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Eugene/Spring/Rose/Alb/Corv News Releases for Sun. Oct. 22 - 2:44 am
Police & Fire
Special Needs Horseback Ride for Children (Photo)
Benton Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/16/17 3:54 PM
2017-10/1505/108806/special_ride.jpg
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The Benton County Sheriff's Mounted Posse is hosting their eighth annual horseback ride event for children with special needs and their siblings, sponsored by Sheriff Scott Jackson.

The event will be will be held on Saturday, October 28th, 2017 from 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m., at the Indoor Arena of the Benton County Fairgrounds, 110 SW 53 St., Corvallis, OR. Registration opens at 9:30 a.m.

Children, as well as posse members, look forward to the ride each year. The posse explains, "It's a way to support our community and give children with special needs the chance to experience the western way of life through horsemanship."

Kids are helped up onto the horse and led around the arena. Special accommodations are made for mounting/dismounting and safety while on horseback. Riders must be between three and 18 years of age and be able to hang on by themselves.

A coloring area and brushing/petting station with miniature ponies will be available to entertain children, as well.

Photographs will be taken in front of a green screen and printed onsite to give to the child. The photos will also be available online after the event for those who give permission to do so. A release form is required for all riders and will be available at the event registration table.

Please respond by October 23rd, so we can plan appropriately. You may either email or phone, with the parent/guardian name and the number of children who will be riding.

Phone: 541-766-6045
Email: sheriffsposse@co.benton.or.us
http://www.bentoncountysheriffsmountedposse.com
Facebook -- Benton County Sheriff's Mounted Posse

END


Attached Media Files: 2017-10/1505/108806/SNRE_Media_Release_2017.pdf , 2017-10/1505/108806/special_ride.jpg
*UPDATE* Scam Alert! How You Can Help
Douglas Co. Sheriffs Office - 10/19/17 4:30 PM
UPDATE

No Sheriff's Deputy, Sergeant, Police Officer or any employee of the Sheriff's Office or any other law enforcement agency will call you to ask you to pay them for fines over the phone with Green Dot Money cards or any other type of pre-paid debit cards!

These scammers are using real employee names to scare you into paying them. Do not fall for this! Hang up and call us to verify the information.

Two more victims that we are aware of today. Please warn your friends and family of this scam.

Additionally, we ask local businesses who sell pre-paid cards to share this information with their staff, post notices at registers and help us to spread the word about this scam. If able, please gently ask the person buying if they are purchasing the card in relation to a call from a scammer portraying themselves as a law enforcement officer.

Members of the media can help by repeating, publishing and airing this information via their outlets.

ORIGINAL RELEASE
If you get a phone call from someone claiming to be with the Sheriff's Office demanding money from you, HANG UP! IT IS A SCAM!

This scam plays on your fears. These con artists tell potential victims that there is an outstanding warrant for an unpaid debt, missed jury duty or some minor infraction and that a fine is due. The caller will then demand payment via debit/credit card, Western Union, or instructs victims to obtain a prepaid card to cover the payment.

To sound credible, these scammers are providing legitimate names and information of law enforcement employees and may even reference a local area judge by name. They also use Caller ID "spoofing," which makes it appear as though the call is coming from a local law enforcement agency or court offices.

If you truly have a warrant for your arrest you are not going to be notified through a phone call. If you have a warrant for your arrest, a law enforcement officer will make efforts to contact you in person. Legitimate warrants can only be cleared through the court system.
No employee of the Sheriff's Office will ever contact members of the public by telephone to demand money or any other form of payment. If you get this type of call, HANG UP IMMEDIATELY.
If you are worried you owe money on a fine, call the number of the court offices that you believe the warrant was issued from. Find the number in the local directory do not assume any number that the caller gave you is valid.

If you do give the caller any personal information or money, call to report it to law enforcement immediately.
Hit and Run leads to DUII Arrest of Springfield Man (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriffs Office - 10/16/17 8:51 AM
Jonathan Hodgin
Jonathan Hodgin
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On Sunday, October 15, 2017, at 12:40 am, the Sheriff's Office responded to a report of a vehicle that had crashed into a residence in the 1400 block of Mustang Drive in Oakland.

Deputies arrived on scene and determined no one was injured. Through their investigation, Deputies learned the driver of the 2000 GMC Jimmy SUV had been 36 year-old Jonathan Joe Hodgin of Springfield. He had fled the scene prior to the arrival of law enforcement.

His 62 year-old father/passenger, Clayton R. Hodgin also of Springfield, was still on scene.

Both Hodgins were found to be intoxicated.

Jonathan Hodgin was eventually located by deputies and taken into custody on the following charges:

DUII, Reckless Driving, Reckless Endangering, Criminal Trespass and Failure to Perform the Duties of a Driver.

Jonathan Hodgin was lodged in the Douglas County Jail.


Attached Media Files: Jonathan Hodgin
Sheriff K9 Tracks Two Stolen Vehicle Suspects (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriffs Office - 10/16/17 8:05 AM
K9 Grim
K9 Grim
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The Douglas County Sheriff's Office assisted the Sutherlin Police Department with a stolen vehicle investigation at 2:30 am on October 16, 2017.

Sutherlin Police Department received a call from a resident who reported his vehicle had just been stolen from his residence in the 900 block of Second Avenue in Sutherlin.

A short time later, the Sutherlin Officer located the stolen vehicle abandoned on the rail road tracks in the 800 block of N. State Street in Sutherlin. The officer requested the Sheriff's Office respond along with a K9.

Sheriff K9 Grim arrived and conducted a track, eventually locating 37 year-old Jeffrey Alan Haines of Sutherlin. Haines did not comply with commands from law enforcement, at which point the K9 apprehended him. Haines was taken into custody and received treatment for a minor injury as a result of the K9 capture.

K9 Grim continued searching the area and located an additional suspect, 33 year-old Tasha Nicole Thompson also of Sutherlin. She was taken into custody without incident.

K9 Grim has been with the Douglas County Sheriff's Office since 2013. He is a 6 year old German Shepherd.


Attached Media Files: K9 Grim , Thompson, T , Haines, J
You and your family are fast asleep when the smoke alarm sounds: Do you know what to do?
Eugene Springfield Fire - 10/19/17 2:55 PM
Consider this scenario: It's 2 o'clock in the morning. You and your family are fast asleep when you awaken to the smoke alarm sounding and the smell of smoke. What do you do? If you and your family don't have a plan in place, it could jeopardize your safety, or even prove deadly.

In a typical home fire, you may have as little as one to two minutes to escape safely from the time the smoke alarm sounds. That's why home escape planning is so critical in a fire situation. It ensures that everyone in the household knows how to use that small window of time wisely.

"Developing and practicing a home escape plan is like building muscle memory," said Eugene Springfield Fire Assistant Fire Marshal Amy Linder "That pre-planning is what everyone will draw upon to snap into action and escape as quickly as possible in the event of a fire."
This year's Fire Prevention theme, "Every Second Counts: Plan 2 Ways Out!" works to better educate the public about the critical importance of developing a home escape plan and practicing it. Eugene Springfield Fire is working in coordination with the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), the official sponsor of the Fire Prevention Week for more than 90 years, to reinforce those potentially life-saving messages by visiting 2nd grade classrooms throughout Eugene and Springfield.

"Home escape planning is one of the most basic but fundamental elements of home fire safety, and can truly make the difference between life and death in a fire situation," said Lorraine Carli, NFPA's vice president of Outreach and Advocacy.
In support of Fire Prevention Week, Eugene Springfield Fire encourages all households to develop a plan together and practice it. A home escape plan includes working smoke alarms on every level of the home, in every bedroom, and near all sleeping areas. It also includes two ways out of every room, usually a door and a window, with a clear path to an outside meeting place (like a tree, light pole, or mailbox) that's a safe distance from the home.

NFPA and the Eugene Springfield Fire offer these additional tips and recommendations for developing and practicing a home escape plan:

Draw a map of your home with all members of your household, marking two exits from each room and a path to the outside from each exit.
Practice your home fire drill twice a year. Conduct one at night and one during the day with everyone in your home, and practice using different ways out.
Teach children how to escape on their own in case you can't help them.
Make sure the number of your home is clearly marked and easy for the fire department to find.
Close doors behind you as you leave -- this may slow the spread of smoke, heat, and fire.
Once you get outside, stay outside. Never go back inside a burning building.
FBI "Women in Tech" Recruiting & Outreach Event (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 10/19/17 11:00 AM
FBI Evidence Response Team
FBI Evidence Response Team
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Women with backgrounds in computer science, engineering, and math are in high demand in today's economy, but they can also play a crucial role in helping keep our shared community safe for generations to come. The FBI, in partnership with ChickTech Portland, is offering women in Oregon and Southwest Washington a chance to learn more about exciting career opportunities that balance work and family while providing new career challenges.

++ WOMEN IN TECH EVENT ++
Date: Thursday, October 26th
Time: 5:30 - 8:00 pm
Location: Downtown Portland (location will be given to those who pre-register)

Pre-registration is required for those who wish to attend. Send an email to portlandapplicants@ic.fbi.gov no later than Wednesday, October 25th.

Anyone interested in applying for the FBI is encouraged to visit www.fbijobs.gov for more information on available positions, requirements and the process.



Media wishing to cover the event should contact PIO Beth Anne Steele prior to the event.


Attached Media Files: FBI Women in Tech flyer , FBI Evidence Response Team
FBI Announces Results of National Child Sex Trafficking Operation in Oregon
FBI - Oregon - 10/18/17 11:06 AM
The FBI's Child Exploitation Task Force, working with a number of local and state partner agencies in Oregon, recovered two child sex trafficking victims as part of a national and international operation in the past week. The FBI and the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC) spearhead the "Operation Cross Country" initiative to recover minor sex trafficking victims and to target the criminal enterprises responsible for the commercial sex trafficking of children.

Across the United States, FBI task forces recovered more than 80 minors and arrested 120 traffickers. In all, 55 FBI field offices working with hundreds of local and state law enforcement partners took part in this, the 11th iteration of Operation Cross Country (OCC). International partners included Canada, the United Kingdom, Thailand, Cambodia and the Philippines.

The Oregon operations resulted in:


PORTLAND
Two minor sex trafficking victims recovered. (One of these two just recently turned 18 but disclosed victimization that began when she was a minor).
Nine adult prostitutes arrested and/or cited. Law enforcement and social service providers offered assistance to all contacted.


EUGENE
Five adult prostitutes contacted. Law enforcement and social service providers offered assistance to all contacted.


SALEM
One arrest - Terrence Martell Williams, age 34, on a state charge of promoting prostitution. Arrested by Salem Police Department.
Six adult prostitutes arrested and/or cited. Law enforcement and social service providers offered assistance to all contacted.


The FBI's victim specialists work with state protective service agencies and social service providers to offer those minors recovered medical assistance, mental health counseling or other support as needed. Adult prostitutes arrested by local law enforcement partners assisting in Operation Cross Country are also given the option to receive social services.

"It can be easy to think that selling sex with children is so corrupt, so depraved that it couldn't possibly happen in my town, my neighborhood, my school. But, as we find out every time we recover a child, these victims are here and their needs are very real," said Loren Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon. "These kids are everyone's responsibility, and they are counting on us -- the FBI, local law enforcement, the community -- to come together to give them a chance at a life we would all wish for our children."

