Food Bank, $20,000 OCF Community Grant 

To support the Youth Internship Program, a new job training program that will enhance social mobility and prepare youth to be career ready.

“Josephine County Food Bank aims to mitigate impacts of poverty through the Youth Internship Project, which empowers youth through a work-ready internship for Josephine County youth experiencing social and economic inequalities,” said Kristin Smith, Farm Manager. “Our mission is to connect low-income youth to monitorships and skills training to spark harmony where we gather to cultivate strengths, laughter, healthy and a resilient community.”

 

United Way of Southwestern Oregon, $50,000 OCF Community Grant

To help establish a new family relief nursery for Coos County.

“Coos County has one of the highest rates of individuals entering the foster care system,” said Sara Stephens, Coastal Families Relief Nursery founder and board member. “We look forward to opening Coastal Families Relief Nursery to invest in upstream, evidence-based programs to support children and families. We couldn’t do it without support from area foundations and donors like Oregon Community Foundation.”

 

Complete List OCF’s 2022 Community Grant Recipients

A complete list of all 371 of the 2022 Community Grant recipients, organized by region, can be found in OCF’s online Press Room.

 

About Donor Funding through Oregon Community Foundation

Oregon Community Foundation manages more than 3,100 charitable funds, stewarding donor contributions toward investments in communities across the state. 

Donor co-funding of Community Grants in 2022 included $1.4 million in advised fund support and $1 million in unrestricted funds to the Oregon Community Recovery Fund.

 

About OCF’s Community Grants Evaluation Process and Program

For more than 20 years, OCF’s Community Grants program, with strong support of OCF donors, has invested in strengthening the social fabric of our communities by responding to emerging and pressing needs facing all Oregonians.

 

Local volunteers representing every region provide grant evaluation in partnership with OCF staff and Board, donating upwards of 5,000 hours of time to help their neighbors in need. This year, 152 volunteers generously donated time to OCF’s Community Grants evaluation process. 

 

To learn more about volunteering with OCF, please visit: Resources for Volunteers » Oregon Community Foundation (oregoncf.org).

 

About Oregon Community Foundation

Oregon Community Foundation (OCF) works with donors and volunteers to award grants and scholarships to every county in Oregon. From 2020 to 2021, OCF distributed more than $560 million, supporting more than 4,000 nonprofits and 6,000 students. With OCF, individuals, families, businesses, and organizations create charitable funds that meet the needs of diverse communities statewide. Since its founding in 1973, OCF has distributed more than $2 billion toward advancing its mission to improve lives for all Oregonians. For more information, please visit: oregoncf.org.

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Attached Media Files: OCF 2022 Complete Community Grants List.docx , OCF 2022 Community Grants FINAL News Release _08 09 2022 , United Way of Southwestern Oregon_1_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation.jpg , 2022 Josephine County Food Bank_Planting_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation.jpg , 2022 Josephine County Food Bank_Abby and Summer_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation.jpg , High Desert Partnership_Connor Githens Plectrum Music_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation.jpg , High Desert Partnership_Kaya Dobson_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation.jpg , 2022 Bohemia Food Hub_Tenants in Kitchen_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation.jpg , 2022 Bohemia Food Hub_New Spring 2022 Signage_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation.jpg , Boys & Girls Club of Warm Springs Outdoors_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation.jpg , Boys & Girls Club of Warm Springs Track_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation.jpeg , Boys & Girls Club of Warm Springs Circle Game_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation.JPG , OCF 2022 Community Grants infographic_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation

Fatal Crash Highway 138W -- Douglas County
Oregon State Police - 08/09/22 7:16 AM

On Monday August 8, 2022, at about 2:30 PM, Oregon State Police (OSP) Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Highway 138W near milepost 17A.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Honda Civic operated by, a female juvenile, age 17, from Oakland, was eastbound and failed to negotiate a curve.  The Honda Civic left the roadway and crashed into a tree. 

The female juvenile operator was pronounced deceased at the scene by emergency personnel. 

OSP was assisted by Sutherlin Police Department, Kellogg Fire Department, Umpqua Valley Ambulance, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office Medical Examiner and ODOT. 

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Mon. 08/08/22
OHA launches website to share updates on opioid settlement funds
Oregon Health Authority - 08/08/22 5:02 PM

August 8, 2022

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, Jonathan.N.Modie@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA launches website to share updates on opioid settlement funds

Users can get info on national settlement agreement sites, distribution of money for prevention, treatment, recovery effort

PORTLAND, Ore.—Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has launched a new website to share updates and information on opioid settlement funds, which will be used to support opioid prevention, treatment and recovery efforts around the state.

The Oregon Opioid Settlement Funds site, at www.oregon.gov/opioidsettlement, has background on the multi-state litigation against the pharmaceutical industry of which Oregon was a party and links to national settlement agreement sites. It also describes how the settlement funds will be distributed in Oregon, how much money is available and what it can be used for.

In addition, the site offerspeople the opportunity, if interested, toapply to serve on the Oregon Opioid Settlement Prevention, Treatment and Recovery Board, which will determine how the state uses its share of funds from the settlements with the opioid industry.

“These settlement funds will provide much-needed opportunities for cities and counties in Oregon to help their communities begin healing from the ravages caused by the pervasiveness of these drugs over the last decade,” said John McIlveen, Ph.D., state opioid treatment authority, OHA Health Systems Division. “We’re looking forward to working with our local partners to get these funds distributed as soon as they become available.”

The lawsuits hold opioid manufacturers, distributors and retailers accountable for their role in creating and fueling the opioid epidemic and for aggressively marketing prescription opioids while simultaneously downplaying their risks to health care providers and the public. The State of Oregon reached resolution with four of these companies in July 2021.

The resolution consists of two agreements and is referred to as the Distributor and Janssen Settlement Agreements.

The 18-member, governor-appointed Opioid Settlement Prevention, Treatment and Recovery (OSPTR) Board will be responsible for making funding decisions that align with approved opioid prevention, treatment and recovery strategies listed in Exhibit E of the settlement and Oregon's Strategic Plan for Substance Use Services developed by the state Alcohol & Drug Policy Commission (ADPC). A portion of the state’s funds must go toward a unified and evidence-based state system for collecting, analyzing and publishing data about the availability and efficacy of substance use prevention, treatment and recovery services statewide.

The governor will appoint the board based on the OSPTR Board membership requirements defined in House Bill 4098. The OSPTR Board is expected to begin meeting in late fall 2022.

About $333 million will be awarded to Oregon from the Distributor and Janssen Settlement Agreements over the course of 18 years, beginning this year. Forty-five percent of the opioid settlement funds will be allocated to a new Opioid Settlement Prevention, Treatment & Recovery fund managed by OHA; 55% will be paid directly to cities and counties with populations of more than 10,000.

About $503 million is going directly to tribes from the Distributor and Janssen Settlement Agreements. All federally recognized tribes are eligible to participate in the Tribal Opioid Settlements, regardless of whether that tribe filed an opioid lawsuit. Oregon’s tribes are eligible to receive a portion of the $503 million settlement.

