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Eugene/Spring/Rose/Alb/Corv News Releases for Sat. Jun. 23 - 2:50 am
Police & Fire
Fourth of July Fireworks
Albany Fire Dept. - 06/22/18 12:48 PM

Every year Albany Police Department and Albany Fire Department respond to upwards of 80-100 reports of illegal fireworks and firework related concerns. These calls are important due to the inherent danger of all fireworks, but they also pull critical resources away from all other 911 calls for service in Albany. 

Fireworks can cause serious bodily injury and pose a significant risk to property. 

What can you do to stay safe and enjoy your holiday? 

1. DO NOT BUY ILLEGAL FIREWORKS. 

2. If your neighbor, family, or friend has purchased illegal fireworks request they DO 
NOT use them. 

3. Have a water hose ready for use and on. 

4. Light all fireworks on a concrete or gravel surface with a 10' clearance away from 
all vegetation and structures. 

5. Alcohol and fireworks do not mix. Save your alcohol for after the show. 

6. Use a water bucket for all used fireworks and only after they are safe to handle. 

7. DO NOT allow children to light fireworks. 

8. Be considerate of your neighbors, pets, others near you when considering the timing 
of your fireworks.


Water and Boat Safety Day (Photo)
Albany Fire Dept. - 06/19/18 1:40 PM
Water & Boat Safety
Water & Boat Safety
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-06/1216/115439/thumb_2018_Water_Safety_Day.jpg

July 7, 2018, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., the third annual Water & Boat Safety Day is at Bowman Park.  Albany Fire Water Rescue Team will be providing proper life jacket fittings, submerged car water rescue demonstrations, and the Linn County Sheriff's Marine Patrol will be offering boat inspections.  AFD will also be giving boat rides for children under the age of 13.  

Food will be offered for monetary donations.  Donations will support the Albany Firefighters Community Assistance Life Vest program. We will also be raffling an overnight stay at Great Wolf Lodge and an AFD engine ride to school.  For more information please contact Albany Fire at 541-917-7700.  




Attached Media Files: Water & Boat Safety

Public's Help Sought to Locate Missing Person Tiffany Bettis - Crime Stoppers Featured Case #18-25 (Photo)
Crime Stoppers of Oregon - 06/21/18 8:00 AM
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The Multnomah County Sheriff's Office, in partnership with Crime Stoppers of Oregon, is asking for the public's help to solve a 2015 missing person investigation.

In March 2015, Tiffany Bettis (aka Melinda Smith) went missing. At the time she maintained a home in Fairview, Oregon and also lived in Roseburg, Oregon. She was reportedly last seen at the Quality Inn in Gresham around March 2, 2015.

She left behind three children and a large family that continues to miss her. Multiple people have reported to investigators that they believe Tiffany Bettis never would have left behind her children willingly. The Multnomah County Sheriff's Office is seeking any information about Tiffany Bettis and her disappearance. Foul play has not been ruled out.

Crime Stoppers of Oregon offers cash rewards for information, reported to Crime Stoppers, that leads to an arrest in any unsolved felony crime and tipsters can remain anonymous.

Information about this case or any unsolved felony crime may be eligible for a cash reward of up to $2,500.

Information learned from social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter or YouTube should be shared as these tips may lead to the identification of a suspect or suspects. Links can be shared anonymously through Crime Stoppers.

Submit an anonymous tip:

Visit the App Store and download P3 Tips to submit secure and anonymous tips.

Online at https://www.p3tips.com/823

Call 503-823-HELP (4357)

###CSO###



Attached Media Files: 2018-06/5183/115405/Tiffany_Bettis.jpg

Cottage Grove Man Wanted After Vehicle Pursuit (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/21/18 12:24 PM
James Bigelow
James Bigelow
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-06/5204/115504/thumb_Bigelow.JPG

DRAIN, Ore. - A Cottage Grove man led deputies on a vehicle chase Wednesday afternoon. 

At 3:40 P.M., a deputy observed a 2000 Black Hyundai Tiburon operated by 39 year-old Cottage Grove resident James Francis Bigelow on Umpqua Highway 99 near Curtain Road. Bigelow took off at a high rate of speed and failed to stop when the deputy attempted to conduct a traffic stop for traffic violations. Bigelow turned onto Upper Smith River Road and eventually onto South Fork. After taking several spur roads, Bigelow fled from the vehicle on foot and ran into the brush. He was not located after an extensive search. 

Bigelow is wanted in connection to the incident. Anyone with knowledge of his whereabouts is asked to immediately contact the Douglas County Sheriff's Office at 541-440-4471 or their local law enforcement. 




Attached Media Files: James Bigelow

Homicide Investigation in Tenmile (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/18/18 8:19 AM
Lee William Gee Mugshot
Lee William Gee Mugshot
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-06/5204/115373/thumb_GEE.jpg

UPDATE 06/18/2018 8:15 AM

DETECTIVES RELEASE NAME OF VICTIM IN FRIDAY'S STABBING

Detectives have released the name of the victim from Friday's stabbing. 52 year-old Raymond E. Vallejo of Tenmile died following the incident. Next of kin has been notified.

Detectives are continuing their investigation. Anyone with information is asked to contact the Douglas County Sheriff's Office at 541-440-4471 or by email dcso.pio@co.douglas.or.us

No further releases are expected. 

###

ORIGNIAL RELEASE

TENMILE, Ore. - On Friday, June 15, 2018, at 8:50 p.m. deputies were called to a residence in the 1000-block of Byron Creek Road for a male who had reportedly been stabbed. When deputies arrived, the victim whose name is being withheld, was pronounced deceased. 

The Douglas County Major Crimes Team has been activated and is investigating this case as a homicide. A suspect, 22 year-old Lee William Gee of Winston has been arrested and lodged in the Douglas County Jail for Criminal Homicide.

Anyone with information is asked to contact the Douglas County Sheriff's Office at 541-440-4471 or dcso.pio@co.douglas.or.us 

The Major Crimes Team is comprised of investigators from the Douglas County Sheriff's Office, Roseburg Police Department, Oregon State Police and the Douglas County District Attorney's Office. 

The Sheriff's Office was assisted at the scene by the Winston Police Department.  




Attached Media Files: Lee William Gee Mugshot

FBI's Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Online Sale Frauds (Part 1) (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 06/19/18 10:00 AM
TT - online sales example c
TT - online sales example c
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Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week, building a digital defense against online sale frauds.

Summer is upon us – and if you are like me, this is the best time to get rid of all that extra stuff sitting in your garage. Who couldn’t use a few extra bucks for that summer vacation, right?

You can do it the old fashioned way – sitting outside for hours on end, hoping someone drives up and offers you big money for your cast-offs. Or, you can sell on platforms like Craigslist and Facebook. Those are great options – if you are smart about how you do business.

I have some personal examples to share with you. Recently, I posted several items for sale… a bed, a barbeque and a few other things. Usually within the first 24 hours of a new posting I received at least one suspicious inquiry, either by email or text. In many cases, the seller said he or she needed to have a mover or shipper pick up the item. The seller proposed sending me a larger-than-requested payment by cashier’s check or electronic transfer, with the caveat that I would use those extra funds to pay the shipper when he arrives to pick up my item.

This is a version of an overpayment scam. Let’s say you get that check and cash it. The shipper takes the item, and eventually the bank figures out the cashier’s check is bogus. The bank is going to come after you for the missing funds and could even pursue criminal charges.

Electronic transfers are not necessarily safer. In a couple cases, the fraudster proposed making a payment via PayPal or a funds transfer. Had I pursued this option, the person would have likely ended up asking for personal information – including bank routing numbers – to push the payment through.

Here are some warning signs to watch for if you are trying to sell online this summer:

  • Look for out-of-area phone numbers. All of the suspicious inquiries I received came from area codes nowhere near Oregon. It is possible for scammers to spoof phone numbers, of course, so make sure to proceed cautiously even when you receive an inquiry from a local number.
  • Look for bad spelling, stilted language, random capitalizations and chunks of text that are obviously cut-and-pasted from your post.
  • Look for those who try to justify why they can’t meet in person. In once case, I had a fraudster claim to be a cabin steward on a major cruise line… which, he said, required an electronic payment and a shipping service. Really? Why does someone who works on a cruise ship need a large barbeque?

Next week we will look at some other scams that pop up in virtual garage sales – complete with more tips on safe selling.

If you have been victimized by an online overpayment scam or any other cyber fraud, be sure to report it to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your local FBI office.

###




Attached Media Files: TT - online sales example c , TT - online sales example b , TT - online sales example a , TT - Online Sales - part 1 - Audio , TT - Online Sales graphic

Crash Injures Two Motorcyclists (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/19/18 3:10 PM
Crash scene photo
Crash scene photo
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EAGLE POINT, Ore. – A crash involving two motorcycles and a pickup injured two White City men Monday evening.  Deputies are investigating whether impairment contributed to the crash. 

On June 18, 2018, at 7:31 p.m., dispatch received a 911 call reporting a crash on Dodge Road near the intersection with Wedgewood Drive.  Deputies learned that a westbound motorcycle collided with the eastbound pickup in the eastbound lane.  The force from the collision caused the motorcycle to collide with another westbound motorcycle. 

The motorcycles and their operators slid on the ground and came to rest off the roadway.  The pickup crashed through a fence and came to a stop in a field. 

Both motorcycle operators were transported to Rogue Regional Medical Center for treatment; one was transported by Mercy Flights helicopter with critical injuries. The driver and passenger in the pickup were not injured.

Witnesses reported seeing a third motorcycle rider, a woman who had been riding with the two men.  After the crash, she reportedly yelled for neighbors to call 911, and then left the scene.  Deputies would like to identify her in order to obtain a witness statement.

Deputies were assisted by JCSO detectives and a crash reconstruction team from the Oregon State Police.  Fire District #3 and Mercy Flights provided medical assistance. 

The incident remains under investigation.  Additional details are not available for release at this time. 

Anyone with information about the incident is asked to call Sergeant Scott Waldon at (541) 774-6800.  Refer to case #18-12375.

###




Attached Media Files: Crash scene photo

Summer Recreation Crime Prevention Tips (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/18/18 7:30 AM
Photo - trailhead parking lot
Photo - trailhead parking lot
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JACKSON COUNTY, Ore. — As more people head outdoors during the summer months, Jackson County Sheriff’s Office deputies offer a reminder to be vigilant and use common sense. Criminals are looking for opportunities to take advantage of you while you leave your vehicle unattended at places like boat ramps and trailheads.

Plan ahead and keep the following tips in mind:

Choose well populated areas for recreation, when possible. Thieves don’t like witnesses.

Do not leave valuables in your vehicle. Common targets include purses, wallets, cell phones, firearms, fishing gear, and high-end clothing.

If you must leave your belongings behind - such as while traveling - hide them from view before arriving at your destination. Thieves will watch for people stashing purses and other valuables in the trunk.

If you must store valuables in the trunk, lock your trunk latch so a thief accessing the vehicle interior can’t open the trunk.

Do not leave a spare key in your car. If a thief finds it, the entire vehicle is likely to be stolen.

Lock your doors! This suggestion is sometimes debated; but, remember that theft is a crime of opportunity. In most cases, thieves want to act quickly and quietly. If you make it difficult, they’ll move on.

Report suspicious activity to local law enforcement. Provide detailed descriptions of vehicles and people.

Have fun!

###




Attached Media Files: Photo - trailhead parking lot

"SWATTING" Incident In Junction City Jeopardizes Lives And Safety
Junction City Police - 06/22/18 6:07 PM

On Friday June 22, 2018 at approximately 2:00 PM the Junction City Police Department received a call from an unknown male stating there were approximately 5 subjects in his home with guns and he had barricaded himself in his bathroom.

The Junction City Police Department, Lane County Sheriff’s Office, and Coburg Police department responded to the scene prepared to deal with a very violent situation.  Upon arrival police observed a vehicle in the driveway that was registered at that address.

Junction City Police dispatch was able to make phone contact with the owners of the vehicle, and residence, and determined they were in their home, were safe, and that no such incident had occurred.  With the owner’s permission officers searched and cleared the residence, confirming that incident was in fact false.

The Junction City Police department has determined this to be an incident of “SWATTING”, which is defined as an action of making a prank call to emergency services in an attempt to bring about the dispatch of a large number of armed police officers to a particular address.

This type of activity is incredibly dangerous for the public and police officers alike, and could ultimately result in the serious injury and/or death of innocent people.  The investigation into this incident is continuing.  Anyone with information on this event is requested to call the Junction City Police Department at 541-998-1245.


Second Annual Human Trafficking Symposium To Be Held In Junction City This Weekend
Junction City Police - 06/19/18 11:03 PM

The Junction City Police Department in conjunction with Junction City Soroptimist’s, and the National Women’s Collation Against Violence & Exploitation (NWCAVE) are hosting the second annual Human Trafficking Symposium Saturday, June 23rd, 2018 from 10 am to 2 pm. This free event will be held at the First Baptist Church of Junction City, located at 28957 W 18th Ave, Junction City, OR 97448.

Human trafficking is real; it affects you; and yes, it does happen everywhere including Junction City, Monroe, Harrisburg, and the surrounding areas!

This crime occurs when a person uses force, fraud, or coercion to control another person for the purpose of engaging in commercial sex acts or soliciting labor or services against his/her will. Unfortunately, Oregon is one of the nation’s leading states in the commission of this horrific crime; and, it begins to occur to children in the homes of everyday citizens at an alarming rate. Awareness and proactive communication between all adults in the community and children is the only way this issue can be addressed.

Please join our master of ceremonies, and local news celebrity, Jackie Garrity of KVAL, for this information-packed session that will empower you to learn information and ways to protect the children in your lives and around our communities. Primary organizer and Junction City Police Chief Bob Morris, will be joined by representatives of the NWCAVE, the FBI, and State Senator James Manning. Together these individuals will impart a diverse cadre of information that will help clarify, and put perspective, the problem that faces each and every citizen.