Nationally and internationally, investigators staged operations in a number of locations, including casinos, hotels and truck stops as well as on street corners and via the Internet. With regards to the Oregon operations, we will not release specifics as to the stings, including their locations, to protect the integrity of future operations.

"We were honored to join this massive effort to hold offenders accountable," said Clackamas County Sheriff Craig Roberts. "We've made child exploitation a major enforcement focus at our agency, with initiatives and partnerships that include our Child Abuse Team, the Inter-agency Child Exploitation Prevention Team (INTERCEPT), A Safe Place Family Justice Center and our annual Child Abuse & Family Violence Summit. We salute the FBI, our deputies and partner agencies in their large-scale effort to bring these individuals to justice."


Oregon law enforcement partner agencies include:
FBI's Child Exploitation Task Force
Portland Police Bureau
Clackamas County Sheriff's Office
Beaverton Police Department
Tigard Police Department
Lake Oswego Police Department
Hillsboro Police Department
Washington County Sheriff's Office
Eugene Police Department
Salem Police Department
Keizer Police Department
Polk County Interagency Narcotics Team (POINT)
Lane County Sheriff's Office
Springfield Police Department
United States Attorney's Office for the District of Oregon


Oregon social service agency partners include:
Safety Compass
Sexual Assault Resource Center (SARC)
Clackamas County District Attorney's Victim Assistance Program
Clackamas County Juvenile Department
Multnomah County Department of Human Services
Washington County Juvenile Department
Marion County District Attorney's Victim Assistance Program
Lane County District Attorney's Victim Assistance Program
Lane County Child Protective Services
Lane County Department of Youth Services
Kids' FIRST Center
Looking Glass

Note: Additional information, b-roll, photos, and interviews associated with this year's operation can be downloaded at www.fbi.gov/occxi
FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Nigerian 419 Scams
FBI - Oregon - 10/17/17 10:00 AM
October Marks National Cyber Security Awareness Month. For more information about emerging cyber threats, go to https://www.fbi.gov/news/stories/national-cyber-security-awareness-month-2017

+++++


Welcome to the Oregon FBI's Tech Tuesday segment. This week, building a digital defense against Nigerian 419 scams.

In 2016, the FBI's Internet Crime Complaint Center received almost 400 reports of 419 scams. The total losses reported by victims exceeded $1 million.

So what are Nigerian 419 scams? The number 419 refers to a section in Nigerian law concerning con artistry and fraud that deals specifically with people requesting assistance with transferring money. This scam has been around for a long time, but now more often than not, the scammer is contacting victims electronically.

What does this look like? An individual may contact you, often through e-mail, explaining that he needs help transferring a large amount of money. He tells you that political turmoil or a recent natural disaster in his country has affected his ability to transfer the money on his own. If you help him, he will allow you to keep some of the funds for yourself.

The scammer asks you to give him your financial information -- including your bank account number -- so he can complete the transfer. This allows him to access and steal from your accounts.

In another version of this scam, the fraudster may require that you to pay a fee in order to facilitate the transfer. Once you pay the fraudster, and he sees that you're willing to give him money, he continues to invent extra costs that he needs you to cover. As long as you keep paying, he keeps coming up with more expenses.

Regardless of which method the fraudsters use, these victims never see the promised jackpot.

So, how can you protect yourself?
Don't give anyone your bank account number or other financial information that could allow him to access your accounts.
Don't send money to strangers, unsolicited contacts or people you don't know face-to-face.
Don't transfer money on behalf of other people.
Don't trust anything that seems like an easy way to make a lot of money. If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

If you have been victimized by this scam or any other online scam, report your suspicious contacts to the FBI. You can file an online report at the FBI's Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office.


Attached Media Files: TT - Nigerian Scams - ENGLISH Audio , TT - Nigerian Scams - SPANISH Audio , TT - Nigerian Scams - SPANISH Written , TT - Nigerian Scams - RUSSIAN Audio , TT - Nigerian Scams - RUSSIAN Written
Man Dies in Single-Vehicle Crash (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/20/17 3:13 PM
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Update 10/20/17: The driver was identified as James Leo Chaplin, 73, of Sams Valley. Chaplin was apparently not wearing a seat belt; he was ejected. The cab over tractor trailer sustained heavy damage when it rolled over. There was no sign of alcohol or drug use.


On October 19, 2017, at 8:28 hours, dispatch received a 911 report of a rollover vehicle crash in the 7500-block of Ramsey Road, Gold Hill. Deputies determined the vehicle, a boom truck belonging to J.I.M. and Associates, Inc., first left the roadway on the passenger side, then crossed the roadway and rolled completely, landing on its tires. The driver, the only occupant, was ejected from the vehicle. He died at the scene.

The Serious Traffic Accident Reconstruction (STAR) team responded to investigate the crash. An investigator with the Jackson County Medical Examiner's Office also responded to the scene. More information will be released pending family notifications and further investigation.

Case 17-22103


Attached Media Files: 2017-10/6186/108904/17-22103_MVC.jpg
Drone shot down; man arrested (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/19/17 2:32 PM
2017-10/6186/108910/17-21982_close.jpg
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WHITE CITY - On Wednesday, October 18, 2017, deputies arrested a Central Point man for shooting down a drone at a popular county recreation area. Christopher David Grindstaff, 33, turned himself in to deputies after hearing about the case online. He was lodged in jail on one count of criminal mischief in the first degree, a Class C felony.

On Tuesday, October 17, at 5:35 pm, the victim called to report his personal drone had been shot down while flying over the Hoover Ponds recreation area. The victim posted photos and video of the incident on Facebook. He later provided deputies with video and images taken by the drone as it was flying.

Grindstaff can be seen in the video standing next to his vehicle, a gray 1994 Isuzu Trooper. In another still photo, he appeared to be pointing a rifle toward the drone, just before the drone crashed to the ground. Deputies determined the involved weapon was a high-velocity air rifle using .177 caliber pellet ammunition. The value of the drone was estimated at more than $1000.

The case will be forwarded to the Jackson County District Attorney's Office for prosecution. It will also be sent to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for review.

Case: 17-21982


Attached Media Files: 2017-10/6186/108910/17-21982_close.jpg , 2017-10/6186/108910/17-21982_vehicle.jpg , Christopher Grindstaff
Suspicious suitcase determined to be nothing but clothing
Junction City Police - 10/18/17 5:39 PM
On Wednesday October 18th the Junction City Police Department received a report of a suspicious suitcase left between the sidewalk and the street in the 1500 block of Juniper Street in Junction City.

Officers arrived on scene at 10:00 AM to find a blue carry-on sized suitcase which did not have any identifying tags or markings. The suitcase was located across the street from a daycare facility.

One resident told officers she left her residence around 8:30am and did not recall seeing the suitcase but upon returning around 8:45 am she noticed the suitcase at the end of her driveway. Other local businesses and homeowners were questioned about whether or not they had any knowledge of the item; none did. For safety reasons, the daycare and local residents were evacuated.

While a citizen was getting ready to evacuate their residence they discovered that their vehicle had been stolen. The stolen vehicle had been parked on the street approximately fifty feet from where the suitcase was located. It is still unknown if the two incidents are related.

The Eugene Police bomb squad arrived on scene at approximately 11:30 AM and x-rayed the bag. The bomb technicians rendered the bag safe by reviewing the images and ultimately opening the suitcase and determined its only contents were women's clothing. At approximately 11:57 AM citizens were allowed to return to their homes.

Although this situation ended safely with the suitcase containing nothing dangerous, the citizen who reported the incident is to be commended for taking the immediate and decisive action to call the police. This could just as easily have been a real bomb or other harmful object. Citizens are urged to always be vigilant and pay close attention to circumstances that are unusual from normal patterns. Persons encountering unattended or out-of-place parcels, bags, or other containers are cautioned to never touch the item and to immediately call 911. People should remain at least 300 feet in all directions from such items.
Tip of the Week - October 23, 2017 - Halloween Safety
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/19/17 10:52 AM
Fall is in the air and Halloween is coming! Many people view Halloween as a time for fun and treats. However in the United States, roughly two times as many children aged 5-14 are killed while walking on Halloween evening compared with other evenings of the year. Falls are a leading cause of injuries among children on this holiday. Parents can help prevent children from becoming injured on Halloween by following these safety tips from the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the National Safety Council.

Children should:
Go only to well-lit houses and remain on porches rather than entering houses.
Travel in small groups and be accompanied by an adult.
Know their phone numbers and carry a cell phone for an emergency phone call.
Carry a note in their pocket with their name and address.
Bring treats home before eating them so parents can inspect them.
When using costume knives and swords, ensure they are flexible, not rigid or sharp.

When walking in neighborhoods, they should:
Use flashlights, stay on sidewalks if available, and avoid crossing yards.
Cross streets at the corner, use crosswalks if available, and don't cross between
parked cars.
Stop at all corners and stay together in a group before crossing.
Wear clothing that is bright, reflective, and flame retardant.
Consider using face paint instead of masks.
Avoid wearing hats that could slide over their eyes.
Avoid wearing long, baggy, or loose costumes or oversized shoes to prevent tripping.
Always look left, right, and left again before crossing the street.

Parents and adults should:
Supervise the outing for children under age 12.
Establish a curfew for older children.
Prepare homes for trick-or-treaters by clearing porches, lawns, and sidewalks and by
placing decorations away from doorways and landings.
Avoid giving choking hazards such as gum, peanuts, hard candies, or small toys as
treats to young children.
Inspect all candy before children eat it.

To ensure the safety of pedestrian trick-or-treaters, parents and adults should:
Make sure children under age 10 are supervised as they cross the street.
Drive slowly.
Watch for children in the street and on medians.
Exit driveways and alleyways carefully.
Have children get out of cars on the curbside, not the traffic side.

Following these tips should help ensure this Halloween is a safe and fun holiday for everyone.

For more information and tips, visit our website at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and Like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff's Office -- Oregon.


Attached Media Files: Halloween Safety
Deputies Investigating After Two People Found Shot ***Update 3*** (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/20/17 3:20 PM
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Today deputies arrested and transported Clayton Stanfill, age 53, of Turner for violating the terms of his probation. Mr. Stanfill is currently on supervision with Marion County Parole and Probation for the crimes of Assault IV and Menacing.

The circumstances of the events that took place on October 15th are still under investigation by Detectives with the Marion County Sheriff's Office. Because of the investigation the Sheriff's Office cannot provide any additional details pertaining to the investigation or Mr. Stanfill's arrest. Mr. Stanfill is being held at the Marion County Jail without bail.

Media Currently the Marion County Jail is operating on backup systems due to a power outage. This outage will delay the booking process of Mr. Stanfill. His image will be available as soon as power is restored and he can be booked into jail. The estimated time for repair is 4 to 6 hours. The image released of Mr. Stanfill is from a previous booking on 06/16/2016.





Deputies have identified the victim in last night's shooting as Judy Stanfill, age 52, of Turner. Ms. Stanfill lived at her residence in the 5000 block of Ash Street with her husband Clayton Stanfill, age 53. Mr. Stanfill is currently at the Salem Hospital where he is expected to recover from a gunshot wound.

Detectives are still working to determine exactly what happened yesterday afternoon in the Stanfill home. Detectives do not believe anyone else was involved in the incident and there is no immediate danger to the public.