Oregon followed the model developed through the national opioid settlement to determine how much funding each eligible city and county would receive. This allocation formula is based on population and public health metrics.

Oregon anticipates receiving additional opioid settlement funds from other lawsuits. However, the timing, amount and allowable uses of these funds have yet to be determined. Generally speaking, the funds must be used for opioid prevention, treatment and recovery strategies that are listed in the settlement. They may not be used for other purposes.

Cities and counties will decide how their funds are used.

Oregon drug overdose deaths more than doubled between 2019 and 2021, an alarming trend driven largely by misuse of the powerful synthetic opioid fentanyl, an OHA analysis found. Preliminary data indicate this trend continued in 2022.

A review of State Unintentional Drug Overdose Reporting System (SUDORS) and Oregon death certificate data by analysts from OHA’s Injury and Violence Prevention Section found that unintentional/undetermined drug overdose deaths increased from 496 in 2019 to 1,072 in 2021. The 2021 figure doesn’t include all fourth-quarter overdose deaths, which are still being tallied and analyzed.

The number of unintentional/undetermined fentanyl overdose deaths jumped more than 600% between 2019 and 2021, from 71 to 509, respectively.

Of all unintentional/undetermined drug overdose deaths in 2021, 47.5% were due to fentanyl; in 2020, fentanyl caused 32.1% of overdose deaths; in 2019, the drug was responsible for 14.3% of overdoses.

Overall, unintentional/undetermined overdoses from opioids, including fentanyl and heroin, also rose sharply during that time, from 280 to 739 deaths – a 164% increase. Unintentional/undetermined stimulant – methamphetamine – overdoses doubled, from 325 to 658 deaths between 2019 to 2021.

The Oregon Department of Justice provides additional information on the settlement here.


Midnight shooting incident leaves two wounded and one teen arrested
Salem Police Department - 08/08/22 4:59 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

DATE: August 8, 2022

 

Midnight shooting incident leaves two wounded and one teen arrested

 

Salem, Ore. — Salem Police detectives have arrested a 17-year-old, male juvenile in a shooting incident which occurred today in the 3300 block of D Street NE.

Just after 12:00 a.m., August 8, 2022, patrol officers responded to the report of a shooting at an apartment complex. Arriving officers located a 24-year-old woman and a 17-year-old girl with gunshot wounds. The two victims were treated by paramedics at the scene, and subsequently transported to Salem Health with non-life-threatening injuries.

Witnesses provided suspect descriptions of two teens involved in the incident which helped officers who scoured the area in search. Officers located two male juveniles who matched the descriptions given nearby.

Salem Police detectives investigating the case arrested one of the juveniles detained who was then lodged at the Marion County Juvenile Detention Center on the following charges:

  • Attempted murder, two counts
  • Assault, two counts
  • Unlawful use of a weapon

The Salem Police Department does not release the names of minors involved in criminal investigations.

All further inquiries on this case should be directed to the Marion County District Attorney’s Office.

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08-08-22 Commissioners Issue Proclamations for National Coast Guard Day and National Lighthouse Week (Photo)
Douglas Co. Government - 08/08/22 4:50 PM
Lighthouse Collage
Lighthouse Collage
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

August 8, 2022

 

Commissioners Issue Proclamations for National Coast

Guard Day and National Lighthouse Week

 

            (Douglas County, Ore.) Douglas County Commissioners Tim Freeman and Tom Kress were on location in Winchester Bay, Oregon on Friday, August 5, 2022 for a special presentation for National Coast Guard Day and National Lighthouse Week.  They issued proclamations and called upon all citizens of Douglas County to observe National Coast Guard Day and National Lighthouse Week in Douglas County.  A copy of the live video presentation can be found on the Douglas County Government Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/DouglasCountyeGovernment.

 

Commissioners recognized the brave men and women of our U.S. Coast Guard who protect the personal safety and security of our people; the marine transportation system and infrastructure; our natural and economic resources; the territorial integrity of our nation–from both internal and external threats, natural and man-made and the interests of our navigable waters including U.S. ports, inland waterways, coastlines and international waters.  Commissioner Kress presented National Coast Guard Day proclamation certificates to both the U.S. Coast Guard Sector North Bend and the U.S. Coast Guard Station Umpqua River.  Guests at the presentation were treated to a special ‘flyby’ from a MH-65 Short Range Coast Guard Recovery Helicopter that was on a training mission from Sector North Bend.  Both Coast Guard locations noted that they are actively searching for new recruits to join the U.S. Coast Guard.  If you are interested in learning more about a career in the U.S. Coast Guard and perhaps a tour of the facilities, contact Station Umpqua River at (541) 271-2138 or Sector North Bend at (541) 756-9220.

 

In attendance representing the U.S. Coast Guard were: U.S. Coast Guard Sector North Bend: Maegan Schwartz, Deputy Commander; Dashen Wada, Fireman; Nate Champlin, Lieutenant Commander; Pete Chambers, Lieutenant; Christopher Belisle, Aviation Survival Technician Petty Officer First Class; Connor Haymaker, Aviation Electronics Technician’s Mate Third Class Petty Officer; Weston Blalock, Seaman; Christopher Kofflin, Seaman.  U.S. Coast Guard Station Umpqua River: Officer-in-Charge Benjamin Snider, Senior Chief Boatswain’s Mate; Christopher Ouellette, Chief Boatswain’s Mate; Matthew Neff, Machinery Technician Chief Petty Officer; Jonathan Corcoran, Boatswain’s Mate First Class Petty Officer; Chayse Sattler, Petty Officer Second Class; Robert Duprau, Petty Officer Second Class; Trevor Dupuis, Petty Officer Third Class; Michael Lane, Boatswain’s Mate Second Class Petty Officer; Grayson Ritchey, Seaman; Brody Jeeseman, Seaman.

 

Commissioners also recognized National Lighthouse Week.  The Umpqua River Lighthouse and corresponding lighthouse grounds stand as a testament to the commitment of our community members, museum employees, foundation members and volunteers, who have all worked painstakingly and passionately over the years to preserve our lighthouse and coastal history.  Commissioner Kress presented National Lighthouse Week proclamation certificates to the staff, volunteers and foundation members that work tirelessly to keep our Umpqua River Lighthouse, Coastal History Museum, Gift Shop & Café, Art Gallery and Whale Watching Station open and beautiful. 

 

In attendance representing the Umpqua River Lighthouse were: Jamie Davis, Museum Director; Eric Winslow, Museum Operations Technician; David Marshall, Gift Shop Assistant; Douglas County Foundation Members: Carol Phillips, Leslie Sherman, Dale Greenley and Mary Becherer; Former Douglas County Commissioner Doug Robertson and much appreciated volunteers Terry Allen, Shelly Allen and Curtis Scrugham.