Also, Jerry Kearney, a former 20-year police officer will explain how the unthinkable combination of meth, human trafficking, and childhood prostitution would invade his family and life. Because of the impact these travesties had on him and his loved ones, he will share his painful experiences in the hope he can prevent these crimes from impacting other families. The symposium will wrap-up with closing remarks from Soroptimist’s International of the America’s President, Dawn Marie Lemonds.

In addition to the formal presentations, a number of local and regional resource organizations will be present and available to provide information about their services and to answer questions about how you can make a difference.

Questions regarding this event can be directed to Junction City Police Chief Bob Morris via email at: bmorris@ci.junction-city.or.us


Tip of the Week-June 25, 2018-Short Term Rental Licensing
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/21/18 9:38 AM

The Lincoln County Board of Commissioners adopted Ordinances #487 and #490 to establish conditions for the operation of short-term-rental dwelling units in unincorporated Lincoln County and to implement a licensing program to ensure compliance with those standards.  The ordinance went into effect on  December 1, 2016, with the Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office as the designated licensing authority.

For individuals or businesses operating dwelling units as short term rentals within the unincorporated areas of Lincoln County, a license is now required to continue operating in this manner.  There are a limited number of exceptions applying to hotels, motels, bed & breakfast inns, lodges, resorts, RV parks or campgrounds.  Any dwelling unit rented for any period of time less than 30 consecutive nights, must be licensed, unless it meets the criteria for any of the exceptions.

What this means for owners of short term rentals:

  • You must fill out an application for a Short Term Rental License.
  • You must pay the $250.00 initial application fee (yearly renewals are $125.00).
  • You must have the property inspected by a compliance deputy.

The inspection is a simple viewing of the property to confirm the information provided on the application, to verify all signage requirements have been met, to verify sanitary services are being provided, and to verify local fire departments have been notified of pertinent rental information.  After a successful inspection, a maximum occupancy for the property is calculated and a license is issued to the owner of the property.

Under the ordinance, property owners are expected to make sure that renters are aware of and abiding by the established quiet time of 10:00 pm – 7:00 am.  They also must assure that tenants know the requirements for garbage service and approved parking areas.  Owners are also tasked with assuring that maximum occupancy is not exceeded. 

What this means for neighbors of short term rental properties:

  • You will have access to 24/7 contact information for the owner and/or a local contact person designated for the property. 
  • You will have complaint procedures.

More information regarding the Lincoln County Short Term Rental Licensing Program can be found on the Sheriff’s Office website, www.lincolncountysheriff.net, under short-term-rental-licensing.  The site contains a copy of the ordinance and all information and forms needed for owners and neighbors.  For additional questions, email us at iffstrlicensing@co.lincoln.or.us">sheriffstrlicensing@co.lincoln.or.us or call us at 541-265-4912.




Attached Media Files: 2018-06/5490/115486/062518-Short_Term_Rental_Licensing.pdf

Amateur Radio "Field Day" June 23-24 Demonstrates Science Skill And Service
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/18/18 9:14 AM

Since 1933, ham radio operators across North America have established temporary ham radio stations in public locations during Field Day to showcase the science and skill of Amateur Radio. 

Members of the Lincoln County Amateur Radio Club will be participating in the national Amateur Radio Field Day exercise, June 23-24, 2018 at the Port of Toledo Waterfront Park next to the Toledo Post Office.  The Club Members will be on site from 11:00 am Saturday to 11:00 am Sunday; this event is open to the public and all are encouraged to attend.

For over 100 years, Amateur Radio - sometimes called ham radio- has allowed people from all walks of life to experiment with electronics and communications techniques, as well as provide a free public service to their communities during a disaster, all without needing a cell phone or the Internet.   Field Day demonstrates ham radio's ability to work reliably under any conditions from almost any location and create an independent communications network.  Over 35,000 people from thousands of locations of locations participated in Field Day in 2015.

"It's easy for anyone to pick up a computer or smartphone, connect to the Internet and communicate, with no knowledge of how the devices function or connect to each other," said Sean Kutzko of the American Radio Relay League, the national association for Amateur Radio.  "But if there's an interruption of service or you're out of range of a cell tower, you have no way to communicate.  Ham radio functions completely independent of the Internet or cell phone infrastructure, can interface with tablets or smartphones, and can be set up almost anywhere in minutes.  That's the beauty of Amateur Radio during a communication outage."

"Hams can literally throw a wire in a tree for an antenna, connect it to a battery-powered transmitter and communicate halfway around the world," Kutzko added.  "Hams do this by using a layer of Earth's atmosphere as a sort of mirror for radio waves.  In today's electronic do-it-yourself (DIY) environment, ham radio remains one of the best ways for people to learn about electronics, physics, meteorology, and numerous other scientific disciplines, and is a huge asset to any community during disasters if the standard communication infrastructure goes down."

Anyone may become a licensed Amateur Radio operator.  There are over 725,000 licensed hams in the United States, as young as 5 and as old as 100.  And with clubs such as the Lincoln County Amateur Radio Club, it's easy for anybody to get involved right here in Lincoln County.

Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office also sponsors the Auxiliary Communications Service Volunteer Group, 70+ Amateur Radio Operators specifically supporting local government emergency response, information brochure attached.

For more information:

###

Respectfully submitted,

Virginia “Jenny” Demaris

Emergency Manager

Lincoln County Sheriff's Office
Emergency Management

225 W Olive Street, Suite 103

Newport, Oregon 97365
is@co.lincoln.or.us">vdemaris@co.lincoln.or.us

(541) 265-4199 Office




Attached Media Files: Media Release - Annual Field Day , Lincoln Co Sheriff's Office ACS Brochure , Media Release - Annual Field Day

Update on Death Investigation
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 06/19/18 3:03 PM

UPDATE:

Linn County Sheriff Jim Yon reports that after further investigation into the death of Trapper Thompson, the death was found to have occurred within the city limits of Corvallis.  The Corvallis Police Department is continuing the investigation and anyone with additional information is asked to call  Detective Pete Dunn with the Corvallis Police Department at (541) 766-6433.    

ORIGINAL RELEASE:
LINN COUNTY SHERIFF'S DEPUTIES INVESTIGATE DEATH

Linn County Undersheriff Paul Timm reports on June 10, 2018, at 4:46 a.m., Linn County Sheriff deputies responded to a death. Trapper Thompson, 22, of Lebanon, was taken to Good Samaritan Emergency Room in Corvallis by friends from an unknown location in Linn County. It was reported Thompson did not have a pulse when they arrived at the hospital.

Linn County Sheriff’s Deputies are still investigating the death and the cause is not known at this time.

Anyone with information about Trapper Thompson or his whereabouts on the night of June 9, or morning of June 10, is encouraged to call Detective John Lovik II at (541) 967-3950.


Deputies Seeking Tips in Home Invasion (Sublimity) **Update** (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/22/18 3:53 PM
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The Marion County Sheriff's Office is releasing a pair of composite sketches created of two men wanted in connection to a home invasion robbery in the 15000 block of Coon Hollow Road SE near Sublimity.  If you believe you may know the identity of either man pictured please call our tip line at 503 540 8079.  The Sheriff’s would like to thank the Composite Sketch Technicians at the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office for assisting in our investigation.   

 

 

Today at 1249 p.m., the Marion County Sheriff's Office was called to investigate a home invasion robbery in the 15000 block of Coon Hollow Road SE near Sublimity. 

Investigators believe two men entered the home, tied up the residents and robbed them of their valuables. No iniuries were reported during the ordeal.

Deputies are searching for two white male adults. Both men wore shorts and tennis shoes.  The first male wore a black long sleeve tee shirt, tennis shoes and a baseball hat. The second male wore a white tee shirt with a basketball jersey over the shirt, a hat and sunglasses. 

Both men left in a late 80's or early 90's Honda Accord or Civic.  Deptuies are asking anyone with information to please call our tip line at 503 540 8079. As this is an active investigation no additional details are available at this time. 




Attached Media Files: 2018-06/1294/115475/MCSO18-14275_CompS2.JPG , 2018-06/1294/115475/MCSO18-14275_CompS1.JPG

Deputies Searching For Salem Man Involved in Stabbing Investigation (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/22/18 8:27 AM
2018-06/1294/115534/Nedelic.jpg
2018-06/1294/115534/Nedelic.jpg
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Deputies and detectives are searching for information on the location of Gleen Nedelic , age 30 of Salem.  On June 21, 2018 at 12:30 a.m., deputies were called to the Devonshire Court Apartments in Salem on a reported fight involving a knife. 

The victim who is not being named at this time reported a male identified as Nedelic stabbed him multiple times in his upper torso causing injury.  The victim was transported to Salem Hospital where he is expedited to survive his injuries. 

Nedelic fled the scene prior to deputies arriving and his current whereabouts are unknown.  The Sheriff’s Office is asking anyone with information to please call 503 588 5032 or you can submit a tip by texting TIPMCSO followed by your tip to 847411. 




Attached Media Files: 2018-06/1294/115534/Nedelic.jpg

Sex Offender Notification (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/21/18 2:25 PM
2018-06/1294/115511/Reserved.ReportViewerWebControl[1].jpg
2018-06/1294/115511/Reserved.ReportViewerWebControl[1].jpg
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DATE:  6/15/18

Marion County Sheriff’s Office is releasing the following information pursuant to ORS181.507, OAR 291-28-30, which authorizes Parole and Probation to inform the public when the release of information will enhance public safety and protection.

The individual who appears on this notification has been convicted of a sex offense that requires registration with the Sheriff’s Office.  Additionally, this person’s criminal history places them in a classification level which reflects the potential to re-offend.  This notification is not intended to increase fear; rather, it is our belief that an informed public is a safer public.

NAME: William Blizzard

SID#: 11749027

DOB: 7/22/1977

CURRENT AGE: 40

RACE:            WHITE           SEX: MALE

HEIGHT: 6’2”                        WEIGHT: 190 lbs

HAIR: BROWN                     EYES: BLU

RESIDENCE: 2178 State Street #2

Salem, OR 97301

William Blizzard is on Post Prison Supervision for the crimes of: SODO I, INCEST, UNLAWFUL USE OF VEHICLE AND MAIL THEFT

This person was granted supervision on: 2/16/2012

Supervision expiration date is: 10/10/2023

Special restrictions include:               

[X] No contact with minors (male/female)

[X] Sex offender treatment

[X] Submit to polygraph        

Other:  Blizzard’s victim pool includes adult males and females known to him.




Attached Media Files: 2018-06/1294/115511/Reserved.ReportViewerWebControl[1].jpg

Deputies Investigate Drowning (Silverton) (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/21/18 12:05 PM
2018-06/1294/115501/Naomi_Rudolph.jpg
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Last night, 06/20/2018 at 7:55 p.m., deputies with the Marion County Sheriff’s Office and fire personnel with the Silverton Fire District were called to Canyonview Camp located in the 13000 block of Finlay Road NE near Silverton.  Camp personnel reported a swimmer had disappeared underwater and could not be located. 

When deputies and fire personnel arrived on scene they found lifeguards and camp counselors searching the approximate two acre pond for the missing swimmer.  A short time later the body of 14 year old, Naomi Rudolph of Keizer was located and pulled from the water.  Naomi had been working at the camp as a junior camp counselor and was using her off time to swim in the pond. 

From their investigation deputies believe the teen was swimming when she began to struggle and called for help.  Sadly lifeguards could not get to her before she submerged and Ms. Rudolph died.  This marks the first drowning death in Marion County for the 2018 summer season and it is with heavy hearts that we must remind swimmers how dangerous water can be.  Provided is a link to some swimming safety tips created by safekidsoregon.org.  http://www.safekidsoregon.org/wp-content/uploads/2009/04/swimming_safety_tips2_0.pdf

The Sheriff’s Office thoughts and prayers are with the Rudolph family and all those affected at Canyonview Camp. 

 




Attached Media Files: 2018-06/1294/115501/Naomi_Rudolph.jpg

Deputies Seeking Tip Burglary Investigation (Donald) (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/18/18 12:25 PM
2018-06/1294/115403/GK_Burg.jpeg
2018-06/1294/115403/GK_Burg.jpeg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-06/1294/115403/thumb_GK_Burg.jpeg

Video and better image added .

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wcre7UqAvgM

Deputies with the Marion County Sheriff’s Office are seeking tips to help identify a man captured in a surveillance image from June 13th. The man is currently wanted for questioning related to a vandalism and burglary investigation.

It is believed the man damaged surveillance cameras on June 13th at GK machinery in Donald. Then on June 18th a man fitting the same description was captured on surveillance cameras burglarizing a City of Donlad water treatment facility. T

he Sheriff’s Office is not prepared to provide any additional information regarding the referenced cases. We are however seeking any tips or information that lead to the identification of the man pictured in the image captured June 13th. You can submit your tips by calling 503 588 5032 or you can submit an anonymous tip via our Facebook page by selecting the “submit a tip” button.




Attached Media Files: 2018-06/1294/115403/GK_Burg.jpeg , 2018-06/1294/115403/case-no-18-14084-Suspect-Headshot.jpg

Fireworks - Keep it Legal, Keep it Safe (Photo)
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 06/22/18 10:00 AM
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The Office of State Fire Marshal, Oregon fire service, Keep Oregon Green,  the Pacific Northwest Wildfire Coordination Group, natural resource agencies, Oregon licensed fireworks wholesalers, and safety experts encourage Oregonians to “Keep it Legal and Keep it Safe” when using fireworks. The 2018 Oregon fireworks retail sales season opens Saturday, June 23 and runs through Friday, July 6. The OSFM and their partners want everyone to know which fireworks are legal to use in Oregon without a permit, where they are permitted to be used, and the important safety steps to take when using fireworks. 

“I want to remind all Oregonians that consumer legal fireworks can only be purchased from Oregon permitted fireworks retailers and stands,” says State Fire Marshal Jim Walker. “And, regulations limit where those fireworks may be used. Fire risk in Oregon is approaching extreme conditions and there is no room for error in fireworks safety.”