The Sheriff's Office and the Turner Police Departments thoughts go out to the Stanfill family and her co-workers at the Marion County Circuit Court. Ms. Stanfill's autopsy is scheduled for tomorrow morning. The Sheriff's Office does not anticipate any further releases until the case has been fully investigated, that time frame is not yet known. Anyone with information is asked to call the Sheriff's Office anonymous tip line at 503 540 8079.






Today at 4:26 p.m., deputies were called to 5000 block of Ash Street in Turner, after a man walked into the Turner Fire Department with a gunshot wound. Turner Fire personnel began treating the man and called the Sheriff's Office for assistance. When deputies arrived they searched the man's residence and located a female deceased inside.

Detectives are now on scene and processing evidence, the area of 3rd Street and Ash Street in Turner is completely blocked and will remain closed for the next several hours. This is an active investigation and the Sheriff's Office is not prepared to release any further details at this time. The Sheriff's Office does not anticipate any additional releases this evening.

The Sheriff's Office is being assisted by the; Turner Police Department, Stayton Police Department, Keizer Police Department, Aumsville Police Department, Marion County Medical Examiner's Office and the Marion County District Attorney's Office.




Deputies and Turner Police are currently on scene and investigating, after two people were found shot in their home in the 5000 block of Ash Street in Turner. This is currently an active scene and Detectives with the Sheriff's Office have been dispatched to assist in the investigation.

There is no immediate danger to the public. PIO is on scene and will be available at the corner of 3rd Street and Cedar Street. Media there is no good staging area so if arriving please park your vehicles as not to obstruct traffic. Further details will be made available at a later time.


Attached Media Files: 2017-10/1294/108779/20171015_173457_1.jpg , 2017-10/1294/108779/Reserved.ReportViewerWebControl[2].jpg
Update on Oregon fire agencies assisting with California wildfires 17 October 2017 (Photo)
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 10/17/17 4:18 PM
Deschutes County Strike Team works to protect structures and property on the Southern LNU Complex
Deschutes County Strike Team works to protect structures and property on the Southern LNU Complex
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-10/1062/108846/thumb_Photo_3_for_17OCT_release.jpeg
As firefighters slowly get the upper hand and weather improves somewhat in northern
California, two Oregon Strike Teams (Marion County and Jackson Josephine counties) are being demobilized today and will head back to their home stations over the next 24 hours.

More Oregon Strike Team demobilizations are in the planning stages if conditions continue to stabilize.

Oregon Strike Teams in southern California will remain deployed as that area is still under a Red Flag Warning and fire officials expect hot, dry weather and significant winds. We expect Oregon resources in that area to remain at least throughout the coming weekend.

Three Oregon Strike Teams (Washington County, Umatilla/Union counties, Linn/Benton counties) have been reassigned to assist with the recently growing Bear Fire in Santa Cruz.

"Oregon's deployed resources have been performing extremely well," said Chief Deputy State Fire Marshal Marian Ruiz-Temple. "We have heard nothing but great things about our Oregon response system and the caliber of our firefighters. All Oregonians can take pride in the effectiveness and professionalism of our deployed men and women."


Attached Media Files: Deschutes County Strike Team works to protect structures and property on the Southern LNU Complex , Dechutes County Strike Team work to protect structures and property on the Southern LNU Complex , Washington County Strike Team receiving orders to leave Prado Staging near Chino and report to the Bear Fire near Santa Cruz.
John Day resident arrested for attempted murder. (Grant County) (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 10/20/17 7:07 PM
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On the afternoon of October 20th, 2017, 32 year old John Day resident Kevin J. RAPP was arrested for the shooting of Kyler Weisenback and lodged at the Grant County Jail for the charges of Attempted Murder, Assault in the 1st Degree, Unlawful Use of a Weapon, and two outstanding warrants.

During the early morning hours of October 16, 2017, 27 year old Eugene resident Kyler Weisenback was awoken while camping and shot twice with a small caliber firearm. Weisenback was camping at the Dixie Creek Campground near the Dixie Summit, located east of Prairie City, Oregon. Weisenback was first flown to a Bend area hospital and subsequently transferred to a Portland area hospital for treatment.

The investigation is active and further information will be released as it becomes available.


Attached Media Files: 2017-10/1002/108952/841[1].jpeg
***Missing Gold Beach Resident Located*** Active search in progress for Gold Beach resident lost at sea. - (Curry County)
Oregon State Police - 10/20/17 2:38 PM
On October 20, 2017, the missing Gold Beach resident, Karen Marie Dunlap was located in Curry County. Citizens in the area called authorities after locating a body in the Rogue River. This was near the area of the sand spit she was last seen. The Curry County Sheriff's office responded and retrieved the body of a female, who was later identified as 57 year old, Karen Dunlap.

End Release

Previous Release:
On Thursday, October 19, 2017, at approximately 6:15PM, 57 year old Gold Beach resident Karen Marie Dunlap was on the ocean shore at the South Jetty of the Rogue River when she went missing in the Pacific Ocean. It is believed she was swept out to sea by a large wave. The US Coast Guard, Oregon State Police, Gold Beach PD and Curry County Sheriff Office initiated an active search of the area. Due to hazardous search conditions, the US Coast Guard has terminated the search at approximately 10:00AM on October 20th.

Current sea and weather conditions make the ocean shores very hazardous. A surf advisory is in effect through 11:00PM Friday October 20,2017.


Attached Media Files: 2017-10/1002/108932/Dunlap_DMV_Photo.docx
Hood River District Attorney's Eagle Creek Fire Press Release (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 10/19/17 12:04 PM
2017-10/1002/108897/Big_Tree_Images_Eagle_Creek_Fire.jpg
2017-10/1002/108897/Big_Tree_Images_Eagle_Creek_Fire.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-10/1002/108897/thumb_Big_Tree_Images_Eagle_Creek_Fire.jpg
On behalf of the Hood River County River District Attorney's Office:

"When the Eagle Creek fire erupted a criminal investigation was immediately begun by the Oregon State Police. US Forest Service investigators have been assisting the State Police in this ongoing investigation. As a result of the investigation legal proceedings have been commenced in the Hood River County Circuit Court. A fifteen year old boy recently appeared and was arraigned on a Juvenile Court Petition.

Allegations in the Petition include acts of Reckless Burning, Depositing Burning Materials on Forest Lands, Unlawful Possession of Fireworks, Criminal Mischief and Recklessly Endangering Other Persons. The charging petition was filed by the Hood River County Juvenile Department at the direction of the Hood River County District Attorney John Sewell. The Hood River County District Attorney's office has been acting in cooperation with the Multnomah County District Attorney's office. Although extensive damage caused by the wildfire occurred in both Hood River and Multnomah Counties, Oregon's juvenile code dictates that legal proceedings be commenced in the county where the illegal act originally occurred, which is Hood River County.

The District Attorney's office, the Oregon State Police and the Hood River County Juvenile Department will have no further comment until the case has been resolved."


Attached Media Files: 2017-10/1002/108897/HRDA_Eagle_Creek_Fire_Release.pdf , 2017-10/1002/108897/Big_Tree_Images_Eagle_Creek_Fire.jpg
Pursuit/Officer Involved Shooting-Josephine County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 10/18/17 5:08 PM
2017-10/1002/108879/Judd-Amin-Sansaver-.jpg
2017-10/1002/108879/Judd-Amin-Sansaver-.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-10/1002/108879/thumb_Judd-Amin-Sansaver-.jpg
On October 18th, 2017, at approximately 10:57 AM, a Josephine County Sheriff's Office Deputy who was accompanied by a Douglas County Sheriff's Office Detective, were in the Wolf Creek area when they attempted to stop a vehicle believed to be stolen out of Douglas County.

The vehicle, a Ford F450 pick-up, failed to yield and a short pursuit ensued. At some point during the pursuit, the vehicle became disabled and the driver, identified as 43 year old Judd Amin Sansaver, of Wolf Creek, brandished a weapon, resulting in an officer involved shooting. Sansaver was subsequently apprehended after a short struggle. Neither the deputies nor the suspect were injured.

Sansaver was lodged at the Josephine County Jail on the following charges:

-Unlawful use of a Weapon
-Resisting Arrest
-Unlawful use of a Motor Vehicle
-Felon in Possession of a Firearm
-Attempt to Elude with a Motor Vehicle

Additionally, Sansaver had a felony warrant out of Jackson County for a parole violation.

Detectives from the Oregon State Police Major Crimes Section in Central Point and the Josephine County District Attorney's office are continuing the investigation into the shooting.

All further media requests should be referred to the Josephine District Attorney's office.


Attached Media Files: 2017-10/1002/108879/Judd-Amin-Sansaver-.jpg
Great Oregon ShakeOut 2017
Roseburg Fire Department - 10/17/17 4:47 PM
On October 19, 2017 at 10:19 a.m., the City of Roseburg and many local agencies, families and businesses will participate in the Great Oregon ShakeOut, a state-wide earthquake drill which prepares Oregonians to survive the fury and devastation of an earthquake. During the drill, participants will practice "drop, cover and hold on" for one to two minutes. City of Roseburg employees will then practice an evacuation drill from their places of work. At the conclusion of the drill, employees will be able to assess their work spaces for items which might fall and injure them during an actual earthquake, making any necessary changes.

In 2016, over 500,000 Oregonians participated in the ShakeOut. So far, the total for Oregon is 560,000, with over 3,520 Douglas County residents signed up to "drop, cover and hold on". Here are just a few of your friends and neighbors who will be participating in this year's event: City of Roseburg employees, Douglas County employees, Mercy Medical Center, Douglas County Amateur Radio Emergency Services (ARES), UCAN / Head Start, Cobb School, Evergreen Family Medicine, Department of Human Services, Umpqua Bank, and many more local businesses, churches, volunteer groups and families.

If you have not already signed up, this is your opportunity to be counted in the largest earthquake drill ever and set an example that motivates others to get involved. To participate, go to www.ShakeOut.org/oregon/register and pledge your family, school, business, or organization's involvement in the drill. Registered participants will receive information on how to plan their drill and how to spread the message of earthquake preparedness to others. All organizers ask is that participants register (so they can be counted and receive communications), and at the minimum practice "drop, cover, and hold on" at 10:19 AM on October 19th. It is only a five-minute commitment for something that can save your life. It all begins with registering, which is free and open to everyone.

For more information, visit www.ShakeOut.org/oregon, or contact the Roseburg Fire Department.

For the latest information regarding the City of Roseburg Fire Department, please visit our website at www.cityofroseburg.org or like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/roseburgfire
Medical
Randall Children's Hospital first children's hospital to receive Level 1 pediatric trauma verification in the Pacific Northwest (Photo)
Legacy Health - 10/16/17 8:00 AM
KIDS Team Mobile ICU
KIDS Team Mobile ICU
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-10/419/108709/thumb_Peds_Level_1_Trauma_Verification_1.jpg
Portland, Ore. (October 16, 2017) The American College of Surgeon (ACS) Committee on Trauma has verified Randall Children's Hospital at Legacy Emanuel as a Level 1 pediatric trauma center, making it the first in Oregon and the first children's hospital in the Pacific Northwest to receive this premier status. There are approximately 50 ACS-verified Level 1 pediatric trauma centers across the country.