 

I want to extend my appreciation to the members of our U.S. Coast Guard in North Bend and Umpqua River for everything you do and for allowing us to celebrate you. The flyover was fantastic!” commented Commissioner Freeman.  “Also, to the Museum Foundation, Staff and Volunteers here at the Umpqua River Lighthouse and Coastal History Museum, thank you.  What an amazing facility we have here in Winchester Bay!  The investments and progress we have made in the last several years at our Lighthouse, Museum and in our coastal communities has been remarkable. I look forward to many more exciting things happening over here in the future.”

 

The proclamations presented on Friday are a reminder to our residents to thank our U.S. Coast Guard men and women for their valued service to our country and our citizens, and to ask that you check out our “gem” on the coast, our Umpqua River Lighthouse, Coastal History Museum, Gift Shop & Café, Art Gallery and Whale Watching Station in Winchester Bay.

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Media Contact:     Tamara Howell, Douglas County Emergency Communications & Community Engagement Specialist, Douglas County Public Affairs Office | Office: (541) 957-4896 | Cell: (541) 670-2804 | Email: tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us

(Proclamations and Photo Collages Attached.  Individual photos available upon request)

Douglas County Proclamation Project

Douglas County Commissioners, Tim Freeman, Chris Boice and Tom Kress recognized that the pandemic traumatized our country, state and county on so many levels.  The impact was not only felt physically, but also mentally, emotionally and financially. The Commissioners collectively decided to start this series of ‘kudos’ proclamations, and are dedicated to recognizing people that have continued to do good things in our community despite the challenges of the past two years.   They plan to continue to highlight the amazing, often selfless work being done in order to encourage our residents to do the same.  The incredible stories being told during our proclamation events shine a huge spotlight on the amazing people and organizations in Douglas County.  We want to focus on what really matters, our people. So far this year, the Commissioners have issued 25 proclamations and honored over 725 Douglas County individuals as a part of our Proclamation Project.  They hope you will join them in supporting, thanking and perhaps volunteering to help these wonderful individuals and service organizations, so we can come together to rekindle and restore our sense of community, our faith in others and the joy that makes Douglas County the best place to live, work and play. 




Attached Media Files: Lighthouse Collage , Coast Guard Collage , Lighthouse Proc , Coast Guard Proc

Missing child alert -- Davin Moore is missing and is believed to be in danger (Photo)
Oregon Department of Human Services - 08/08/22 4:28 PM
Davin Moore
Davin Moore
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/973/156602/thumb_Davin_Moore.jpg

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division, asks the public to help find Davin Moore, age 14, a child in foster care who went missing from Hermiston, Oregon on Aug. 5. He is believed to be in danger.

ODHS asks the public for help in the effort to find Davin and to contact 911 or local law enforcement if they believe they see him.

Davin is suspected to be in the Oregon cities of Pendleton, La Grande or Richland. 

Name: Davin Moore
Pronouns: He/him
Date of birth: April 22, 2008
Height: 5-foot-6
Weight: 229 pound
Hair: Brown
Eye color: Brown 
Hermiston Police Department Case #22-1712
Pendleton Police Department Case #22-2082
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children # 1457596

Sometimes when a child is missing they may be in significant danger and ODHS may need to locate them to assess and support their safety. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and assess their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. 

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Attached Media Files: Davin Moore

Oregón supera la meta de ayudar a financiar 1,000 viviendas permanentes con servicios de apoyo para personas sin hogar
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 08/08/22 2:44 PM

8 de agosto de 2022

 

Contacto para medios de comunicación: 

Delia Hernández                                                   

equests@hcs.oregon.gov">HCS.mediarequests@hcs.oregon.gov 

 

Oregón supera la meta de ayudar a financiar 1,000 viviendas permanentes con servicios de apoyo para personas sin hogar

SALEM, Ore. – El Departamento de Vivienda y Servicios Comunitarios (OHCS, por sus siglas en inglés) anuncio que superó la meta del Plan Estatal de Vivienda de 20192023 de ayudar a pagar por la construcción de 1,000 viviendas permanentes con servicios de apoyo (PSH, por sus siglas en inglés). El Concilio para la Estabilización de Vivienda de Oregón aprobó la semana pasada financiación para la construcción de unas 250 viviendas con servicios de apoyo lo que ayudo a la agencia a superar su meta un año antes de la fecha fijada. Hasta el momento, OHCS se ha comprometido a ayudar a pagar la creación de un total de 1,255 viviendas PSH. 

“Lograr este objetivo es la manifestación de un esfuerzo colectivo entre la gobernadora, la Legislatura de Oregón, socios comunitarios, Naciones Tribales, agencias federales, estatales y locales, desarrolladores de vivienda, negocios y comunidades locales”, dijo la directora de OHCS Andrea Bell. “No aceptamos la falta de hogar como un hecho de la vida. Invertir en soluciones humanas y dignas que sabemos funcionan es lo que las personas de Oregón se merecen y a la vez ahorramos dinero de los fondos públicos. Estoy orgullosa de lo que hemos logrado. Al avanzar hacia adelante, estamos dispuestos a construir y avanzar soluciones juntos”. 

La vivienda permanente con servicios de apoyo es un modelo que se ha comprobado funciona para apoyar a individuos y familias carentes de hogar. Este tipo de vivienda es una estrategia reconocida nacionalmente para afrontar la falta de vivienda crónica, la cual provee vivienda profundamente asequible y permanente con servicios extensivos para albergar a personas independientemente de las barreras que enfrenten.  

Alder House, localizada en el centro de Portland, es un ejemplo de vivienda permanente con servicios de apoyo en Oregón. Alder House provee 130 departamentos a individuos con ingresos bajos, con 30 departamentos designados como vivienda permanente con servicios de apoyo. Todos los hogares reciben servicios para ayudar a construir el sentido de comunidad y mejorar la estabilidad de los residentes, además de que los 30 hogares PSH reciben administración intensiva de casos. Alder House tiene una sala comunitaria donde residentes pueden organizar eventos y convivir con sus vecinos.  

Alder House está cerca de varias opciones de transporte y supermercados, para que las personas tengan acceso a las necesidades básicas. Con un enfoque principal en facilitar el acceso a la vivienda, Alder House ayuda a las personas a conectarse con los recursos que necesitan para permanecer en sus hogares y prosperar en sus comunidades.  

Los esfuerzos para construir más viviendas permanentes con servicios de apoyo en Oregón continúan dada la magnitud de la necesidad de vivienda en el estado. Actualmente, hay nueve proyectos PSH en Oregón participando en el Instituto de OHCS para Vivienda con Servicios de Apoyo de 2022. La agencia continuará trabajando junto a la comunidad para encontrar soluciones innovadoras y orientadas en la equidad con la meta de ayudar a familias que carecen de vivienda. Para más información sobre este trabajo, visite el sitio de internet de OHCS.  




Attached Media Files: PSH PR

All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group to meet August 17
Oregon Health Authority - 08/08/22 1:59 PM

August 8, 2022

Contact: Liz Gharst, 971-666-2476, eth.a.gharst@dhsoha.state.or.us">elizabeth.a.gharst@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Brian Toups, 503-385-6542, rian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us">brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group to meet August 17

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group.

