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Eugene/Spring/Rose/Alb/Corv News Releases for Fri. May. 24 - 11:22 pm
Fri. 05/24/19
Public's help sought for missing mother and child - UPDATE (Photo)
Salem Police Dept. - 05/24/19 5:31 PM
2019-05/1095/124663/3704CA83-5365-4556-9B5F-033B95FC421F.jpeg
2019-05/1095/124663/3704CA83-5365-4556-9B5F-033B95FC421F.jpeg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/1095/124663/thumb_3704CA83-5365-4556-9B5F-033B95FC421F.jpeg

UPDATE: May 24, 2019 at 5:30 p.m.

Salem, Ore.— 

The Salem Police Department has Michael John Wolfe in custody.

Wolfe is being charged with two counts of Aggravated Murder and two counts of Kidnapping. Final charges will be determined by the Office of the District Attorney of Yamhill County.

Salem Police investigators and other law enforcement partners continue the search for Karissa and William Fretwell in rural Yamhill County.

We still need the public’s help in locating Karissa and William. Please refer to the images previously released. Anyone with information regarding this case should call the Salem Police Department Tips Hotline at 503-588-8477.

# # #

_____

UPDATE on May 24, 2019 at 3:25 p.m.

Salem, Ore.— The Salem Police Department is holding a presser on the Fretwell case today, Friday, May 24, 4:30 p.m. at Salem city hall, 555 Liberty ST SE.

News outlets interested in participating should meet in council chambers located on the second floor.

Outlets who may find themselves delayed in traffic should call the PIO so we can make adjustments.

# # #

_____

UPDATE on May 23, 2019 at 3:00 p.m.

Salem, Ore.— The Salem Police Department has developed a person of interest in the disappearance of Karissa and William Fretwell.

Michael John Wolfe, age 52 of Gaston, Oregon, is sought for questioning by the Salem Police Department and the Yamhill County Sheriff’s Office.

Wolfe is a white male adult, 6’ 2” tall, and weighs more than 200 pounds. He has thinning brown hair and hazel eyes.

Investigators ask the public for help in locating Wolfe. Anyone with information about his whereabouts should call the Salem Police Department Tips Hotline at 503-588-8477.

# # #

_____

On May 17, 2019, the Salem Police Department was contacted by family members of Karissa Alyn Fretwell, age 25 of Salem, to file a missing persons report. Karissa’s family told police they had not seen or heard from her or her three-year-old son, William (Billy) Fretwell, since May 13.  

Karissa is a white female, 5 feet 9 inches tall, and weighs approximately 135 pounds. She has blue eyes and naturally blond hair that she dyes red.  

Billy is a white male, approximately 3 feet tall, and weighs approximately 30 pounds. He has blond hair and blue eyes.

Anyone with information about the case should call the Salem Police Tips Hotline at (503) 588-8477 and leave a message for Detective Jake Burke. If you know where Karissa and Billy are,please call the Salem Police Department non-emergency number at (503) 588-6123.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/1095/124663/3704CA83-5365-4556-9B5F-033B95FC421F.jpeg , 2019-05/1095/124663/E0C69444-4696-4BD7-B229-C88D50D8E244.jpeg , 2019-05/1095/124663/7D902F2F-BB84-4F72-93BE-729649022139.jpeg , 2019-05/1095/124663/215180BE-7E93-4BB2-802D-6C787F60A5B1.jpeg , Michael John Wolfe_2 , Michael John Wolfe_1 , Michael John Wolfe_poster , Michael John Wolfe_poster-updated

UPDATE - Interagency Deadly Force Investigations Team to Investigate Incident Involving Pursuit of Suspect in Stolen Vehicle - Lane County
Oregon State Police - 05/24/19 3:31 PM

The Deputies involved in yesterdays incident are identified as:

Deputy Eric Churchill

Hired in 2002

currently assigned to the Police Services Division

 

Deputy Michael Hudson

Hired in 2003

Currently assigned to the Police Services Division

 

Further releases will come from the Lane County District Attorney's Office.

On Thursday, May 23, 2019 at approximately 9:45 am, the Lane County Sheriff’s Office attempted a traffic stop involving a stolen Ford F350 truck on Hwy 99 near Milliron. The driver of the vehicle increased speed and deputies pursued the driver southbound on Hwy 99, onto Greenhill Road, Clearlake, and Lawrence before the suspect fled on foot on Dalewood Drive. During the pursuit the suspect rammed occupied Sheriff’s Office patrol vehicles and deputies discharged their firearms.

No injuries have been reported.

The suspect, identified as 34 year old Keith Newsome, has been taken into custody.

The Interagency Deadly Force Investigations Team (IDFIT) has been assigned to investigate the incident.

Further information will be provided following the investigation when more facts are known.


Search Warrant Served, Curtin Man Arrested (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/24/19 2:50 PM
Gregory Wayne Ferguson
Gregory Wayne Ferguson
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/5204/124832/thumb_Ferguson.jpg

CURTIN, Ore. - On Wednesday, May 22, 2019, at 1:20 pm, Deputies with the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office received information regarding a domestic dispute that had occurred at a residence in the 1000-block of Bear Creek Road earlier in the week. The initial report was that the resident, 43 year-old Gregory Wayne Ferguson, had fired a weapon at his girlfriend inside the home in the presence of a small child. Both the child and female had left the residence before reporting the incident. Despite their efforts, deputies were unsuccessful in contacting Ferguson regarding the reported incident.

Deputies continued the investigation and were able to contact Ferguson at his residence Thursday morning.

Deputies later served a search warrant at the residence looking for evidence of the disturbance. During the search of the home, deputies located evidence as well as a substantial quantity methamphetamine and other suspected controlled substances.

Ferguson was taken into custody and lodged at the Douglas County Jail on the following charges:

  • Unlawful Use of a Weapon
  • Menacing
  • Pointing a Firearm at Another
  • Reckless Endangering
  • Unlawful Possession of Methamphetamine
  • Unlawful Delivery of Methamphetamine
  • Unlawful Manufacture of Methamphetamine



Attached Media Files: Gregory Wayne Ferguson

House Fire 183 SE 116th Street
Newport Fire Department - 05/24/19 2:24 PM

 

 

TO:    All Media

Friday, May 24, 2019

 

For Immediate Release

 

House Fire 183 SE 116th Street

                                                                       

At 12:33 AM on Friday, May 24, 2019, Newport Fire Department was dispatched to a report of a fire in a residence at 183 SE 116th Street, South Beach. Upon arrival observed heavy smoke coming from the interior of the residence.

 

Fire crews made access and extinguished the fire, which had just started to extend into the attic. Crews remained on scene for about 2 ¼  hours overhauling the structure.

 

Newport Fire Department received mutual aid assistance from Depoe Bay Fire District, Seal Rock Fire District and Toledo Fire Department.  Newport Police Dept., LCSO and Pacific West Ambulance provided assistance. Newport Fire Department responded with 2 fire engines, 1 chief officer and 7 firefighters.

 

The cause of the fire is under investigation. Newport Fire Department reminds you to have a working smoke detector and test it regularly.

 

Newport Fire Department

541-265-9461


Madison and Sunset Schools are open
Coos Bay Sch. Dist. - 05/24/19 8:22 AM

Madison and Sunset Schools are open even though there is a power outage in the Empire/Charleston areas.Teachers are being creative in their lessons today and the students are safe. Students will bused home on the normal Friday schedule.
 


BBB, OR Fish & Wildlife Warn of Phony Fishing, Hunting Licenses
Better Business Bureau Northwest + Pacific - 05/24/19 5:00 AM

NEWS RELEASE – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Better Business Bureau Northwest + Pacific

Danielle Kane, Portland Marketplace Manager | 503-833-2301

Dawn Johnson, Eugene Marketplace Manager | 541-514-8697

Tracy Vedder, Director of Communications | 208-519-6922

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife: Michelle Dennehy | (503) 947-6022 | Michelle.N.Dennehy@state.or.us

 

BBB, OR Fish & Wildlife Warn of Phony Fishing, Hunting Licenses

Online Scam Hooks Consumers With False Advertising 

 

Portland, OR – May 24, 2019 – For Oregon consumers looking to hunt and/or fish this season, be careful when purchasing licenses as Better Business Bureau Northwest + Pacific has learned of an ongoing online scam pushing out phony licenses.

Oregon Department Fish & Wildlife (ODFW) contacted BBB NW+P to share that its employees have been made aware of at least two people who recently purchased items from the website www.fishinglicense.org after searching online for an Oregon fishing license. BBB has also confirmed two Oregonians filed a complaint and Scam Tracker report against fishinglicense.org just within the last month.

This is not the first time BBB has alerted consumers to this website, but concerningly, the page is still up and running. ODFW and other state fish and wildlife agencies have been hearing about customers mistakenly buying items from this website since 2017.

“While it’s not a widespread problem, it’s unfortunate that even one person would be misled when trying to buy an Oregon fishing license,” said Linda Lytle, ODFW License Services Manager. “This is not the first time we have heard about this and it isn’t just happening in Oregon.”

Fishinglicense.org, which claims to operate out of Coeur d’Alene, ID, has no office. The company operates under the umbrella organization, “Orange Grove LLC”, which claims to help consumers with a variety of services including travel planning, registrations and drivers’ licenses

Within the last year, there have been 20 complaints regarding the company mostly related to false adverting and fraudulent sales. There have also been numerous negative reviews left on the company’s BBB profile, which has garnered an F-rating. It appears representatives for fishinglicense.org have been responding to some of the recent complaints, though BBB cannot confirm at this time whether any refunds have been issued.

BBB cautions consumers not to use any websites associated with Orange Grove LLC, including fishinglicense.org or driverslicenseonline.org. This issue has been brought to the attention of the Federal Trade Commission.

Oregon fishing or hunting licenses can be purchased via the ODFW landing page. Consumers can also purchase a license at one of the sale agents listed on the site. On the website, Oregonians will be guided to the proper licensing processes and procedures for fishing, crabbing, bird hunting and big-game hunting.

For consumers who have purchased a fake license somewhere else, head to the ODFW website for help. For hunters, please note the deadline to apply for a valid license is June 1.

For ODFW, combating this issue is imperative to protect consumers from losing money and to prevent them from going out with improper licenses, which can lead to further problems.

“We would just like consumers to be aware of this issue and not get tricked into buying something when what they really want is an Oregon fishing, hunting or shellfish license,” said Lytle.

BBB NW+P offers the following tips for consumers to protect themselves from online scams:

  • Check a site’s security settings. If the site is secure, its URL should start with “https://” and include a lock icon on the purchase or shopping cart page
  • Shop with a credit card. In case of a fraudulent transaction, a credit card provides additional protections; it’s easier to dispute charges. Debit cards, prepaid cards or gift cards don’t have the same protections as a credit card.
  • Think before your click. Be especially cautious about email solicitations and online ads on social media sites that bring you to a website. Many sketchy retailers can easily “spoof” an existing website to appear legitimate, when really, it’s a fake page all together.

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ABOUT BBB:?For more than 100 years, the Better Business Bureau has been helping people find businesses, brands,?and?charities they can trust. In 2017, people turned to BBB more than 160 million times for BBB Business Profiles on more than 5.2 million businesses and Charity Reports on 11,000 charities, all available for free at?bbb.org. There are local, independent BBBs across the United States, Canada,?and?Mexico, including BBB Northwest & Pacific, which serves more than 15 million consumers in Alaska, Washington, Idaho, Oregon, Montana, Hawaii and Western Wyoming.

 


Thu. 05/23/19
Man Dies in Fall From Trail (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/23/19 6:48 PM
SAR prep
SAR prep
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/6186/124814/thumb_8680EC6D-CC1E-4072-91AD-9F088E4E7B61.jpeg

ASHLAND, Ore. – A man fell to his death Wednesday night while hiking on a trail northeast of Ashland. The Jackson County Sheriff’s Office (JCSO) search and rescue (SAR) tactical rope rescue team (TRRT) recovered the man’s body at the base of a steep cliff.

On May 22, 2019, at 8:08 p.m., dispatch received a call from a woman reporting a man had fallen from the Lost Falls trail. The woman had to hike to another location to obtain cell phone coverage to call 911.

JCSO deputies responded to the area with personnel from Ashland Fire & Rescue and Mercy Flights. The man was found deceased in the water at the base of a 100-foot cliff.

The victim was identified as Michael Kent Brewster, 63, of Medford. His family has been notified of his death.

JCSO search and rescue (SAR) personnel returned Thursday morning to recover Brewster’s body during daylight hours. An investigator with the Jackson County Medical Examiner’s Office accompanied SAR during the recovery effort. The cause and manner of death is under investigation.

Case #19-10084

###




Attached Media Files: SAR prep , Rappelling , Scene - SAR , Scene - rope team

Southern Oregon Man Sentenced to 46 Months in Federal Prison for Interstate Trafficking of Marijuana
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 05/23/19 4:53 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—Daniel Stewart Gregg, 67, of Ashland, Oregon, was sentenced today to 46 months in federal prison and two years’ supervised release for engaging in a conspiracy to traffic Oregon-grown marijuana across state lines.

According to court documents, in 2015, Illinois law enforcement seized a 354-pound load of marijuana originating in Southern Oregon, valued at approximately $885,000. Following the seizure, investigators seized more than $153,000 from the courier’s residence in North Carolina. Further investigation revealed that Gregg had coordinated this shipment and other later out-of-state shipments of marijuana.