This recognition highlights the hospital's commitment and holistic approach to improving the care of injured children, ensuring every child access to pediatric specialists and expertise and providing the highest level of care for the most critically injured pediatric patients. The verification is also an extension of the long-standing expertise in trauma care offered at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center, which has been an ACS-verified Level 1 trauma center since 1988 and is home to the Legacy Oregon Burn Center -- the only facility of its kind between Seattle and Sacramento.

"Randall Children's Hospital is a leader in Oregon and the Pacific Northwest and this achievement in pediatric trauma highlights the hospital's approach to comprehensive care for each patient," said Bronwyn Houston, president of Randall Children's Hospital. "I am so proud of our incredible team. Receiving the ACS verification is an outstanding testament to their dedication and commitment to providing the highest level of care."

Randall Children's Hospital recognizes that children have different needs, illnesses and injuries than adults. That is why the hospital has a children's emergency department (CED) designed just for kids, open 24 hours a day. Studies have shown that children have better results when treated at a hospital that specializes in pediatric care. The children's emergency department is staffed by doctors and nurses who specialize in children's emergency care and the location on the Legacy Emanuel campus provides quick access to pediatric medical and surgical specialists, as well as experts in trauma, burn and critical care. In addition to trauma-related care, the medical team in the CED treat over 27,000 patients each year with various levels of injuries and life-threatening illnesses.

The process to achieve ACS verification is voluntary and means that the hospital and staff are required to meet stringent and essential criteria that ensure trauma care capability and institutional performance as outlined by the American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma's published guidelines. The hospital is currently working on its Level 1 pediatric surgical center verification to be finalized in 2018.

"We are very proud that several years of diligence and hard work by the entire institution has led to verification of our center as a Level 1 American College of Surgeons Pediatric Trauma Center. This distinction means that we meet or exceed national standards established for medical centers treating the most severely injured children and their families," said Mubeen Jafri, MD, pediatric trauma medical director.

Some requirements and attributes of an ACS-verified pediatric trauma program include:

Pediatric specialists in neurosurgery, radiology, anesthesia, orthopedics, trauma surgery and critical care medicine who are available to care for children 24-hours-day, 7 days a week and meet additional standards of a Level 1 trauma center.
Dedicated trauma social worker and trauma-credentialed nurses.
Commitment to partner with hospitals throughout the state to improve the care of injured children in their communities, as well as at the Level 1 trauma center.
The highest level of staffing, skills, and facilities to provide pediatric trauma care to injured patients.
Performance improvement efforts to ensure that each patient experiences the best possible outcome by providing a continuum of care from the emergency department to our inpatient rehabilitation program, the only program of its kind in the state of Oregon.

The American College of Surgeons is a scientific and educational association of surgeons that was founded in 1913 to improve the quality of care for the surgical patient by setting high standards for surgical education and practice. Longstanding achievements have placed the ACS in the forefront of American surgery and have made it an important advocate for all surgical patients.


Attached Media Files: KIDS Team Mobile ICU , Randall Children's Hospital Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU)
Utilities
UPDATE: October 20th: Pacific Power crews helping Northern California recover from catastrophic wildfires (Photo)
Pacific Power - 10/20/17 8:26 AM
Charred poles on steep hillside require special equipment to be replaced.
Charred poles on steep hillside require special equipment to be replaced.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-10/1270/108834/thumb_fire3.jpg
Pacific Power crews helping Northern California recover from catastrophic wildfires

SANTA ROSA, Calif.--Oct 17, 2017--Sixteen Pacific Power crew members, from Yreka, Calif., Grants Pass, Medford, Bend and Portland, Ore. are working behind the active fire areas to help Pacific Gas & Electric restore electricity. Over the next 10 to 14 days, they'll work to rebuild the area's distribution system by putting in poles, stringing transmission line and reconnecting customers to the power they need to begin their recovery.

The crew at work consists of 12 linemen, 2 foremen, a manager and a mechanic. They left on Oct. 15 for a base camp outside Santa Rosa from which this highly-skilled team will be deployed as needed.

Pacific Power serves 45,000 customers in northern California in Del Norte, Siskiyou and Modoc counties, which are beyond the fire zone.

UPDATE Oct 20th (new photos):

As part of the extended team of crews from across the west responding to the fire damage, Pacific Power crews have been part of the effort that have replaced 1,000 poles so far.

As the terrain is difficult, 4 poles were set yesterday (October 19th) with a helicopter to assist.


Attached Media Files: Charred poles on steep hillside require special equipment to be replaced. , Burnt utility poles being replaced near Santa Rosa, Calif. , Pacific Power crews work with helicopter to set new poles , Pacific Power crews work with helicopter to set new poles , Pacific Power crew works to restore power in fire damaged Santa Rosa , Pacific Power crew work to restore customers in fire damaged Santa Rosa
Federal
BLM announces three selections for National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board (Photo)
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 10/17/17 9:20 AM
Oregon Wild Horses
Oregon Wild Horses
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-10/5514/108821/thumb_Feb_20_2010_Burns_Horse_Adoption_22.jpg
WASHINGTON -- The Bureau of Land Management announced today that the Secretaries of Interior and Agriculture have made selections for the three open positions on its nine-member National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board. Mr. Fred T. Woehl, Jr. of Harrison, Arkansas, has been reappointed for the category of public interest (equine behavior); Dr. Sue M. McDonnell of West Chester, Pennsylvania, has been reappointed for the category of wild horse and burro research; and Mr. James French of Winnemucca, Nevada, has been newly appointed for the category of natural resources management. Each individual will serve a three-year term on the Advisory Board.

The nine-member National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board advises the BLM, an agency of the Interior Department, and the U.S. Forest Service, part of the Agriculture Department, on the management and protection of wild free-roaming horses and burros on public lands and national forests administered by those agencies, as mandated by the 1971 Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act. Members of the board, who represent various categories of interests, must have a demonstrated ability to analyze information, evaluate programs, identify problems, work collaboratively, and develop corrective actions. More information about the advisory board can be found here.

Mr. Woehl has been involved in the horse community for over 43 years as a trainer, natural horsemanship clinician and educator. He has been involved with the Equine Science Department at the University of Arkansas and taught Equine Science at North Arkansas College. He has served as a volunteer for the BLM's Wild Horse and Burro Program for ten years, conducting demonstrations of wild horse versatility and assisting with adoptions. Additionally, Mr. Woehl worked as a senior agricultural adviser for the U.S. State Department from October 2008 to November 2009 in Iraq, where he was responsible for the development and implementation of agricultural programs and policy for the Ninewa Province. From November 2009 to March, 2011, he worked in the Kingdom of Jordan, for the Department of Interior's International Technical Assistance Program, where he developed policies for horse use and trained the local Bedouin tribesmen in humane methods of training and in the use of horses at the Archeological Park of Petra. Mr. Woehl currently has four BLM mustangs that are used for demonstrations in Branson, Missouri, and good-will visits at nursing homes, schools and churches.

Dr. McDonnell is a Clinical Associate and Adjunct Professor of Reproduction and Behavior at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine. Also, as a Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist, she consults privately on equine behavior and welfare. Dr. McDonnell, who holds a Ph.D. from the University of Delaware, co-edited the current leading academic book on horse behavior, titled "The Domestic Horse: The Evolution, Development and Management of its Behavior," published by Cambridge University Press.

Mr. French has spent more than 40 years involved in the management of wildlife on public lands in north-central Nevada. Over the course of his career, including 32 years as a biologist with the Nevada Department of Wildlife, he developed a unique understanding of wild horse and burro issues, and has worked with diverse groups to develop land management plans on county, state and federally-managed public lands. Since 2011, he has served on the Humboldt County Commission, the Nevada Association of Counties (also known as NACO) Board of Directors, the National NACO Western Interstate Region Board of Directors, NACO Public Lands and Natural Resources Steering Committees (both state and national), the Humboldt River Water Authority Board of Directors, and the Nevada State Land Use Planning Council. He has contributed to the development of public lands policy, resource management plans and herd management plans for more than three decades. Mr. French has worked collaboratively with county commissions in 16 counties, as well as the BLM, U.S. Forest Service, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Indian Affairs and government in six states.

-BLM-

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land, the most of any federal agency. This land is primarily located in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The BLM's mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America's public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations.


Attached Media Files: Oregon Wild Horses
State
DPSST Police Policy Committee Meeting scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 10/17/17 4:22 PM
For Immediate Release
October 17, 2017
Contact: Mona Riesterer
(503) 378-2431


Notice of Regular Meeting
The Police Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting at 10:00 a.m. on November 16, 2017. The meeting will be held in the Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, Oregon. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above.

Dial-in number: 888-273-3658 and Participant code: 4711910

If you dial-in for the meeting, please mute your phone unless you are addressing the group. Doing so will enable you to hear the meeting more effectively.


Agenda Items:

1. Introductions

2. Approve Meeting Minutes
Approve minutes from the August 17, 2017 Police Policy Committee Meeting

3. Approval for Changes to the Basic Police Curriculum
Presented by Staci Yutzie

4. Introduction to the New Denial/Revocation/Suspension Standards
Presented by Linsay Hale

5. Administrative Closures -- Police/Regulatory Specialist
Presented by Katrina Robson


6. McDonald, Rachel DPSST #57760 -- Portland Police Bureau; Application for Training and Subsequent Police Certification
Presented by Katrina Robson

7. Shipley, Joseph DPSST #24794 -- Yamhill County Sheriff's Office; Basic, Intermediate, Advanced, Supervisory, and Management Police Certifications
Presented by Katrina Robson

8. Hewitt, Megan DPSST #31385 -- Hillsboro Police Department; Basic, Intermediate, Advanced, Supervisory, and Management Police Certifications
Presented by Katrina Robson

9. Plummer, Teresa DPSST #31191 -- DPSST; Basic, Intermediate, Advanced, Supervisory, Management, and Executive Police Certifications and Instructor Certification
Presented by Katrina Robson

10. Ames, Zechariah DPSST #42841 -- Oakridge Police Department; Basic Police Certification, Basic Corrections Certification, Basic Telecommunicator Certification, and Basic Emergency Medical Dispatcher Certification
Presented by Katrina Robson

11. Schafer, Bradley DPSST #54285 -- Canby Police Department; Basic Police Certification
Presented by Katrina Robson

12. Ruiz, Jason DPSST # 57553 -- Bend Police Department; Application for Training and Subsequent Police Certification
Presented by Katrina Robson

13. Smith, Clarence DPSST # 10581 -- Basic Intermediate, Advanced & Supervisory Police Certifications
Presented by Katrina Robson

14. Citizen Complaints against Grant County Sheriff Palmer, Glenn DPSST #18276
Presented by Katrina Robson

15. Department Update


16. Next Police Policy Committee Meeting -- February 15, 2018 at 10:00 a.m.

Administrative Announcement
This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Police Policy Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff's Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.
DPSST Corrections Policy Committee Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 10/17/17 4:16 PM
For Immediate Release
October
Contact: Mona Riesterer
(503) 378-2431


Notice of Regular Meeting
The Corrections Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting at 10:00 a.m. on November 14, 2017. The meeting will be held in the Boardroom at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above.

Dial-in number: 888-273-3658 and Participant code: 4711910

If you dial-in for the meeting, please mute your phone unless you are addressing the group. Doing so will enable you to hear the meeting more effectively.