When: August 17, 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

Where: By webinar and conference line only. The public may join remotely through a webinar and conference line:

  • Join the webinar at

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1605687795?pwd=M2xPWmlicTlZZHNaVTQ1aERTZEFWQT09

  • Conference line: 669-254-5252, Meeting ID: 160 568 7795, Password: 183443.

Agenda: Attendance for those attending by phone only; Meeting opening; Public comment; General updates; Status of 2022-23 rule changes and timeline; System updates; Follow up on race/ethnicity data in APAC; Future topics; adjourn

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/All-Payer-All-Claims-TAG.aspx.  

# # #

For people who speak a language other than English or people with disabilities we can provide free help.

Some examples are:

  • spoken language interpreters,
  • sign language interpreters,
  • CART captioning,
  • braille,
  • large print,
  • transcripts,
  • virtual platform change.

If you need help with these services or other related services please contact Brian Toups, 503-385-6542 (voice/text), rian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us">brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 business hours before the meeting. All relay calls are accepted. To best ensure our ability to provide an accommodation please contact us even if you are only considering attending the meeting. The earlier you make a request the more likely we can meet the need.


Benton County Sheriff's Office Rescues Mountain Biker off Mary's Peak (Photo)
Benton Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/08/22 1:09 PM
2022-08/1505/156592/Marys_Peak_Trail_Map.jpg
2022-08/1505/156592/Marys_Peak_Trail_Map.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/1505/156592/thumb_Marys_Peak_Trail_Map.jpg

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Over the weekend Benton County Sheriff’s Office Search and Rescue (SAR) rescued a 21-year-old mountain biker off Mary’s Peak.

On August 6, 2022, at around 6:00 p.m., two local mountain bikers were on top of Mary’s Peak, attempting to ride the East Ridge trail to Conner’s Camp parking lot. About a half mile down, one biker got a flat front tire. The other cyclist decided to ride to Conner’s Camp to get a tube and a tire pump. When he returned to fix the flat, he did not locate his friend.  All trails except the North Ridge trail were searched prior to SAR activation.

The reporting party called the Benton County Sheriff’s Office (BCSO) at 8:06 p.m. when he was unable to locate his friend and was about to get dark. 

SAR was called out and multiple members arrived at Conner’s Camp at 11:30 p.m. to start a search for the missing biker, described as a 6’2” male, who was without water, food, phone, or extra clothing.

Two of the SAR members went to the top of the North Ridge trail and rode their bikes down. At 12:40 a.m. they had voice contact with the biker and located him halfway to Woods Creek Road. Shortly after, he was located and assisted to the end of the trail at 1:30 a.m. After a quick medical evaluation, he was determined to be uninjured but dehydrated.

“I’d like to thank our SAR volunteers for their continued dedication to our community,” stated Sheriff Van Arsdall. “24/7, 365, these men and women are here to aid in searches by air, ground, water, and now by bike as well.”

SAR is a non-profit volunteer unit for BCSO. All SAR-certified members not only search for missing or lost people but also assist with evidence searches and disaster response as well. If you are interested in volunteering with one of the six Benton County Search and Rescue units, go to https://www.co.benton.or.us/sheriff/page/search-rescue for more information.

XXX




Attached Media Files: 2022-08/1505/156592/Marys_Peak_Trail_Map.jpg

Linn County Sheriff's Office Investigates Child Exploitation Case that Leads to 35 Year Sentence (Photo)
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 08/08/22 1:06 PM
John DiMolfetto
John DiMolfetto
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/2993/156591/thumb_DiMolfetto_(002).jpg

Linn County Sheriff Michelle Duncan reports that on August 8, 2022, John Anthony DiMolfetto, 39, of Gates, was sentenced to 1,027 months in prison related to an online child exploitation investigation which was reported to the Linn County Sheriff’s Office in April of 2020.  The investigation revealed John DiMolfetto created dozens of personas and used numerous social media and texting accounts to manipulate, deceive, and exploit children as young as 7-years-old over a span of nearly a decade. 

Investigators believe John DiMolfetto either exploited or attempted to exploit over 300 children across the United States in the six months prior to his arrest.  Some of the child victims were known by John DiMolfetto and others were children he met on the internet.  John DiMolfetto was arrested on May 13, 2020, after detectives of the Linn County Sheriff’s Office served a search warrant at his residence in Gates, Linn County, Oregon.     

John DiMolfetto was found guilty of 23 counts involving the online sexual exploitation of children on August 3, 2022, following a bench trial.  Some of the charges incurred sentences that will be served concurrently (at the same time).  However, ultimately John DiMolfetto will spend 35 years and 10 months in prison with no time reduction. 

John DiMolfetto has been lodged at the Linn County Jail since the date of his arrest.

 

 

Updated Aug. 8, 2022 at 1:05 p.m. with DiMolfetto's photograph.




Attached Media Files: John DiMolfetto

The Great Resignation
Oregon Values and Beliefs Center - 08/08/22 12:42 PM

From July 8–16, 2022, the Oregon Values and Beliefs Center conducted a statewide survey to determine whether and how the COVID-19 pandemic changed Oregonian’s work lives and ask about the great resignation. The question numbers in this document correspond with the survey questionnaire (Q14–24). 

First Off, How Many People Have Worked Over the Last Two Years?

https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/Have-you-worked-for-pay-over-the-last-two-years-300x300.png 300w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/Have-you-worked-for-pay-over-the-last-two-years-150x150.png 150w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/Have-you-worked-for-pay-over-the-last-two-years-512x512.png 512w" sizes="100vw" width="600">

About two out of every three Oregonians over the age of 18 worked for pay over the last two years (65%) (Q14). 

Men are more likely than women to have worked at some point during the past two years by a small, but statistically significant, margin (68% to 61%). 

Most People Experienced a Job-Related Change in Their Life

https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/Response-category-2-300x225.png 300w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/Response-category-2-768x576.png 768w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/Response-category-2.png 1200w" sizes="100vw" width="1024">The pandemic brought seismic changes for many Oregon workers—but for others, there were no changes at all. A plurality of workers say nothing has changed in the past two years (38%) (Q15). 

Men are more likely than women to say nothing has changed in their workplace as a result of the pandemic (44% compared to 31%). Workers with higher annual incomes have experienced fewer pandemic-related changes than those making less than $50,000 per year (39%-42% compared to 33% of those who make less than $50,000).

Has Covid-19 Created More Remote Work Environments?

Since the beginning of the pandemic, one in five Oregon workers has stopped going to an office every day and has instead become a remote or hybrid worker (20%), but the benefits of working from home were not shared across all groups (Q15).

34% of six-figure workers switched to a home office situation, compared with 13–18% of workers at lower income levels (less than $100K per year).  Those with college degrees were much more likely to have moved work to their homes than those with less formal education (34% compared to 16% of those with just some college and 8% of those with a high school education or less).