July 4th holiday public land visitors are advised to leave all fireworks at home. The use of fireworks is prohibited on all national forestland, Oregon state parks, and beaches. “It’s best to leave fireworks to the professionals,” states Keep Oregon Green President Kristin Babbs. “Support your local community by enjoying fireworks at sponsored events. If you choose to use fireworks at home, make sure they stay on the pavement and always keep a bucket of water nearby for safety and to extinguish spent fireworks.”

Oregon law prohibits possession, use, or sale of any firework that flies into the air, explodes, or travels more than 12 feet horizontally on the ground, without a permit issued by the OSFM. Fireworks commonly called bottle rockets, Roman candles, and firecrackers are illegal in Oregon, without a permit.

There were 318 reported fireworks-related fires in Oregon during 2017, resulting in eight injuries and more than $861,000 in property damage. Over the past five years, from 2013 through 2017, there were 1,355 reported fireworks-related fires in Oregon resulting in one death, 34 injuries, and more than $3 million in property damage.

Officials may seize illegal fireworks and charge offenders with a class B misdemeanor which could result in a fine of up to $2,500 per violation and a civil penalty of up to $500. Those who misuse fireworks or allow fireworks to cause damage are liable and may be required to pay fire suppression costs or other damage. Parents are also liable for fireworks damage caused by their children.

 “All Oregonians share the responsibility to use only consumer legal fireworks and use them carefully,” adds Walker. And we encourage you to be aware and considerate of neighbors and their pets, before deciding on when and where you choose to light fireworks.”

The OSFM encourages everyone to use the four B’s of safe fireworks use:

  • Be Prepared before lighting fireworks: keep water available by using a garden hose or bucket.
  • Be Safe when lighting fireworks: keep children and pets away from fireworks.
  • Be Responsible after lighting fireworks: never relight a dud. Wait 15 to 20 minutes then soak it in a bucket of water before disposal.
  • Be Aware: use only legal fireworks and use them only in legal places.

The four B’s of fireworks safety brochure is available here:

http://www.oregon.gov/OSP/SFM/docs/Licensing_permits/fireworks/4BesFireworks.pdf.

Tips in Spanish are also available at: http://www.oregon.gov/OSP/SFM/docs/Licensing_permits/fireworks/Fireworks_4Bs_Spanish.pdf




Attached Media Files: 2018-06/1062/115518/Firework_Image.jpg

Graham Fire declared a conflagration
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 06/21/18 9:45 PM

Governor Kate Brown has declared the Graham Fire, burning approximately 3 miles south of Billy Chinook, a conflagration. The declaration cleared the way for the state fire marshal to mobilize firefighters and equipment to assist local resources battling the fire.

The Office of State Marshal’s Green Incident Management Team and two structural task forces from Clackamas and Washington counties will arrive in the morning and begin working to protect structures.

The Jefferson County Emergency Manager said there was a Level 3 (Leave) evacuation order issued but it was unclear how many people had evacuated.

“This is a reminder that fire season has arrived,” said Chief Deputy State Fire Marshal Mariana Ruiz-Temple. “Please be aware of maintaining defensible space and know the fire restrictions in your area.”

Oregon’s conflagration may be invoked only by the Governor and allows the State Fire Marshal to dispatch structural firefighters and equipment. More information on Conflagration and Emergency

Mobilization is available at OSFM website:

 http://www.oregon.gov/OSP/SFM/2008_Oregon_Fire_Service_Mobilization_Plan.shtml.

Additional resources on surviving wildfires may be accessed at:


Media Advisory - Keep it Legal, Keep it Safe Live safety demonstration -- safer use of legal fireworks in legal places
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 06/21/18 5:29 PM

WHEN:           Friday, June 22, 2018 at 9:30 a.m.

WHERE:         Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue Training Center, 12400 SW Tonquin Road, Sherwood, Oregon

WHO:             The Office of State Fire Marshal, Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue, U.S. Forest Service, Oregon Department of Forestry, Oregon State Parks, Clackamas Fire District #1, Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs, Oregon Burn Center, the Oregon Humane Society, and Oregon licensed fireworks wholesalers will provide information on legal fireworks in Oregon, where fireworks may be used, and safety education and enforcement efforts. Live fireworks demonstrations are scheduled. 

WHAT:           Keep it legal, keep it safe

  • Legal fireworks in legal places
  • Live demonstration – Safer use of fireworks

June 23 opens the season for fireworks sales in Oregon. Legal fireworks may be purchased only from Oregon permitted fireworks retailers and stands. The Office of State Fire Marshal has issued approximately 722 retail fireworks permits, and 138 display permits. Oregon law prohibits possession, use, or sale of any firework that flies into the air, explodes, or travels more than 12 feet horizontally on the ground, without a permit issued by the OSFM. Fireworks commonly called bottle rockets, Roman candles, and firecrackers are ILLEGAL in Oregon without a permit.

All fireworks are prohibited on all Oregon beaches, in state parks, and campgrounds, and on all federal public lands.

Illegal fireworks can be expensive. Officials may seize illegal fireworks and charge offenders with a class B misdemeanor which could result in a fine of up to $2,500 per violation and a civil penalty of up to $500. Those who misuse fireworks or allow fireworks to cause damage are liable and may be required to pay fire suppression costs or other damage. Parents are also liable for fireworks damage caused by their children.


Media Advisory - Keep it Legal, Keep it Safe Live safety demonstration -- safer use of legal fireworks in legal places - Media Advisory
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 06/19/18 3:03 PM

WHEN:           Friday, June 22, 2018 at 9:30 a.m.

WHERE:         Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue Training Center

12400 SW Tonquin Road, Sherwood, Oregon

WHO:             The Office of State Fire Marshal, Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue, U.S. Forest Service, Oregon Department of Forestry, Oregon State Parks, Clackamas Fire District #1, Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs, Oregon Burn Center, the Oregon Humane Society, and Oregon licensed fireworks wholesalers will provide information on legal fireworks in Oregon, where fireworks may be used, and safety education and enforcement efforts. Live fireworks demonstrations are scheduled. 

WHAT:           Keep it legal, keep it safe

  • Legal fireworks in legal places
  • Live demonstration – Safer use of fireworks

June 23 opens the season for fireworks sales in Oregon. Legal fireworks may be purchased only from Oregon permitted fireworks retailers and stands. The Office of State Fire Marshal has issued approximately 722 retail fireworks permits, and 138 display permits. Oregon law prohibits possession, use, or sale of any firework that flies into the air, explodes, or travels more than 12 feet horizontally on the ground, without a permit issued by the OSFM. Fireworks commonly called bottle rockets, Roman candles, and firecrackers are ILLEGAL in Oregon without a permit.

All fireworks are prohibited on all Oregon beaches, in parks, and campgrounds, and on all federal public lands.

Illegal fireworks can be expensive. Officials may seize illegal fireworks and charge offenders with a class B misdemeanor which could result in a fine of up to $2,500 per violation and a civil fine of up to $500. Those who misuse fireworks or allow fireworks to cause damage are liable and may be required to pay fire suppression costs or other damage. Parents are also liable for fireworks damage caused by their children.


State fire marshal announces three counties complete hazmat by rail response plans
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 06/18/18 5:00 PM

The Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal has announced that three Oregon counties, Morrow, Polk, and Umatilla, have completed local hazardous materials by rail emergency response plans

These plans identify rail lines locally that transport hazardous materials, outline emergency notification and response procedures, and are created in conjunction with local emergency planning committees (LEPC) and county emergency managers.

The Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal (OSFM) – who, among other responsibilities, coordinates emergency response planning for oil or hazardous materials spills or releases during rail transport – recently worked with Morrow, Polk, and Umatilla counties to complete the plans. Input is gathered from stakeholder groups including first responders, emergency planners, tribal representatives, railroad operators, healthcare administrators, and many more to ensure a “whole community” approach to planning and response. 

 

The overall goal of these local plans is to develop the framework for a safe, effective, and efficient response to a hazmat by rail emergency that might occur within their jurisdiction. Plans include information such as the frequency of hazardous commodities transported, emergency notification and response procedures, evacuation routes, probable areas and population impacted along the rail lines, and historically, culturally, and environmentally sensitive areas.

With roughly 40% of all hazardous materials transported in the United States shipped by rail, Oregon State Fire Marshal Jim Walker applauds communities for taking preventative action locally. “By planning notification and response procedures upfront, communities like these get ahead of the curve by preparing for an incident of this magnitude and favorably influence the outcome for both responders and the citizens they protect.”

Follow the OSFM on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/OregonStateFireMarshal and Twitter @OSFM.


Oregon State Police is Hosting a National Summit on School Safety Tip Lines (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 06/21/18 10:22 AM
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Representatives from 21 States and Canada are gathering in Salem, Oregon next week for a three-day Summit (Monday June 25 – Wednesday June 27). The Summit is the first of its kind and will feature presentations from experts, government officials, and other school safety leaders regarding the effective implementation and operation of tip lines to prevent threats to student safety. Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum will welcome participants and kick off the Summit.

Oregon State Police will showcase the State’s school safety tip line SafeOregon. SafeOregon launched statewide in January 2017, and to date, generated over 1,450 tips. For more details visit www.safeoregon.com.  

“This summit will give the opportunity to share information first hand and learn from others with years of experience to help Oregon continue to improve our processes and tip line tool to be the best resource it can for our young Oregonians.”  Superintendent Travis Hampton.

Outcomes of the Summit include a blueprint for implementing and sustaining a tip line. OSP is partnering with RTI International and Summit participants to develop a framework to share with others interested in starting at tip line.

Pre-registration was required to attend this event.

Media is welcome to attend on Monday, June 25, 2018 until the conclusion of Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum’s welcoming. (Media needs to be set up by 12:30 PM.  We expect remarks to be done by 1:00 PM)

 About SafeOregon

SafeOregon is a statewide resource managed by Oregon State Police and is designed to accept confidential or anonymous reports concerning student safety through a phone call, text message, mobile application or the internet by students and other members of the public. The school safety tip line program is called SafeOregon. It became Law through HB 4075 (2016), as a result of recommendations from the Oregon Task Force on School Safety.

About RTI International

RTI International is an independent, nonprofit research institute dedicated to improving the human condition. Clients rely on us to answer questions that demand an objective and multidisciplinary approach—one that integrates expertise across the social and laboratory sciences, engineering, and international development. We believe in the promise of science, and we are inspired every day to deliver on that promise for the good of people, communities, and businesses around the world.  For more information, visit www.rti.org.




Attached Media Files: 2018-06/1002/115491/Picture1.png

Motorcyclist dies in crash north of Albany - Linn County
Oregon State Police - 06/20/18 7:25 AM

On June 19th, 2018 at about 12:35 pm Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a crash involving a motorcycle and an SUV.  The crash occurred near the intersection of Dever-Conner Road and Interstate 5 in Linn County. 

The preliminary investigation revealed a Harley Davidson motorcycle driven by Eric Wayne Clanfield, age 42 of Dallas, was traveling west on Dever-Conner Road.  A Infiniti Sport Utility Vehicle, driven by Kristin Dawn Holcomb, age 44 of Albany, was traveling east on Dever-Conner Road and was attempting to turn left onto the southbound on ramp to I-5.  The SUV turned in front of the motorcycle which resulted in a nearly head on collision.  Clanfield was deceased at the scene due to the injuries he sustained in the crash.  Holcomb was not injured.

Jefferson Fire Department, Linn County Sheriff’s department, Oregon Department of Transportation arrived on scene to assist. 

Dever-Conner Road was closed for about 3 hours.

  


Update - Names Released - Vehicle crashes into Hellgate Canyon - Josephine County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 06/18/18 3:07 PM
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The operator of the Honda Civic has been identified as Hailee FOX, age 21 from Grants Pass.  FOX sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene.  The passenger Rodrigo, HERRERA, age 24 from Grants Pass.  HERRERA was transported to the hospital for his injuries.

No further information will be released as investigation is continuing

On June 16, 2018 at approximately 12:50 AM Oregon State Police Troopers responded to a 911 call on Galice Rd.

Preliminary investigation reveals that a female from Grants Pass had called 911 and reported that a male had been assaulted and that he was in need of medical attention.    She stayed on the phone with 911 and began driving to the hospital.  As Troopers were responding they located the male in the middle of Galice Rd. and evidence that a vehicle had left the road and went into Hellgate Canyon.

Rural Metro Fire personnel rappelled into Hellgate Canyon and there they located a Honda Civic with a female operator that sustained fatal injuries in the crash and was pronounced deceased at the scene.

Oregon State Police was assisted by Josephine County Search and Rescue and Rural Metro Fire.

No further information will be released as investigation is continuing.




Attached Media Files: 2018-06/1002/115382/20180616_054626.jpg , 2018-06/1002/115382/20180616_061507.jpg , 2018-06/1002/115382/20180616_054600.jpg

Commercial Structure Fire - 3031 NE Stephens Street - 6-21-18
Roseburg Fire Department - 06/21/18 10:34 AM

At 1:53 a.m. on June 21, 2018, the Roseburg Fire Department was dispatched to a commercial structure fire at 3031 NE Stephens Street.  An on-duty police officer reported the fire inside the structure.

Firefighters arrived on scene to find light smoke showing inside the two-story structure, which is currently under construction.  Upon arrival, firefighters found most of the fire already extinguished, reducing the amount of damage to the structure.     

A total of 15 firefighters assisted with the firefighting operations. Other agencies assisting with the fire included Roseburg Police Department, Douglas County Fire District #2, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, and Bay Cities Ambulance.

The structure, which is valued at $5,750,000, suffered approximately $50,000 in damage.  According to fire investigators, the fire is suspicious in nature and is under investigation. 