Agenda Items:

1. Introductions

2. Minutes -- August 8, 2017
Approve the minutes of the August 8, 2017 Corrections Policy Committee meeting.

3. Approval for Changes to the Basic Parole & Probation Curriculum
Presented by Chris Enquist

4. Quarterly Review of DOC BCC
Presented by Robert Sigleer

5. Proposed Rule Change for OAR 259-008-0065 and Repeal of 259-008-0066 -- Combines the certification maintenance for P&P Officers employed part-time with the requirements for all other law enforcement officers
Presented by Jennifer Howald

6. Introduction to New Denial/Revocation/Suspension Standards
Presented by Linsay Hale


7. Administrative Closures -- Corrections/Parole & Probation
Presented by Kristen Hibberds

8. Ware, John DPSST #30288 -- DOC EOCI; Basic, Intermediate and Advanced Corrections Certifications
Presented by Kristen Hibberds

9. Shield, Russell DPSST #42433 -- Coos County Sheriff's Office; Basic Corrections Certification and Application for Intermediate Corrections Certifications
Presented by Kristen Hibberds

10. Nauman, Alexander DPSST #54373 -- DOC OSCI; Basic Corrections Certifications
Presented by Kristen Hibberds

11. Feist, Miranda DPSST #57004 -- DOC TRCI; Application for Training and Subsequent Certification
Presented by Kristen Hibberds

12. Olsen, Theresa DPSST #33223 -- DOC OSP; Basic, Intermediate and Advanced Corrections Certifications and Instructor Certification
Presented by Kristen Hibberds

13. Frost, Nicolas DPSST # 48377 -- DOC DRCI; Basic and Intermediate Corrections Certifications
Presented by Kristen Hibberds

14. Todd, Cheryl DPSST #51507 -- DOC SFFC; Basic Corrections Certifications
Presented by Kristen Hibberds

15. Hernandez Jeffrey DPSST #45724 -- DOC OSP; Basic, Intermediate and Advanced Corrections Certifications and Instructor Certification
Presented by Kristen Hibberds

16. Cook, Christopher DPSST #53053 -- DOC SRCI; Basic Corrections Certifications
Presented by Kristen Hibberds

17. Joseph, Tracey DPSST #31239 -- DOC CRCI; Basic, Intermediate and Advanced Corrections Certifications
Presented by Kristen Hibberds

18. Moore, Kenneth DPSST #57737 -- Curry County Sheriff's Office; Application for Training and Subsequent Certifications
Presented by Kristen Hibberds

19. Witty, Kyle DPSST #57693 -- DOC EOCI -- Application for Training and Subsequent Certification
Presented by Kristen Hibberds


20. Hyder, Brandan DPSST # 57869 -- Warm Springs Police Department; Application for Training and Subsequent Certification
Presented by Kristen Hibberds

21. Gilham, Robert DPSST #57870 -- Warm Springs Police Department; Application for Training and Subsequent Certification
Presented by Kristen Hibberds

22. Holguin, Michael DPSST # 51994 -- Josephine County Sheriff's Office; Application for Training and Subsequent Certification
Presented by Kristen Hibberds

23. Department Update

24. Next Regularly Scheduled Meeting -- February 13, 2018 @ 1:30 p.m.


## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff's Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.
DPSST Basic Telecommunications Curriculum Committee Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 10/17/17 4:14 PM
For Immediate Release
October 17, 2017
Contact: Sara Stewart
503-378-2424


Notice of Regular Meeting
The Basic Telecommunications Curriculum Committee will hold a regular curriculum meeting at 10:00-15:30 on October 26, 2017. The meeting will be held in the conference room A234 at DPSST. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above.


Agenda Items:

Welcome new members
Final revisions to content drafts
Mini Basic Facilitator Development
Instructor Suggestions
Instructional Materials Review & To Do




Administrative Announcement
This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by the Basic Telecommunications Curriculum Committee unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff's Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.
Oregon Home Care Commission meets Thursday, November 2, 10 a.m. in Salem
Oregon Department of Human Services - 10/17/17 2:45 PM
The Oregon Home Care Commission (OHCC) meets Thursday, November 2,
10 a.m., 676 Church Street NE, Salem. The meeting is open to the public.
The agenda includes: public testimony; Executive Director's report; OHCC Budget Update; Governor's Commission on Senior Services; Oregon Disabilities Commission; Oregon Association of Area Agencies on Aging and Disabilities, Oregon Self-Advocacy Coalition, Aging and People with Disabilities, Community Advisory Councils and Coordinated Care Organizations; and a Quarterly Homecare Worker Benefits Trusts update.

There will be a working lunch during question and answer staff reports, including: quarterly Workers' Compensation, quarterly Registry and quarterly STEPS QBR Referral, bi-monthly Developmental Disabilities/Mental Health Committee and monthly OHP OmbudsAdvisory Council, Traditional Health Worker Commission and training/Registry updates.

A Worker's Classification -- Workforce Development update will be followed by a quarterly Aging and People with Disabilities update. The full agenda is attached.

For those who are unable to attend in person there is a call-in number: 1-888-278-0296; then dial the access code: 7999724 #. The commission meets on the first Thursday of every month. Visitors are welcome to these meetings. Persons needing an accommodation due to a disability should contact Joanna DeMeyer at 503-378-4984; joanna.m.demeyer@state.or.us.

About the Oregon Home Care Commission (OHCC)
The OHCC ensures high quality homecare services for seniors and people with physical, intellectual/developmental and mental health disabilities. The Commission defines qualifications, manages a statewide registry and trains homecare workers (HCWs) and personal support workers (PSWs). The commission serves as the employer of record for purposes of collective bargaining for HCWs and PSWs receiving service payments from public funds.

Learn more about OHCC at www.oregon.gov/dhs/seniors-disabilities/hc and
"Like" us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/OregonHomeCareCommission.

# # #


Attached Media Files: 2017-10/973/108838/Home_Care_Commission_Agenda_November_2_2017.pdf
Services for seniors will continue
Oregon Department of Human Services - 10/16/17 8:46 AM
On August 23, 2017 Mid-Columbia Council of Governments Board of Directors determined "that the Mid-Columbia Council of Governments cease providing services under all programs and contracts." "Further MCOGS shall continue to provide services until such time that appropriate process and transitions may be undertaken by the parties in the best interest of the public, programs, employees and the organization as a whole."

The Department of Human Services/Aging and People with Disabilities has initiated the public process of designating another entity to function as the Area Agency on Aging and deliver services, as outlined in the Older Americans Act, Oregon Revised Statute Chapter 410 and the Oregon Administrative Rules Chapter 411, Division 2.

In late October and early November Aging and People with Disabilities will be holding public meetings in Hood River, Wasco, Sherman, Gilliam and Wheeler counties share information on the process and seek public input. Details on these meetings will be shared as soon as they are available.
New documentary featuring Oregon LGBTQ veterans to premiere Nov. 3 in Portland (Photo)
Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs - 10/19/17 12:13 PM
ODVA logo
ODVA logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-10/1082/108899/thumb_Department_Horiz.jpg
The Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs is proud to present the world premiere of "Breaking the Silence," a documentary featuring the stories of some of Oregon's LGBTQ service members and veterans.

This groundbreaking film explores the lives of five Oregon veterans, who not only served their country honorably, but were forced to serve in silence and at great risk to themselves, their careers and their families.

"We are privileged and honored to share the stories of these five incredible men and women, who have shown such great courage in coming forward after years or even decades of silence," said Cameron Smith, director of the Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs. "We are extremely proud of this film and are excited to celebrate the diversity that unites us as a vibrant community of veterans and as a state."

"Breaking the Silence" was filmed by the multi-talented videographer Julia Reihs and produced by Portland storyteller Paul Iarrobino, in collaboration with Nathaniel Boehme, ODVA's LGBTQ veterans coordinator.

Veterans and family, the general public and media are welcome and encouraged to join us for the film premiere on Friday, Nov. 3, at the Mission Theater, 1624 N.W. Glisan St. in Portland. Doors open at 6 p.m.; the screening will be at 7 p.m., followed by a panel discussion and Q&A with the veteran storytellers who participated in the project.

Admission is free. There will also be food and drinks by McMenamins available for purchase. Minors are welcome to attend accompanied by a parent or guardian.

A trailer for the film can be found online at www.youtube.com/watch?v=JeBpkFepTnU&t. If you are an LGBTQ veteran in need of assistance or support or have any questions about the benefits you've earned through your service to our nation, please contact us at LGBTQVets@odva.state.or.us.

Media interested in interviewing the veteran participants prior to the event may contact ODVA's Tyler Francke at 971-239-6640 or tyler.francke@state.or.us to make arrangements.


Attached Media Files: Film premiere flyer (PDF) , ODVA logo , Film premiere flyer (JPG) , "Breaking the Silence" title card
DCBS announces federal approval of 1332 State Innovation Waiver application
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 10/19/17 3:28 PM
Salem -- The Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS) announced today that it has received approval of Oregon's 1332 State Innovation Waiver from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). This approval will grant Oregon an estimated $30 million annually to fund the new Oregon Reinsurance Program created during the 2017 Legislative Session.

The Oregon Reinsurance Program is designed to stabilize the individual market, reduce rates, and encourage insurance companies to offer plans in more parts of the state. Reinsurance spreads the risk of high-cost claims so that all insurance companies take an equal share of the risk of expensive claims.

Rates for individual plans in 2018 have already been reduced by 6 percent from what they would have been without the reinsurance program.

"We are pleased that CMS has quickly approved Oregon's 1332 State Innovation Waiver application enabling Oregon to establish its reinsurance program," said Acting DCBS Director Jean Straight. "The Oregon Reinsurance Program will provide much needed stability to Oregonians who purchase insurance on their own. Without this program, we might be seeing counties with no plans offered through Oregon's Health Insurance Marketplace, and much larger rate increases for those who purchase insurance on their own in 2018."

Funding for the reinsurance program comes from federal funding through the approved 1332 State Innovation Waiver from CMS, funds from the previous temporary reinsurance program that ended in 2016, the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace assessment account, and an assessment approved by the Legislature during the 2017 session. The total expected funding for plan year 2018 is approximately $90 million.

For more information about about the Oregon Reinsurance Program as it becomes available, visit dfr.oregon.gov.

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The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov.
Award recognizes Oregon's return-to-work programs
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 10/18/17 1:22 PM
(Salem) -- The Oregon Workers' Compensation Division (WCD) has received an award from a worldwide organization for the division's ongoing efforts and track record of success in helping injured Oregon workers return to work.

The International Association of Industrial Accident Boards and Commissions -- the largest trade association of workers' compensation agencies in North America -- honored WCD with a 2017 President's Award. Such awards recognize the contributions of regulators and industry professionals in improving workplace health and safety, including helping workers recover from on-the-job injury and illness.

WCD's award, announced by the association during its 103rd annual convention held in Portland this month, recognizes two Oregon programs: the Employer-at-Injury Program and the Preferred Worker Program.

The Employer-at-Injury Program encourages the early return to work of injured workers by helping lower an employer's early return-to-work costs and claim costs. Since 1995, it has helped more than 160,000 injured Oregon workers achieve both long-term employment and wages that are higher than those who did not use the program.