On June 8, 2018, Gregg waived indictment and pleaded guilty to a single count of conspiring to distribute a controlled substance.

Gregg has a long history with controlled substances. He was convicted of marijuana possession in 1970 and 1975, of distributing a hallucinogen in 2004 for which he served 15 months in federal prison and of selling marijuana in 2012.

This case was investigated by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and prosecuted by Julia E. Jarrett and Steven T. Mygrant, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

This case was brought as part of the Justice Department’s Organized Crime and Drug Enforcement Task Force (OCDETF) program, the centerpiece of the department’s strategy for reducing the availability of drugs in the U.S. OCDETF was established in 1982 to mount a comprehensive attack on drug trafficking by disrupting and dismantling major drug trafficking and money laundering organizations. Today, OCDETF combines the resources and expertise of its member federal agencies in coordination with state and local law enforcement.

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Attached Media Files: Sentencing Gregg Final

French Prairie Area to Receive Focused Traffic Patrols ***Update***(Photo) (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/23/19 4:18 PM
2019-05/1294/124654/TST_Lidar.jpg
2019-05/1294/124654/TST_Lidar.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/1294/124654/thumb_TST_Lidar.jpg

This week the Marion County Sheriff’s Office Traffic Safety Team conducted an enforcement operation in the French Prairie area in northern Marion County.  The focused patrol efforts were done during a four hour window on Monday morning and again for four hours during the afternoon commute on Tuesday.  Deputies focused their efforts on dangerous driving habits which are known to contribute to serious injury and fatal motor vehicle crashes such as speeding, cell phone usage and following too close. 

The Traffic Safety Team made 106 total traffic stops while issuing 146 citations and 15 warnings.  Below are some additional notable statistics from the operation:

20 citations were for speeds between 75-90 miles per hour

93 total citations for speeding

17 citations for no operator’s license or driving while suspended

The Sheriff’s Office is continuing to collaborate with Marion County Public Works, the Oregon Department of Transportation and other community stakeholders to promote traffic safety in the community.  The efforts earlier this week were funded by a grant from the Oregon Department of Transportation.

As the holiday weekend approaches, the Sheriff’s Office would like to remind drivers to slow down and to drive responsibly.

The Marion County Sheriff’s Office Traffic Safety Team will be focusing their efforts in the French Prairie area of Marion County on May 20th and 21st during the morning and evening commutes.  The French Prairie area of Marion County sees a heavy amount of commuter traffic along multiple roadways such as Highway 219, River Road, French Prairie Road, McKay Road, Yergen Road, and Ehlen Road.  These roadways have also been the site of multiple serious injury and fatal motor vehicle crashes.

Dangerous driving behavior including speeding, cell phone use, and following too close have been identified as contributing factors to serious injury and fatal crashes throughout Marion County.  During this operation our goal will be to educate drivers about these dangerous driving habits and to enforce violations which are known to result in crashes.

This is part of an ongoing collaboration with our community partners to reduce motor vehicles crashes throughout Marion County.  This operation is being funded by grants provided by the Oregon Department of Transportation.




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/1294/124654/TST_Lidar.jpg

New Public Relations and Search/Recovery K9 - 5-23-19 (Photo)
Roseburg Fire Department - 05/23/19 4:13 PM
Image 2
Image 2
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The Roseburg Fire Department is excited to introduce a new Public Relations and Search/Recovery K9.  The K9 is a two year old, yellow Labrador retriever named Poppy.  She is originally from Mountain View K9 Training Inc., located in Highland, California.  Her handlers are Chris and Hannah Sutton.  Chris is a Battalion Chief with the Roseburg Fire Department.  Chris and Poppy have spent numerous hours receiving specialized training and are now a Certified Disaster Human Remains Team. 

Poppy recently became a Certified Human Remains Canine Search Specialist.  She tested in the areas of K9/Human Aggression, Obedience, Agility, Directional Control, and Rubble Search.  Poppy will be a resource to respond locally, regionally, and nationally for search and recovery.  In addition, she has received a K9 Good Citizen certificate and will be participating in Public Education Outreach activities for the department.  Please help us in welcoming Poppy to the department.

 




Attached Media Files: Image 2 , Image 1

Regional Forest Practice Committees for Northwest and Southwest Oregon will meet May 29 in Springfield
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 05/23/19 3:10 PM

SPRINGFIELD, Ore. — The Regional Forest Practice Committees for Northwest Oregon and Southwest Oregon will meet Wednesday, May 29 from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Hilton Garden Inn, 3528 Gateway St., Springfield 97477.

The committee will discuss and receive updates on the following topics:

  • Siskiyou Streamside Protection Review
  • Marbled Murrelet Rule Analysis Update
  • Updates to Smoke Management Rules
  • Emerald Ash Borer, Invasive Species
  • Implementation Study
  • Fish passage Memorandum of Understanding

This meeting is open to the public with opportunity for public comment. Questions about accessibility or special accommodations can be directed to the Oregon Department of Forestry at least 48 hours prior to the meeting at 503-945-7502.

Regional Forest Practice Committees are panels of citizens - mandated under Oregon law - that advise the Oregon Board of Forestry on current forestry issues and forest management approaches. Three Regional Forest Practice Committees, serving the Northwest, Southwest and Eastern Oregon regions of the state, were created by the 1971 Oregon Forest Practices Act. Under Oregon law, a majority of Regional Forest Practice Committees members must be private forest landowners and logging or forest operations companies.

Oregon’s forests are among one of the state’s most valued resources, providing a balanced mix of environmental, economic and social benefits.  Additional information about ODF’s Regional Forest Practice Committees is available on the Oregon Department of Forestry’s web site: http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/RFPC.aspx.


Health advisory for water contact at D River Beach lifted May 23
Oregon Health Authority - 05/23/19 2:55 PM

May 23, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7174, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Health advisory for water contact at D River Beach lifted May 23

Testing shows fecal bacteria levels have subsided

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) today lifted a public health advisory for contact with marine water at D River Beach, located in Lincoln County. The health authority issued the advisory May 22 after water samples showed higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters.

Results from later samples taken by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) showed lower bacteria levels. Contact with the water no longer poses a higher-than-normal risk. However, officials recommend staying out of large pools on the beach that are frequented by birds, and runoff from those pools, because the water may contain increased bacteria from fecal matter.

State officials continue to encourage other recreational activities at all Oregon beaches, suggesting only that water contact be avoided when advisories are in effect. Since 2003 state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state agencies participating in this program are OHA, DEQ and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

For more information, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0440, or call the OHA toll-free information line at 877-290-6767.

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https://bit.ly/2K5hABz


Community objects to the proposed Q'alya ta Kukwis shichdii me Traditional Cultural Property Historic District
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 05/23/19 2:30 PM

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department // NEWS RELEASE // May 23, 2019

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Chris Havel, Associate Director // Desk: (503) 986-0722 Cell: (503) 931-2590 // is.havel@oregon.gov">chris.havel@oregon.gov

Christine Curran, Deputy State Historic Preservation Officer // Desk (503) 986-0684 Cell: (503) 510-6226 // issy.curran@oregon.gov">chrissy.curran@oregon.gov

 

Community objects to the proposed Q’alya ta Kukwis shichdii me Traditional Cultural Property Historic District

Salem, Ore. Thursday, May 23, 2019 -- The Oregon State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) has determined that the opponents of the proposed Q’alya ta Kukwis shichdii me (Jordan Cove and the Bay of the Coos People) Traditional Cultural Property Historic District (District) in Coos County submitted enough objections to prevent listing the District in the National Register of Historic Places. According to federal rules for the program, if a majority of the private property owners within a proposed district object to the listing, the district cannot be listed in the National Register. There are 1,001 owners in the boundaries of the proposed district, and 696, or 70%, submitted valid objections.

The SHPO sent the nomination document to the NPS on May 23, 2019 for a “determination of eligibility.” In this process, the NPS determines if the District is eligible for listing in the Register, but does not actually list it. The SHPO expects the NPS to respond before early-July 2019, following a consideration period of up to 45 days.

The nomination document and all materials submitted to the National Park Service (NPS) are online at http://bit.ly/coostcp.

Additional comments may be sent to the National Park Service at:

National Park Service
National Register of Historic Places
1849 C Street, NW (7228)
Washington, DC 20240

Or

By email to Alexis_Abernathy@nps.gov.

 

The Oregon SHPO requests that all correspondence be copied to the office at

Q’alya ta Kukwis shichdii me
State Historic Preservation Office
725 Summer Street NE, Suite C
Salem, OR 97301

Or

By email to SHPO.NationalRegisterProgram@oregon.gov">ORSHPO.NationalRegisterProgram@oregon.gov

The proposed Q’alya ta Kukwis shichdii me Traditional Cultural Property Historic District is a 20-square mile area that follows the general horseshoe shape of the Coos Bay Estuary. The District includes portions of the cities of Coos Bay and North Bend and Coos County. A Traditional Cultural Property (TCP) recognizes the cultural significance and identity of a living community. A TCP not only tells the stories of the people who have historically called the area home, but recognizes how the descendants of those people keep the traditional practices and beliefs alive.

The Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua, and Siuslaw Indians (CTCLUSI) nominated the District for its cultural significance to the Tribe. The Tribes tribe’s continued use of the estuary since time immemorial to present is shown by archaeological sites, named places in Hanis and Miluk dialects of the Coosan Language, and the presence of prehistoric and historic burials of peoples at former villages and Native American subsistence sites.

The State Advisory Commission on Historic Preservation, a governor-appointed volunteer commission of people with interest and skill in Oregon history, first reviewed and recommended approval of the nomination in February 2019.

# # #


UPDATE- Single Vehicle Fatal Crash on Hwy 101 - Coos County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 05/23/19 1:29 PM
2019-05/1002/124783/20190523_000832.jpg
2019-05/1002/124783/20190523_000832.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/1002/124783/thumb_20190523_000832.jpg

The driver is identified as Joey Vandenhey (60) of Lakeside, OR.

On Wednesday, May 22, 2019 at approximately 9:45 P.M. Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to a report of a single vehicle crash on Hwy 101 mile post 223 near Lakeside.

Preliminary investigation reveals that a Ford pickup was traveling on Hwy 101 when for unknown reasons left the roadway and rolled.  

The operator, and lone occupant, sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene.  Name is being withheld pending notifications.

OSP was assisted by Lower Umpqua Ambulance, North Bend Chapel, and the Coos County Sheriff's Office.




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/1002/124783/20190523_000832.jpg

Oregon Farm Bureau seeks calendar photos (Photo)
Oregon Farm Bureau - 05/23/19 12:58 PM
2019-05/5507/124796/2020calendarcontest.png
2019-05/5507/124796/2020calendarcontest.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/5507/124796/thumb_2020calendarcontest.png

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 23, 2019

Oregon Farm Bureau seeks calendar photos

Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) invites all photography enthusiasts to enter their best images of Oregon agriculture in the annual OFB Calendar Contest.

Twelve selected photographers will have their work featured as month images in the 2020 Oregon’s Bounty Calendar.

The award-winning calendar celebrates all aspects of Oregon agriculture: the products, the people, the production, the landscape, the enjoyment, anything that depicts the beauty, technology, culture, enjoyment, or tradition of family farming and ranching.

“Spring is a fantastic time to look for photo opportunities within Oregon agriculture,” said OFB Communications Director Anne Marie Moss. “Farmers markets are in full swing, fields are blooming, farmers are preparing for summer harvest, and young farm animals abound.” 

Horizontal-format, high-resolution images — both close-ups and panoramic views — are needed of all types of agriculture in all seasons.

Subject ideas include scenes from farmers markets, close-ups of ag products or crops in the field, planting and harvesting crops, panoramic scenes of farmland, people enjoying Oregon-grown ag products, portraits of farmers/ranchers/families, farm animals, state or county fairs, 4-H and FFA events, on-farm festivals, to name just a few.

Photographers with images selected for month pages in Oregon’s Bounty will receive a photo credit in the 2020 calendar, which is mailed to 67,000 Farm Bureau members, and copies of the calendar. Everyone who submits an image will receive a complimentary copy of the calendar ($20 value), provided they include their mailing address.

The deadline for entries is Sept. 15, 2019.

Photographers do not need to be Farm Bureau members to participate and there is no limit to the number of photos that can be submitted.

Photo specifications and contest rules are attached and are at www.oregonfb.org/calendar.

The state’s largest general farm organization, Oregon Farm Bureau is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit organization representing the interests of the state's family farmers and ranchers in the public and policymaking arenas. The calendar is mailed to 67,000 members around the state and thousands more are distributed throughout the year. 

For more information and to see previous years of the Oregon’s Bounty Calendar, visit www.oregonfb.org/calendar.

Project contact is Anne Marie Moss, OFB Communications Director, at ie@oregonfb.org">annemarie@oregonfb.org, 503.399.1701.

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Note to Editors: “Farm Bureau” is a registered trademark; please capitalize in all cases.

Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit, general farm organization representing the interests of farming and ranching families in the public and policymaking arenas. First established in Oregon at the county level in 1919 and the state level in 1932, Farm Bureau is organized in all 36 counties.

Oregon Farm Bureau President Sharon Waterman is an OFB Hall of Fame honoree and operates a Century Ranch raising sheep, cattle, and timber in Bandon. She is OFB’s 16th president.