Roseburg Police Press Release (update)
Roseburg Police Dept. - 06/22/18 11:06 AM

On 06-21-18 at approximately 4:12 PM, Roseburg Police Officers were dispatched to Evergreen Urgent Care (2570 NW Edenbower Blvd, Roseburg, Oregon) to investigate a possible death.  Investigation revealed a child had been left unattended in a vehicle in a parking lot adjacent to Evergreen Urgent Care for several hours.  Ambulance personnel responded and transported the child to Mercy Medical Center where the child was pronounced deceased.  The Douglas County Major Crimes Team responded to investigate.  The mother of the child, Nicole Engler (38 year old Roseburg resident), was taken into custody and lodged at the Douglas County Jail, charged with Manslaughter in the Second Degree.  The investigation is on-going and no further details will be released at this time. 

UPDATE (06-22-18):

The child was a 21 month old female.  


Federal
BLM announces auction and sale of federally owned helium for 2019 delivery
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 06/21/18 12:48 PM

Amarillo, Texas – The Bureau of Land Management’s Federal Helium Program is planning an auction and sale of federally owned crude helium for delivery beginning in fiscal year 2019.  The auction is scheduled for July 18, 2018.  After the auction, the BLM will invite the helium industry to bid for crude helium in an unallocated sale. This effort will facilitate development opportunities that create jobs and help local communities grow.

The auction complies with the Helium Stewardship Act of 2013, which established an auction system for the sale of federal helium and mandated that all property, equipment, and interest held by the United States in the Federal Helium Reserve be disposed of by Sept. 30, 2021.  The BLM conducted sales and auctions for fiscal years 2014 through 2018, and enhanced the process based upon public and stakeholders’ comments.  As a result, the BLM will use the same auction and sale process used for FY 2018 for the FY 2019 delivery.  The auction will be announced in the Federal Register on Friday.

The Federal Helium Program is responsible for the conservation and sale of federally owned helium. The BLM operates and maintains a helium storage reservoir, enrichment plant, and pipeline system near Amarillo, Texas, that supplies enough helium to meet more than 40 percent of domestic demand for the gas. 

Helium is used in the testing of rocket engines, welding, commercial diving, and production of semiconductor chips. The element’s ability to reach very low temperatures attracts many commercial and institutional users who conduct magnetic resonance imaging and other scientific applications. Other industries depend on helium’s lifting powers for operating weather and party balloons. 

Additional documents relating to the proposed plan for the FY 2019 auction and sale, including documents related to previous Federal Register notices and the 2019 Auction Guide, can be found on the BLM’s Helium Program website at http://www.blm.gov/programs/energy-and-minerals/helium.  The auction will be held at the BLM Amarillo Field Office, 801 South Fillmore Street, Suite 500, in Amarillo, Texas.

You may request a copy of the Federal Register notice and associated documents by e-mail at lm_nm_amfo_spo@blm.gov">blm_nm_amfo_spo@blm.gov, by fax at 806-356-1041, or by mail at BLM Amarillo Field Office, Attention: Samuel Burton, Field Manager, 801 South Fillmore Street, Suite 500, Amarillo, Texas 79101.

-BLM–

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. Diverse activities authorized on these lands generated $75 billion in sales of goods and services throughout the American economy in fiscal year 2016—more than any other agency in the Department of the Interior. These activities supported more than 372,000 jobs.

 


BLM seeks bids for new public off-range pastures for wild horses and burros
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 06/20/18 1:50 PM

WASHINGTON— The Bureau of Land Management announced today that it is seeking proposals for new public off-range pastures that provide a free-roaming environment for wild horses removed from Western public lands while also allowing for regular public visitation.

Today’s announcement is part of the BLM’s effort to address the growing overpopulation of wild horses and burros on public rangelands. As of March 1, 2018, the wild horse and burro population on public lands was estimated at 81,951 animals, which is more than triple the number of animals the land can support in conjunction with other legally mandated land uses. This chronic overpopulation increases the risk of damage to rangeland resources and raises the chances of starvation and thirst for animals in overpopulated herds.

New public off-range pastures are a more cost-effective and efficient approach to managing costs for animals in holding while providing the public with opportunities to view wild horses in a natural setting. The pastures will also provide opportunities for the public to adopt animals into private care in order to help reduce the number of animals in holding.

One or more public off-range pasture contracts will be awarded and each pasture must accommodate at least 100 to 500 wild horses. Selected participants will be contracted by the BLM to provide humane care for up to 10 years.

Proposals will be accepted through July 10, 2018, from the following states: Colorado, Kansas, Montana, Oklahoma and Wyoming.

 All applicants are required to possess a Dun and Bradstreet number authorizing them to conduct business with the Federal Government.  These can be obtained at www.dnb.com.  Applicants are then asked to access the System for Award Management, at www.sam.gov. There is no fee involved.

To obtain the bid solicitation: (1) go to www.fedconnect.net; (2) click on “Search Public Opportunities”; (3) under Search Criteria, select “Reference Number”; (4) enter the solicitation number “L15PS00182”; and (5) click Search” and the solicitation information will appear. The solicitation form describes what applicants should submit and where to send application information. 

For assistance, please contact Kemi Ismael at (202) 912-7098 or kismael@blm.gov. Ms. Ismael can assist with general questions and/or coordinate a meeting between applicants and a local BLM contracting officer and small business specialist. A list of frequently asked questions with additional information is available at:  www.blm.gov/whb.

To learn more about adopting a wild horse or burro online, visit the new Online Corral at https://wildhorsesonline.blm.gov/.

-BLM–

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. Diverse activities authorized on these lands generated $75 billion in sales of goods and services throughout the American economy in fiscal year 2016—more than any other agency in the Department of the Interior. These activities supported more than 372,000 jobs.


Nigerian Leader of Nationwide Identity Theft and IRS Tax Fraud Scheme Sentenced to Federal Prison
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 06/21/18 7:58 AM

False federal tax returns filed using the personal identifying information of thousands of Oregon and Washington taxpayers

EUGENE, Ore. – On Wednesday, June 20, 2018, Emmanuel Oluwatosin Kazeem, 35, of Bowie, Maryland and Nigeria, was sentenced to 15 years in prison for leading a vast conspiracy to steal identities and file fraudulent tax returns. He was ordered to pay more than $12 million in restitution and will be subject to deportation when released from prison.

“Emmanuel Kazeem orchestrated one of the largest tax fraud schemes in our nation’s history. The complexity of this case and the incredible effort by law enforcement to bring those responsible to justice cannot be understated,” said Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon. “I want to remind everyone that this case began when vigilant Oregonians notified the IRS when fraudulently tax returns were filed in their names. It only takes one tip to make a difference and bring down a complex criminal organization.”

“IRS-CI vigorously investigates criminals who band together to take advantage of our tax system. Today’s sentencing of Emmanuel Kazeem sends a strong message to those who seek to rob U.S. citizens of their hard earned tax dollars,” said Acting Special Agent in Charge, Brian Payne.

According to court documents and evidence presented at trial, in May 2013, a victim in Medford, Oregon notified the IRS that false federal and Oregon state tax returns were filed electronically using her and her husband’s personal identifying information (PII) including social security numbers and dates of birth.

An IRS investigation led to search warrants of residences in Illinois, Maryland, and Georgia and to numerous email and instant messenger accounts used by Kazeem and other co-conspirators. At a Chicago residence, agents seized approximately 150 prepaid debit cards and $50,000 in money orders. In Maryland and Georgia, agents seized more than 50 electronic devices, 40 money orders in amounts exceeding $29,000, $14,000 in cash and numerous prepaid debit cards containing over $12,000 in fraudulent tax refunds. The search warrants helped agents identify Kazeem as the leader and mastermind of the scheme.

The scheme resulted in the conspirators possessing stolen PII of more than 259,000 victims. Kazeem purchased more than 91,000 identities from a Vietnamese hacker that originated from an Oregon company’s private database. The company provided pre-employment and volunteer background checks for thousands of clients. Kazeem divided the identities into batches and shared them with other co-conspirators. They were in turn used to file fraudulent tax returns between 2012 and 2015.

In carrying out the scheme, Kazeem trained and directed his co-conspirators including his younger brother, Michael Oluwasegun Kazeem, to use stolen PII to obtain thousands of electronic filing PINs to bypass IRS authentication procedures. They acquired over 19,500 E-File PINS during the course of the conspiracy. Kazeem also used taxpayers’ PII to gain unauthorized access into many taxpayers’ IRS transcripts, which contain sensitive personal financial information. Conspirators also used pre-paid debit cards with the victims’ stolen identities to receive direct electronic tax refund deposits from the IRS.

In total, Kazeem was linked to 10,139 fraudulent federal tax returns attempting to get over $91 million dollars in refunds and successfully receiving over $11.6 million dollars. Refunds were withdrawn from the debit cards and at least 2,000 wire transfers totaling over $2.1 million dollars were sent to Nigeria. Over 700 of those wire transfers, totaling more than $690,000, were directly linked to Kazeem.

Kazeem used the conspiracy windfall to place a nearly $200,000 down payment on a newly constructed house and to purchase a $175,000 townhouse, both in Maryland. His average monthly credit card payment during 2012 to 2015 was over $8,300. Kazeem also attempted to use his ill-gotten funds to develop a $6 million dollar, 4-star hotel in Lagos, Nigeria.

In May 2015, Kazeem transferred the townhouse to his sister in Nigeria for $10 and included her on the deed to his Maryland residence, also for $10. He was arrested one day later.

IRS agents determined Kazeem had no verifiable sources of income between 2012 and 2015. In order to disguise the source of the fraudulent refunds, he listed sources of income from bogus employers in reports to both the IRS and immigration authorities. After entering the United States on a student visa from Nigeria, Kazeem engaged in marriage fraud to evade immigration laws. In April 2014, while leading the tax fraud scheme, he filed for naturalization under the Immigration and Nationality Act. Based on the false information provided to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, he was approved. The same year he personally participated in filing over 1,445 fraudulent federal tax returns and received over $3,385,000 from returns paid out by the IRS.

Kazeem was convicted by a federal jury on 19 counts, including mail and wire fraud, aggravated identity theft and conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud, in Medford on August 4, 2017. Five other co-conspirators, Oluwaseunara Osanyinbi, Oluwatobi Dehinbo, Lateef Animawun, Oluwamuyiwa Olawoye and Michael Kazeem, previously received federal prison sentences for their roles in the same conspiracy.

This case results from a joint investigation by IRS-Criminal Investigation, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and Homeland Security Investigations with support provided by the Department of Treasury, Inspector General for Tax Administration, the U.S. State Department, and the Oregon Department of Revenue Policy and Systems Unit. The case is being prosecuted by Byron Chatfield and Gavin Bruce, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2018-06/6325/115461/SENTENCING-Kazeem-Final.pdf

Portland Couple Accused of Interstate Distribution of Marijuana and Firearms Crimes (Photo)
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 06/20/18 2:25 PM
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PORTLAND, Ore. – Isaiah Lee Holt, 30, and Marjorie Livingston, 37, residents of Portland, were charged today in a five-count indictment alleging the couple engaged in a conspiracy to distribute marijuana and illegally purchased and possessed firearms.

Holt is charged with one count each of conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute marijuana, possession with intent to distribute marijuana, possession with intent to distribute cocaine, and felon in possession of a firearm.

Holt made an initial appearance today in federal court before U.S. Magistrate Judge Paul Papak. He will appear at an arraignment and detention hearing on June 21, 2018.

Livingston is charged with one count of conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute marijuana and one count of making false statements during the purchase of a firearm. She is expected to make her first appearance before a federal magistrate judge on or before June 22, 2018.

According to court documents, in February 2018, Livingston is alleged to have illegally purchased a firearm for Holt, a convicted felon, at a licensed federal firearms dealer located in Portland.

ATF agents obtained a search warrant on Holt and Livingston’s NE Portland residence. On April 4, 2018, while surveilling Holt and the residence, agents contacted Holt and conducted a search of his person. Holt possessed two cell phones, two bundles of cash, two sets of keys, and seven small baggies of cocaine weighing approximately 11.5 grams.

Later the same day, agents conducted a search of the residence where they found materials consistent with drug trafficking including digital scales, small baggies, and Inositol, an agent commonly used for “cutting” cocaine.  Subsequent searches of the residence revealed a locked safe containing $46,100 in cash, two large plastic totes containing approximately 14 pounds of marijuana, U.S. Postal Service mailing labels, a heat sealer and food saver bags. Agents also found a Ruger AR-556 rifle, a Taurus 9mm pistol and a loaded M&P Shield .40 caliber firearm with an attached Crimson Trace laser.

Searches conducted of Holt and Livingston’s phones revealed numerous text and picture messages referencing marijuana and bank deposits. Messages were exchanged with phone numbers in North Carolina, Georgia, Texas and Florida. These messages included photos of bulk marijuana, shipping receipts, and bank deposit receipts.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime; defendants are presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

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Attached Media Files: Indictment Release , Image 1 , Image 2 , Image 3 , Image 4 , Image 5 , Image 6 , Image 7 , Image 8

Seattle Man Pleads Guilty to Fraud Conspiracy Involving Former Oregon Department of Energy Employee
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 06/20/18 2:15 PM

PORTLAND, Ore. – Martin J. Shain, 61, of Seattle, Washington, pleaded guilty today to one count each of conspiracy to defraud the U.S. and tax evasion.

According to court documents, between June 2012 and March 2015, Shain and Joseph Colello, a former employee of the Oregon Department of Energy’s (ODOE) Business Energy Tax Credit (BETC) program, maintained a secret business relationship whereby the two would personally profit from the sale and purchase of Oregon BETCs.

Shain and Colello devised a plan whereby Colello would give Shain the names of BETC sellers and interested buyers—information he had access to as an ODOE employee. Colello would then contact the sellers and buyers to negotiate credit transfers, but made it appear as though the Shain had brokered the deals. Shain created a company in the name of his relative in order to receive commission payments from the sellers of the tax credits and to conceal their earned income from the IRS. Shain charged sellers a 1-2% fee, undercutting brokers who typically charged a 10% fee for facilitating similar transfers. Colello would receive a portion of this fee as a kickback.