Unemployment Benefits

One in four workers with household incomes of $50,000 or less had to go on unemployment at some point between 2020 and today (26%) (Q15). 

The lowest income workers were most likely to have reported filing for unemployment, but between 9–15% of Oregon workers in all other income groups say they filed, too. One in five women (21%) accessed unemployment benefits sometime during the past two years, a bit more than men (15%). 

Do Oregonians Prefer a Remote Work Environment?

Today, workers are a bit more likely to have the option of working remotely, at least sometimes, than they are to report to an office or facility every day (40%, 37%) (Q20). 

Workers who work remotely at least sometimes are split fairly evenly: 22% work exclusively from home and 18% work in a hybrid model. High school graduates and those with some college education are most likely to report to work each day in person (43–44%), while just 24% of college grads do the same. 

https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/July-2022-Q21-2-300x300.png 300w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/July-2022-Q21-2-150x150.png 150w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/July-2022-Q21-2-512x512.png 512w" sizes="100vw" width="600">

Twice as many Oregonians would like the option of working from home or an office than currently have the option of a hybrid work environment (41%, 18%) (Q21, Q20). 

While residents would prefer to work exclusively from home more than coming into work each day (26% to 19%), they are even more likely to prefer a hybrid environment (41%). Half of college graduates want the option of choosing whether to go to an office or stay home (54% compared to 33–37% for other educational levels). 

One in Four Oregonians Joined “The Great Resignation”

https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/Have-you-quit-a-job-over-the-last-2-years-300x300.png 300w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/Have-you-quit-a-job-over-the-last-2-years-150x150.png 150w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/Have-you-quit-a-job-over-the-last-2-years-512x512.png 512w" sizes="100vw" width="600">

One in four Oregon workers joined The Great Resignation by quitting a job (28%) (Q16). 

Some of these Oregon workers decided to become self-employed (12%), became a stay-at-home parent (5%), or chose to retire early (4%) (Q15). 

Self-employment—perhaps via the gig economy—was an especially notable choice for lower-income Oregonians (18% compared to 5-9% for those who make more than $50,000 a year). 

 

The most common reasons for resignation include that Oregonians felt disrespected and underpaid (43%, 41%) (Q17). Workers say disrespect is worse than low pay, and Oregonians are more likely to have quit over it than Americans broadly, per a Pew survey from February 2022data://8BDF1DB8-3878-4914-89CA-F225E007CA7C#_ftn1">[1] (43% to 35%). 

Oregonians are also more likely than other Americans to quit over low pay1 (41%, 37%). 

Oregonians are less likely than the national average to have quit their job due to dissatisfaction with benefits, with 15% saying they quit because benefits like health insurance and paid time off weren’t good, compared to 23% of Americans1.

“Our town hasn’t been able to fill positions for a pharmacist, anesthesiologist, teachers, and domestic violence shelter executive director due to lack of housing (housing turned into tourist rentals).”

Woman, age 30–44, Curry County, white

“Prejudices against people with prior felony convictions prevents so many from finding work, not enough access to affordable childcare, irregular shifts that interfere with family life, lack of transportation.”

Woman, age 65–74, Wallowa County, white

Why Did Some Oregonians Lose Their Job?

Additionally, 21% of workers lost their job during the pandemic (Q18). 

Nearly one-third of workers with a high school education lost a job (30%), double the number of college grads who lost a job (15%). Four times as many low-income residents lost their jobs compared to those who make $100,000 or more a year (31%, 7%). 

Four in ten employees lost their jobs due to a lack of work, or the business folding entirely (43%). Notably, three in ten workers say their job loss stemmed from physical or mental health issues (30%) (Q19). 

Lower-wage workers with household incomes of $50,000 per year or less were among the most likely to say that their employer went out of business (25%, compared to 11–14% for other income groups). 

“It’s being falsely represented that employers are having a hard time finding willing workers. I have applied to a lot of jobs [since] I lost my job, and it was hard to get even one interview when I have plenty of work history. They’re turning away so many applicants without a second look at us.”

Woman, age 18-29, Washington County, Native American/American Indian/Alaska Native and white

Women Favor Working From Home

Nearly half of Oregon residents—working or not—say that the option to work from home would determine whether they accepted a job (44%) (Q22). This is especially true for women (49%), more so than men (38%). There is no difference between different income levels as to whether a work from home option would determine their acceptance. 

“The Great Resignation” is the Product of High Cost of Living

Oregonians say The Great Resignation and the low-wage worker shortage is the product of a high cost of living, not people living off government benefits (60% to 34%) (Q23). 

“If the pay matches the expense of living, more people would be looking for jobs.”

Woman, age 18-29, Multnomah County, Black or African American

“Partly due to high cost of living but also due to family obligations (caretaking), stressful working conditions of many low-wage jobs, and thoughts of entitlement.”

Man, age 65-74, Benton County, Asian

“Benefits and wages aren’t keeping up with inflation and supply chain issues.”

Man, age 30-44, Multnomah County, Asian

“If employers were willing to raise wages to a living level, people would jump at the chance to get those jobs. Since they have a bit of a cushion now, people looking for work can afford to be slightly pickier rather than desperate.”

Woman, age 30-44, Deschutes County, white

“I’m one of them. I wish I knew where these people are getting all this money to live off of. [Maybe] Mitch McConnell can tell me. Our only income is my husband’s $728.00 per month.”

Woman, age 55–64, Marion County, Asian and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander

“I believe people have realized they deserve better as well.”

Woman, age 30–44, Coos County, white

“In addition to young people not wanting to work in low wage jobs, I believe quite a few believe that it is beneath their perceived status to work in a minimum wage job.”

Woman, age 65–74, Multnomah County, white

“People want a free ride off the backs of others. Those on fixed income should get stimulus but don’t.”

Woman, age 45–54, Deschutes County, white

Demographic Trends

Identifying what unites us. Understanding what divides us.

Reported below are statistically significant subgroup differences between BIPOC and white Oregonians, urban and rural Oregonians, and age groups.  Many of these differences are not major and are presented to inform public education and communications initiatives.  

  • BIPOC Oregonians are more likely than white residents to have been employed in the past two years (72% to 63%) (Q14). 
    • BIPOC workers were equally likely to experience changes (or not) in their workplace over the last two years. For example, one in five workers in each demographic group shifted to remote or hybrid work (19% and 20%) (Q15).
  • Given the option, BIPOC Oregonians have a stronger preference for an all-at-home work model than white Oregonians (31%, 24%) (Q21). 

These findings mirror those from some companies’ internal workplace surveys[2]. Several publications have addressed the issue as well, investigating the link between discrimination and microaggressions in the workplace and the desire to return in-person. 