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/5507/124796/2020calendarcontest.png , 2019-05/5507/124796/2019calendarcover.JPG

Deputies Plan Memorial Day DUII Patrols (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/23/19 12:19 PM
Rural Patrol photo
Rural Patrol photo
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JACKSON COUNTY, Ore. – Memorial Day weekend is the unofficial start of summer. For many people it is a time for road trips and outdoor recreation.  To help keep roadways safe for everyone, Jackson County Sheriff’s Office (JCSO) deputies will be adding patrols to find and stop impaired drivers.

From Saturday, May 25, through Monday, May 27, 2019, deputies will focus their attention on rural roadways, especially those near popular recreation areas.  Grant funding allows JCSO to add deputies to the road without taking away from regular calls for service.

Deputies offer the following tips to help prevent impaired driving:

  • DRINK OR DRIVE: Once you know where you'll spend your time, decide whether you're drinking or driving - choose only one.
  • GETTING AROUND: Before you take your first sip, leave your keys at home or give them to a friend. Get a ride from a sober friend or family member, or use public transportation.
  • HAVE A BACKUP PLAN: Save the number of a taxi company in your phone so you are always ready. In some areas, you can use ride share services such as Uber or Lyft.
  • CAMP OUT: Rural areas may not have cell phone service. Take an overnight bag with you so you can spend the night if you’re too intoxicated to drive.
  • PASSENGERS, TOO: Drivers aren't the only ones at risk. Only accept a ride from a sober driver.
  • HELP A FRIEND: If you know someone who is about to drive while impaired, help them to make other arrangements to get to where they are going safely.
  • SAY SOMETHING: If you suspect an impaired driver on the roadway, call police immediately. It is okay to call 911 to report an impaired driver.

For state-specific information and statistics from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) regarding impaired driving and traffic fatalities, follow this link: https://crashstats.nhtsa.dot.gov/Api/Public/ViewPublication/812483 .

###




Attached Media Files: Rural Patrol photo

Office of State Fire Marshal to Host Media Field Day with Regional HazMat Team in Eugene
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 05/23/19 12:11 PM

The Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal, in coordination with its Oregon fire service partners, is hosting a Regional Hazardous Materials Emergency Response Team (RHMERT) Media Field Day in Eugene on May 28.

Regional Hazardous Materials Emergency Response Team HM02 Eugene
Eugene/Springfield Fire
1705 W 2nd Ave., Eugene, Oregon 97402
9 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

A second event will follow on June 4, in Medford:
Regional Hazardous Materials Emergency Response Team HM08 Southern Oregon
Medford Fire-Rescue - Station #4
2208 Table Rock Road, Medford, Oregon 97501
9 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

All local media are invited to attend the events. Each event will begin at the set time above with a short presentation to provide media outlets, agency public information officers, and elected officials an overview of Oregon’s statewide RHMERT program, an understanding of HazMat response terminology, and information about the local HazMat Team response services.

Tours and photo opportunities will be available of the HazMat response vehicle and equipment following each presentation.

Regional teams respond to hazardous materials emergency incidents that exceed the resources of local jurisdictions. There are 13 teams across Oregon. They are a technical resource for local incident commanders.

Team members receive 160 hours of specialized training to the technician level and are equipped to provide different levels of response. Teams are prepared for response to petrochemical highway incidents, as well as supporting response partners at biological, radiological, and explosive incidents. The teams provide outreach training to local responders and industry to ensure communities are prepared to respond to a hazardous materials incident and create safer communities.

For more information on the RHMERT program, go to: https://www.oregon.gov/osp/programs/sfm/Pages/Regional-Response-Teams.aspx. See the attached fact sheet for additional information.

Please join us as the RHMERT program celebrates 30 years of service to Oregon, protecting life and the environment by responding to chemical emergencies and minimizing the dangers associated with them.

Register here to RSVP: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/media-field-day-and-open-house-tickets-59741241662.

For media inquiries, please contact: Rudy Owens, Public Affairs Specialist; Rudy.Owens@osp.oregon.gov; tel: 503.934.8217; cell: 971.332.0052.




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/1062/124793/hazmatbrochuresmall.pdf.pdf

Oregon Hosts International Association of Chiefs of Police Women's Leadership Institute in Salem (Photo)
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 05/23/19 11:32 AM
2019-05/1187/124792/class_with_instructors.jpg
2019-05/1187/124792/class_with_instructors.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/1187/124792/thumb_class_with_instructors.jpg

The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST), in partnership with the Oregon Association of Chiefs of Police (OACP) and the Oregon State Sheriff’s Association (OSSA) are proud to host the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP), Women’s Leadership Institute (WLI) in Salem. The class began on Sunday evening, May 19, 2019 and concludes on May 24, 2019

The IACP’s Women’s Leadership Institute (WLI) is a 40-hour course, focused on the unique challenges facing women leaders in law enforcement. The course develops current and future leaders and the curriculum focuses on enhancing the business, leadership, and personal effectiveness skills of female leaders.  The class is open to both male and female law enforcement agency leaders.

This interactive program uses senior women instructors and mentors from United States and Canadian law enforcement agencies and operates in an intensive, experiential learning environment. It is open to female and male, sworn and non-sworn personnel serving in supervisory positions, and senior patrol officers aspiring to become supervisors. The week-long class hosted at DPSST’s Oregon Public Safety Academy had 49 participants from 10 law enforcement agencies in Oregon.

The IACP has offered the WLI around the nation and since the program’s inception in 2013 this class has been offered by IACP at more than three dozen locations around the nation and also in Kathmandu, Nepal and Cape Town, South Africa. This delivery of the WLI class is unique as it’s only the second-time a state has hosted the class with all participants from city, county, and state agencies from the hosting state.  Oregon hosted this important training as a state both times, the first time in 2017.

The WLI curriculum includes the following topics: Individual Differences; Emotional Intelligence; Motivating Success; Leading Teams; Organizations and Change; Crucial Conversations and Counseling; Strategic Career Planning; Fair, Impartial & Ethical Policing; Understanding Human Bias; Leadership and Wellness; Financial Management; Networking and Mentorship; etc.

Two seasoned instructors delivered the class.  Miami Beach PD Chief of Staff Wendy Rich-Goldschmidt (former police chief in Colorado as well) and Retired Austin, TX Commander Cathy Haggerty, both members of the International Association of Chiefs of Police Women’s Leadership Institute training cadre.

Local women in leadership roles in Oregon law enforcement agencies participated in the program in both panel discussions and as mentors.  Captain Erica Hurley of the Portland Police Bureau, Lieutenant Caprice Massey of the Washington County Sheriff’s Office, Lieutenant Jennifer Bills of the Eugene Police Department, Chief Kathy McAlpine of the Tigard Police Department, Chief Kris Allison of the Central Point Police Department and President of the Oregon Association of Chiefs Police, Captain Stephanie Ingraham of the Oregon State Police and Captain Ronda Groshong of the Beaverton Police Department.

As city, county, tribal, state and university law enforcement agencies look to fill more than 1,000 vacancies statewide that are expected over the next two years as seasoned employees get ready for retirement we encourage interested applicants to look at www.OregonPoliceJobs.com.

 

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/1187/124792/class_with_instructors.jpg

173rd FW to conduct Memorial Day flyovers in Oregon (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 05/23/19 10:26 AM
Two U.S. Air Force F-15C Eagles from the 173rd Fighter Wing, Oregon Air National Guard, fly over Southern Oregon during a routing training mission. The 173rd FW is the sole F-15C training base for the U.S. Air Force. (Courtesy Photo)
Two U.S. Air Force F-15C Eagles from the 173rd Fighter Wing, Oregon Air National Guard, fly over Southern Oregon during a routing training mission. The 173rd FW is the sole F-15C training base for the U.S. Air Force. (Courtesy Photo)
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/962/124788/thumb_170111-Z-F3914-0001.jpg

KINGSLEY FIELD, Ore. – The 173rd Fighter Wing out of Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Ore. will conduct Memorial Day flyovers for ceremonies at locations throughout Oregon.

F-15 Eagle fighter jets are scheduled to conduct flyovers at the following community locations at, or around, the designated times on Monday, May 27. 

11:00 a.m. Veterans Memorial Park, Klamath Falls, Ore.

11:15 a.m. Eagle Point National Cemetery, Eagle Point, Ore.

11:30 a.m. Roseburg National Cemetery, Roseburg, Ore.

11:45 a.m. Memory Gardens, Medford, Ore.

11:53 a.m. Hillcrest Memorial Park, Medford, Ore.

12:00 p.m. Siskiyou Memorial Park, Medford, Ore.

12:15 p.m. Riverside Park, Grants Pass, Ore.

12:30 p.m. Brookings Harbor Port, Brookings, Ore.

12:40 p.m. Curry County Veterans Memorial, Gold Beach, Ore.

All passes will be approximately 1,000 feet above ground level and about 400 mph airspeed. Flights could be canceled or times changed due to inclement weather or operational contingencies.

The Oregon Air National Guard has been an integral part of the nation's air defense since 1941.  The 173rd FW is home to the sole F-15C pilot training facility for the United States Air Force.

 

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Attached Media Files: Two U.S. Air Force F-15C Eagles from the 173rd Fighter Wing, Oregon Air National Guard, fly over Southern Oregon during a routing training mission. The 173rd FW is the sole F-15C training base for the U.S. Air Force. (Courtesy Photo)

Tip of the Week for May 27- Pet Licensing
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/23/19 9:48 AM

A PET’S LICENSE IS THEIR TICKET HOME

Buying a license for your dog isn’t just about the law--it can save your dog’s life.  Anyone who has experienced the panic and sorrow of having a lost dog knows how important it is to license your pet.  Our dogs are our friends and companions, and they look to us for nearly everything: food, shelter, water and love.  They also need us to help bring them home if they wander.

One of the best and most basic things we can do for our dogs is to license them.  Our goal is to be able to reunite all lost dogs with their families, and you can help us reach that goal with increased dog licensing.  When Good Samaritans find stray dogs that are licensed, they can call the Lincoln County Animal Shelter or Dispatch to find your information, and your pet may never even have to come to the shelter.

While happy reunions are the most important consideration, failure to obtain a dog license can result in a $265 fine.  All dogs in the county are required to be licensed within thirty days of residence, whether or not you live in the city and whether or not your dog leaves your property.  While cat licenses are not required, they help the animal shelter reunite families with their feline friends, too.

You may easily purchase or renew a license by mail, at the Animal Shelter, or at many local veterinarians’ offices.  Applications and additional information are available online at www.LincolnCountyAnimalShelter.org.

WHY LICENSING IS IMPORTANT

 

  • License tags allow us to contact you as soon as possible--providing you peace of mind, leaving space at the shelter for another animal in need, and saving the community tax-payer money.
  • License fees support shelter programs and operations which provides approximately 1,000 animals with food, veterinary care, safe shelter, training, behavior enrichment, foster and adoption services each year.
  • License fees support field services and investigations to address loose pets, aggressive dogs, and bite reports.
  • License fees allow Animal Services to investigate, seize, and care for animals who are victims of cruelty and neglect.
  • Fees support our pet retention programs, including distribution of over 1,000 pounds of pet food from our food bank each month, to help people keep pets in their homes.
  • Last year, our redemption rate was over 90% for dogs, well above the national average, but only 4% for cats. Our goal is to reunite all lost pets with their families.
  • If your animal is found injured and wearing its license, it is much easier for us to obtain emergency medical attention for him or her and contact you with the details.
  • Identification is critically important for your pet in the event of a manmade or natural disaster.
  • If your dog is impounded and is current on its license and altered, then the first $30 impound fee is waived (but if they are impounded again, the second impound fee must be paid).
  • License fees are an important way the community supports our policy of not euthanizing for space and finding new homes to as many animals as possible.

 

Please keep your pets safe with a license, ID tag, and microchip, and remember to search for your lost pet at the Lincoln County Animal Shelter at 510 NE Harney St. in Newport and by calling 541-265-6610.

 

For more information and tips, visit our web site at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and Like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/5490/124787/052719_Pet_Licensing.pdf

OnPoint Community Credit Union Announces Winners for the 2019 Prize for Excellence in Education (Photo)
OnPoint Community Credit Union - 05/23/19 8:12 AM
Left to Right: K-8 Finalist Nadia Boria, K-8 Educator of the Year Francesca Aultman, OnPoint Community Credit Union President & CEO Rob Stuart, 9-12 Educator of the Year Tori Sharpe, and 9-12 Finalist Joe Minato
Left to Right: K-8 Finalist Nadia Boria, K-8 Educator of the Year Francesca Aultman, OnPoint Community Credit Union President & CEO Rob Stuart, 9-12 Educator of the Year Tori Sharpe, and 9-12 Finalist Joe Minato
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/963/124785/thumb_On_Point_20190521_0189_(002).jpg

PORTLAND, Ore., May 23, 2019—OnPoint Community Credit Union has announced its Educator of the Year award winners. Francesca Aultman was named the K–8 Educator of the Year and Tori Sharpe was named the 9–12 Educator of the Year. Both winners will have their mortgages paid for one full year, and a $2,500 donation will be awarded to their schools for resources and supplies.