Between 2012 and 2015, Shain deposited over $1.3 million in income from the commissions charged to sellers of BETC credits. He would transfer a portion of these funds into a personal account from which he would purchase and issue biweekly cashier’s checks payable to Colello. Over the course of the conspiracy, Shain purchased and issued approximately 58 cashier’s checks to Colello or Colello’s girlfriend. In total, Colello received more than $300,000 in bribe payments for his role in the scheme. Shain failed to report more than $1.34 million in income received brokering tax credit sales on four income tax returns between 2012 and 2015.

Colello pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to engage in monetary transactions in property derived from specific unlawful activity, one count of conspiracy to defraud the United States, and one count of filing a false income tax return on March 15, 2018. On April 3, 2018, he was sentenced to 60 months in prison and was ordered to pay more than $81,000 in restitution.

Shain faces a maximum sentence of five years in prison, a $250,000 fine and three years of supervised release on each charge. He will be sentenced on September 20, 2018 before U.S. District Court Judge Robert E. Jones.

The case was investigated by IRS Criminal Investigation and the FBI and prosecuted by Claire M. Fay and Scott E. Bradford, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

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Attached Media Files: 2018-06/6325/115459/CHANGE_OF_PLEA-Shain-Final.pdf

Former Oregon State University Student Charged for Threatening Campus Shooting
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 06/20/18 12:08 PM

EUGENE. Ore. – Christopher Adam Strahan, 22, a resident of Corvallis, Oregon, was indicted today for threatening a campus shooting at Oregon State University (OSU).

The indictment alleges Strahan threatened to shoot classmates at OSU in a series of tweets on February 27, 2018. He is charged with a single count of making threatening communications in violation of 18 U.S.C. § 875.

Strahan was previously detained as a flight risk and danger to the community when he made his initial appearance in federal court on a criminal complaint on March 27, 2018. Strahan will be arraigned on the indictment on June 27, 2018 before U.S. Magistrate Judge Jolie A. Russo.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

Anyone who witnesses imminent threats of violence in any form made via internet or another means should call 9-1-1 immediately. Non-emergency tips can be submitted by contacting the FBI’s Portland Field Office at (503) 224-4181 or visiting the SafeOregon website at www.safeoregon.com.

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State
Parole & Probation Officers to Graduate from Oregon Public Safety Academy
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 06/21/18 11:00 AM

The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is pleased to announce the graduation of its 77th Basic Parole & Probation Officer Class on Friday, June 29, 2018 at the Oregon Public Safety Academy at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE in Salem, Oregon.  The event will begin at 11:00 a.m. with a reception to follow after the ceremony.  Ross Caldwell of the Oregon Criminal Justice Commission will be the guest speaker.  All family and friends of students, supervisors, department heads and elected officials are welcome to attend.

The graduating students appreciate the family, friends and guests who make graduation an appropriate conclusion to their basic training at the Oregon Public Safety Academy.

Reception immediately following.

Roster of Basic Parole and Probation Class 77

 

Parole & Probation Officer Zeth Allen

Lincoln County Community Corrections

 

Parole & Probation Officer Patricia Arrington

Umatilla County Community Corrections

 

Parole & Probation Officer Eileen Bailey

Multnomah County Adult Community Justice

 

Parole & Probation Officer Nathan Biel

Lane County Parole & Probation

 

Parole & Probation Officer Megan Bubar

Columbia County Community Corrections

 

Manager Thanh Dang

Multnomah County Adult Community Justice

 

Parole & Probation Officer Amanda Dennis

Washington County Community Corrections

 

Parole & Probation Officer Robert Divine

Jackson County Community Justice

 

Parole & Probation Officer Maria Frank

Lake County Community Justice

 

Parole & Probation Officer Daniel Garcilazo-Madrigal

Umatilla County Community Corrections

 

Parole & Probation Officer Janine Grund

Deschutes County Adult Parole & Probation

 

Parole & Probation Officer Trevor Kendall

Lincoln County Community Corrections

 

Parole & Probation Officer Sarah Mosley

Deschutes County Adult Parole & Probation

 

Parole & Probation Officer Kari Page

Multnomah County Adult Community Justice

 

Parole & Probation Officer Amanda Parks

Deschutes County Adult Parole & Probation

 

Parole & Probation Officer James Rodriguez

Jefferson County Community Corrections

 

Parole & Probation Officer Molly Seel

Multnomah County Adult Community Justice

 

Parole & Probation Officer Rodney Sofich

Multnomah County Adult Community Justice

 

Parole & Probation Officer Phillip Trupe

 Lincoln County Community Corrections

 

Parole & Probation Officer Nicole Vann

Lane County Parole & Probation

 

Parole & Probation Officer Laura Vejar

Multnomah County Adult Community Justice

 

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.


DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.


Unified Child and Youth Safety Implementation Plan Steering Team to meet Thursday, June 28, in Salem
Oregon Department of Human Services - 06/18/18 10:32 AM

The Unified Child and Youth Safety Implementation Plan Steering Team meets Thursday, June 28 from 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at the Barbara Roberts Human Services Building, Room 137 A-D, 500 Summer St. NE, Salem. The meeting is open to the public.

Agenda items include: foster parent training and supports updates, coordinated response to allegations of child abuse updates, status reports on ten priority projects and future agenda items.

Individuals unable to attend in person may call into the meeting and follow the presentation along online. Conference line: 1-877-848-7030; Participant Code: 285-3245. To follow presentation online, please use this link:  https://bit.ly/2L8U6bY.

The meeting location is accessible to people with disabilities. For questions about accessibility or to request an accommodation, please contact Kelsi Eisele at 971-283-1628 or kelsi.p.eisele@state.or.us. Requests should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting. A good faith effort will be made to fulfill requests.

For questions about this meeting, please contact: Nathan Rix, Executive Projects Director, at nathan.k.rix@state.or.us or Kelsi Eisele, Communication Project Manager, at kelsi.p.eisele@state.or.us.

DHS developed the Unified Child and Youth Safety Implementation Plan, which defines a two-year scope of work for transforming the child safety system and governance structure. The project team is now driving forward ten priority projects geared towards increasing child safety in Oregon. This steering team provides oversight, adherence to goals, and will monitor and control projects within the Unified Child and Youth Safety Implementation Plan.

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Oregon Department of Corrections Receives a National Innovation Award
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 06/20/18 1:24 PM

The National Institute for Governmental Purchasing or, NIGP: Institute for Public Procurement, represents over 3,000 member agencies and 15,000 procurement professionals around the world and has recently selected the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) to receive the 2018 NIGP Innovation Award. DOC Procurement and Contracts employees, Matt Shoemaker and Craig Heilman, created an easy-to-use Microsoft Excel tool that now enables the Department to save countless hours and reduce errors when staff are completing contract documents.

Public Works Public Improvement contracts typically have between eight and nine required documents to complete a solicitation. Historically, these documents have been recreated for each individual project, which increases the potential for human errors and missing information; this can create unintentional and unnecessary time and cost burdens. The DOC team automated the entire process by combining the documents into a single file allowing them to complete one Excel tab which then fills out each of the required forms of approximately 50 total pages. DOC has now seismically shifted a fiscally-dependent procedure that used to take many hours, to managing this complicated process in less than one hour. 

The Innovation Award is one of NIGP’s most prestigious achievements, recognizing DOC’s innovative approach to solving modern problems. NIGP’s Knowledge and Management Committee was fascinated by DOC’s innovative approach to improving internal processes.

Mr. Shoemaker, a Procurement and Contracts Specialist, will accept the award and speak on the topic at the annual forum in Nashville, TN in August.   

DOC employs 4,700 staff members at 14 institutions, two community corrections offices, and several centralized support facilities throughout the state. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of over 14,700 adults sentenced to more than 12 months of incarceration, and direct or indirect supervision of 33,000 offenders on felony supervision in the community. DOC is recognized nationally among correctional agencies for providing adults in custody with the cognitive, education, and job skills needed to become productive citizens when they transition back to their communities.


2018 Mid-Willamette Valley Interagency Wildland Fire School begins Monday, June 25 in Sweet Home, Oregon (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/21/18 4:14 PM
Firefighters train at last year's Interagency Wildland Fire School, which is again being held in Sweet Home, Ore. the last week in June.
Firefighters train at last year's Interagency Wildland Fire School, which is again being held in Sweet Home, Ore. the last week in June.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-06/1072/115520/thumb_Fire_School_Sweet_Home_-_2_firefighters_holding_hoses_photo_(14).JPG

SWEET HOME, Ore. – Over 200 wildland firefighters and instructors will convene in Sweet Home the last week of June to take part in the annual five day Mid-Willamette Valley Interagency Wildland Fire School. Officials from the U.S. Forest Service, Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF), U.S Fish and Wildlife Service, Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) are hosting the training to prepare new firefighters for fighting fire, both in Oregon's forests and in rural-urban interface areas.

Co-Incident Commanders Shawn Sheldon, Deputy Fire Staff for the BLM and Willamette National Forest; and Craig Pettinger, Unit Forester for ODF in Sweet Home, see fire school as an opportunity to train firefighters in both tactical skills and safety.

“This is the 22nd year our agencies have collaborated for this,” said Sheldon. “Fire School provides crucial education and training in wildland fire to new firefighters and gives career firefighters a chance to refresh their skills and explore leadership opportunities."  

Trainees will spend the first part of the week in a classroom. Classes include basic fire behavior, weather, map and compass use, teamwork, safety, use of engines, tools and hose lays, fighting fire in the rural-urban interface and fire investigation. Students will sleep in tents at Sweet Home High School and eat meals together, giving them a taste of life in a real fire camp.

The course is capped with a live-fire exercise on Friday, June 29 just outside of Sweet Home. This will give trainees a final challenge: applying their newly acquired skills to suppress and mop-up a real fire.

“Cascade Timber Consulting, Inc., a local landowner, provides a new field site each year and we are very grateful,” added Sheldon. “The live fire exercise significantly enhances the students’ training experience – working in smoke, hiking through uneven terrain, and working closely with crew members to dig fireline, are all things they’ll experience this season as wildland firefighters.”

Safety principles of fire training include wearing protective gear, safe use of tools and being on the lookout for hazards. “Safety is paramount in every aspect of wildland firefighting, and it begins with our training exercises,” explained Pettinger.  "Working together in a training setting improves communications and builds effective relationships for the agencies to draw on during fire season."

This year, the field site that will be used for the live fire exercise is located approximately 5 miles east of Sweet Home adjacent to Highway 20. Fire officials are urging the public to use caution as there will be increased fire traffic in the area and the potential for visible smoke on Friday, June 29. For more information, please contact Public Information Officers Chiara Cipriano, (541) 731-4427, or Jim Gersbach, (503) 945-7425.

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Note to media:
This opportunity offers access to both trainee and experienced firefighters as they prepare for the 2018 fire season. However, we require 24-hour notice of your intent to participate, as all media must be accompanied by an agency escort and have personal protective equipment (see list below).
 
Personal protective equipment includes:

  • Nomex pants
  • Long-sleeve Nomex shirt
  • Gloves
  • Hard hat
  • Vibram-soled leather boots

Protective equipment (excluding boots) may be available for media to borrow. Please contact Chiara Cipriano to make arrangements.




Attached Media Files: Firefighters train at last year's Interagency Wildland Fire School, which is again being held in Sweet Home, Ore. the last week in June.

Three ODF fire protection districts from the coast to the Cascades enter fire season
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/21/18 12:41 PM

SALEM, Ore. — Three Oregon Department of Forestry fire protection districts from the mid-coast through the southern Willamette Valley to the crest of the Cascades entered fire season on Thursday, June 21. ODF-protected lands covered by the declaration include state, private, county, and city forestland, as well as Bureau of Land Management (BLM) forestlands in western Oregon.

The West Oregon, Western Lane and South Cascade districts protect lands in Benton, Lane, Lincoln, Polk, southern Linn County and a portion of northwest Douglas County.

An unusually dry May and early June prompted the declarations.

 “We’ve received a couple shots of rain recently, but that doesn’t make up for the dry spring we’ve experienced this year. The result is that we are a couple weeks ahead of where we traditionally are regarding fuel moistures and fire conditions in the forest,” said Western Lane District Forester Link Smith.

Chris Cline is district forester for ODF’s South Cascade District based in Springfield. He said fuel moistures in eastern Lane and southern Linn counties are already similar to what they historically would be for the beginning of July. “We look carefully at local conditions in determining when to declare the start of fire season. What they are telling us is that in our district it is now dry enough for wildfires that do start to have the potential to spread more rapidly.”

As of June 20, more than 200 wildfires were reported on ODF-protected lands throughout Oregon. These burned just over 200 acres. More than 80% of those fires were caused by people. In light of those numbers, West Oregon District Forester Mike Totey said, “Most wildfires at this time of year are triggered by people, so they are almost entirely preventable with some foresight. An activity that might be low risk when vegetation is thoroughly soaked and humidity is high could ignite a wildfire when longer hours of sunlight, warmth and relatively light rainfall have started drying those fuels out.”

Fire restrictions in ODF districts vary somewhat. To find out what restrictions are in place at any given location, go online to ODF’s statewide fire restrictions and closures page at www.oregon.gov/ODF/Fire/Pages/Restrictions.aspx or call the ODF office below that is nearest:

  • Western Lane (Veneta) – 541-935-2222
  • West Oregon (Philomath) – 541-929-6300 and press 1
  • South Cascade – (Springfield) – 541-726-3588 and press 2

Six other ODF districts and forest protective associations in southern and eastern Oregon have been in fire season since earlier this month due to warm, dry conditions that have elevated fire risk.

                                                                                         # # #


ODF, Forest Service announce first timber sale under Good Neighbor Authority on Fremont-Winema Forest
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/19/18 4:27 PM

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon Department of Forestry and the USDA Forest Service jointly announced today the award of the first timber sale contract under the Good Neighbor Authority (GNA).

The sale is part of the Paddock Butte GNA restoration project on the Fremont-Winema National Forest and represents the first ODF-administered timber sale under the GNA. The Paddock Butte timber sale was awarded to Ore-Cal Land Development, LLC of Klamath Falls, and the contract signed on June 6.