  • In rural Oregon, fewer people have worked within the past two years (55%), due in large part to a higher percentage of senior residents in rural areas (Q14). Of those who are still in the workforce, rural residents are less likely to have experienced changes over the past two years.
    • 43% of rural workers say nothing in their job has changed as a result of the pandemic, compared to 28% of urban workers (Q15).
    • Rural workers are about as likely to have quit a job since 2020 as urban and suburban workers (25–31%) (Q16).
  • Rural workers were less likely to shift to working remotely, whether in the same job or in a new one (Q15). 
    • The shift to remote work affected one in four residents in urban areas, but just one in ten in rural parts of Oregon (26% to 10%) (Q15).
    • Urban residents are also more likely than rural residents to have started a new job in order to work remotely, although not by a significant margin (12% urban, 7% rural) (Q15).
    • Nearly one in three urban residents works from home 100% of the time (30%), compared to just 18% of rural workers (Q20).
  • Rural workers are about as likely to have quit a job since 2020 as urban and suburban workers (25–31%) (Q16). 
    • Unlike their suburban and rural-changing-to-suburban counterparts, the most common reason urban and rural residents quit their jobs is low pay (urban: 42%; rural: 38%), followed by the top statewide reason: feeling disrespected as work (urban: 39%; rural: 37%) (Q17).
  • A majority of Oregonians from all types of communities believe that a skyrocketing cost of living is more to blame for a shortage of workers than a glut of government benefits keeping people at home. In rural areas, a scant majority of residents take that view (Q23). 
    • Exactly 50% of Oregonians in rural areas say people simply can’t afford low-wage work these days, a view shared by 72% of urban residents.
  • Workers are, of course, more likely to be people aged 18–64, and labor participation declines steadily with age. For those 18–29, about 83% were employed in the last two years; for those 65–74, 40% were employed. Fewer than one in five seniors over the age of 75 worked for pay in the past two years (19%). 
  • Half of workers under the age of 30 quit a job in the past two years, along with more than one-quarter of workers 30–44 (48%, 29%) (Q16). 
    • Between 0–21% of other age groups quit a job in the past two years, with numbers falling steadily as age groups rise. 
    • Low pay is an especially significant factor for young Oregonians just entering the workforce. For those under 30, more than half quit in favor of more financially sustaining opportunities (53%) (Q17). 
    • Additionally, more than one in four workers under 45 lost a job over the same period (27-28%) (Q18).
  • Oregonians under 30 have strong opinions on the labor shortage. Two-thirds say it is more accurate to blame the high cost of living, including rising rents (66%) (Q23). 
    • While some might believe these young residents are slacking off and simply not working hard enough, it is worth noting this same demographic group quit their jobs in search of higher income (53%) and demonstrate an entrepreneurial spirit by becoming self-employed (16%) (Q17, Q15).  
  • About two out of every three Oregonians over the age of 18 worked for pay over the last two years (65%) (Q14). 
    • Workers are, of course, more likely to be people aged 18–64, and labor participation declines steadily with age. For those 18–29, about 83% were employed in the last two years; for those 65–74, 40% were employed. Fewer than one in five seniors over the age of 75 worked for pay in the past two years (19%). 

Methodology: The online survey consisted of 1,572 Oregon residents ages 18+ and took approximately 15 minutes to complete. Respondents were contacted by using professionally maintained online panels. In gathering responses, a variety of quality control measures were employed, including questionnaire pre-testing, validation, and real-time monitoring of responses. To ensure a representative sample, demographic quotas were set, and data weighted by area of the state, gender, age, and education.

Statement of Limitations: Based on a 95% confidence interval, this survey’s margin of error for the full sample ±2.47%. Due to rounding or multiple answer questions, response percentages may not add up to 100%.

This survey uses aggregated data to analyze the opinions of BIPOC residents in comparison to the opinions of residents who identify as white and not another race. BIPOC residents are not a monolith; the grouping represents a wide diversity of races and ethnicities. The findings included in this memo should not be construed such that all people of color are believed to share the same opinions. Disaggregated race data will be provided when sample sizes permit reliability.




Attached Media Files: OVBC July 2022 Crosstabs , OVBC July 2022 Annotated Questionnaire

Traffic Enforcement Patrols
Roseburg Police Dept. - 08/08/22 12:23 PM

During July through September the Roseburg Police Department will have some extra patrols out working traffic enforcement, with a specific focus on safety belt use, distracted driving and speeding.  These focused patrols are made available due to grants received from Oregon Impact and the Oregon Department of Transportation.

In 2017 alone, seat belts saved an estimated 14,955 lives and could have saved an additional 2,549 people if they had been wearing seat belts. 

Seat belts have been proven to be one of the best ways to save your life in a crash. Yet many still don’t buckle up. Worse still, not wearing a seat belt is a habit that will pass on to impressionable youth, who in turn will think it’s safe to not buckle up.

Distracted driving is one of the fastest growing safety issues on the roads today. Distracted drivers aren’t just a threat to themselves: they’re a danger to everyone else on the road. The national distracted driving effort focuses on ways to change the behavior of drivers through legislation, enforcement, public awareness, and education.


Oregon surpasses goal to fund 1,000 permanent homes with supportive services for people experiencing homelessness
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 08/08/22 11:45 AM

August 8, 2022

 

Media Contact: 

Delia Hernández                                                   

equests@hcs.oregon.gov">HCS.mediarequests@hcs.oregon.gov 

 

Oregon surpasses goal to fund 1,000 permanent homes with supportive services for people experiencing homelessness

SALEM, Ore. – Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS) announced it has exceeded the 20192023 Oregon Statewide Housing Plan goal to fund 1,000 units of permanent supportive housing (PSH). The Housing Stability Council approved last week funding for almost 250 PSH homes. OHCS has now committed to funding 1,255 PSH homes, which is a year ahead of the scheduled target date of 2023. 

“Achieving this goal is a manifestation of collective galvanizing of the governor, Oregon Legislature, community partners, Tribal Nations, federal, state and local agencies, developers, local businesses, and local communities,” said OHCS Director Andrea Bell. “We do not accept homelessness as a fact of life. Investing in humane, dignified solutions that we know are effective is what the people of Oregon deserve and optimizes public funds. I am proud of what we have accomplished together. As we continue pushing forward, we are eager to learn, build, and advance solutions together.” 

Permanent supportive housing is an evidence-based model for supporting people and households experiencing homelessness. PSH is a nationally recognized strategy to address chronic homelessness. It provides deeply affordable and permanent housing with wraparound services to house people regardless of barriers they may face. 

Alder House, located in the heart of downtown Portland, is one example of what permanent supportive housing looks like in Oregon. Alder House provides 130 apartments for individuals earning low incomes, with 30 apartments designated as permanent supportive housing (PSH). All households receive supportive resident services to help build community and improve housing stability, and the 30 PSH households also receive intensive case management services. Alder House features a community room in which residents can organize events and convene with neighbors. 

In addition, it is near various transportation and grocery options, so people have easy access to their basic everyday needs. With a housing first approach, Alder House helps people get connected with the resources they need to stay stable in their homes and thrive in their communities. 

The work to build more PSH developments in Oregon continues given the magnitude of Oregon’s housing needs. Currently, there are nine PSH projects throughout the state participating in the 2022 OHCS Supportive Housing Institute. Moving forward, OHCS will continue to work alongside community and partners to find innovative and equity-centered solutions to help families who are experiencing homelessness. For more information about this work, visit the OHCS website.  