The Preferred Worker Program encourages re-employment of qualified Oregon workers who have permanent disabilities from on-the-job injuries. The program, which focuses on small- to medium-sized businesses, offers Oregon employers a chance to save money by hiring preferred workers. Since 2012, the program has served an average 1,029 newly eligible workers per year.

In putting the spotlight on both programs, the association noted WCD's commitment to continuously improve its services. "While both programs have been successful," according to the association, "Oregon continues to measure the impact and make changes to improve outcomes."

"This award reflects the energy, hard work, and professionalism of all of our staff," said Lou Savage, administrator for WCD. "And we remain committed to what matters most: helping improve the lives of injured workers -- and their families -- in Oregon."

Learn more about WCD's return-to-work programs by visiting http://wcd.oregon.gov/rtw/Pages/index.aspx, calling 800-452-0288 (toll free), or by sending an email to the Employer-at-Injury Program -- Eaip.oregon@oregon.gov -- or the Preferred Worker Program -- Pwp.oregon@oregon.gov.

For more information about the Oregon Workers' Compensation Division, visit http://wcd.oregon.gov/Pages/index.aspx.


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The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov.
Division of Financial Regulation seeking comment on cost-sharing reduction rate increases ¬-- deadline is Oct. 17 at 5 p.m.
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 10/16/17 3:19 PM
Salem - The Oregon Division of Financial Regulation is seeking public comment on cost-sharing reduction rate increases for silver metal tier individual health insurance premiums for 2018 plans.

The comment period starts Monday, Oct. 16. Due to the limited time frame to file revised rates, the deadline for comment is Tuesday, Oct. 17 at 5 p.m. To comment in writing, email Ethan Baldwin via email at Ethan.C.Baldwin@oregon.gov.

The reason for the public comment period is on Oct. 12, the Trump administration issued an announcement about immediately stopping cost-sharing reduction payments to health insurance companies. The Division of Financial Regulation is committed to the stability of Oregon's health insurance market and ensuring access to statewide comprehensive health coverage.

The division has determined that in order to ensure carriers can continue to offer coverage in Oregon, it must offer health insurance companies offering plans on HealthCare.gov the opportunity to increase their already approved silver metal tier 2018 plan rates by 7.1 percent. The deadline for insurance companies and the state to file new rates on HealthCare.gov is 12 p.m. on Oct. 17.

Non-silver metal tier plan rates (e.g., bronze and gold) will remain unaffected.

This increase will affect plans both on and off HealthCare.gov, and will compensate for the $49 million worth of cost-sharing reduction payments that the federal government will no longer be making to Oregon insurance companies in 2018.

Visit http://dfr.oregon.gov/news/Pages/20171013-trump-payment-reduction.aspx for more details about the decision to increase rates and a sample rate table of the revised rates.

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The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov and www.dfr.oregon.gov.
Community Bank Week honored in Oregon
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 10/16/17 11:30 AM
(Salem) -- Oregon Gov. Kate Brown has proclaimed Oct. 16-20, 2017, as Community Bank Week, honoring local banks for the significant economic and civic contributions they make in communities across the state.

Oregon banks, most of which are chartered by the Department of Consumer and Business Services, take a relationship-based approach to doing business and are actively involved in the communities they serve. They play an essential part of the state's economy, financing Main Street businesses, providing a full range of banking services, and creating jobs.

In some communities, the banks are the largest employer or the only provider of banking services.

"Oregon communities, especially small businesses, depend on their local banks," said Jean Straight, acting DCBS director. "Not only do these local bankers lend to Oregon families and farms to help communities flourish, but they also provide critical information and education to their customers about a variety of financial matters."

Community banks reported loans to Oregon small businesses topping $5.9 billion in a single year, according to a recent survey by the Oregon Bankers Association. The survey also showed community banks in the state gave to their communities, pitching in $4.9 million to nonprofits and community organizations. Meanwhile, their employees logged more than 64,000 volunteer hours.

Members of Community Banks of Oregon (CBO) and community banks throughout the state are celebrating Community Bank Week in Oregon. Banks will host consumers, students, small businesses, and local elected officials to showcase the positive effect banks have on the people they serve.

To learn more about the Oregon banks recognized during Community Bank Week, go to http://www.oregonbankers.com/community-bank-week.html.

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The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest consumer protection and business regulatory agency. The department's Division of Financial Regulation oversees the financial and insurance industries in Oregon. For more information, visit http://www.oregon.gov/dcbs/Pages/index.aspx and http://dfr.oregon.gov/Pages/index.aspx.
Fire season has ended on all lands statewide protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 10/20/17 4:34 PM
SALEM, Ore. -- Fire season has officially ended on all private and public lands protected by Oregon Department of Forestry districts statewide. The last district to end its fire season -- the Southwest Oregon District covering Josephine and Jackson counties -- did so this morning at 9 a.m.

Although fire season began a few weeks later this year because of a wet winter and spring in much of the state, fuels over the summer quickly dried out. Statewide across all jurisdictions there were almost 2,000 wildfires this year. About half of those started on the 16.2 million acres of forestland protected by ODF. However, of the approximately 678,000 acres burned by wildfire in Oregon this year, only about 6 percent was land protected by ODF.

The estimated 42,000 acres that burned on ODF-protected land this year was about 35 percent above the 10-year average of 34,000 acres annually. Nearly half that amount -- some 20,000 acres -- occurred when a single lightning-caused fire spread from a wilderness area onto private and Bureau of Land Management lands in Curry County. In all, the Chetco Bar Fire burned some 191,125 acres, making it the largest wildfire this year in Oregon and one of the larger fires this century.

Lightning storms -- which were unusually absent last year -- started hundreds of wildfires across Oregon, especially in August. ODF's Southwest Oregon District alone responded to more than a hundred lightning fires this season, followed by the Klamath-Lake District with 57 lightning fires, Central Oregon with 44 and Northeast Oregon with 36. All other districts combined reported 37 lightning-caused wildfires.
While lightning significantly contributed to fire starts this year, humans caused the majority of wildfires on ODF-protected land in every district except Northeast Oregon. Regardless of cause, ODF crews and their cooperators succeeded in putting out the great majority of all wildfires quickly at less than 10 acres, and with no fatalities and fewer injuries than average.

The start and end of fire season are set by each district based on the fuel conditions in their area. The arrival of steady, soaking rain coupled with cooler temperatures and shorter day lengths usually triggers the closure of fire season.

The end of fire season removes restrictions on ODF-protected lands intended to prevent wildfire, such as on backyard debris burning and use of certain equipment. Many structural fire departments in Oregon, however, still require a permit for debris burning, so check with your local fire department before starting a burn.

"Fires can start even outside of fire season, so it's always wise to be careful when burning a debris pile," said ODF Fire Prevention Coordinator Tom Fields. "Never leave a burn pile unattended and always make sure it is dead out before leaving." Fields also says to return to the area periodically to double check for heat and smoke. Debris piles can hold heat for several weeks and come back to life under dry, windy conditions.

For more tips on how to keep yourself, your loved ones and your property safe from wildfire at any time of year, visit ODF's Fire Prevention webpage at http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Fire/pages/FirePrevention.aspx or go to the Keep Oregon Green website at KeepOregonGreen.org
# # #
Board of Forestry to meet in Eugene Nov. 1, hosting joint meeting and field tour with EQC on Nov. 2
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 10/19/17 8:55 AM
Release date: Oct. 19, 2017
Contact: Ken Armstrong, ODF Public Affairs Director, 503-945-7420


Board of Forestry to meet in Eugene Nov. 1, hosting joint meeting and field tour with EQC on Nov. 2


The Oregon Board of Forestry will hold a regular business meeting on Nov. 1 from 10 a.m. to 3:25 p.m., in the North and Middle Columbia Room at the Valley View Inn, located at 1000 Valley View Way in Eugene. Following the meeting, from 5 to 7 p.m., there will be a community social event to meet and visit with local community leaders. On Nov. 2, the Board will meet jointly with the DEQ Environmental Quality Commission from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. to discuss water quality protection, smoke management and prescribed burning. The BOF and EQC will then tour an active slash burn.

The Nov. 1 meeting agenda includes the following agenda items:
Overview of the financial dashboard
2017 fire season update
Forest Trust Land Advisory Committee testimony
Western Oregon Habitat Conservation planning update
Overview of coordination to develop landscape-scale projects that serve private landowners and advance restoration on public lands
Presentation on urban and community forests -- future challenges and trends in Oregon and nationwide
Forest health update

Immediately following the regular meeting, the Board will meet in executive session from 3:25 to 4:25 p.m. to conduct the State Forester's Annual Performance Review, as provided for in Oregon Revised Statute 192.660(2)(i).

The public is welcome to attend the meetings, community social, and tour. There is opportunity at the beginning of the Nov. 1 meeting for general public comment on items that are not scheduled on the Board's meeting agenda, as well as opportunities to comment throughout the meeting on the individual agenda items.

Agenda materials are available online at www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/BOFMeetings.aspx.

Accommodations for people with disabilities, and special materials, services, or assistance can be arranged by calling the ODF Public Affairs Office at 503-945-7200, at least 48 hours in advance.

The Oregon Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. Responsibilities include appointing the State Forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon's 30 million-acre forestland base. More information about the Board is available at www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/AboutBOF.aspx.

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County advisory group to state forestry meets Oct. 20
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 10/17/17 9:00 AM
Release date: Oct. 16, 2017

Contact:
Liz Dent, State Forests Division Chief, Salem, 503-945-7351



Salem, ORE - The Forest Trust Lands Advisory Committee will meet Friday, Oct. 20 from 9:30 a.m. to noon at the Oregon Department of Forestry Salem headquarters, Tillamook Room, Building C, 2600 State St. Items on the committee's agenda include comments from State Forester Peter Daugherty and updates from the ODF State Forests Division staff on the following:
Business Improvements
State Forests Division performance measures reporting
Habitat Conservation Plan
Forest Management Plan project

The meeting agenda is available on the department's web site at http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/FTLAC.aspx.

The Forest Trust Lands Advisory Committee is comprised of seven county commissioners representing 15 Oregon counties where state forestlands are located. The FTLAC is a statutorily established committee that advises the Board of Forestry on matters related to forestland managed by ODF.

Members of the public may attend the meeting and an opportunity for public comment is scheduled. Questions about accessibility or special accommodations for the meeting can be directed to the Oregon Department of Forestry at 503-945-7200.

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Kicker percentage corrected
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 10/20/17 9:20 AM
SALEM, Oregon--A corrected rate for Oregonians' tax surplus credit, or "kicker," for the 2016 tax year has been certified by the Office of Economic Analysis (OEA) since previous public announcements. The more than $463 million total tax surplus remains the same.

The surplus will be returned to taxpayers through a credit on their 2017 state personal income tax returns filed in 2018. No "kicker checks" will be issued as there were in the past, although a taxpayer's kicker credit may make up some or all of a regular refund check.

To calculate the amount of your credit, multiply your 2016 tax liability before any credits--line 24 on the 2016 Form OR-40--by 5.6 percent. This is the corrected rate, as determined and certified by OEA. Taxpayers who claimed a credit for tax paid to another state subtract the credit amount to their liability before calculating the kicker.