Governor Kate Brown and Pacific Northwest Regional Forester Jim Peña signed a Master Agreement in March 2016 to execute the Good Neighbor Agreement in Oregon. Under GNA, which was authorized by Congress in the 2014 Farm Bill, state agencies work in partnership with the USDA Forest Service to implement restoration projects on federal lands.

Chad Davis, Director of the ODF Partnership & Planning Program, said that GNA is an integral component of the department’s Federal Forest Restoration Program, first initiated by the state legislature in 2013.

“GNA allows us to significantly ramp up our partnership with the U.S. Forest Service to increase the pace, scale and quality of restoration. The Paddock Butte project is a prime example of the work needed to improve forest health to increase the resiliency of our fire-prone forests to uncharacteristic wildfire and invasive species,” Davis said.

The Paddock Butte timber sale is 637 acres of ponderosa pine on National Forest System lands in Klamath County on the Bly Ranger District and within the ODF Klamath-Lake District.  The sale area is surrounded on three sides by private land and is located north of Gerber Reservoir.

The Paddock Butte GNA project is more than a timber sale. It permits activities to treat insect and disease-infected trees, reduce hazardous fuels, and other treatments to restore or improve forest, rangeland and watershed health, including wildlife habitat.

“Paddock Butte embodies the spirit of GNA,” said USDA Forest Service Lakeview and Bly District Ranger Mike Ramsey. “It’s an area where restoration and fuel reduction work is already occurring on private and other government lands. If the Forest Service land was left untreated, that has the potential to intensify the effects of a wildfire and undermine all the valuable restoration work being done by other landowners.”

Typically timber revenues on federal lands would return to the federal agency.  A benefit to GNA is that ODF can administer the timber sale and use the resulting funds to recover their administrative costs and fund additional restoration activities, including invasive weed treatments and juniper removal.

Public in the area may see increased traffic in the area during the timber harvest and subsequent fuel reduction, including the application of prescribed fire, and other restoration treatments.

The Paddock Butte sale and restoration project was identified as a high priority treatment area by the Klamath-Lake Forest Health Partnership, the Oregon Department of Forestry's Klamath-Lake District, and the Fremont-Winema National Forest.                    

For more information on the Paddock Butte project or the Fremont-Winema National Forest, please visit www.fs.usda.gov/fremont-winema, follow the forest on Twitter @FremontWinemaNF or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/R6FWNF.

For more information on the Oregon Department of Forestry: www.oregon.gov/ODF/pages/index.aspx, on Twitter via @ORDeptForestry or on Facebook via @oregondepartmentofforestry.


Recreational use health advisory for Dorena Reservoir lifted June 22
Oregon Health Authority - 06/22/18 3:37 PM

June 22, 2018

Recreational use health advisory for Dorena Reservoir lifted June 22 
Reduced cyanobacteria, cyanotoxin levels confirmed

The Oregon Health Authority has lifted the recreational use health advisory issued June 13 for Dorena Reservoir, located six miles east of Cottage Grove in Lane County, due to the presence of a cyanobacteria (harmful algae) bloom.

Water monitoring has confirmed that the level of cyanotoxins (harmful algae toxins) in the reservoir are below recreational guideline values for human exposure. However, OHA officials advise recreational visitors to always be alert to signs of a cyanobacteria (harmful algae) blooms in all Oregon waters, because blooms can develop and disappear throughout the season. Only a fraction of the many lakes and waterways in Oregon are monitored for cyanobacteria by state, federal and local agencies, therefore, you are your own best advocate when it comes to keeping you and your family safe while recreating.

People and especially small children and pets should avoid recreating in areas where the water is foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish red in color, if a thick mat of blue-green algae is visible in the water, or bright green cells are suspended in the water column. If you observe these signs in the water you are encouraged to avoid activities that cause you to swallow water or inhale droplets, such as swimming or high-speed water activities.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) at 971-673-0440.

For information about recreational advisories issued or lifted for the season, contact the Oregon Public Health toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767 or visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://healthoregon.org/hab and select “Algae Bloom Advisories.” 


Dental Pilot Project Rules Advisory Committee meets June 25
Oregon Health Authority - 06/22/18 2:19 PM

What: The Oral Health Program at the Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division is convening a series of rules advisory committee (RAC) meetings to discuss amendments to rules related to Dental Pilot Projects.

The purpose of the RAC is to provide feedback and input on the development of amended rule language, as well as review the statement of need and fiscal impact for the proposed rules.

Agenda: Review background information; brief overview of the rulemaking process; review draft amended rules; next steps.

When: June 25, 9 am-11am. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St., Room 1A, Portland. Conference line: 1-888-273-3658, participants code: 76-64-09

Background: Senate Bill 738, passed by the Oregon State Legislature in 2011, allows the Oregon Health Authority to approve dental pilot projects once an application has been approved. These projects are intended to evaluate the quality of care, access, cost, workforce, and efficacy by teaching new skills to existing categories of dental personnel; developing new categories of dental personnel; accelerating the training of existing categories of dental personnel; or teaching new oral health care roles to previously untrained persons.

Materials: Copies of materials are available online at healthoregon.org/dpp

Program contact: Sarah Kowalski, 971-673-1563, ah.e.kowalski@state.or.us">sarah.e.kowalski@state.or.us.

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Recreational use advisory issued for Lake Billy Chinook due to cyanotoxins
Oregon Health Authority - 06/22/18 1:45 PM

High levels of cyanobacteria toxins found in Jefferson County water body

The Oregon Health Authority issued a recreational use health advisory today for areas of Lake Billy Chinook due to the presence of a cyanobacteria (harmful algae) bloom. The lake is located about 12 miles west of Madras, in Jefferson County.

Water monitoring has confirmed the presence of cyanobacteria and the toxins they produce in Perry South Cove on the Metolious Arm of Lake Billy Chinook. The cyanotoxin concentrations found can be harmful to humans and animals.

The advisory extends from the cove at Perry South Campground to the southern tip of Three Rivers Island located downstream in the Metolious Arm.

People should avoid swimming and high-speed water activities, such as water skiing or power boating, in areas of the lake where blooms are identified. Although toxins are not absorbed through the skin, people who have skin sensitivities may experience a puffy red rash at the affected area.

Drinking water directly from this area of the lake at this time is especially dangerous. OHA public health officials advise campers and other recreational visitors that toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating water with camping-style filters.

Anyone drawing in-home water directly from the affected area is advised to use an alternative water source because private treatment systems are not proven effective for removing cyanotoxins. However, public drinking water systems can reduce cyanotoxins through proper filtration and disinfection. If people are connected to public water systems or are on wells in the area, that water is not affected by the bloom in the lake. If community members have questions about water available at nearby campgrounds, they should contact campground management.

Oregon health officials recommend that those who choose to eat fish from waters where cyanobacteria (harmful algae) blooms are present remove all fat, skin and organs before cooking, as toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water. Public health officials also advise people to not eat freshwater clams or mussels from Lake Billy Chinook and that Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations do not allow the harvest of these shellfish from freshwater sources. Crayfish muscle can be eaten, but internal organs and liquid fat should be discarded.

Exposure to cyanotoxins can produce a variety of symptoms including numbness, tingling and dizziness that can lead to difficulty breathing or heart problems, and require immediate medical attention. Symptoms of skin irritation, weakness, diarrhea, nausea, cramps and fainting should also receive medical attention if they persist or worsen. Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. People who bring their pets to this area of Lake Billy Chinook for recreation activities should take special precautions to keep them from drinking from or swimming in this area of the lake.

The advisory will be lifted when the concern no longer exists.

With proper precautions to avoid exposure to affected water, people are encouraged to visit this area of Lake Billy Chinook and enjoy activities such as fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, and bird watching. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray, which could lead to inhalation risk.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) at 971-673-0440.

OHA maintains an updated list of all health advisories on its website. To learn if an advisory has been issued or lifted for a specific water body, visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://www.healthoregon.org/hab and select “algae bloom advisories,” or call the Oregon Public Health Division toll-free information line at 877-290-6767.

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Recreational use health advisory lifted June 22 for Upper Klamath Lake
Oregon Health Authority - 06/22/18 1:42 PM

Reduced cyanobacteria and cyanotoxin levels confirmed

The Oregon Health Authority has lifted the recreational use health advisory issued June 15 for Upper Klamath Lake—located off Oregon Route 140, 15 miles west of Klamath Falls in Klamath County—due to the presence of a cyanobacteria (harmful algae) bloom and the toxins they produced.

Water monitoring has confirmed that the level of cyanotoxins (harmful algae toxins) in the lake are below recreational guideline values for human exposure. However, OHA officials advise recreational visitors to always be alert to signs of a cyanobacteria (harmful algae) blooms in all Oregon waters, because blooms can develop and disappear throughout the season. Only a fraction of the many lakes and waterways in Oregon are monitored for cyanobacteria by state, federal and local agencies, therefore, you are your own best advocate when it comes to keeping you and your family safe while recreating.

People and especially small children and pets should avoid recreating in areas where the water is foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish red in color, if a thick mat of cyanobacteria (harmful algae) is visible in the water, or bright green cells are suspended in the water column. If you observe these signs in the water you are encouraged to avoid activities that cause you to swallow water or inhale droplets, such as swimming or high-speed water activities.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) at 971-673-0440.

For information about recreational advisories issued or lifted for the season, contact the Oregon Public Health toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767 or visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://healthoregon.org/hab and select “Algae Bloom Advisories.”

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Recreational use health advisory for Dorena Reservoir lifted June 22
Oregon Health Authority - 06/22/18 1:37 PM

Reduced cyanobacteria, cyanotoxin levels confirmed

The Oregon Health Authority has lifted the recreational use health advisory issued June 13 for Dorena Reservoir, located six miles east of Cottage Grove in Lane County, due to the presence of a cyanobacteria (harmful algae) bloom.

Water monitoring has confirmed that the level of cyanotoxins (harmful algae toxins) in the reservoir are below recreational guideline values for human exposure. However, OHA officials advise recreational visitors to always be alert to signs of a cyanobacteria (harmful algae) blooms in all Oregon waters, because blooms can develop and disappear throughout the season. Only a fraction of the many lakes and waterways in Oregon are monitored for cyanobacteria by state, federal and local agencies, therefore, you are your own best advocate when it comes to keeping you and your family safe while recreating.

People and especially small children and pets should avoid recreating in areas where the water is foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish red in color, if a thick mat of blue-green algae is visible in the water, or bright green cells are suspended in the water column. If you observe these signs in the water you are encouraged to avoid activities that cause you to swallow water or inhale droplets, such as swimming or high-speed water activities.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) at 971-673-0440.

For information about recreational advisories issued or lifted for the season, contact the Oregon Public Health toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767 or visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://healthoregon.org/hab and select “Algae Bloom Advisories.”

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Healthcare-Associated Infections Advisory Committee meets June 27
Oregon Health Authority - 06/20/18 2:21 PM

June 20, 2018

Healthcare-Associated Infections Advisory Committee meets June 27

What: The quarterly public meeting of the Healthcare-Associated Infections Advisory Committee (HAIAC)

When: June 27, 1-3 p.m. A 10-minute public comment period is scheduled at 2:50 p.m.; comments are limited to five minutes.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1B, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. Conference call line: 877-873-8018, access code 7872333.

Agenda: Outbreaks update; infection control infection and response (ICAR) tools; nursing home prevalence study; injection practice and needle use project update; TAP assessment progress; discussion; public comment.

Background: OHA provides oversight and support for the mandatory reporting of health care-associated infections in Oregon via the HAI program. The board meets on a quarterly basis to make recommendations to OHA regarding infection measures reportable by health care facilities. More information is available on the program's webpage at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/DiseasesConditions/CommunicableDisease/HAI/Prevention/Pages/Meetings.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Roza Tammer at 971-673-1074, 711 TTY, or oza.p.tammer@dhsoha.state.or.us">roza.p.tammer@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 


Correction: Out of Hospital Births Prior Authorization Review Workgroup to meet June 20 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 06/20/18 10:49 AM

June 13, 2018

What: A public meeting of the Out of Hospital Births Prior Authorization Review Workgroup.

When: Wednesday, June 20, 10 a.m. to noon. A public comment period will be held at approximately 11:30 a.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Conference Room 1D, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland.

The public also may attend by conference call at 888-278-0296, participant code 843163.

Agenda: Welcome, introductions and process overview; background and workgroup scope and goal; current process for out-of-hospital births prior authorization; challenges with and reflections on PA process; public comment; summary and next steps.

Background: The Out of Hospital Births Workgroup met in 2016-2017 to discuss the Oregon Health Plan's coverage of childbirth in settings other than hospitals. The workgroup presented recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority in summer 2017. OHA is convening this small group to undertake the workgroup's third recommendation, "Prior Authorization Process Review," with the goal of optimizing safety while improving the efficiency of the process. Questions and public comments may be submitted to OOHB.Workgroup@dhsoha.state.or.us.

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Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services.  OHA provides free help.  Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Heather Johnson at 503-508-8276, 711 TTY or heather.n.johnson@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

This news release was updated June 20, 2018, at 10:44 a.m., to correct the telephone number.