The OnPoint Prize for Excellence in Education is an annual award that recognizes educators throughout Oregon and Southwest Washington for their exceptional work to inspire students and positively impact their schools and communities. Currently celebrating its 10th year, the campaign has awarded more than $365,000 in prizes to over 275 local educators and schools. 

“Even beyond their direct work with students, inspiring and innovative teachers have a positive impact on our entire community,” said OnPoint Community Credit Union President and CEO Rob Stuart. “We have a rich history supporting educators, having been founded by 16 schoolteachers more than 85 years ago, and the OnPoint Prize for Excellence in Education is one way we showcase the exceptional work they continue to provide today.”

K – 8 Educator of the Year

Francesca Aultman- 5th Grade; Gilbert Heights Elementary School; Portland, Oregon

Francesca is a beacon of equity at Gilbert Height Elementary. She helps her students overcome their struggles, build confidence and achieve their goals. She has shifted her curriculum to reflect the diverse student groups through incorporating texts such an Esperanza Rising and lessons that are relevant to her students. During the most recent school year, 89 percent of her students passed the SBAC English Language Arts test. She has demonstrated a track record of above-average student growth for both gifted and struggling students. Francesca inspires other educators to do their best work. She also serves on four different school improvement teams and has served as a member of Gilbert Height’s Building Leadership Team, 21st Century Site Council, Student Support Team and as a teacher representative for the Core Literacy Team.

9- 12 Educator of the Year

Tori Sharpe- English, AVID, ELL; Skyview High School; Vancouver, Washington

As an English, AVID and ELL teacher, Tori strives to create mutual respect among her students. She empowers her students to share their needs, assess their own learning and display their knowledge in the way that is best for them. Tori utilizes international exchange, videos, music, pop culture, traditional essays, reading, classroom collaboration and presentations as creative teaching tools. A few of the incredible projects Tori’s students have completed include six-word memoirs, a This I Believe speech unit and a Edgar Allen Poetry Off. She works to build community inside and outside her school by facilitating volunteer opportunities at the Vancouver Bike Parade and Randall Children’s Hospital. She acts as a leader at Skyview through the expansion of the school’s English Language Development Classes, leading professional development on ELL techniques, acting as the girls wrestling coach and implementing family engagement nights. Tori inspires learning and creativity through her teaching.

Educator of the Year Finalists

OnPoint will award $5,000 to the following 2019 finalists and make a $1,500 donation to their schools for resources and supplies:

  • Nadia Boria – K-8 Finalist; 3rd grade; Scouters Mountain Elementary School; Happy Valley, Oregon
  • Joe Minato – 9-12 Finalist; AP Physics I and Science Research; Wilson High School; Portland, Oregon

Circle of Excellence

Six additional teachers have been named to the Circle of Excellence. These educators will each receive a $1,500 cash prize and a $1,000 donation to their school.

  • Michelle Colbert – Art, Fir Ridge Campus Alternative School, Portland, Oregon
  • Stephanie Fitzgerald – 7th and 8th Grade Math, Colton Middle School, Damascus, Oregon
  • Brandon Ramey – Health and PE, Newberg High School, Newberg, Oregon
  • Myron Ryan – Metalworking and Manufacturing, Franklin High School, Portland, Oregon
  • Kellie Tichenor – 1st Grade, West Tualatin View Elementary, Portland, Oregon
  • Greg Wognild – Drama, Coding/Computer Science, Woodshop, Sky View Middle School, Bend, Oregon

2019 Community Builder Award Recipients:

OnPoint also announced the recipients of the Community Builder Award. The following four schools will receive a $1,000 donation to help fund a special school project. One school, selected by community votes, will receive a $2,000 donation.

  • Bridger Elementary School Portland, Oregon – Bridger Scholars Program
  • Molalla High School – Molalla, Oregon – Friendship Courtyard
  • Prescott Elementary School – Portland, Oregon – SUN School Homework
  • Tucker Maxon School – Portland, Oregon – Special Needs Projector/Sound System
  • Vose Elementary – Beaverton, Oregon – Ballet Folklorico After School Club

Learn more about the OnPoint Prize for Excellence in Education and our winners at www.onpointprize.com.

ABOUT ONPOINT COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION

OnPoint Community Credit Union is the largest credit union in Oregon, serving more than 370,000 members and with assets of $5.5 billion. Founded in 1932, OnPoint Community Credit Union's membership is available to anyone who lives or works in one of 13 Oregon counties (Benton, Clackamas, Columbia, Crook, Deschutes, Jefferson, Lane, Linn, Marion, Multnomah, Polk, Washington and Yamhill) and two Washington counties (Skamania and Clark) and their immediate family members. More information is available at www.onpointcu.com or 503-228-7077 or 800-527-3932.

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Attached Media Files: Left to Right: K-8 Finalist Nadia Boria, K-8 Educator of the Year Francesca Aultman, OnPoint Community Credit Union President & CEO Rob Stuart, 9-12 Educator of the Year Tori Sharpe, and 9-12 Finalist Joe Minato

Oregon Man Sentenced to 15 Months in Federal Prison for Hate Crime Targeting Eugene Church
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 05/23/19 7:24 AM

EUGENE, Ore.—Benjamin Jaramillo Hernandez, 69, of Eugene, Oregon, was sentenced today to 15 months in federal prison and three years’ supervised release for committing a hate crime targeting St. Mary Catholic Church in Eugene in September 2018 and illegally possessing ammunition. The announcement was made by Assistant Attorney General Eric Dreiband of Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division and U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams of the District of Oregon.

“Threats of violence and hateful intimidation will not be tolerated by the Department of Justice,” said Assistant Attorney General Dreiband. “As demonstrated by this case, the Civil Rights Division will vigorously prosecute those who violate the right of individuals or entire communities to freely exercise their religious beliefs.”

“Mr. Hernandez used intimidation and threats of violence to terrorize a single congregation, but the harm from hate crimes like this extends beyond the specific individuals or group targeted. These crimes threaten the security, freedom and well-being of entire communities,” said U.S. Attorney Williams. “No conviction can reverse the harm caused by Mr. Hernandez, but we hope it provides some measure of justice to St. Mary parishioners and the entire Eugene community.”

“Our right to worship freely and without fear is fundamental to life in America,” said Renn Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon. “Whatever your faith, the FBI and our partners will work to protect your right to express your beliefs and live in peace.”

According to court documents, on Sept. 9, 2018, Hernandez was escorted from St. Mary property following an angry outburst during the sacrament of communion. Five days later, on September 14, a church employee reported to the Eugene Police Department that someone had dispensed pepper spray on the exterior door handles and through the mail slot of the St. Mary office front door. Employees reported burning sensations in their fingers and respiratory distress. A Eugene police officer and FBI agent identified Hernandez in church surveillance footage as the person responsible for both incidents.

On Sept. 16, 2018, Hernandez was again spotted near St. Mary. A witness saw Hernandez across the street from the church when he stopped near the Eugene Public Library and shouted at the witness, “I’ve got something for you right here,” while pointing to a bag he was carrying.

A few days later, on Sept. 20, St. Mary employees reported finding a threatening note and seven 10mm Sig hollow point bullets left in the office. The note threatened the church with “2 MP5s w/ 50 rounds each,” a type of submachine gun. The note concluded: “Eugene is going on the [expletive] map.”

A Eugene police officer again reviewed church surveillance footage and identified Hernandez as the individual who dropped off the note and bullets. On September 21, 2018, Eugene Police arrested Hernandez at the Eugene Public Library. During a search of Hernandez’s person, officers located a partially empty can of pepper spray, three .410 shotgun shells, and thirteen 10mm Sig hollow point bullets. The 10mm bullets were the same brand and caliber as the bullets left at St. Mary with the threatening note.

On Feb. 12, 2019, Hernandez pleaded guilty to a two-count information charging him with obstruction or attempted obstruction of persons in the free exercise of their religious beliefs and unlawful possession of ammunition.

St. Mary Catholic Church staff and parishioners have reported that Hernandez’s threats have left staff and churchgoers physically injured, frightened, concerned about their own safety and unable to participate freely in the exercise of their religious beliefs. The harassment has not only affected individual parishioners, but the parish as a whole. Multiple members of the St. Mary community have reported that the church has experienced a drop in attendance and in weekly collections after Hernandez’s conduct.

This case was investigated by the Eugene Police Department and the FBI and prosecuted by Gavin W. Bruce, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon, and Cameron Bell, Trial Attorney for the Civil Rights Division.

For more information about the Department of Justice’s work to combat and prevent hate crimes, visit www.justice.gov/hatecrimes: a one-stop portal with links to department hate crimes resources for law enforcement, media, researchers, victims, advocacy groups, and other organizations and individuals.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Press Release

Wed. 05/22/19
Detectives Investigating Shots Fired Call in Green
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/22/19 5:44 PM

UPDATE 05/22/2019 5:45 PM

On May 19th, 2019, the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office responded to a report of a shots fired in the area of Highway 99 and Grant Smith Road, in the Green District.

Sheriff’s Office Detectives were activated and determined that an employee of a business in the area was leaving work, when she was shot at by a person who had been in the area.  The employee was being picked up in a vehicle when the attack occurred.  Neither the employee or the person providing the ride were injured in the attack, despite being fired at around 15 times.

The investigators were able to determine that the suspect in the case was 36 year-old Roseburg area resident, Joshua Preston.  The victim and suspect were known to each other.

On 05-21-19, at around 1750 hours, Joshua Preston was contacted by members of the Sheriff’s Office and taken into custody without incident.  He was lodged at the Douglas County Jail on multiple charges including;

  • Attempted Assault I
  • Felon in Possession of Firearm
  • Unlawful Use of a Weapon
  • Pointing a Firearm at another
  • Recklessly Endangering
  • Criminal Mischief II
  • Menacing

Investigators have learned there were other persons were in the area of the shooting when it occurred, but have yet to make contact with them.  Those persons may not be aware of what they were witness to, therefore are asked to please call into the Sheriff’s Office and speak with an investigator.  The case is continuing and the Sheriff’s Office is requesting anyone else with information about the incident to call the Douglas County Detectives Division at 541 440 4458. 

ORIGINAL RELEASE 05/20/2019

ROSEBURG, Ore. - Detectives are following up on leads after a vehicle was struck by gunfire in Green Sunday night. 

At about 10:22 pm, deputies were dispatched to investigate a report of shots fired in the area of Ladd Lane, but were unable to locate any witnesses or the source of the gunfire. 

At approximately 11:00 pm, dispatchers received a report from an individual who stated their vehicle had been struck by gunfire earlier in the evening near Taco Bell. No one was injured in the incident. 

Detectives were notified and are currently investigating the incident. Anyone with information is asked to contact the Investigations Division at 541-440-4458 or the non-emergency dispatch center at 541-440-4471.


Advance Directive Adoption Committee meets June 3
Oregon Health Authority - 05/22/19 4:44 PM

May 22, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7174, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Advance Directive Adoption Committee meets June 3

What: The first public meeting of the Advance Directive Adoption Committee.

Agenda: Review required work of committee, based on statute; elect a chair of the committee; review advance directive form.

When: June 3, 9 a.m. to noon. The meeting is open to the public. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Conference Room 1C, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland.

Oregon’s Advance Directive Adoption Committee provides guidance to the Oregon Health Authority on necessary revisions to Oregon’s Advance Directive form. The committee convenes for the first time in the spring of 2019. The committee reviews the Advance Directive form every four years.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Krasimir Karamfilov, 971-673-1222, 711 TTY, or asamir.karamfilov@dhsoha.state.or.us">krasamir.karamfilov@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group (TAG) meets May 23
Oregon Health Authority - 05/22/19 4:32 PM

May 22, 2018

Media contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us

CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group (TAG) meets May 23

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group.

When: May 23, 1-3 p.m.

Where: Five Oak Building, Suite 850, Mary Conference Room, 421 SW Oak St, Portland. Limited space is available. The public also may join remotely through a webinar and conference line at 415-655-0060, listen-only code 383-191-215.

Agenda: Welcome and introductions; updates; TAG input – updated obesity metrics specifications; review stakeholder survey results; Clinical Quality Metrics Registry (CQMR) update, and TAG input on continuous enrollment for electronic health record (EHR)-based measures; adjourn.

Program contact: Pete Edlund, 503-931-8873, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us.

For more information, please visit the committee's website.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund, 503-931-8873, 711 TTY, or .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Portland Man Pleads Guilty to Production of Child Pornography
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 05/22/19 1:52 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—Juan Carlos Ramon, 33, of Portland, pleaded guilty today to two counts of production of child pornography after sexually exploiting two minor victims, aged six and eight, using musical.ly, a social media application now known as TikTok.

According to court documents, on or about June 28, 2017, Ramon began communicating with two minors using the musical.ly app. He used the screen name “@lexithetiger” and pretended to be a minor female. Ramon encouraged his victims to play a “Simon Says” type game where he would send sexually explicit photos of a minor female and ask his victims to take and send him photos imitating the positions and acts depicted. The minor victims agreed and sent Ramon a series of progressively more explicit self-produced images. A relative of the two victims later discovered the communications and reported it to law enforcement.

Each count of production of child pornography carries a maximum sentence of 30 years in prison with a 15-year mandatory minimum, a $250,000 fine, a $5,000 special assessment and a life term of supervised release with a five-year mandatory minimum. Ramon will be sentenced on September 5, 2019 before U.S. District Court Judge Robert E. Jones.