Attached Media Files: PSH PR

Oregon State Correctional Institution reports in-custody death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 08/08/22 11:22 AM

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Dennis Eugene Dunn, died August 7, 2022. Dunn was incarcerated at Oregon State Correctional Institution and passed away at a local hospital while on hospice care. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified.

Dunn entered DOC custody on October 30, 2017, from Clackamas County with an earliest release date of October 30, 2026. Dunn was 83 years old. 

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 12,000 individuals who are incarcerated in 12 institutions across the state. While crime information is public record, DOC elects to disclose only upon request out of respect for any family or victims.

OSCI is a multi-custody prison located in Salem that houses approximately 870 adults in custody. It provides a range of correctional services and programs including education, drug and alcohol treatment, mental health treatment, religious services, work crews, and transition planning. OSCI participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises, including a print shop and a contact center. OSCI was established by action of the 1955 Legislature and became fully operational on June 1, 1959.

 

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Attached Media Files: Dennis E. Dunn

LOCATION UPDATE: OSFM to Host Town Hall Meeting on 2022 Oregon Defensible Space Code Development
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 08/08/22 10:21 AM

The location for this town hall meeting is updated.

SALEM, Ore. - The Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal (OSFM) is hosting a series of town hall meetings to talk about the 2022 Oregon Defensible Space Code, its development, timelines, and opportunity for community input.

The OSFM is working through a public development process with the Oregon Defensible Space Code development committee, a diverse group of stakeholders, to develop the code based on the framework established through SB 762. To continue the open and transparent process, the OSFM is hosting a series of 17 community town halls across Oregon, which began last week in Southern Oregon.

The OSFM will host a town hall discussion in Lane County this week. The meeting will be held Tuesday, August 9, 5:30 to 7 p.m. at the University of Oregon, 240A McKenzie Hall, 1101 Kincaid St., Eugene.

For a full schedule, visit Oregon Defensible Space Code webpage.

Oregon Senate Bill 762 directs the OSFM to establish minimum defensible space code standards and where they may apply. Accordingly, the OSFM created a section on their website dedicated to the defensible space code development process. To learn more, visit defensible space code requirements.

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UPDATE - Oregon Department of Human Services announces that Nevaeh Rohrbach has been found
Oregon Department of Human Services - 08/08/22 10:11 AM

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division, is thankful for the community support to find Nevaeh Rohrbach. 

Nevaeh Rohrbach, age 13, is a child who went missing from Portland on Aug. 1. She was found Aug. 4. 

Sometimes when a child is missing they may be in significant danger and ODHS may need to locate them to assess and support their safety. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and assess their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. 

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Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs Advisory Committee to Hold In-Person Meeting in Grand Ronde
Ore. Department of Veterans' Affairs - 08/08/22 10:00 AM

The next meeting of the Advisory Committee to the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs will be held in person Wednesday, September 14, 2022, at Spirit Mountain Casino, in the Kalapuya B conference room. Spirit Mountain is located at 27100 SW Salmon River Highway in Grand Ronde.

The meeting begins at 9:30 a.m. It is the committee’s first in-person meeting since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in Oregon in March 2020.

The committee is made up of veterans appointed by the governor to provide counsel on veteran issues and represent veteran concerns across Oregon. Its nine members serve in a vital advisory role to the director and staff of the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs.

The committee meets quarterly in various locations across the state. The public is invited to attend.

ODVA’s Reports to the Advisory Committee are available to the public on the ODVA website: https://issuu.com/odva/stacks/38107bb40c054695831edf5634865ca4

More information is available online at www.oregon.gov/odva/Pages/advisory.aspx or to contact the Advisory Committee, please email vaac@odva.state.or.us.

Town Hall:

The business meeting will be followed by a town hall in which attendees will be invited to ask questions of the committee and director. This time is set aside for individuals to bring up broader veteran community issues. Members of the community are also invited to submit written public comments to the committee by email to vaac@odva.state.or.us.

Established in 1945, the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs is dedicated to serving Oregon’s diverse veteran community that spans five eras of service members. ODVA administers programs and provides special advocacy and assistance in accessing earned veteran benefits across the state. Learn about veteran benefits and services, or locate a local county or tribal veteran service office online at https://oregon.gov/odva.

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08-08-22 Commissioner Announce Opening of New Full-Service RV Dump Station (Photo)
Douglas Co. Government - 08/08/22 9:48 AM
SH new boat wash 4
SH new boat wash 4
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/6789/156581/thumb_RV_Dump_Station_4.jpg

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

August 8, 2022

 

Commissioners Announce Opening of New Full-Service

RV Dump Station at Salmon Harbor Marina

 

(Douglas County, Ore) Douglas County Commissioners Tim Freeman, Chris Boice and Tom Kress along with  Douglas County’s Salmon Harbor Marina are elated to announce the opening of a new modern full-service RV Dump Station at Salmon Harbor Marina in Winchester Bay.  The RV Dump Station located at the north end of Salmon Harbor  Marina on Ork Rock Road, has been reconfigured to feature twin dump lanes with unlimited capacity, two potable water fill stations, three boat wash stations and an automated pay station that can accept cash, as well as credit and debit cards. 

 

The modern dump station is the latest of several ongoing improvement projects initiated by the Douglas County Board of Commissioners for the Winchester Bay community. Commissioner Chris Boice worked with Salmon Harbor Marina Director Jim Zimmer, the Winchester Bay Sanitary District, and engineers from Dyer Partnership to reconfigure the previous site layout in order to modernize services, increase user efficiency and double the capacity for RV users, travelers, local fishermen and marina visitors alike.   

 

RV dump stations offer an easy and convenient way for RVers and campers to get rid of waste while traveling on the open road. Our modern station allows patrons to pull in, connect a hose, empty their tank and also refill potable water in a relatively short and convenient manner.  The new station replaces an old single lane station that was limited to 25 users per day. The renovation project was completed by contractor Jesse Rodriguez Construction, LLC and also included extending utility services and paving the road to the end of Ork Rock Road. The fee to dump waste at the new station is $10, and both cash and credit/debit cards are accepted at the automated pay machine. 

 

Renovating the RV Dump Station at Salmon Harbor not only immediately enhanced the experience for dry campers and RVers by providing the total camping package, but it allowed us to prime the unused empty lot at the end of the marina for future development, which will add value and services to the community long-term,”  stated Commissioner Boice, liaison Commissioner for Salmon Harbor Marina and the Winchester Bay community. “As Commissioners, we are always thinking about how to best optimize projects like this to bring maximum benefits to the residents and travelers recreating in Douglas County.”