$7.3 million Megabucks ticket was a lucky mistake
Oregon Lottery - 06/22/18 8:07 AM

June 22, 2018 – Salem, Ore. – The $7.3 million Oregon’s Game Megabucks winning ticket started out as a lucky mistake.
When Charles Svitak (pronounced ‘Swee-Tok’) of Central Point noticed the Oregon’s Game Megabucks jackpot was more than $7 million, he went to his local 7-Eleven to pick up a ticket. When he went to buy the ticket, the clerk told him that there were two mistake tickets that had already been printed, and offered him the chance to purchase them. Svitak opted to buy one of the two tickets.
Svitak said he went out to his vehicle, thought about it, then went back in and purchased the other mistake ticket – a decision that turned out to be worth $7.3 million.
“When I checked the ticket on my computer I couldn’t believe it,” Svitak, who works a graveyard shift in Medford, said. “The first thing I thought is that I had worked my last graveyard shift. It was a very good day.”
Svitak immediately traveled to Salem to claim his prize – without telling his wife.
“On the way home I got a new truck and put the oversized check they gave me on the windshield,” he said. “Then I took her out to show her truck and she realized I won the lottery. She hasn’t stopped giggling since.”
Svitak took the lump sum option and was given a check for $3.65 million for his prize. The couple said they are talking to a financial planner and said they planned on traveling and purchasing a couple of new vehicles with the winnings.
The winning ticket was sold at the 7-Eleven on Front Street in Central Point on Saturday, June 16 -- the day of the draw. Svitak became the 284th Oregon’s Game Megabucks millionaire since Nov. 20, 1985, when the game first launched. William Breese of Portand was the last Oregon’s Game Megabucks jackpot winner, $8.9 million, in March.
During the 2015-17 biennium, more than $34 million in Oregon Lottery proceeds were directed to economic development, parks, education and watershed enhancement in Jackson County, where Svitak lives.
Lottery officials recommend that you always sign the back of your tickets with each Oregon Lottery game you play, to ensure you can claim any prize you may win. In the event of winning a jackpot, players should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 should contact the Lottery office to schedule an appointment to claim their prize.
Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $11 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

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Did you buy a Powerball ticket in Salem? You may have won $150 million
Oregon Lottery - 06/21/18 3:22 PM

June 21, 2018 – Salem, Ore. – An Oregon Lottery player matched all numbers drawn in Wednesday night’s $150.4 million Powerball® jackpot. The winning ticket was sold in Salem. The specific store location is not available for release until after the ticket has been redeemed and validated at Lottery headquarters in Salem.

Winning numbers for draw date (June 20, 2018): 4 -14 - 23 - 27 - 56 and the power ball was 13

The Power Play multiplier was 2

The winning Salem ticket was the only ticket sold to have the all the winning numbers. More than 6,800 winning tickets, with smaller prizes, were sold in Oregon during the June 20 draw.

A winner has one year from the date of the drawing to claim the prize. Oregon Lottery office hours are from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. 

Players have two jackpot prize payment options when claiming their Powerball tickets. One option is the “annuity” plan, under which Powerball jackpots provide the winner(s) with 30 annual payments.  Under the “cash” option, the winners(s) receives a one-time lump sum payment equal to approximately one-half the final jackpot. If the winner opts to take the lump sum, they can take home nearly $61.7 million after taxes. If the winner opts for the annuity option they will receive 30 graduated payments over 29 years. Federal withholding is 24 percent and state withholding is 8 percent.

Powerball is a multi-state jackpot operated by 44 states plus the District of Columbia, the US Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico. By pooling a portion of each lottery’s Powerball sales, this game is able to offer players jackpots of far greater value than any lottery could offer alone.

This is the fifth time a ticket sold in Oregon has had all the winning numbers. Previous winners include Dan Gannon of Milwaukie who won $182.7 million in 2006; The West and Chaney families of Medford who won $340 million; Robin Powell of Beaverton who won $33.8 million in 1999; and the Givens family of Eugene who won $38.4 million in 1992.

It is also the fifth time the Powerball jackpot has been won this year nationwide.

In Oregon, the winner’s name, city, city of retailer, date of win, prize and game played are considered public information and will be released.

For additional information about the Powerball jackpot, please contact the Oregon Lottery Public Affairs the next business day at 503-540-1015.

Lottery officials recommend that you always sign the back of your tickets with each Oregon Lottery game you play, to ensure you can claim any prize you may win. In the event of winning a jackpot, players should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 should contact the Lottery office to schedule an appointment to claim their prize.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25,1985, it has earned more than $11 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

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Operation Dry Water Focuses on Impaired Boat Operators (Photo)
Oregon Marine Board - 06/22/18 12:00 PM
Operation Dry Water messaging
Operation Dry Water messaging
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-06/4139/115531/thumb_ODW_osmb.jpg

The Marine Board and law enforcement from 32 counties and the Oregon State Police will be participating in Operation Dry Water during the weekend of June 29- July 1, as part of a nationally coordinated effort to reduce the number of accidents and fatalities related to boating under the influence of intoxicants (BUII).  

“To help marine officers prepare, we train them to recognize drug and alcohol impairment and arrest those operators –including those with paddles,” says Randy Henry, Boating Safety Manager for the Marine Board. 

Boating under the influence of intoxicants means prescription drugs, alcohol, inhalants, marijuana, or any other substance that impairs a person’s ability to make sound judgments and have the ability to safely operate a boat.  The effects of drugs and alcohol are also amplified on the water with the combination of sun glare, wind, waves and other environmental stressors.  Alcohol also dehydrates the body making sudden immersion into cold water at an even greater risk for drowning. 

Impaired boaters can expect to be arrested or face serious penalties.  In Oregon, the consequences of being convicted of BUII include the possibility of jail time, $6,250 in fines and loss of boating privileges.  Marine officers can arrest boaters on observed impairment and can legally obtain blood, breath or urine if a boater fails field sobriety testing.  So far this year, nine people have been arrested for BUII. 

“Overall, recreational boating is very safe if boaters wear life jackets, boat sober, and keep a sharp lookout. Waterways are becoming more crowded with a variety of mixed boating and other activities, so it’s important to pay attention to what’s going on around you and to follow the navigation rules of the road.  If boaters changed two things; wear life jackets and abstain from substances, accidents would be extremely rare,” says Henry.  So far this year, the common denominators for accidents include impairment, distracted operation and no life jacket.   Henry goes on to say, “The public is our ally in safe boating.  If you see an impaired operator or someone who is operating in a way that threatens others’ safety, call 911 and report it.  That’s how we can work together to save lives.”  

For more information about Operation Dry Water, visit www.operationdrywater.org.

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Attached Media Files: Operation Dry Water messaging

Marine Board to Hold Rule Hearings on Wake Sports, Solicits Public Comments
Oregon Marine Board - 06/21/18 10:22 AM

The Oregon State Marine Board will be holding an additional rule hearing in Clackamas to gather testimony on proposed statewide rules of operation for wake sports.  Oral testimony will be limited to two minutes per speaker. The hearing will be held at Clackamas Community College, McLaughlin Auditorium (M-121), 19600 Molalla Ave., in Oregon City on July 18 at 6 pm. 

This hearing, is in addition to three other previously scheduled hearings, will be held in different areas of the state:

  • Deschutes County Services Building, Barnes Sawyer Meeting Room, 1300 NW Wall St. in Bend on June 28, beginning at 11 am;
  • Jackson County Parks, Auditorium Room, 7520 Table Rock Rd. in Central Point on July 10, beginning at 6 pm; and,
  • Oregon State Marine Board, Conference Room, 435 Commercial St. NE in Salem on August 15, beginning at 6 pm.

The proposed rule language amends OAR 250-010-0010 Definitions, to include terms used in Chapter 250 of Oregon’s Administrative Rules for wakeboarding and wake surfing; and adopts a new rule, OAR 250-010-0026 Wake Sport Operations, prohibiting wakeboarding and wake surfing within 200 feet of a dock, float, floating home, boathouse, designated boat moorage, floating restroom, or person in the water.  The rule also prohibits wakeboarding and wake surfing within 100 feet of a non-motorized boat. 

Written comments will be accepted until August 31, 2018 by 5 pm and can be submitted via email to .rulemaking@oregon.gov">osmb.rulemaking@oregon.gov  or by U.S. mail to: June LeTarte, Administrative Rules Coordinator, Oregon State Marine Board, 435 Commercial Street NE, Suite 400, Salem, OR 97301.  Comments via telephone will not be accepted.  

To view the proposed rule language, visit http://www.oregon.gov/osmb/info/Pages/Rulemaking-and-Public-Notices.aspx.

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Oregon Office of Emergency Management Signs Agreement for FEMA Integration Team in Oregon (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 06/22/18 9:23 AM
Emergency management directors gather in Portland today to sign FEMA Integration Team (FIT) agreement to enhance state preparedness and resilience. Left to right: OEM Director Andrew Phelps, FEMA Region 10 Administrator Mike O'Hare and Interim Director fo
Emergency management directors gather in Portland today to sign FEMA Integration Team (FIT) agreement to enhance state preparedness and resilience. Left to right: OEM Director Andrew Phelps, FEMA Region 10 Administrator Mike O'Hare and Interim Director fo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-06/3986/115537/thumb_20180622_082211.jpg

PORTLAND – June 22, 2018 – FEMA Region 10 Administrator Mike O’Hare visited Oregon today to meet with Oregon Office of Emergency Management Director Andrew Phelps to sign an agreement that launches the FEMA Integration Team Program in the state. The FIT program will embed FEMA staff with state, local, tribal and territorial emergency management partners to increase capabilities and build resilience before, during and after disasters. 

The agreement was signed at Portland Bureau of Emergency Management offices in Portland to underscore the partnership between agencies at all levels of government.

“Oregon is proud to be among the nation’s first states to participate in the FIT program,” said Andrew Phelps. “It will enhance our capacity to support Oregonians in disasters and strengthen our relationship with FEMA through onsite collaboration and communication.”

The signing of the agreement is the first step toward implementing the FIT program. Through the embedded FIT staff, FEMA will provide technical assistance, training and coordination support for a range of program areas including, but not limited to, all hazards planning, exercise design and evaluation, access and functional needs or disability integration, grants management, and risk assessment and analysis.  The program is expected to be underway by late fall, 2018.




Attached Media Files: Emergency management directors gather in Portland today to sign FEMA Integration Team (FIT) agreement to enhance state preparedness and resilience. Left to right: OEM Director Andrew Phelps, FEMA Region 10 Administrator Mike O'Hare and Interim Director fo

Construction scheduled for June 27 on Beverly Beach State Park campground entrance bridge (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 06/20/18 10:00 AM
Beverly Beach State Park campground entrance bridge
Beverly Beach State Park campground entrance bridge
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BEVERLY BEACH, Ore. - Repair work is scheduled for June 27 on the bridge spanning Spencer Creek at the campground entrance to Beverly Beach State Park. Work will occur 9 a.m. – 2 p.m.

The repairs are required to keep the bridge in compliance with Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) standards.

Workers will be grinding down asphalt as part of the repair process. Campground users should expect some construction noise as a result. The grinding is expected to persist for the entire construction window, but will conclude by 2 p.m.

ODOT will have flaggers to control traffic near the bridge work site. Expect short delays if you are traveling to or from the campground during construction times.

Park staff ask that all incoming campers respect the 4 p.m. check-in time that day to help eliminate extra congestion.

The June 27 work is the first phase of a larger construction project at the park. Future phases will be communicated as soon as details are available. The project will be completed by end of summer.

For more information, call the Beverly Beach State Park office 541-265-4560.




Attached Media Files: Beverly Beach State Park campground entrance bridge

Oregon Heritage Commission grants awarded to museums throughout the state
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 06/20/18 8:04 AM

Oregon Heritage Commission has awarded nearly $60,000 in grants to nine museums throughout the state. The grants will help fund a variety of projects including collection preservation, visitor education and heritage tourism. Award amounts ranged $4,500 - $8,000.

Funded projects:

  • Clackamas County Historical Society, in Oregon City, for collections inventory and shelving at the Stevens Crawford House.
  • Deschutes County Historical Society, in Bend, for the “Cruisin’ 97” exhibit and geotagging tourism project.
  • Fort Rock Valley Historical Society and Homestead Museum for repairing the Belltable Home at Fort Rock museum complex.
  • High Desert Museum, near Bend, for the “By Her Hand” exhibit, and other historic and contemporary indigenous art.
  • Mount Hood Cultural Center and Museum, in Government Camp, to organize and digitize a historic photograph collection.
  • Oregon Jewish Museum, in Portland, to place online finding aids that link to the museum’s object collection.
  • Oregon Nikkei Endowment, in Portland, to preserve the WWII Minidoka Incarceration Site collection at the Oregon Nikkei Legacy Center.
  • Umatilla County Historical Society, in Pendleton, to install the “Umatilla Gold: The History of Wheat in Umatilla County” exhibit.
  • Willamette Heritage Center, in Salem, to preserve and create a finding aid for over 800 plans created by architectural firm Payne, Settecase and Smith.

The museum grant program is offered annually by the Oregon Heritage Commission, part of the Oregon Heritage program at Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD). The grant program began in 1965 when only 24 organizations were eligible for the program.

The Oregon Heritage Commission works to secure, sustain and enhance Oregon’s heritage. The Commission sponsors heritage initiatives that educate the public about the value of heritage and celebrate the state’s diversity.

The Oregon Heritage Commission consists of nine members appointed by the governor and nine agency advisors. Members are chosen from state agencies and statewide organizations, and represent a diverse geographical and heritage background.

To learn more about the Oregon Museum Grant or the Oregon Heritage Commission, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at i.gill@oregon.gov">Kuri.gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.


Cities
June 18 tests show Albany water is safe to drink
City of Albany - 06/20/18 4:36 PM

Applies to City of Albany, City of Millersburg and Dumbeck Lane Water District

Samples of finished City of Albany drinking water collected Monday, June 18, 2018, show no cyanotoxins in Albany’s drinking water. The City received these most recent test results today.

Due to recent harmful algae blooms in Detroit Lake and associated cyanotoxins found in the City of Salem’s drinking water, the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) requested Albany sample its water intake on the Santiam River and finished drinking water from the Albany-Millersburg Water Treatment Plant. The finished drinking water samples show no cyanotoxins in Albany’s drinking water.

Sampling at the Albany-Millersburg Water Treatment Plant will continue at the request of the OHA. Beginning next week, Albany will also sample for cyanotoxins at the water intake for the Vine Street Water Treatment Plant and in the finished water from that plant. The Oregon Health Authority is writing new sampling rules for drinking water providers across Oregon in response to the cyanotoxins found in the North Santiam River and Detroit Lake. All sample results from both plants will be posted on the City of Albany website as soon as they are available.