As part of the plea agreement, Ramon has agreed to pay restitution to his victims identified by the government prior to sentencing and as ordered by the court.

This case was investigated by FBI Portland’s Child Exploitation Task Force (CETF) and is being prosecuted by Natalie Wight, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

This case was brought as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse. For more information about Project Safe Childhood, please visit www.justice.gov/psc.

The FBI’s Child Exploitation Task Force (CETF) conducts sexual exploitation investigations – many of them undercover – in coordination with other federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies. The Portland FBI’s CETF consists of agents and task force officers from the Beaverton Police Department, Portland Police Bureau, Tigard Police Department, Hillsboro Police Department, and the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office. The FBI’s CETF is committed to locating and arresting those who prey on children as well as recovering underage victims of sex trafficking and child exploitation.

Anyone who has information about the physical or online exploitation of children are encouraged to call the FBI at (503) 224-4181 or submit a tip online at www.fbi.gov/tips.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Press Release

Oregon State Police Trooper Nicolas Cederberg receives the National Public Safety Medal of Valor (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 05/22/19 1:45 PM
2019-05/1002/124768/Nic_4.jpg
2019-05/1002/124768/Nic_4.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/1002/124768/thumb_Nic_4.jpg

Today, Oregon State Police Trooper Nic Cederberg received the National Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor presented by the President of the United States. This is the highest national award for valor a public safety officer can receive. 

Nic was awarded this honor for his bravery shown on December 25, 2016, Christmas Day. Trooper Cederberg, on patrol alone and without cover, attempted to arrest a craven and desperate murder suspect. The suspect engaged Nic in a close quarters gun battle, with our OSP family member sustaining a dozen gunshot wounds and left clinging to life. That Christmas morning, Nic provided us all with the greatest gift imaginable, his determination and will to survive in the face of impossible odds.

Nic, who was a US Army veteran and who was a seven year veteran of the Oregon State Police at the time, has not yet been able to return to work due to the injuries sustained. Nic initially spent 48 long days in the hospital and continues to fight for a full recovery.

“The greatest gift the Oregon State Police has received is Nic’s pure determination to survive. Trooper Cederberg typifies the grit and perseverance of an OSP Trooper, humbly serving with distinction in the face of difficult circumstances. Nic, we love you and honor your service. All of Oregon celebrates your award of the Medal of Valor and the personal story it symbolizes.”- Superintendent Travis Hampton

“I am proud to have our Oregon State Police represented at the White House today by Trooper Cederberg. On Christmas Day 2016, he showed enormous courage in the most difficult of circumstances, and exemplified the kind of service and bravery the Medal of Valor represents. His life and community will be forever impacted by that night, and his experience is part of why I feel strongly that we need more troopers on Oregon’s highways. I wish Nic the best on his continued recovery and congratulate him for this distinguished recognition.” Governor Kate Brown

Every day, public safety officers risk their lives to protect America’s citizens and communities. To honor that commitment, Congress passed The Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor Act of 2001 (https://www.bja.gov/programs/medalofvalor/valor.html), which created the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor, the highest national award for valor by a public safety officer. The medal is awarded annually to public safety officers who have exhibited exceptional courage, regardless of personal safety, in the attempt to save or protect human life




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/1002/124768/Nic_4.jpg , 2019-05/1002/124768/Nic_3.jpg , 2019-05/1002/124768/Nic_2.jpg , 2019-05/1002/124768/Nic_1.jpg , 2019-05/1002/124768/Nic.jpg

Former Burns Municipal Airport Manager Sentenced to Probation for Stealing Surplus Federal Property
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 05/22/19 1:31 PM

EUGENE, Ore.—Jeffrey Robert Cotton, 45, the former Manager of the Burns Municipal Airport in Burns, Oregon, was sentenced today to 4 years’ probation and 300 hours of community service for stealing thousands of dollars of equipment that rightfully belonged to the City of Burns, by converting to his personal use property acquired through the Federal Personal Property Utilization Program.

The Federal Personal Property Utilization Program is intended to benefit state and local governments and eligible organizations by giving them property the federal government no longer needs at no cost.

According to court documents, between 2014 and 2016, Cotton acquired, allegedly on behalf of the airport, numerous pieces of federal excess property including a heater/air conditioner, commercial lighting sets and various trucks and vans, tractors, and other heavy equipment.

Throughout the acquisition process, Cotton failed to fully inform or notify the City of Burns, its mayor, city manager or city council of the federal excess property obtained on its behalf. Instead, Cotton illegally converted much of the property to his personal use, either by titling property in his own name or transferring the property to Emergency Equipment Solutions, Inc. (EES), a nonprofit fully owned and operated by Cotton.

When confronted with the theft, Cotton lied and misrepresented information regarding how he had obtained the property. Additionally, Cotton signed phony bills of sale falsely representing that EES had purchased the property. Records show thousands of dollars were transferred from EES to Cotton personally.

On April 11, 2019, Cotton pleaded guilty to two counts of theft from a local government receiving federal funds.

This case was investigated by the General Services Administration Office of Inspector General and the FBI, and was prosecuted by Gavin W. Bruce, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

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Attached Media Files: 2019-05/6325/124765/SENTENCING-Cotton-Final.pdf

Chinese National Pleads Guilty to Trafficking Counterfeit iPhones from Hong Kong
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 05/22/19 11:44 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.—Quan Jiang, 30, a Chinese national and former engineering student at Linn Benton Community College in Albany, Oregon, pleaded guilty today to one count of trafficking in counterfeit goods, specifically fake and altered Apple iPhones. Jiang would import the counterfeit devices from Hong Kong and submit them to Apple in exchange for genuine warranty replacement phones to be sold on the Chinese market.

“Counterfeiting undermines commerce and inevitably leads to increased prices for goods enjoyed by millions of consumers,” said Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon. “The investigators who worked this case and others like it provide an invaluable public service to American companies, entrepreneurs, and consumers alike in preserving a competitive market free of criminal interference.”

“Individuals who deal in counterfeit goods would have you believe that these are victimless crimes,” said Brad Bench, Special Agent in Charge of Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) Seattle. “Do not be fooled, they’re not. Not only do they hurt the economy and legitimate businesses, but they also impact consumers directly. HSI and our law enforcement partners will continue to fight counterfeiting across all industries.”

According to court documents, between January 1, 2016, and February 1, 2018, Jiang would regularly receive packages containing between 20 and 30 counterfeit iPhones from associates in Hong Kong. Using various assumed names, Jiang would submit each iPhone to Apple individually in person or online for a warranty replacement; he would then ship the genuine replacement devices he received back to China for resale. In exchange for his service, Jiang’s associate would pay Jiang’s mother, also residing in China, who would in turn deposit the money into Jiang’s bank account.

Jiang later admitted to investigators that he knew the devices were counterfeit and that it was illegal to submit them to Apple as genuine products still under warranty. In just over two years, Jiang imported more than 2,000 inoperable counterfeit iPhones. He ultimately obtained approximately 1,500 genuine replacement iPhones, each with an approximate resale value of $600.

Jiang faces a maximum sentence of ten years in prison, a $2,000,000 fine or twice his proceeds, whichever is greater, and three years of supervised release. He will be sentenced on August 28, 2019 before U.S. District Court Judge Anna J. Brown.

As part of the plea agreement, Jiang has agreed to pay $200,000 in restitution to Apple.

This case was investigated by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Homeland Security Investigations (ICE-HSI) and prosecuted by Ryan W. Bounds, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Press Release

Health advisory issued May 22 for water contact at D River Beach
Oregon Health Authority - 05/22/19 11:05 AM

May 22, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7174, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Health advisory issued May 22 for water contact at D River Beach

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) issued a public health advisory today for higher-than-normal levels of bacteria in ocean waters at D River Beach, located in Lincoln County.

Water samples indicate higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria, which can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. People should avoid direct contact with the water in this area until the advisory is lifted. This applies especially to children and the elderly, who may be more vulnerable to waterborne bacteria.

Increased pathogen and fecal bacteria levels in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources such as stormwater runoff, sewer overflows, failing septic systems, and animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

While this advisory is in effect at D River Beach, visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Even if there is no advisory in effect, officials recommend avoiding swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

Although state officials advise against water contact, they continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk even during an advisory. Neighboring beaches are not affected by this advisory.

The status of water contact advisories at beaches is subject to change. For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0482, or 877-290-6767 (toll-free).

Since 2003 state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state organizations participating in this program are the OHA, Department of Environmental Quality, and Parks and Recreation Department.

# # #

https://bit.ly/2Hvf99v


Oregon Lottery Receives National Financial Reporting Award
Oregon Lottery - 05/22/19 9:19 AM

May 22, 2019 - Salem, Oregon – For the 11th consecutive year, the Oregon Lottery has received the Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting.

The Certificate of Achievement is the highest form of recognition in the area of governmental accounting and financial reporting, and its attainment represents a significant accomplishment by a government and its management.

The award is presented each year by the Government Finance Officers Association of the United States and Canada. The Oregon Lottery received the award for its comprehensive annual financial report (CAFR).

The CAFR has been judged by an impartial panel to meet the high standards of the program including demonstrating a constructive “spirit of full disclosure” to clearly communicate its financial story and motivate potential users and user groups to read the CAFR.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets April 25, 1985, it has earned nearly $12 billion for economic development, public education, state parks, watershed enhancements, veteran services and Outdoor School.

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Apartment Fire 100 Block of NE 60th Street
Newport Fire Department - 05/22/19 8:30 AM

At 3:27 AM on Wednesday, May 22, 2019, Newport Fire Department was dispatched to a report of a fire in the second story of an apartment on NE 60th Street. Upon arrival observed fire coming out of the back deck area of a corner unit.
Fire crews made access and extinguished the fire, which had just started to extend into the attic. The adjacent unit was checked for damage. There was some water damage to this unit and the unit below the fire. Crews remained on scene for about 2 ½ hours overhauling the structure. Residents from 4 units were displaced and are being sheltered by the Red Cross. One resident was taken to the hospital in stable condition.
Newport Fire Department received mutual aid assistance from Depoe Bay Fire District, Seal Rock Fire District, Toledo Fire Department and North Lincoln Fire & Rescue. Newport Police Dept. and Pacific West Ambulance provided assistance. Newport Fire Department responded with 2 fire engines, 1 ladder truck, 1 chief officer and 10 firefighters.
The cause of the fire is under investigation. Newport Fire Department reminds you to have a working smoke detector and test it regularly.


Tue. 05/21/19
Public hearing June 4 for Preventive Health and Health Services Block Grant plan
Oregon Health Authority - 05/21/19 4:21 PM

May 21, 2019

What: A hearing to take public comments on Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division’s proposal for the use of funds from the Preventive Health and Health Services Block Grant.

Agenda: Review of Preventive Health and Health Services Block Grant proposal for October 2019 through September 2020. Public comment will be taken. Draft proposal will be posted at http://www.healthoregon.org/lhd.

When: June 4, 11-11:30 a.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 915, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland. A call-in option is available for remote attendance. Conference call number is 877-873-8017, participant code 767068#.

Program contact: Danna Drum, 503-957-8869, um@state.or.us">danna.k.drum@state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Danna Drum at 971-673-1223, 711 TTY or um@state.or.us">danna.k.drum@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2Hw7XtV


BLM honors outstanding volunteers at 'Making a Difference' awards ceremony
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 05/21/19 1:33 PM

WASHINGTON – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will honor some of their most dedicated volunteers this week at the agency’s 2019 Making a Difference National Volunteer Awards. Volunteers play a critical role in helping the BLM welcome millions of visitors annually to more than 245 million acres of public lands across the American West.

The annual awards, which recognize exceptional volunteer service on BLM-managed lands, will be presented during a special awards ceremony on Wednesday, May 22 at 1:00 p.m. EDT in Washington, D.C., and live via video teleconference on www.blm.gov/live

“It’s important to recognize and celebrate the contributions made by our dedicated volunteers,” said Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt. “I’m continually humbled and inspired by the enthusiasm and hard work of these outstanding individuals as each of you have made a lasting impact on our public lands. Thank you on behalf of the places you safeguard for all Americans, and thank you on behalf of the people whose lives you’ve touched through your generosity.”

In 2018, over 30,000 volunteers contributed nearly one million hours of service, providing the equivalent of more than $24 million in labor and enabling BLM to help more Americans experience their public lands. These hard-working volunteers help monitor trails, manage wild horses, keep campers safe, and provide environmental education, interpretation, and other visitor services.

“The BLM has only about 9,000 employees to sustainably manage hundreds of millions of acres of public lands for a range of multiple uses. While our employees are exceptionally dedicated, the support they receive from our volunteers is essential to helping our agency achieve its mission for the American people,” said Casey Hammond, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Land and Minerals Management, exercising the authority of the BLM Director. “It is a privilege to recognize these incredible people for their tireless efforts.”