You're eligible to claim the kicker if you filed a 2016 tax return and had tax due before credits. Even if you don't have a filing obligation for 2017, you still have to file a 2017 tax return to claim your credit. There will be detailed information on how to claim your credit in the 2017 Oregon personal income tax return instructions: Form OR-40 for full-year Oregon residents, Form OR-40-P for part-year residents, and Form OR-40-N for nonresidents. Composite and fiduciary-income tax return filers are also eligible.

Keep in mind that the state may use all or part of your kicker to pay any state debt you owe, such as tax due for other years, child support, court fines, or school loans.

A What's My Kicker? calculator will be active on Revenue's website for personal income tax filers when filing season opens in January. To calculate your kicker, you'll enter your name, Social Security number, and filing status for 2016 and 2017.

You can visit www.oregon.gov/dor to get forms, check the status of your refund, or make payments. You can call (503) 378-4988 or (800) 356-4222 (toll-free) or email questions.dor@oregon.gov for additional assistance. For TTY for hearing or speech impaired, call (800) 886-7204.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Employment in Oregon September 2017 News Release
Oregon Employment Dept. - 10/17/17 10:00 AM
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: October 17, 2017 CONTACT INFORMATION:
Nick Beleiciks, State Employment Economist
(503) 947-1267 Video and Audio available at 10:00 AM
David Cooke, Economist (503) 947-1272


Oregon's Employment Declines for the Second Consecutive Month in September

In September, Oregon's nonfarm payroll employment dropped by 3,800 jobs, following a revised loss of 7,000 in August. These job losses followed rapid gains during February through July, when a total of 42,600 jobs were added in just six months.

Recent forest fires did not have a noticeable impact on the September jobs report. Although many individuals and businesses were impacted in September by forest fires that raged in many locations within Oregon, the industry employment totals did not appear to be impacted significantly. A job is counted in this report when a worker is employed for any part of the business's pay period that includes the 12th of the month. Workers able to return to work during the September pay period are counted in the jobs report.

In September, four industries cut more than 1,000 jobs, while two added more than 1,000. Leisure and hospitality (-3,700 jobs) cut the most as this industry returned to the long-term trend line after a spike upward in June and July. With vacancy surveys indicating that many firms are having trouble attracting workers, part of the weakness in hiring is likely due to the tight labor market.

Professional and business services (-3,100 jobs) cut back at a time of year when a flat trend is typical for the industry. The industry appears to have stalled from its upward trajectory over the past eight years. Each of its published component industries cut jobs since September 2016: employment services (-1,400 jobs), business support services (-400), and services to buildings and dwellings ( 1,500). The two other industries that cut substantially in September were private educational services ( 1,400 jobs) and other services (-1,200).

All was not lost in September, as construction added 2,900 jobs and government added 1,400.

The September jobs report indicates that Oregon's over-the-year job growth, while moderate, has slowed. Between September 2016 and September 2017, payroll employment expanded by 37,400 jobs, or 2.0 percent. This is a reduction from the 3.1 percent job-growth rate seen through July. In the past 12 months, several industries continued to add jobs at a rapid clip, such as construction (+11,600 jobs, or 12.7%); health care and social assistance (+8,500 jobs, or 3.7%); and manufacturing (+5,700 jobs, or 3.0%). However, many of Oregon's industries haven't experienced the same rapid growth over the past 12 months, including government; professional and business services; wholesale trade; information; other services; and logging.

Oregon's unemployment rate was essentially unchanged at 4.2 percent in September from 4.1 percent in August. Oregon's rate was significantly below its year-ago rate of 4.9 percent in September 2016. The U.S. unemployment rate was 4.2 percent in September 2017.

These preliminary estimates of jobs and other labor force data are produced in cooperation with the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics, are based largely on a survey of businesses and a survey of households, and are subject to later revision.

Next Press Releases
The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the September county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Tuesday, October 24th, and the next statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for October on Tuesday, November 14th.??NLG



Notes:
All numbers in the above narrative are seasonally adjusted except for the detailed industries within professional and business services.

The Oregon Employment Department and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) work cooperatively to develop and publish monthly Oregon payroll employment and labor force data. The estimates of monthly job gains and losses are based on a survey of businesses. The estimates of unemployment are based on a survey of households and other sources.

The Oregon Employment Department publishes payroll employment estimates that are revised quarterly by using employment counts from employer unemployment insurance tax records. All department publications use this Official Oregon Series data unless noted otherwise. This month's release incorporates the January, February and March 2017 tax records data. The department continues to make the original nonfarm payroll employment series available; these data are produced by the BLS.



The pdf version of the news release, including tables and graphs, can be found at www.QualityInfo.org/press-release. To obtain the data in other formats such as in Excel, visit www.QualityInfo.org, then within the top banner, select Economic Data, then choose LAUS or CES. To request the press release as a Word document, contact the person shown at the top of this press release.

For help finding jobs and training resources, visit one of the state's WorkSource Oregon Centers or go to: www.WorkSourceOregon.org.

Equal Opportunity program -- auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For the Deaf and Hard of Hearing population, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.


Attached Media Files: Employment In Oregon September 2017
Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet October 20 in Wilsonville
Oregon Health Authority - 10/18/17 3:23 PM
October 18, 2017

Contact: Heather Johnson, 503-508-8276, heather.n.johnson@state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority Metrics and Scoring Committee.

When: Friday, October 20, 9 a.m. to noon. Public testimony will be heard at 9:20 a.m.

Where: Clackamas Community College Wilsonville Training Center, 29353 SW Town Center Loop E, Wilsonville

Attendees can also follow the presentation by webinar and listen to discussion by phone. Register for the webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/312837825839229954. Conference line: 888-204-5984, participant code 1277-166. Phone will be unmuted during public testimony.

Agenda: Welcome, consent agenda and updates; public testimony; OHA obesity measure proposal; consider 2019 potential change to tobacco prevalence measure; consider potential change to PCPCH measure; finalize recommendation to Health Plan Quality Metrics Committee; future meeting schedule and topics.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/hpa/analytics/Pages/Metrics-Scoring-Committee.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:
Sign language and spoken language interpreters
Written materials in other languages
Braille
Large print
Audio and other formats
If you need help or have questions, please contact Heather Johnson at 503-508-8276, 711 TTY, heather.n.johnson@state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.
Glass Ionomer Rules Advisory Committee to meet October 19
Oregon Health Authority - 10/17/17 4:06 PM
October 17, 2017

What: A public meeting of the Glass Ionomer Rules Advisory Committee (RAC)

Agenda: Approve meeting minutes; review draft amended rule language (version 2); review statement of need and fiscal impact form; discuss next steps

When: Thursday, Oct. 19, 9-11 a.m. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St., Room 1A, Portland. Conference line: 888-636-3807, participant code 793800.

Who: The Glass Ionomer Rules Advisory Committee includes broad representation of these key stakeholder categories: coordinated care organizations (CCOs), dental care organization (DCOs), local school dental sealant programs, and dental sealant materials and clinical experts. More information can be found on the committee's website at http://www.healthoregon.org/sealantcert.

Program contact: Amy Umphlett, 971-673-1564, amy.m.umphlett@state.or.us

# # #
Marine Board to Hold Special Board Meeting October 26
Oregon Marine Board - 10/20/17 2:28 PM
The Oregon State Marine Board will convene a special Board meeting on October 26, at 9 am, via teleconference to review and approve the recruitment plan for filling the Marine Director vacancy. The recruitment strategy will be presented to the Board by the Department of Administrative Services Human Resources.

The public is invited to attend the Board meeting by coming to the agency, located at 435 Commercial St. NE in Salem. Public participation by teleconference is not available.
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Marine Board Seeks Written Public Comment on Proposed AIS Program Rule Changes
Oregon Marine Board - 10/20/17 9:40 AM
The Oregon State Marine Board seeks written public comment on proposed changes to the Aquatic Invasive Species Prevention Permit Program as it relates to carriage requirements for liveries (rental businesses). The Board approved opening the rulemaking process during its quarterly Board meeting held in October.

The proposed rule change will exempt nonmotorized liveries from AIS permit carriage requirements.
All rental facilities, with boats clearly labeled with their livery name, will be issued a Certificate of Compliance for all of their rental fleet within a discounted pricing schedule. This proposed rule amendment also creates a more streamline process for compliance inspection by law enforcement.

Written comments will be accepted until November 30, 2017 by 5 pm and can be submitted via email to osmb.rulemaking@oregon.gov or by U.S. mail to: June LeTarte, Administrative Rules Coordinator, Oregon State Marine Board, 435 Commercial Street NE, Suite 400, Salem, OR 97301. Comments via telephone will not be accepted.

To view the proposed rule language, visit http://www.oregon.gov/OSMB/info/Pages/Rulemaking-and-Public-Notices.aspx.

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Marine Board Appoints Director (Photo)
Oregon Marine Board - 10/19/17 9:40 AM
Interim Marine Director, Rachel Graham
Interim Marine Director, Rachel Graham
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-10/4139/108890/thumb_RachelGrahamHeadshot.jpg
The Oregon State Marine Board appointed Rachel Graham as Marine Director effective October 16, 2017 at its quarterly meeting in La Pine. This interim appointment will remain in effect through the recruitment and hiring process to replace outgoing Marine Director, Scott Brewen.

ORS 830.135 states the Marine Board shall appoint the Marine Director who shall serve at the pleasure of the Board. The Board, with assistance from the Department of Administrative Services Human Resources, anticipates posting the position vacancy and beginning its recruitment for a Marine Director prior to year-end.

Ms. Graham began her employment with the Marine Board in 2010 and in her capacity as the Policy and Environmental Manager has represented the agency on many state, interstate and agency legislative initiatives.

Ms. Graham may be contacted at (503) 378-2617 or by email at Rachel.B.Graham@oregon.gov.

For more information about the Marine Board and the agency's self-supporting programs, visit www.boatoregon.com.
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Attached Media Files: Interim Marine Director, Rachel Graham
Oregon Heritage Commission to meet November 6 by phone
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 10/20/17 9:46 AM
The Oregon Heritage Commission agenda includes approval of minutes from the previous meeting and approval of Oregon Heritage grants. The commission will meet at 1 p.m. A public listening room will be available at the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department offices, 725 Summer St. NE, Salem. A preliminary agenda with participation information is available on the commission website at www.oregonheritage.org

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon's heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The mission of the Oregon Heritage Commission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity. For more information, contact interim coordinator Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or kuri.gill@oregon.gov . Meetings are accessible to people with disabilities. Special accommodations may be arranged up to 72 hours in advance of the meeting by calling 503-986-0690.
OPRD seeks to fill position on grant committee that advises on statewide trails
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 10/16/17 2:09 PM
The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is seeking a representative of the hiking community for a vacant volunteer position on the Recreation Trails Program (RTP) Advisory Committee that evaluates grants for statewide trails projects.

The competitive grant program is funded by the U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration and administered by OPRD. Grants are awarded to non-profits and governments for trail projects, including building new trails, improving existing trails and installing trail signs.

"Reviewing these grant applications is an important step in the process of improving and expanding Oregon's trail system," said OPRD grant coordinator Jodi Bellefeuille. "Grant committee members get to have a direct say in what trail projects are funded and provide feedback to land managers about their proposals."