 

Salmon Harbor Marina, “the best kept secret on the Oregon Coast,” is one of the largest recreational facilities along the Oregon Coast. Salmon Harbor has immediate access to the Umpqua River, the Umpqua River Lighthouse and Coastal History Museum, the Oregon Dunes National Recreation Area, the Pacific Ocean, and miles of public white-sand beaches.  The full-service marina offers 550 moorage slips with power and water, two launch ramps, a full-service fuel dock and 124 self-contained first come, first served camping sites with restroom and shower facilities.  They also operate the nationally renowned Winchester Bay RV Resort with 138 large full-hook up sites with newly upgraded WiFi service. 

 

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Media Contact:     Tamara Howell, Douglas County Emergency Communications & Community Engagement Specialist, Douglas County Public Affairs Office | Office: (541) 957-4896 | Cell: (541) 670-2804 | Email: tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us

Kellie Trenkle, Public Affairs Specialist, Douglas County Public Affairs Office | Office: (541) 440-4493 Email: kellie@co.douglas.or.us 

Photos Attached:

  1. Pictured here are Kevin & Shonda Haglan of Redding, California.  They have visited the Oregon Coast annually for the past 20 years for Shonda’s Birthday and hit Dune Fest on their way home. They came to town looking for the air station and stumbled on the new dump station by accident and were very pleased with the convenience of the dump station, the automated pay machine, as well as the potable water available at no charge. 
  2. New automated pay station
  3. New RV Dump Station at Salmon Harbor Marina in Winchester Bay.  
  4. New Boat Wash Station at Salmon Harbor Marina in Winchester Bay.



Attached Media Files: SH new boat wash 4 , SH new RV dump station 3 , SH new pay station 2 , SH new RV Dump Station 1

hMPXV (Monkeypox) in Oregon: Interviews with Dr. Sharff, Chief of Infectious Disease (Photo)
Kaiser Permanente Northwest - 08/08/22 9:22 AM
Dr. Katie Sharff, Chief of Infectious Disease for Kaiser Permanente in Portland, Ore.
Dr. Katie Sharff, Chief of Infectious Disease for Kaiser Permanente in Portland, Ore.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/5557/156575/thumb_Katie_Sharff_Chief_of_Infectious_Disease_at_Kaiser_Permanente_Northwest.jpg

PORTLAND, Ore. (August 8, 2022): As Human Monkeypox Virus (hMPXV) cases rise in Oregon and nationwide, Kaiser Permanente will begin administering vaccines to high-risk individuals in the Northwest on Tuesday August 9th. We encourage people to be aware of this illness, understand how the virus spreads, and know what precautions and treatments are available.

Dr. Katie Sharff, Chief of Infectious Disease for Kaiser Permanente in Portland, Ore., encourages the public to be aware of the virus and take it seriously, but not to panic. “We don’t believe the current hMPXV outbreak will mirror the COVID-19 pandemic because hMPXV simply doesn't spread as easily as COVID does, and it’s rarely fatal.”

“That being said, the symptoms of monkeypox can be very uncomfortable and debilitating for some patients, so it is important we educate about this disease and maximize strategies to reduce spread,” continued Dr. Sharff. “Most cases resolve with supportive care, and we also have developed vaccines that can be used to prevent hMPXV infection. Vaccine supply is currently very limited, but we anticipate it will increase over time.”

There are more than 7,100 confirmed cases of hMPXV in the US and it has been declared a public health emergency. Most cases of hMPXV have been transmitted through close, personal, and skin-to-skin contact, including during sex. While the majority of cases thus far have been among men who have sex with men, anyone can be affected by hMPXV, and it is essential to educate and avoid stigma with this infection.

Interviews available:
Dr. Katie Sharff, Chief of Infectious Disease for Kaiser Permanente in Portland, Ore, is available for Zoom interviews with media from 1-3 p.m. on Monday, August 8; or noon-1 p.m. on Tuesday, August 9. Contact en.a.vitt@kp.org">karen.a.vitt@kp.org to schedule.

Dr. Sharff is prepared to discuss:

Human Monkeypox Virus (hMPXV)

  • What is hMPXV and what are the symptoms?
  • How does hMPXV spread?
  • What can you do to decrease risk for exposure to hMPXV?
  • What should you do if you’ve been exposed?

hMPXV testing and treatment

  • Is testing available for hMPXV?
  • How is monkeypox treated?

hMPXV Vaccines

  • What hMPXV vaccines are available?
  • Who should get vaccinated?
  • Where can you access the vaccines?

ABOUT KAISER PERMANENTE 
For 75 years, Kaiser Permanente has been committed to shaping the future of health and health care — and helping our members, patients, and communities experience more healthy years. We are recognized as one of America’s leading health care providers and not-for-profit health plans. Since July 21, 1945, Kaiser Permanente’s mission has been to provide high-quality, affordable health care services and to improve the health of our members and the communities we serve. We currently serve 12.4 million members in 8 states and the District of Columbia. Care for members and patients is focused on their total health and guided by their personal Permanente Medical Group physicians, specialists, and team of caregivers. Our expert and caring medical teams are empowered and supported by industry-leading technology advances and tools for health promotion, disease prevention, state-of-the-art care delivery, and world-class chronic disease management. Kaiser Permanente is dedicated to care innovations, clinical research, health education, and the support of community health.

For more information, please visit: about.kaiserpermanente.org




Attached Media Files: Dr. Katie Sharff, Chief of Infectious Disease for Kaiser Permanente in Portland, Ore.

Committee for Family Forestlands meets Aug. 10
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/08/22 8:57 AM

SALEM, Ore. — The Committee for Family Forestlands will meet Wednesday, Aug. 10 from noon to 4:30 p.m. The public meeting will be a hybrid meeting held in the Tillamook Room, Building C, at the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters, located at 2600 State St. in Salem. To join virtually, please use the Zoom video conference information found on the agenda. To provide public comment, please email estresources.committees@odf.oregon.gov">forestresources.committees@odf.oregon.gov.

The committee’s agenda includes:

  • Fire protection update
  • Forest Practices Act draft administrative rules based on the Private Forests Accord Report

The meeting is open to the public to attend in-person or online via Zoom. Public comments will be accepted near the start of the meeting. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 72 hours before the meeting by emailing estresources.committees@odf.oregon.gov">forestresources.committees@odf.oregon.gov.

The 13-member committee researches policies that affect family forests, natural resources and forestry benefits. Based on its findings, the committee recommends actions to the Oregon Board of Forestry and the State Forester. View more information on the CFF webpage.


Beachside and South Beach state parks host August sand castle contests
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 08/08/22 8:00 AM

Newport, Oregon—Bring your best ideas and creative skills to the annual sand castle contests at Beachside State Recreation Area, Aug. 13, and South Beach State Park, Aug. 27. Sign-ups begin at 10 a.m. in the day-use areas. 

The theme this year is 100 Years of Oregon State Parks and celebrate public beach access. Judges will evaluate entries based on creativity, originality and best use of beach resources added to the design. Judging for each event begins 12 p.m., followed by announcements of first, second, third and judges’ awards.

The parks have a few sand buckets for loan; however, contestants may bring other hand tools and supplies to build their sand creations.

Contact Park Ranger Supervisor Brian Fowler, 541-867-7451, for more information. 

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