The 2019 awardees and their BLM nominating offices are:

  • Tracy Greenwood, Lifetime Achievement, Mother Lode Field Office (CA), for consistent management of the Briceburg Visitor Center at the Merced River Recreation Area since 2000.
  • Walt & Kathy Horsfall, Lifetime Achievement, Safford Field Office (AZ), for their service to the Gila Box Riparian National Conservation Area, collecting data on hundreds of miles of roads around the Gila Box Riparian NCA.
  • Phil & Chriscinda Jamison, Lifetime Achievement, Northeastern States District (ES), for more than 15 years in support of the Wild Horse and Burro Program in the BLM Eastern States Office.
  • Thomas Parkinson & Peter Kearns, Outstanding Achievement, Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument (AZ), for 400 hours of volunteer service in 2018, contributing to multiple programs on the Parashant.
  • Pedal United Chapter of IMBA, Group Excellence, Billings Field Office (MT), for helping to develop more than 28 miles of mountain bike trails and a trailhead facility over the last four years.
  • Blake Ramos-Manz, Sergio Ramos-Manz, & Dylan Brennan, Outstanding Achievement, Wild Rivers Recreation Area (NM), for helping to manage the Wild Rivers Recreation Area, including five campgrounds, 27 campsites, and over 36 miles of trail.
  • Roy Thornton, Outstanding Achievement, Cottonwood Field Office (ID), for his volunteer service at  the BLM's Cottonwood Field Office recreation sites and campgrounds over the last eight years

A national panel of BLM specialists and partner organization representatives selected the winners for their exceptional contributions to conservation and management of public lands. 

For more information, please contact Linda Schnee, BLM National Volunteer Program Lead, at (202) 912-7453 or lschnee@blm.gov

-BLM-

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. Diverse activities authorized on these lands generated $96 billion in sales of goods and services throughout the American economy in fiscal year 2017. These activities supported more than 468,000 jobs.


Early results show fewer youth started smoking since Tobacco 21 took effect
Oregon Health Authority - 05/21/19 11:20 AM

March 21, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7174, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Early results show fewer youth started smoking since Tobacco 21 took effect

PORTLAND, Ore. — The Oregon Health Authority announced promising short-term outcomes of Senate Bill 754, which raised the age of purchase for tobacco and vaping products in Oregon from 18 to 21 years.

OHA found a significant decrease in youth (aged 13-17) and young adults (aged 18–20) who have started using tobacco since the law took effect Jan. 1, 2018. The evaluation also shows a decrease in young adults’ perceived ease of access to tobacco and vaping products.

"Tobacco 21 was enacted to help prevent young people from starting to use tobacco, and it’s working," said Tom Jeanne, MD, deputy state health officer and epidemiologist. "With this and our strong Indoor Clean Air Act, Oregon is a national leader in protecting youth from tobacco use."

In August 2017 Governor Kate Brown signed Senate Bill 754, making Oregon the fifth state to increase the age to purchase tobacco. To ensure compliance with the law, businesses that sell tobacco products and inhalant delivery systems such as e-cigarettes must post signs prohibiting sales of these products to persons under the age of 21.

Ending youth access to tobacco is only a minor cost for retailers but a huge gain for reducing tobacco-related deaths and diseases in Oregon’s next generation, Jeanne says.

Fewer current youth tobacco users reported purchasing tobacco products from convenience stores, grocery stores, or tobacco or vape shops after the legislation went into effect. However, statewide requests for proof of age by retailers did not change significantly, especially outside the Portland metro area. This is, in part, because Oregon is one of only nine states that does not have tobacco retail licensure.

"Nicotine is a poison and tobacco is sweet, cheap and easy to get in Oregon," Jeanne said. "Enforcing Tobacco 21 is vital, and there are other actions we can take to keep our momentum going. For example, we know that raising the price of tobacco keeps kids from starting and encourages people to quit. Our Legislature is considering several bills this session to increase the price of tobacco, e-cigarettes and other flavored tobacco products."

The evaluation of Tobacco 21 assessed short-term outcomes of the law in communities throughout Oregon. OHA contracted with RMC Research, an independent evaluator, to conduct the evaluation through online surveys with youth and young adult tobacco users before and nine months after the law took effect.

The report is available as a PDF at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/PREVENTIONWELLNESS/TOBACCOPREVENTION/Documents/Oregon-Tobacco-21-Impact-Evaluation-Report.pdf.

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https://bit.ly/2WXeGSV


Linda Maddy at DPSST Recognized by Port of Portland Police (Photo)
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 05/21/19 10:27 AM
Linda Maddy DPSST and Lt. Scott Creager of Port of Portland Police
Linda Maddy DPSST and Lt. Scott Creager of Port of Portland Police
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/1187/124722/thumb_Linda_Maddy_PDX_5-16-2019.jpg

Linda Maddy of the Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) was honored recently by the Port of Portland Police Department with a Community Partner Award.

Linda, a Licensed Clinical Social Worker with more than a decade of service, is one of two Coordinators assigned to DPSST's Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) / Mental Health Program which provide training to first responders around the state through Oregon's Crisis Intervention Team Center of Excellence (CITCOE).

The Community Partner Award is given by the Port of Portland Police Department to individuals and organizations who work with the police department to support the safety and security of those who work and travel through Portland International Airport (PDX).   

Over the past year, Linda has spent countless hours, and has delivered dozens of classes at PDX, in the area of mental health first aid, working with people in crisis, and other mental health topics for law enforcement officers and 9-1-1 telecommunicators at the airport.  In addition she has worked with Port of Portland Police to deliver a variety of classes to employees who work at the airport ranging from PDX staff, airline ticket and gate agents, and even rental car company staff who encounter people in crisis on a daily basis as PDX serves more than 19 million travelers each year.

DPSST's Director Eriks Gabliks said "Linda’s commitment to training excellence is appreciated and is one example of the great work done by the men and women at DPSST on a daily basis.  Linda's work with veterans, and public safety professionals, around the state is making a difference in how we respond to incidents involving people in crisis."

 ## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement.  Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, OLCC regulatory specialists, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.

 




Attached Media Files: Linda Maddy DPSST and Lt. Scott Creager of Port of Portland Police

Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Vacation Rental Scams (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 05/21/19 10:00 AM
TT - Vacation Rentals - GRAPHIC - May 21, 2019
TT - Vacation Rentals - GRAPHIC - May 21, 2019
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/3585/124279/thumb_TT_-_Vacation_rentals_-_GRAPHIC_-_May_20_2019.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: building a digital defense against vacation scams. 

The kids are almost out of school, and the weather is warming up… definitely a good time to start planning your next escape out of town. It seems like it has never been easier to find the perfect space in the perfect place to take your family. Want to rent a condo for a few nights in the big city? A cottage in the woods? Or a bungalow by the beach? There are tons of options for every kind of possible vacation, and you can find them all with a few quick clicks on the keyboard. 

Our friends at the Federal Trade Commission, though, have some advice to help make sure that your quest for rest and relaxation doesn’t lead you to a rental scam. 

Here’s how it can work: you find a great house or apartment listed for rent on the internet. The photos look great, and the rates are somewhere between very low and reasonable. You make contact with the person you think is the owner, book a date and pre-pay some or all of your fee. In some cases, a fraudster may have just lifted the info and pictures from a real listing and re-posted them elsewhere. He changes the contact info so you come to him, not the owner, and now he’s making money. 

In other cases, the fraudster posts a phantom listing… the rental doesn’t really exist. He promises all kinds of amenities, and you think you’ve just snagged a great option at a low price. All he has to do is get you to pay up before you figure things out. 

Here’s how to protect yourself: 

  • Be wary if the owner asks you to pay by wire transfer. This is like sending cash – you likely will never get your money back if there’s a problem. Use a credit card. 

  • Watch out if the owner says he is overseas and wants you to send a deposit to a foreign bank. If you are traveling overseas, again, your best bet is to use a credit card. 

  • Consider only using a reputable travel website to book your stay. Look for sites that use secure payment portals and/or those that don’t release the payment to the owner until you’ve checked in. 

  • Use mapping apps – like Google maps or similar – to confirm that the property really exists. 

Remember - if you have been victimized by an online scam, you can report your suspicious contacts to the FBI. You can file an online report at the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office. 

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Attached Media Files: TT - Vacation Rental Scams - AUDIO - May 21, 2019 , TT - Vacation Rentals - GRAPHIC - May 21, 2019

Commissions to meet in June for grant approvals
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 05/21/19 9:05 AM

The Oregon Heritage Commission will meet via teleconference at 10 a.m. on June 3. A public listening room will be provided in Room 146 of the North Mall Office Building, 725 Summer St. NE, Salem. Its agenda includes approval of Oregon Museum Grants and approval of minutes. Call +1 (646) 749-3122 and use access code 725-625-509.

 

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon's heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The mission of the Oregon Heritage Commission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity. For more information, contact coordinator Beth Dehn at 503-986-0696 or Beth.Dehn@oregon.gov

 

The Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries will meet via teleconference at 1 p.m. on June 7. Its agenda includes approval of Oregon Historic Cemeteries Grants. A public listening room will be provided in Room 146 of the North Mall Office Building, 725 Summer St. NE, Salem. Call +1 (224) 501-3412 and use access code 549-452-845.

 

State law established the seven-member Commission to maintain a listing of all historic cemeteries and gravesites in Oregon; promote public education on the significance of historic cemeteries; and help obtain financial and technical assistance for restoring, improving and maintaining their appearances. For more information about commission activities, contact coordinator Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail at i.gill@oregon.gov">kuri.gill@oregon.gov.

 

Commission meetings are open to the public and their agendas include opportunities for public comment. The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Special accommodations for the meeting – including translation services – may be made by calling (503) 986?0690 at least 72 hours prior to the start of the meeting.

 

For more information about the commissions, visit www.oregonheritage.org


Mon. 05/20/19
Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services committee holds town hall in Medford
Oregon Department of Human Services - 05/20/19 6:48 PM

Salem, Ore .– The Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services (ODHHS) Advisory Committee will hold a town hall in the large meeting room of the Medford Library, 205 S. Central Ave. in Medford, Oregon, from 6 to 8 p.m. on May 21.

The ODHHS Advisory Committee will also hold its full advisory committee meeting prior to the town hall from 2 to 4 p.m., May 21. The executive committee meeting will follow from 9 to 11 a.m., May 22, in the Carpenter Room at the Medford Library, 205 S. Central Ave., Medford, Oregon.

All three meetings are open to the public.

Agenda items for the full advisory committee and executive committee meetings will include: public comment, announcements, an update on the Office of Aging and People with Disabilities, brochures for the Advisory Committee and the ODHHS program, new membership discussion, retreat planning and discussion about bylaws.

Sign language interpreters, FM assistive listening devices and live captioning will be provided for each meeting. Those who are unable to attend in person may view real-time captioning at https://zoom.us/j/416452805 for the Advisory Committee meeting, https://zoom.us/j/795840168 for the Town Hall, and https://zoom.us/j/321918652 for the executive committee meeting.

For questions about these meetings, please contact: Barbara Robertson at 503-509-9550 or the ODHHS program at odhhs.info@state.or.us.

About the Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services Advisory Committee

The committee assists the Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services (ODHHS) program by providing  issues affecting individuals who are deaf, deaf-blind, hard of hearing and those with additional disabilities.

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TOMORROW: Eugene Rally to Stop Abortion Bans
Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon - 05/20/19 4:27 PM

A rally in downtown Eugene will be held at noon Tuesday to support the National Day of Action to Stop the Bans being led by reproductive freedom and justice groups across the country.

This day of action comes at a critical juncture in the fight for reproductive freedom and justice, as anti-abortion politicians push laws infringing on personal decisions that should be left to individuals and their doctors, with the goal of overturning and gutting Roe v. Wade. Former Eugene Mayor Kitty Piercy will join the rally in speaking to what Oregon can do to stand up to these dangerous attacks on reproductive freedom.

WHAT: National Day of Action to Stop the Bans
WHO: NARAL Pro-Choice Oregon, Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon, ACLU of Oregon, Forward Together, Western States Center, Democratic Party of Oregon, Northwest Abortion Access Fund, Family Forward Action, NWGSD PDX, Emerge Oregon, AAUW Oregon
WHERE: Steps of the Wayne Lyman Morse U.S. Federal Courthouse, 405 E Eighth Ave.
WHEN: Noon-1pm Tuesday, May 21st

Sign up to receive more information on the National Day of Action by visiting www.StopAbortionBans.org.

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Campfire safety tips for your summer camping trip (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 05/20/19 3:30 PM
S'more at The Cove Palisades State Park
S'more at The Cove Palisades State Park
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/1303/124694/thumb_SMORE.jpg

Memorial Day is nearly here and for many Oregonians the holiday weekend is the start of their camping season in Oregon’s natural places. However, dry conditions are already present in many areas and Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) reminds visitors to enjoy their campfires responsibly.

“Regularly reviewing campfire safety practices, even if you’re a seasoned camper, is a good habit to get in to,” said Chris Havel, OPRD associate director. “It’s especially important if you’re camping with children or folks that are learning about responsible outdoor recreation.”

Follow these tips for a safe and enjoyable campfire:

  • Know before you go: research conditions for the area surrounding your campground. Fire restrictions may be in place at the park, county or state level.
  • Maintain campfire flames at knee height, or roughly two feet high. This helps prevent ash or embers from becoming airborne, especially during the dry summer months. If you see wind stirring up embers from your fire, play it safe and extinguish it.
  • Only build campfires in the existing fire ring in your campsite. Fire ring locations are carefully picked and park rangers clear vegetation around rings to create a safe buffer zone.
  • Always keep plenty of water nearby to extinguish your campfire. To put out your fire, drown the flames with water and stir the embers to make sure everything is wet. The stirring step is important: ash and wood debris often maintain heat and embers unless they are drowned out.
  • Beach campfires should be started on open sand, away from driftwood or vegetation. Use water to extinguish your beach fire, not sand. Covering the fire with sand will insulate the coals, keeping them hot enough to burn unsuspecting beachgoers hours or even days later.
  • For propane fire rings, follow the same safety precautions you would with a log-based campfire. Propane fire rings should be placed in, on or directly next to installed park fire rings.
  • Make sure everyone in your campsite, even children, is familiar with campfire safety. Always keep an eye on your campfire; many accidental fires are started because campers left their fire unattended for “just a minute.”