The ten member committee evaluates and ranks requests for grant funding. Ideal candidates can live anywhere in Oregon and will be avid hikers with experience in one or more of the following areas: recreation planning, trail design, project management, grant management and budget review.

The committee meets once or twice a year at locations throughout the state. In 2017, meetings were held in Salem in May and September. Dates for 2018 have not been finalized. Time commitment varies and includes reviewing and evaluating 40-80 grant applications each annual funding cycle.

Those interested in serving must submit an OPRD Grant Advisory Committee Appointment Interest Form by Friday, Nov. 17. For more information or to obtain an interest form, visit http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/GRANTS/Pages/RTP-Committee.aspx, or contact Jodi Bellefeuille at jodi.bellefeuille@oregon.gov or 503-986-0716.
Committee to review Oregon Heritage Grant applications
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 10/16/17 1:19 PM
A committee will meet to score and rank applications for the Oregon Heritage Grant program. The recommendations from the committees will be forwarded to the Oregon Heritage Commission for final review and approval on November 6 via conference call. The grant committee meeting will be at the North Mall Office Building, 725 Summer Street, NE, and can also be accessed by phone. The committee will meet October 30, 9:00 a.m. -3:00 p.m. in room 124A. Call in information is 1?888?
278?0296, access Code: 4653554.

For information about the grants contact Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail: Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov .
Banks & Credit Unions
October 20 is International Credit Union Day
Northwest Credit Union Assn. - 10/18/17 10:26 AM
Find out why 235 million consumers worldwide, and 2 million in Oregon, have chosen not-for-profit, cooperative credit unions as their financial services partners.

TIGARD, OR. -- If you visit a credit union branch anytime, you'll receive a warm welcome, local service, and better interest rates than most other financial institutions offer. If you visit a credit union branch October 20th you'll feel an even more energized buzz. It's International Credit Union Day, an annual celebration of more than 68,000 credit unions and their 235 million members worldwide.

As not-for-profit financial cooperatives, credit unions provide a viable alternative to profit-driven financial institutions. Credit unions not only offer a plethora of financial services to their member-owners; they are also committed to community service, and are a force for positive economic and social change.

In Oregon, 5,000 employees of 59 credit unions serve 2 million members across the state, in 289 branch locations, and with 24/7 technology that helps consumers make wise financial decisions.

Since 1948, International Credit Union Day has been celebrated annually on the third Thursday of October. Each year, the international event affords the opportunity to remember credit unions' proud history and promote awareness of and support for the credit union difference. This year's theme, "Dreams Thrive Here," celebrates how credit unions and other financial cooperatives serve as catalysts to make different professions, personal choices, and career paths real.

Interview credit union employees and members in your community on #ICUDay. Please share this video with your audiences so consumers know they have a not-for-profit, cooperative financial services choice: https://vimeo.com/229748075





Attached Media Files: 2017-10/4992/108864/International_Credit_Union_Day_in_Oregon.docx
Homeless vets in Eugene to have a warmer, safer winter, thanks to $35,000 grant from Wells Fargo to Community Supported Shelters (Photo)
Wells Fargo - 10/19/17 1:29 PM
CSS co-founders Erik de Buhr (fifth from left) and Fay de Buhr (fourth from right) and board member Evelyn Anderton (far left) accept a $35,000 grant from Wells Fargo.
CSS co-founders Erik de Buhr (fifth from left) and Fay de Buhr (fourth from right) and board member Evelyn Anderton (far left) accept a $35,000 grant from Wells Fargo.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2017-10/1188/108905/thumb_CSS_grant.jpg
EUGENE, Ore. -- A group of formerly homeless veterans in Eugene will have a warmer, safer winter this year, thanks to a $35,000 grant from Wells Fargo to the nonprofit Community Supported Shelters.

Wells Fargo's VeteranWINS grant program provides financial support to community-based nonprofits focused on addressing veteran homelessness, transitional housing, and low- to moderate-income veteran home rehabilitation.

Community Supported Shelters (CSS) operates four communities in Eugene for the homeless, including one exclusively for veterans on the grounds of the Eugene Mission at 1477 W. First Ave. Veterans stay there for about one to five months while they receive counseling services and seek permanent housing and employment.

The veterans' camp has 15 micro-shelters called Conestoga Huts and currently 11 residents. Like the other communities operated by CSS, its common space and kitchen uses a wood-burning stove for heat in the winter.

"Up to now, collecting and chopping firewood has been a major challenge," said CSS co-director and co-founder Erik de Buhr. "We have used part of this generous gift to purchase a hydraulic dump trailer to transport the wood from local donors, as well as protective gear and chainsaws to chop it up. Our residents want to be self-reliant."

The wood will be used to heat not only the veterans' camp but also all three of the other camps that CSS operates in Lane County. At some point in the future CSS will also look at creating a small business to sell its excess firewood.

"Our shed is now packed full of wood. There is no way we could have done that without the grant. We are going into this winter better prepared than ever before to heat all our camps," he said.

The nonprofit will use other funds from the grant to upgrade the huts, including new roofs, the installation of solar panels and charging stations. It will also convert at least one of the huts so it's wheelchair-accessible, de Buhr said.

The micro-shelters at the veterans' community are equipped with small propane-powered heaters but up to now the residents were not able to use them, due to a lack of smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors. CSS used some of the grant funds to also purchase the needed detectors, as well as fire extinguishers.

"Now we can use the heaters and feel secure they are going to be safe. It works pretty well. The guys are a lot more comfortable. They really appreciate it," said de Buhr.

The grant to the Eugene agency is part of the $200,000 total the Wells Fargo program is donating this year to six nonprofit groups that support veterans. The others are in California, Florida, Georgia, Iowa and Texas.

"Wells Fargo partners with nonprofits such as Community Supported Shelters that work tirelessly to help veterans achieve long-term stability and success," said Andrew Tweedie, a Wells Fargo Community Relations consultant in Oregon.

"We are committed to building better communities including by working with nonprofits to address homelessness for veterans," Tweedie said. "Community Supported Shelters is active and experienced in military housing efforts and was identified by Wells Fargo as a leader nationally in addressing veteran homelessness."

Wells Fargo has been helping military members, veterans and their families succeed financially for more than 160 years. Since 2012, Wells Fargo has donated more than 300 homes, valued at over $50 million, to veterans in all 50 states; donated more than $25 million to military- and veteran-related nonprofits; and hired more than 6,700 veterans. Learn more about Wells Fargo services and support for military and veterans at www.wellsfargo.com/military. Last year Wells Fargo donated $281.3 million to 14,900 nonprofits.

About Community Supported Shelters
Founded by Erik and Fay de Buhr in 2013, Community Supported Shelters manages four Safe Spots Camp Communities. Consisting of Conestoga Huts, the communities have several features that make them a very basic, but livable environment for people without other shelter options. The majority of its funding comes from community donations. More information: (541) 683-0836 or communitysupportedshelters.org.

About Wells Fargo
Serving the financial needs of Oregonians since 1852, Wells Fargo & Company (NYSE: WFC) is a diversified, community-based financial services company with $1.9 trillion in assets. The firm provides banking, insurance, investments, mortgage, and consumer and commercial finance through more than 8,400 locations; 13,000 ATMs; the internet (wellsfargo.com); and mobile banking. Wells Fargo has repeatedly been named one of the most generous companies in Oregon and America.
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Attached Media Files: CSS co-founders Erik de Buhr (fifth from left) and Fay de Buhr (fourth from right) and board member Evelyn Anderton (far left) accept a $35,000 grant from Wells Fargo.
Organizations & Associations
Red Cross Responds to Home Disaster Affecting Nine People in Veneta
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 10/21/17 11:05 AM
Disaster responders with the American Red Cross Cascades Region responded to a home disaster at approximately 2:45 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 21, 2017 in the 87000 block of Huston Road in Veneta, Lane County, Ore.

The multi-family fire affected three adults, six children and three pets.

The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits, information about recovery services, and health and mental health services.

Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.

The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters, like home fires, every day.

The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/CascadesHomeFire to schedule an appointment.
Red Cross Responds to Home Disaster Affecting Four People in Veneta
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 10/21/17 10:59 AM
Disaster responders with the American Red Cross Cascades Region responded to a home disaster at approximately 3:00 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 21, 2017 in the 29000 block of Jeans Road in Veneta, Lane County, Ore.

The single-family fire affected two adults and two children.

The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits, information about recovery services, and health and mental health services.

Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.

The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters, like home fires, every day.

The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/CascadesHomeFire to schedule an appointment.
Red Cross Responds To Eugene Home Fire
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 10/15/17 10:03 PM
On Sunday, October 15, 2017, at approximately 8:30 p.m. Red Cross  disaster response volunteers responded to a residential fire disaster that occurred  in the 29000 block of Kelso Street, Eugene, OR.
This single-family fire affected 2 adults and 1 pet.
The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits with toiletry items, information about recovery services, and health and mental health services. Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.

The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters, like home fires, every day. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/CascadesHomeFire to schedule an appointment
Northwest Association for Blind Athletes to host Goalball Experience at the University of Oregon
Northwest Assn. for Blind Athletes - 10/20/17 12:16 PM
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact:
Billy Henry, Founder/Executive Director
Northwest Association for Blind Athletes
311 West Evergreen Blvd, Ste. 200
Vancouver, Washington 98660
Local Phone: 1-360-718-2826
Toll Free: 1-800-880-9837
http://www.nwaba.org
bhenry@nwaba.org

Northwest Association for Blind Athletes to host Goalball Experience at the University of Oregon

Vancouver, Washington--October 19, 2017,--Northwest Association for Blind Athletes (NWABA) announced today that it will be hosting a Goalball Experience for adults with visual impairments at the University of Oregon in Eugene. The event is scheduled for Saturday, October 21st from 11:00 am-1:00 pm at Gerlinger Hall on the University of Oregon campus (Gerlinger Hall, 1468 University Street Eugene, OR 97403). So far 9 athletes are registered to take part in this fun experience, but there are open spots still available! It is open to individuals of all ages with visual impairments across the state of Oregon. Individuals with visual impairments under the age of 18 are welcome to attend, but they will need to be accompanied by a guardian.

"We are very excited to provide this Goalball Experience for individuals who are blind and visually impaired in Eugene. This event will introduce participants to the fundamentals of the sport, provide opportunities for competitive play and act as a catalyst as we begin to deliver enhanced programming in the area to people who are blind." said Founder & Executive Director Billy Henry.

Goalball is a Paralympic sport played by individuals who are blind and visually impaired. Developed after WWII as a way to keep blinded veterans physically active, it has become the premiere team game for blind athletes. Goalball is a fast paced, physically challenging, strategic and exciting game played competitively by men and women across the world.

About NWABA:
The mission of Northwest Association for Blind Athletes (NWABA) is to provide life-changing opportunities through sports and physical activity to individuals who are blind and visually impaired. A group of visually impaired students formed the Association in 2007 to ensure that people who are blind were participating in sports and physical activity. Today, NWABA is a rapidly expanding charitable organization that provides more than 1,500 children, youth, adults and military veterans with visual impairments tailored programming, which improves self-confidence and self-esteem, promotes independence, creates an inclusive community of supporters, and builds the skills necessary to succeed in all areas of life including school and employment.

For information: http://www.nwaba.org or
Contact: bhenry@nwaba.org
Phone: 1-360-718-2826

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