Emergency Reports | News Releases | Participants
Sort by: Date | Category
Eugene/Spring/Rose/Alb/Corv News Releases for Mon. Jan. 20 - 3:37 pm
Police & Fire
Missing Person Investigation Continues-- Albany Police Case # 20-00214 (Photo)
Albany Police - 01/16/20 12:36 PM
Craig Lazon
Craig Lazon
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/1192/130793/thumb_lazon.jpeg.JPG

Albany Police Detectives continue to investigate the disappearance of 37-year old Tiffany Marie Lazon.  The last reported contact with Tiffany was around December 27th at the 16th Avenue address.  Since that time family, friends and law enforcement have not had any contact with Tiffany.  Albany Police Detectives have not received any verifiable information on the whereabouts of Tiffany.

Detectives with the Albany Police Department met with Tiffany’s family to express concern over the lack of information about Tiffany’s whereabouts.  The family reiterated their concern that Tiffany would not have left Albany without valued possessions like her car, pet cat, or phone. 

On Wednesday, January 14th, 2020, Albany Police arrested Craig Lazon for Animal Neglect in the 2nd degree and Animal Abandonment, Albany Police Case # 20-321.  The animal neglect involved Tiffany Lazon’s pet cat.  Tiffany’s cat was released to Tiffany’s daughter on January 16th.

Albany Police personnel were assigned to maintain security where Tiffany Lazon had been living, at the 2628 SE 16th Avenue, until a search warrant was obtained.  On Wednesday, January 15th, a search warrant was executed at the 16th Avenue address, with the assistance of the Oregon State Police Crime Lab. 

At this time the investigation is being handled as a missing person case and death investigation.  Detectives are continuing with a rigorous investigation as leads develop.

Craig Lazon is a person of interest in this investigation and was the last and closest person with Tiffany prior to her disappearance. 

The Albany Police Department would like the public’s help by providing any relevant information regarding Tiffany Lazon’s recent or current whereabouts. 

Anyone with information regarding this case is asked to contact the Albany Police Detective Unit at 541-917-7686.

   

#  #  #




Attached Media Files: Craig Lazon

Missing Albany Woman-Albany Police Case #20-00214 (Photo)
Albany Police - 01/16/20 12:22 PM
Tiffany Lazon
Tiffany Lazon
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/1192/130688/thumb_Lazon_Tiffany.jpg

On January 8, 2020, at 7:22 p.m., Albany Police were contacted to check on the welfare of 37-year old Tiffany Marie Lazon.  A family member contacted Albany Police reporting they had not heard from Tiffany since  December 25, 2019.  Officers attempted to contact Tiffany at her residence in the 2600 block of SE 16th Avenue, Albany, and were unable to locate her.    

On January 9, 2020, at 01:26 a.m., Albany Police contacted Craig Lazon, Tiffany’s estranged husband, in Albany.  Craig Lazon did not know the current whereabouts of Tiffany Lazon and indicated Tiffany was moving to Washington.

On January 9, 2020, Albany Police entered Tiffany Lazon in the Law Enforcement Data System (“LEDS”) as a missing person.  Tiffany Lazon is reportedly 5 feet 5 inches tall and weighing 115 lbs.  She has blonde hair, blue eyes, and wears glasses.

The investigation is continuing, and no further information is available.  Anyone who’s seen Tiffany Lazon or has information on her whereabouts is asked to contact Albany Police Detectives at 541-917-7680.  




Attached Media Files: Tiffany Lazon

Douglas County Fire District No. 2 - Public Notice
Douglas Co. Fire Dist. No.2 - 01/15/20 2:22 PM

BOARD REGULAR MEETING NOTICE             

The Board of Directors of Douglas County Fire District No. 2 will hold its Regular Board meeting at DCFD#2 Fire Station 655 at 6000 Garden Valley Rd., Roseburg, OR on Tuesday, January 21, 2020 at 5:30 p.m.

The Board agenda to include but not limited to:              

  1. Monthly Financials
  2. Rescue Team Update

Winston-Dillard Fire District No. 5 - Public Notice
Douglas Co. Fire Dist. No.2 - 01/15/20 2:17 PM

BOARD MEETING  NOTICE

                         

The Board of Directors of Winston-Dillard Fire District No. 5 will hold its Regular Board meeting at their fire station, 250 SE Main St., Winston, OR on Monday, January 20, 2020 at 5:30 p.m.

The agenda to include but not limited to:

            1. Monthly Financial Report


Update: Roseburg Man Dies Following Hit & Run Wednesday Night
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/17/20 6:42 PM

UPDATE 01/17/2020 6:45 PM

ROSEBURG, Ore. - The male struck in a hit and run incident on Wednesday has died.

On the evening of Friday, January 17, 2020, the Douglas County Sheriff's Office was notified that 46 year-old Stephen Bruce Galindo of Roseburg succumbed to injuries he sustained after being struck by a car near the Buckaroo Barn in the 5000-block of NE Stephens Street. Galindo's family has been notified. 

The vehicle and driver were identified on Thursday, January 16, 2020. The investigation is ongoing and no further information will be released at this time. 

###

UPDATE 01/16/2020 5:45 PM

ROSEBURG, Ore. - On Thursday, January 16, 2020, deputies and detectives identified the vehicle involved in the hit and run incident from Wednesday evening. 