To reserve your stay at an Oregon state park, head to oregonstateparks.org.

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May is Wildfire Awareness Month. During May, the Oregon Department of Forestry, the Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal, the Office of Emergency Management, Keep Oregon Green, the U.S. Forest Service, OPRD and other federal, state and local emergency and response agencies are promoting programs and messages encouraging the public to work together in their local communities to prevent the risk of wildfire.




Attached Media Files: S'more at The Cove Palisades State Park , Family and campfire at L.L. Stub Stewart State Park

Committee to review historic building grant applications
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 05/20/19 2:45 PM

Two separate committees will meet to score and rank applications for the Preserving Oregon and Diamonds in the Rough Grant programs. The recommendations from the committees will be forwarded to the State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation for final review and approval on June 21 in Cottage Grove. Both meetings will be at the North Mall Office Building, 725 Summer Street, NE, and can also be accessed by phone.

The Diamonds in the Rough Grant committee will meet June 5, 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. in room 124A. Call in information is 1-877-402-9757, access code 4605348.

The Preserving Oregon Grant committee will meet June 10, 9:00 a.m. -12:30 p.m. in room 124A. Call in information is 1-877-402-9757, access code 4605348.

For information about the grants contact Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail: i.Gill@oregon.gov">Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov . The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Special accommodations for the meeting – including translation services – may be made by calling (503) 986?0690 at least 72 hours prior to the start of the meeting.


Oregon State Penitentiary reports two in-custody deaths (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 05/20/19 2:41 PM
Nickolas Kasemehas
Nickolas Kasemehas
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/1070/124691/thumb_Kasemehas_N.jpg

Two Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adults in custody died recently. Both were incarcerated at the Oregon State Penitentiary (OSP) in Salem and passed away in the infirmary while on hospice care. As with all in-custody deaths, Oregon State Police have been notified.

Ovid John Teixeira died May 18, 2019. He entered DOC custody on January 9, 2018, from Linn County with an earliest release date of October 13, 2020. Teixeira was 55 years old.

Nickolas John Kasemehas died May 20, 2019. He entered DOC custody on November 13, 2014, from Multnomah County with an earliest release date of May 20, 2022. Kasemehas was 78 years old.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,700 individuals who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state. While crime information is public record, DOC elects to disclose only upon request out of respect for any family or victims.

OSP is a multi-custody prison located in Salem that houses over 2,000 adults in custody. OSP is surrounded by a 25-foot-high wall with 10 towers. The facility has multiple special housing units including death row, disciplinary segregation, behavioral health, intermediate care housing, and an infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care. OSP participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including the furniture factory, laundry, metal shop, and contact center. It provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, work-based education, work crews, and pre-release services. OSP was established in 1866 and, until 1959, was Oregon’s only prison.

 

####

 

 




Attached Media Files: Nickolas Kasemehas , Ovid Teixeira

Citizen Alert Test Scheduled for Wednesday (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/20/19 2:39 PM
Citizen Alert image
Citizen Alert image
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The following release is sent on behalf of Jackson County Emergency Management:

Rogue Valley Citizen Alert Test Scheduled For Wednesday, May 22

If you get a phone call, text message or email from Citizen Alert on May 22, don’t be concerned – it’s an annual test of our Emergency Notification System. The test is scheduled to begin at 10 a.m.

Jackson and Josephine County Emergency Management conduct annual tests of the Citizen Alert Emergency Notification System. Citizen Alert is used to notify residents of important public safety information, such as wildfire evacuations, hazardous materials incidents, or even a fugitive or missing person in your area. Testing the system allows emergency management staff and citizens to practice using the system, as if a real emergency has occurred.

All landline telephones in both Jackson and Josephine Counties will be alerted during this test. Other forms of communication (such as cell phones and email) will be sent to those who have signed up in Citizen Alert.  Landline phone numbers (both published and non-published) are automatically provided to the emergency notification system by the phone company; however, many people don’t have a landline phone anymore. Cellular companies do not provide telephone numbers to the system. If you do not have a landline telephone at your home or business, we do not have your information and therefore, we cannot alert you about potentially dangerous situations.

Signing up for Citizen Alert enables you to receive timely notifications wherever you are.  Jackson and Josephine County Emergency Management will not share your information with anyone. Your information is only used to send you emergency information, and (if you choose) important community alerts.

To sign up for Citizen Alert, visit Rogue Valley Emergency Management at www.RVEM.org.

###




Attached Media Files: Citizen Alert image

Deputies Begin "Click It or Ticket" Patrols (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/20/19 2:28 PM
Click It or Ticket image
Click It or Ticket image
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/6186/124688/thumb_click_it_or_ticket.png

JACKSON COUNTY, Ore. – Jackson County Sheriff’s Office (JCSO) deputies are kicking off two weeks of focused enforcement aimed at saving lives on the road.  JCSO joins law enforcement agencies across the nation for the “Click It or Ticket” enforcement campaign. 

Deputies will be adding patrols from May 20 to June 2, 2019, to ensure that drivers and passengers are wearing their seat belts.  Grant funding allows JCSO to add the enforcement patrols without reducing the number of deputies available for regular calls for service.

“Oregon has a relatively high usage rate for seat belts,” said Sgt. Julie Denney. “But we still see deaths and injuries that could have been prevented if people had buckled up.”

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), there were more than 10,000 unbuckled vehicle occupants killed in crashes in the United States in 2017.  Fifty-one percent of men killed in crashes were not buckled up, compared to 39 percent of women.  Many crash fatalities involving unrestrained passengers also involve impairment or distractions.

The bottom line, according to NHTSA:  wear your seat belt every time—no matter how uncomfortable it feels or how far you're going.  It could save your life.

###




Attached Media Files: Click It or Ticket image

Eugene man's first Oregon's Game Megabucks win is $3.2 million (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 05/20/19 1:26 PM
2019-05/4939/124684/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg
2019-05/4939/124684/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg
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May 20, 2019 - Salem, Ore. – Mark Bennett of Eugene hadn’t even won so much as free ticket while playing Oregon’s Game Megabucks – until last week when his monthly ticket purchase was worth $3.2 million.
“I like the game, but I had never won anything,” Bennett said. “I always get the 26 draws, then put the ticket away until it is up and get another one.” Players can purchase Oregon’s Game Megabucks tickets for up to 26 draw dates.
Bennett said he purchased a ticket in April from the Jasper’s on Coburg Road in Eugene, and put it away, until recently when he couldn’t sleep. Officials from Jasper’s said it was their first big win at that location.
"To hear one of our guests won the Megabucks jackpot was incredible news!” said Tezra Kong, Director of Operations for Jasper’s. “This will be something our team will be talking about for years to come.  We are very excited for our lucky guest, and his good fortune.  We look forward to sharing some of the seller's bonus with the team that provided the exceptional guest service at Sheldon Jasper's."
For selling the winning ticket Jasper’s will receive a 1-percent selling bonus, $32,000.
Bennett took the opportunity to bring the ticket to the Oregon Lottery for validation before he claimed his prize. A little-used option allows players to bring in a winning jackpot ticket to Lottery headquarters to have the ticket validated. The Oregon Lottery will then hold the winning ticket up to 60 days while the winner determines to the best option for them to claim the jackpot.
A few days later Bennett came back to the Lottery office after talking with his accountant. He took the bulk sum payment of $1.6 million. After taxes he took home $1.08 million.
“I am going to use the money to set up education funds for my grandchildren,” Bennett said.
During the 2015-17 biennium, more than $50 million in Oregon Lottery proceeds were directed to economic development, parks, education and watershed enhancement in Lane County, where Bennett lives and purchased the ticket. Since 1985, Oregon Lottery players have won more than $38 billion in prizes.
The Oregon Lottery reminds players to always sign the back of their Lottery tickets, regardless of the game. In the event of winning a jackpot, they should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 are advised to contact the Lottery office and schedule an appointment to claim their prize.
Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned nearly $12 billion for economic development, public education, state parks, Veterans services and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org
 




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/4939/124684/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg , 2019-05/4939/124684/OL_LOGO_HORZ.jpg

Updated: Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Taskforce to meet May 23 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 05/20/19 12:59 PM

Updated with call-in information

May 20, 2019

Media contact: Saerom England, 971-239-6483, om.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us">saerom.y.england@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Taskforce to meet May 23 in Portland

What: Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Taskforce

Agenda: Welcome, taskforce purpose and outcomes, agenda review, introductions, background on formation of the Taskforce, principles for guidelines, key components for inclusion in the guidelines, next steps and summary

When: Thursday May 23, 2019 from 1:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building (PSOB), 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland Oregon Conference Line: 1-888-278-0296 Public Meeting ID: 843163.

.For more information, please visit the Opioid Prescribing Guidelines Task Force website.

Program contact: Lisa Bui, 971-673-3397, ootg.info@dhsoha.state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Lisa Bui, 971-673-3397, 711 TTY, or ootg.info@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Keep your family safe from the West Nile Virus this summer
Oregon Health Authority - 05/20/19 12:11 PM

Update for news stations: Raw sound on tape and B-roll https://youtu.be/YRWZfA3iEF4

Spanish / Español

May 20, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7174, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Keep your family safe from the West Nile Virus this summer

As the weather continues to warm up, health officials say it’s important for people to protect themselves from disease-carrying mosquitoes. One of the illnesses to avoid is the potentially deadly West Nile virus.

About one in five infected people may show signs of West Nile virus. People at risk of serious illness include individuals 50 and older, and people with immune-compromising conditions, such as diabetes and high blood pressure.

West Nile symptoms may include fever above 100 degrees and severe headache, stiff neck, mental confusion, muscle weakness, shaking, paralysis or rash. People should contact their health care provider if experiencing any of these symptoms.

Health officials are advising people to take precautions against mosquitoes to avoid the risk of infection, including preventing mosquito bites. West Nile is spread to humans through the bite of an infected mosquito.

"It’s very easy for people to prevent bites from mosquitoes that may carry West Nile virus," said Dr. Emilio DeBess, public health veterinarian at the Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division. "Although the risk of contracting West Nile virus is low, people can take simple precautions to keep these insects at bay if they’re headed outdoors."

To prevent the spread of West Nile virus:

  • Eliminate sources of standing water that are a breeding ground for mosquitoes. This includes watering troughs, bird baths, clogged gutters and old tires.
  • When engaged in outdoor activities at dusk and dawn when mosquitoes are most active, protect yourself by using mosquito repellants containing DEET, oil of lemon eucalyptus or Picardin, and follow the directions on the container.
  • Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants in mosquito-infested areas.
  • Make sure screen doors and windows are in good repair and fit tightly.

In 2018, there were two human cases of West Nile virus in two Oregon counties: Harney and Clackamas. The virus was found in one bird, 58 mosquito pools — samples of about 50 mosquitoes each — and two horses. In 2017, seven humans, 92 mosquito pools, five horses and one bird tested positive for West Nile. The virus also can be found in chickens, squirrels and dogs.

Climate change, particularly effects such as increased temperature and changes in rainfall, have led to longer mosquito seasons and are contributing to the spread of West Nile virus, health officials say. They agree these and other climate change indicators must be considered to help people better prepare for future transmission of the disease.

Additional information about West Nile virus is available on the Oregon Health Authority website, and from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

# # #

https://bit.ly/2wbuwxv

West Nile virus overview from Dr. Emilio DeBess, OHA Public Health Veterinarian


Fatal Crash Highway 126W near Veneta -- Lane County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 05/20/19 11:58 AM
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Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into Saturday afternoon’s multi-vehicle fatal crash on 126W near Veneta. 

On May 18, 2019 at about 3:30 PM, OSP and first responders were dispatched to a multi-vehicle crash on Highway 126W near milepost 50.

Preliminary investigation revealed that several eastbound vehicles were stopped on 126W near the intersection of Lake Side Drive waiting for a vehicle to make a turn.  A Chevrolet pickup operated by Thomas HILL, age 39, from Eugene, was eastbound and failed to observe traffic coming to a stop.  The Chevrolet pickup rear ended a Dodge pickup, operated by Christopher STUART, age 29 from Florence.  The impact caused the Dodge pickup to go into the westbound lane where it crashed into a  Ford Focus operated by Jennifer STEPHENSON, age 37, from Noti. 

STEPHENSON suffered fatal injuries from the impact.  STEPHENSON’s passenger, Matthew MARCUERQIAGA, age 39, from Noti, sustained serious injuries and was transported to Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend.  STUART sustained critical injuries and was also transported to Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend. 

Highway 126W was closed for about two hours during the investigation.

OSP was assisted by Lane County Sheriff’s Office, ODOT and Veneta Fire. 

Photograph provided by OSP. 