The Albany water supply is regularly and frequently monitored according to OHA standards. We remain vigilant for any signs of contamination and will ensure that our customers are notified promptly if any problems are detected.

Customers with questions may contact the Albany Public Works Department at 541-917-7600.

If you would like to know more about harmful algae blooms and cyanotoxins, visit the Oregon Health Authority website: http://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/HealthyEnvironments/DrinkingWater/Operations/Treatment/Pages/algae.aspx.

Visit the City’s Emergency Management page at cityofalbany.net/em for more information including:

• Map of current alerts and hazards, • Tips on how to make an emergency plan, • The basics of building an emergency kit, • Sign up or follow the City’s information and notification systems (including Facebook, Twitter, Nixle, FlashAlert, and the Linn-Benton Alert reverse 9-1-1 system).


Courts/District Attorneys
Aumsville Police Officer Cleared, Suspect Indicted
Marion Co. Dist. Attorney's Office - 06/18/18 12:28 PM

Today a Marion County Grand Jury unanimously found that an Aumsville Police Officer was justified in using deadly force against Joshua Brook Biles, date of birth 12/27/90, in the early morning hours of June 8, 2018.

Officer Ryan Bambrick was cleared in the shooting that occurred after he stopped Joshua Brook Biles’ vehicle for a traffic violation near the intersection of Stayton Road and Bates Road, just outside the city limits of Aumsville. At the time of the stop, an altercation occurred between Officer Bambrick and Joshua Brook Biles, who then fled the scene and was quickly arrested a short distance away.

As a result of the altercation, Joshua Brook Biles received a minor injury and was treated on scene.  Officer Bambrick was not injured, however, his civilian ride-along passenger did sustain a non life-threatening injury. 

The same Grand Jury that found Officer Bambrick’s actions to be justified also indicted Joshua Brook Biles for: Assault in the Third Degree, 2 counts of Recklessly Endangering Another Person, Criminal Mischief in the Second Degree, and Attempting to Elude a Police Officer.

Joshua Brook Biles is scheduled to be arraigned on the indictment on June 18, 2018 at 8:30 a.m. at 4000 Aumsville Highway. 

Due to the ongoing nature of Joshua Brook Biles’ criminal case, the DA’s Office will not release any further detail of the shooting or the crimes at this time.

 

Contact Info:  Matt Kemmy, Deputy DA, 503-588-5222


Coos Co. Schools
Updated Coos Bay School District Public Meeting Schedule for June 2018
Coos Bay Sch. Dist. - 06/20/18 4:02 PM

Coos Bay School District public meeting schedule for June 2018. All meetings are held at Milner Crest Education Center, 1255 Hemlock Ave., Coos Bay, unless otherwise noted. The schedule and agenda are subject to change.

Special School Board Meeting and Budget Hearing – June 25 at 5:30 PM at Milner Crest Education Center. Agenda and packet will be posted at http://cbd9.net/schoolboard/agendas the Friday before the meeting.

Special School Board Meeting with Finding of Fact Hearing – June 27 at 5:00 PM at Milner Crest Education Center. Agenda and packet will be posted at http://cbd9.net/schoolboard/agendas the Friday before the meeting.

All Coos Bay School District Board Meetings are subject to the Public Meetings Law (ORS 192.610-192.710).  The public is welcome to attend. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. Request for other accommodations should be made to Peggy Ahlgrim at 541-267-1310, 541-269-5366 (fax) or peggya@coos-bay.k12.or.us

 

Peggy Ahlgrim

Secretary to Superintendent and School Board

Coos Bay School District

1255 Hemlock Ave.

Coos Bay, OR 97420

541-267-1310     541-267-1308 fax

 


Businesses
PacificSource Health Plans Names Dr. Edward McEachern as EVP and Chief Medical Officer (Photo)
PacificSource Health Plans - 06/21/18 1:31 PM
2018-06/2392/115508/Edward.McEachern.Web357x500.jpg
2018-06/2392/115508/Edward.McEachern.Web357x500.jpg
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(SPRINGFIELD, Ore.) June 21, 2018— PacificSource Health Plans has named Dr. Edward McEachern as executive vice president and chief medical officer. Dr. McEachern joined PacificSource in 2015 as medical director for Medicare programs and has been serving as interim chief medical officer since early 2018. In his new role, Dr. McEachern will provide operational and strategic leadership to the clinical enterprise of the company.

Dr. McEachern’s will also work to maintain strong relationships with PacificSource’s provider partners to improve the health outcomes in populations the organization serves in Oregon, Idaho, and Montana.

 

“Dr. McEachern is a proven leader with a track record for producing innovative, industry-changing solutions,” said Ken Provencher, president and CEO of PacificSource. “His global healthcare background, knowledge of care coordination, and mastery of quality management will serve our members well, now and into the future.”

 

Dr. McEachern originally came to PacificSource from Saint Alphonsus Health Alliance in Boise, Idaho, where he was chief medical officer and executive director of operations. Prior to that role, he helmed a venture capital fund that focused on healthcare, and served as chief medical officer for Blue Cross Blue Shield of Ohio.

 

Dr. McEachern is also an associate professor at the University of Utah School of Medicine and an assistant professor at Utah’s David Eccles School of Business. He holds six patents, authored seven books, published more than 80 peer-reviewed articles, and has served as a healthcare consultant for the U.S. State Department and Peace Corps.

 

Outside of work he enjoys music, cycling, hiking, rafting, camping, fishing, and spending time with his wife and teenaged triplets. 

 

About PacificSource Health Plans:

PacificSource Health Plans is an independent, not-for-profit community health plan serving the Northwest. Founded in 1933, PacificSource is based in Springfield, Oregon, with local offices throughout Oregon, Idaho, and Montana. The PacificSource family of companies employs 1000 people, serves more than 300,000 individuals, and has 3,900 employer clients throughout the Northwest. For more information visit PacificSource.com.

 

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Attached Media Files: 2018-06/2392/115508/Edward.McEachern.Web357x500.jpg

Organizations & Associations
Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington to Bestow Highest Honor for 25 Gold Award Girl Scouts on Saturday, June 23, 2018 (Photo)
Girl Scouts of Ore. and SW Washington - 06/20/18 4:59 PM
GSOSW GA Invite
GSOSW GA Invite
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Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington to Bestow Highest Honor for 25 Gold Award Girl Scouts this Saturday, June 23, 2018

PORTLAND, Ore. – Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington (GSOSW) will recognize 25 recipients of the Girl Scout Gold Award in a special ceremony this Saturday, June 23, 2018, in Salem, Oregon in celebration of 102 years of the organization’s highest award.

Who: 25 Gold Award Girl Scouts, as well as Silver and Bronze Award Girl Scouts, their family and friends, plus staff, volunteers and media

What: Celebration of Girl Scouts changing the world and achieving Girl Scouting's highest honors with a keynote address from Girl Scout alumna and Gold Award recipient Elizabeth Dinh, evening news anchor for Fox 12 Oregon

When: June 23, 2018, at 1 p.m.

Where:  Willamette Heritage Center, 1313 Mill St SE, Salem, Oregon 97301

R.S.V.P.:  The event is by invitation only—interested media must R.S.V.P. by email to: mkenney@girlscoutsosw.org

On-site interviews: GSOSW’s Director of Communications, Sarah Shipe, and Director of Program, Sarah Brown, as well as Gold Award, Silver Award and Bronze Award Girl Scouts, will be available on-site during the day of the event for media interviews.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the highest honor a Girl Scout can earn, acknowledges each recipient’s dedication to empowering and bettering herself while working to make the world a better place. Just 6% of Girl Scouts earn this prestigious award annually—it has been the pinnacle of the Girl Scout experience since 1916.

“We know that when girls have leadership opportunities when they are young, they are more likely to go on to become leaders in their communities and in their professional lives,” says Sarah Brown, Director of Program for GSOSW. “Through Girl Scouting, GSOSW’s Gold Award Girl Scouts have come to know that they have the ability to make a positive impact. The nature and quality of their Gold Award projects show us that these girls are the leaders of tomorrow, because they are leading today.”

Some of the Gold Award projects completed this year include:

Backpacks for Refugees—backpacks filled with school supplies for refugee students

Bilingual Lending Library— building a bilingual lending library at a local food pantry and collecting books to fill the shelves

Birthday Party Kits for Low-Income Youth— birthday party kits for low-income families, distributed to local shelters and service agencies

Girls Expo—free event to connecting young women to organizations and activities that align with their passions

Me Too—to increase awareness of teen sexual assault

Each Gold Award Girl Scout contributes a minimum of 80 hours to the community through her project, carrying out a plan that has sustainable and measurable, ongoing impact.

“As a Girl Scout alumna, I’m so happy to welcome this next group of talented and smart young women who now join me as a fellow Gold Award recipient,” says Elizabeth Dinh, evening news anchor for FOX 12 Oregon. “It took a lot of hard work and dedication to earn this prestigious award, and I know these Gold Award Girl Scouts will continue to overcome obstacles, pursue their dreams and change the world.”

Girl Scouts celebrates 102 years of Girl Scout Gold Award excellence, innovation, and visionary leadership and continues empowering future generations of girls to follow their dreams, discover their passions and make a global impact.

About Girl Scouts’ Highest Honors

To learn more about Girl Scouts’ highest honors, please visit: http://www.girlscoutsosw.org/en/about-girl-scouts/our-program/girl-awards/highest-awards.html.

About Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington

Our council serves 13,955 girls in 37 counties with the help of over 10,000 volunteers. The Girl Scout mission is to build girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place. Every opportunity in Girl Scouting develops these essential skills in an all-girl, inclusive, safe environment. For more information, please visit girlscoutsosw.org.




Attached Media Files: GS Girl Scout Data Report , Gold Award GS Fact Sheet , Gold Award Girl Scouts Press Release , Gold Award Girl Scout Profiles , GSOSW GA Invite , GS Girl Scout Photo 2 , GA Girl Scout Photo 1

Girl Scout Statement About Families Separated at the U.S./Mexico Border
Girl Scouts of Ore. and SW Washington - 06/20/18 3:14 PM

Girl Scout Statement About Families Separated at the U.S./Mexico Border

FROM GIRL SCOUTS OF THE USA (GSUSA)

GSUSA recently joined other members of Leadership 18—an alliance of CEOs from the nation’s largest and most influential human service nonprofits—in calling on the Trump administration to halt its “zero tolerance” immigration policy that separates children from parents who illegally enter the United States. The Leadership 18 statement asks the administration to “immediately stop this wrong and immoral policy” and to “take immediate steps to restore connections between” separated family members. In conjunction with this statement, GSUSA published a new Raising Awesome Girls piece offering parents and caregivers tips for how to address this difficult and frightening issue with their girls.

Talking to Kids About Children Being Separated from Their Families and Communities: http://bit.ly/2M9yRau 

FROM GIRL SCOUTS OF OREGON AND SOUTHWEST WASHINGTON (GSOSW)

The mission of Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington is to help girls understand and relate to the world around them. For this reason, Girl Scouts joined the other members of Leadership 18 to call for an end to the harmful practice of separating children from their parents. Preparing girls to lead can mean having difficult conversations about current events. The purpose of our Raising Awesome Girls piece is to assist parents and caregivers as they navigate these types of conversations with their girls.


Oregon hospitals provide $2.19 billion in community benefit statewide
Oregon Assn. of Hospitals and Health Systems (OAHHS) - 06/21/18 12:18 PM

Today, the Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health System (OAHHS) released a report showing that in 2016, Oregon hospitals provided $2.19 billion in community benefit to the communities they serve. From training medical professionals, to funding critical health research, to sponsoring wellness events, hospitals increased spending in state-defined community benefit categories other than charity care by $400 million in 2016, as compared with average levels over the previous three years. This increase continues to fulfill a pledge from early 2015, in which hospitals announced they would offset drops in charity care, as a result in Medicaid expansion, by investing in other state-defined community benefit categories. The statewide total of $2.19 billion was a record high.

“We are very proud of Oregon hospitals’ continued community commitment,” said Andy Van Pelt, executive Vice President of the Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems. “The numbers reflect the profound health needs in our communities that hospitals are addressing. It shows that hospitals continue to go beyond providing high-quality care for the sick and injured and indeed work to the health of communities outside the four walls of the hospital.”

Analysis of the data shows that total community benefit has increased 49 percent from 2010 to 2016 – rising from $1.47 billion in 2010 to $2.19 billion in 2016. Significant subcategory program increases from 2010 to 2016 include:

  • Community building, which include programs that provide opportunities to address root causes of health problems, such as poverty, homelessness, and environmental problems, increased by a significant 150 percent;
  • Community health improvement, which includes school health-education programs, web-based consumer health information, and worksite health education programs, increased by 10 percent;
  • Research increased 12 percent;
  • Health professions education increased 8 percent; and
  • Subsidized health services increased 9 percent.

In the report based on state data, OAHHS highlights not just the numbers behind the community benefit data but also some examples of current community benefit programs around Oregon.

 “These stories show that Oregon’s hospitals are not only continuing to keep their commitment to community benefit spending, but they are going above and beyond in their local communities and are deeply focused on the health needs of the people they serve,” concluded Van Pelt.

In 2007, the Oregon legislature defined community benefit as health care-related services that hospitals provide without the expectation of compensation. It includes but is not limited to such categories as:

  1. Health services to vulnerable or underserved people
  2. Financial or in-kind support for public health programs
  3. Health education, health screenings, and prevention services
  4. Medical research and health professions education
  5. Community-building activities such as neighborhood revitalization projects, or workforce development programs

The hospital stories contained in OAHHS’ report highlight the wide range of services that respond to specific, identified health needs of local communities. If you are interested in learning more about community benefit programs at your local hospital, reach out to your hospital directly for more examples like the ones found in the Community Benefit Report.

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To learn more about Oregon hospitals’ community benefit activities, visit http://www.oahhs.org/policy/community-benefit.

To learn more about the state reporting program of community benefit, visit
https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Hospital-Reporting.aspx

 




Attached Media Files: community benefit