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ###
Twitter: @ORStatePolice
Facebook: @ospsocial




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/1002/124677/SP19-174466_Fatal_(21).JPG

Click It or Ticket Campaign
Roseburg Police Dept. - 05/20/19 11:04 AM

Thanks to a generous grant through Oregon Impact and the Oregon Department of Transportation, the Roseburg Police department will be having Officers work shifts that specifically focus on specific traffic offenses.  From May 20th through June 2nd, 2019 they will be focusing on seat belt and child restraint usage, texting while driving, and speeding.

Enforce Lifesaving Laws

  • Click It or Ticket isn’t about citations; it’s about saving lives. In 2017, there were 10,076 unbuckled passenger vehicle occupants killed in crashes in the United States. To help prevent crash fatalities, we need to step up enforcement and crack down on those who don’t wear their seat belts.
  • Seat belt use is required by law for a reason: In 2017, seat belts saved an estimated 14,955 lives of occupants 5 and older. From 2013 to 2017, seat belts saved nearly 69,000 lives.
  • If all passenger vehicle occupants 5 and older involved in fatal crashes had worn their seat belts, an additional 2,549 lives could have been saved in 2017 alone.

For more information on the Click It or Ticket mobilization, please visit www.nhtsa.gov/ciot.    


DPSST Basic Police Revision Advisory Panel Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 05/20/19 11:02 AM

For Immediate Release                                        

May 16, 2019

Contact:    Staci Yutzie
                 503-378-2426

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Basic Police Revision Advisory Panel for Phase 3 will hold a regular meeting on June 6, 2019 from 10:00a-2:00p.  The meeting will be held in the Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, Oregon. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

Agenda Items:

I.   Welcome- Ryan Keck

II.  Basic Police Revision Overview- Ryan Keck and Staci Yutzie

  1. Phase 1 & 2 Product
  2. Phase 3 Goal
  3. Phase 4 Plan

III.  Metrics- Dr. Stephen James

IV.  Advisory Panel Tasks

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Basic Police Revision Advisory Panel members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


Meth seizure and arrest (Photo)
Douglas Interagency Narcotics Team (DINT) - 05/20/19 10:28 AM
2019-05/6255/124670/House.jpeg
2019-05/6255/124670/House.jpeg
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The Douglas Interagency Narcotics Team (DINT) has been investigating the activities of 58 year old Ron House.  House has been alleged to be using and selling controlled substances from his residence in the 600 block of Parrott Street in Roseburg.  

The ongoing investigation led to the seizure of a substantial amount of methamphetamine in recent weeks.  

On Friday, May 17th, DINT detectives, with help from the Roseburg Police Department, conducted a traffic stop on a vehicle in the 1300 block of NE Stephens Street in Roseburg.  Ron House was an occupant of the vehicle and he was detained without incident.  A search of the vehicle revealed approximately a half pound of methamphetamine.

A search of House's residence in the 600 block of Parrott Street revealed approximately another half pound of methamphetamine, a small amount of cocaine, and other drug paraphernalia such as scales used to weigh drugs, and packaging materials.  

House was lodged at the Douglas County Jail on the following charges:

  • 2 counts of Unlawful Possession of Methamphetamine.
  • 2 counts of Unlawful Delivery of Methamphetamine.
  • 1 count of Unlawful Possession of Cocaine.



Attached Media Files: 2019-05/6255/124670/House.jpeg

Fatal Crash Territorial Highway & High Pass Road near Junction City -- Lane County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 05/20/19 10:11 AM
2019-05/1002/124668/DSC00946.JPG
2019-05/1002/124668/DSC00946.JPG
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Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into Friday morning’s two vehicle fatal crash on Territorial Highway and High Pass Road near Junction City. 

On May 17, 2019 at about 10:20 AM, OSP troopers and first responders were dispatched to a two vehicle fatal crash at the intersection of Territorial Highway and Highway Pass Road. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Chevy Cavalier, operated by Russell Lee NICKERSON, age 81, from Eugene was traveling westbound on High Pass Road when for unknown reasons he failed to stop at the intersection.  NICKERSON’s vehicle was struck by a  Ford Econoline Van, operated by Cary Allen RAMSAY (male), age 55, from Eugene. 

NICKERSON suffered fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene.  RAMSAY was transported to Riverbend Hospital with serious injuries. 

Territorial Highway was closed for approximately four hours following the crash. 

OSP was assisted by Lane County Sheriff's Office, ODOT, Junction City Fire and Lane Fire Authority.

Photograph provided by OSP.

### www.oregon.gov/OSP ### 
Twitter: @ORStatePolice 
Facebook: @ospsocial




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/1002/124668/DSC00946.JPG

Sun. 05/19/19
Dance Party with Trail Blazers' DJ O.G. One at Sunday Parkways Today! (Photo)
Kaiser Permanente Northwest - 05/19/19 8:30 AM
Kermit rides Southeast Portland Sunday Parkways
Kermit rides Southeast Portland Sunday Parkways
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/5557/124618/thumb_1._kermit.jpg

When: 
Media invited from 11 a.m. to noon on Sunday, May 19

Where:
Laurelhurst Park
Kaiser Permanente "Music Is Medicine" booth at Southeast 37th Avenue and Oak Street

What: 
Kaiser Permanente returns for the 12th year as Presenting Sponsor of Portland Sunday Parkways, kicking off the season in Southeast Portland. Visit Laurelhurst Park from 11 a.m. to noon for highlights including a silent dance party with Trail Blazers’ DJ O.G. One, a flash mob of doctors in white coats on bikes, and “prescriptions” for healthy food, exercise, dance and play at four Kaiser Permanente event booths. Participants visiting all five Kaiser Permanente and Biketown booths will get a prize and a donation to mental health organizations in our community.

Why:
Kaiser Permanente is deeply committed to the total health and wellness of the communities we serve. Being active, eating nutritious food, and playing with friends and neighbors at Sunday Parkways is part of our investment in keeping Portland healthy.

Interviews:

  • Dr. Imelda Dacones, President and CEO for Northwest Permanente (the physician group of Kaiser Permanente)
  • Dan Field, Executive Director of Community Health for Kaiser Permanente’s Northwest region

Visuals: 

  • Opportunities for photos and videos of Portlanders (last year’s attendance 24,000) coming together to bike, walk and run a 7-mile traffic-free route, while enjoying food, live music, fun and games.
  • Doctor Flash Mob ride: Approximately 25 doctors in white lab coats will depart on bikes from the Kaiser Permanente Booth at Laurelhurst Park at 11:30 a.m.
  • Silent Dance Party with Trail Blazers’ DJ O.G. One at Kaiser Permanente's “Music Is Medicine Booth” at Laurelhurst Park.

Background:

  • Kaiser Permanente is the founding and Presenting Sponsor of Portland Sunday Parkways for the 12th year, and is proud to support the City of Portland in contributing to the total health of the city -- where Kaiser Permanente had its beginnings back in World War II.
  • There is a strong link between physical activity and health and mental wellness, so encouraging people to walk, ride and bike Sunday Parkways with friends and family is a great way for everyone to get out, get active and get to know their neighbors, while also allowing us to improve the mental health and resilience of our local communities.
  • Players who complete the Kaiser Permanente Sticker Hunt at Sunday Parkways will earn a collectible neighborhood enamel pin and a donation to mental health organizations in our community.

More Information:

Visit kp.org/sundayparkways for route maps and info.




Attached Media Files: Kermit rides Southeast Portland Sunday Parkways , Southeast Portland Sunday Parkways street scene. , Dancing at Southeast Portland Sunday Parkways , Dance with Trail Blazers' DJ O.G. One in the Kaiser Permanente , Play the Kaiser Permanente Sticker Hunt at SE Portland Sunday Parkways.

Sat. 05/18/19
[PHOTO RELEASE]- 23rd Annual Living History Day at Camp Withycombe (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 05/18/19 4:35 PM
190518-Z-PL933-0129-Visitors to the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019 got to see how military equipment, in this case a boat, is loaded on and off of a truck. The Armed Forces Day celebration, hoste
190518-Z-PL933-0129-Visitors to the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019 got to see how military equipment, in this case a boat, is loaded on and off of a truck. The Armed Forces Day celebration, hoste
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/962/124660/thumb_190518-Z-PL933-0129_rev.jpg

190518-Z-PL933-0008-Visitors, current service members and military Veterans spend time interacting during the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. This event is co-sponsored by the Military Vehicle Collectors Club of Oregon and hosted by the Oregon Military Museum, Oregon's official military history repository and an award-winning museum located at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas. (U.S. National Guard photo by Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs.)

190518-Z-PL933-0012-Visitors young and old enjoy the interactive displays during the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. The Armed Forces Day celebration, hosted by the Oregon Military Museum, pays special tribute to those with military service in the U.S. Armed Forces, expanding public knowledge of the military's role in our communities, our nation, and the world. (U.S. National Guard photo by Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs.)

190518-Z-PL933-0058-A restored WWI Ford Model-T Ambulance on display from the Vancouver Barracks Military Association is presented to the public at the 23rd annual Living History day at Camp Withycombe in Clackamas, Ore. May 18, 2019. The Armed Forces Day celebration, hosted by the Oregon Military Museum, pays special tribute to those with military service in the U.S. Armed Forces, expanding public knowledge of the military's role in our communities, our nation, and the world. (U.S. National Guard photo by Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs.)

190518-Z-PL933-0070-Visitors young and old enjoy the interactive displays during the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. The Armed Forces Day celebration, hosted by the Oregon Military Museum, pays special tribute to those with military service in the U.S. Armed Forces, expanding public knowledge of the military's role in our communities, our nation, and the world. (U.S. National Guard photo by Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs.)

190518-Z-PL933-0086-Rory Jensen, from Camas, Wash, displays his WWII-era camera again this year during the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. His camera from last year has been sold in order to buy this more historically accurate model used by the United States Army throughout WWII. The Oregon Military Museum held the 23rd Annual Living History Day as part of Armed Forces Day celebrations throughout the country. (U.S. National Guard photo by Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs.)

190518-Z-PL933-0101-Visitors and military Veterans spend time interacting during Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. The Oregon Military Museum held the 23rd Annual Living History Day as part of Armed Forces Day celebrations throughout the country. (U.S. National Guard photo by Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs.)

190518-Z-PL933-0129-Visitors to the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019 got to see how military equipment, in this case a boat, is loaded on and off of a truck. The Armed Forces Day celebration, hosted by the Oregon Military Museum, pays special tribute to those with military service in the U.S. Armed Forces, expanding public knowledge of the military's role in our communities, our nation, and the world. (U.S. National Guard photo by Jason van Mourik, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs.)

Hi-res photos available on our Flickr account at:

https://www.flickr.com/gp/oregonmildep/1hE1MX

 

 




Attached Media Files: 190518-Z-PL933-0129-Visitors to the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019 got to see how military equipment, in this case a boat, is loaded on and off of a truck. The Armed Forces Day celebration, hoste , 190518-Z-PL933-0101-Visitors and military Veterans spend time interacting during Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. The Oregon Military Museum held the 23rd Annual Living History Day as part of Armed Forces Day , 190518-Z-PL933-0086-Rory Jensen, from Camas, Wash, displays his WWII-era camera again this year during the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. His camera from last year has been sold in order to buy , 190518-Z-PL933-0070-Visitors young and old enjoy the interactive displays during the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. The Armed Forces Day celebration, hosted by the Oregon Military Museum, pays s , 190518-Z-PL933-0058-A restored WWI Ford Model-T Ambulance on display from the Vancouver Barracks Military Association is presented to the public at the 23rd annual Living History day at Camp Withycombe in Clackamas, Ore. May 18, 2019. The Armed Forces Day , 190518-Z-PL933-0012-Visitors young and old enjoy the interactive displays during the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. The Armed Forces Day celebration, hosted by the Oregon Military Museum, pays s , 190518-Z-PL933-0008-Visitors, current service members and military Veterans spend time interacting during the 23rd annual Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 18, 2019. This event is co-sponsored by the Military Vehicle Co

Arson Investigation leads to the Arrest of a South Beach man, Lincoln County, Oregon. (Photo)
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/18/19 9:08 AM
2019-05/5490/124658/Jasper.png
2019-05/5490/124658/Jasper.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-05/5490/124658/thumb_Jasper.png

On May 4, 2019, Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office Deputies were dispatched to an address in South Beach to investigate a suspicious fire at a residence. When Deputies arrived, they observed what appeared to be an incendiary device placed against the residence. Deputies requested resources from the Lincoln County Fire Investigation Team. Investigators developed a suspect based on evidence identified at the crime scene. Detectives from the Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office obtained a search warrant for the suspect’s residence; items found during the execution of the search warrant were consistent with the device used at the point of origin in the original complaint.

Derrick Jasper of South Beach was arrested on the following charges:

Attempted Aggravated Murder, two counts Attempted Murder, Arson in the first degree, Arson in the second degree, Unlawful Manufacture of a Destructive Device, and Possession of Destructive Device.

Jasper was lodged at the Lincoln County Jail on $500,000 bail.

See Attached photo

The Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office would like to thank the following agencies for assistance provided in the investigation:

Newport Fire / Lincoln County Fire Investigation Team

City of Newport Police Department

City of Lincoln City Police Department

Oregon State Police

Lincoln County District Attorney’s Office

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Respectfully submitted by:

Rick Ballentine, Patrol Sergeant

Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office

225 W. Olive Street

Newport, Oregon 97365




Attached Media Files: 2019-05/5490/124658/Jasper.png