The victim remains in critical condition at Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend. 

The investigation is ongoing and no further details will be released tonight. 

###

ORIGINAL RELEASE

ROSEBURG, Ore. – Deputies are investigating a hit and run incident which occurred Wednesday which has left a man in grave condition.

On Wednesday, January 15, 2020, at 8:54 PM, dispatchers received a 9-1-1 call of a man in a wheelchair who had been struck by a car in the 5000-block of NE Stephens Street near the Buckeroo Barn. When deputies arrived, they located a 46 year-old Roseburg man, whose name is being withheld at this time, lying in the roadway suffering from critical injuries. The man had been in a motorized scooter at the time he was struck. The vehicle that had struck the man left prior to the arrival of emergency crews.

The victim was transported by ambulance to Mercy Medical Center in Roseburg and later transferred to Sacred Heart Hospital at Riverbend where he is in grave condition suffering from life-threatening injuries.

Deputies located evidence at the scene to indicate the vehicle involved was a white 2014-2016 Mazda 3. The vehicle will have right front-end damage. Anyone with information as to the vehicle or driver of the car is urged to call the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office at 541-440-4471 or email dcso.pio@co.douglas.or.us

The investigation is ongoing at this time.


Two Rescued from Cultus Lake Tuesday (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/15/20 5:30 PM
Rescue
Rescue
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/5204/130769/thumb_Resized952020011495174440.jpg

GLIDE, Ore. - On Tuesday, January 14, 2020, Douglas County Dispatch received a call from 33 year-old Brad Barron of Canyonville. Barron told dispatchers he and his wife were stranded in the snow near Cultus Lake and were in need of rescue. Cultus Lake is in Douglas County is located at 43.1188 -122.9505.

Deputies learned that Barron and his wife had left their residence and drove to Cultus Lake on Monday, January 13th. While at the lake, they began to experience vehicle problems and ended up staying the night. Over night, a large amount of snow fell which added to the complications of their trip.

Barron had walked several miles in the snow until he was able to obtain cell service and summon assistance. 

Douglas County Search and Rescue dispatched its snowcat and a tracked side-by-side. It took Search and Rescue crews approximately 9 hours to reach the stranded subjects due to the significant amount of snow and several downed trees blocking the roadway. When rescue crews arrived, both Barron and his wife were cold, but in otherwise good condition. No medical assistance was required. Search and Rescue were able to rescue the Barrons from the snow and delivered them safely to waiting family members. 

The equipment utilized in this rescue was made possible by the diligent efforts and support of the Douglas County Board of Commissioners. Sgt. Brad O'Dell said, "The equipment proved to be invaluable in this rescue. We would like to extend our thanks to the Board of Commissioners for their support of SAR and their mission."

O'Dell said this incident is a good reminder to be prepared when venturing outdoors."It is always important to prepare and plan ahead for hazardous conditions or unexpected emergencies." For additional information, please visit www.ready.gov.




Attached Media Files: Rescue , Douglas County SAR Side-By-Side

Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Tech Support Fraud (part 2) (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 01/14/20 9:00 AM
TT - Tech Support Fraud #2 - January 14, 2020 - GRAPHIC
TT - Tech Support Fraud #2 - January 14, 2020 - GRAPHIC
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/3585/130438/thumb_TT_-_Tech_Support_Fraud_#2_-_GRAPHIC.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: building a digital defense against tech support scams.  

Last week we talked about how to avoid getting scammed by people offering refunds on your digital device repair. This week we are looking at other frauds where criminals impersonate tech support agents to cash in on your computer troubles.  

Recently our friends at the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) issued a warning regarding a scam where fraudsters are tricking people into believing that they have a serious problem with their computer. They convince the victim that his computer has a virus or malware, or that bad guys have hacked his computer. Then, using high-pressure tactics, they persuade the victim to pay for tech support services that he doesn’t need in order to fix a problem that does not exist. Frequently, these scammers will ask for payment in the form of a gift card or a prepaid card or via a money transfer app.  

Two popular ways the scammer targets victims: through phone calls or pop-up warnings. In the first scenario, the criminal calls you, pretending to be from a well-known company. He tells you that there is some problem with your computer that needs fixing right away. He will ask for remote access, pretend to run a diagnostic test, and ask you to pay for fake problems. 

In the second scenario, you see a pop-up warning on your computer telling you that there is a security issue with your device. It may include logos from big, trusted tech companies. It will tell you to call a specific number to get help.  

So what should you do to protect yourself and your device? 

  • If you ever get a call that you are not expecting from someone you don’t know who says that you have a problem with your computer, hang up. It’s a scam.  

  • If you get a pop-up message on your screen saying that you have a security issue and need to call a specific number for help, ignore it.  

  • Remember that the legitimate tech companies won’t contact you unsolicited to ask for access to your computer. They also won’t ask for account passwords.  

  • Make sure all anti-virus and malware software is up-to-date on your computer. Set your system to update automatically, and, when in doubt, run a scan yourself to see if you are infected with viruses or malware.  

  • If you have what you think is a problem, try shutting down and restarting first. Sometimes that resolves the problem.  

  • If you do need computer support, go to a company that you know and trust. You should make the initial contact, preferably in person or by phone, using a publicly contact information.  

As always, if you have been a victim of this online scam or any other type of cyber fraud, report it to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your local FBI office.  




Attached Media Files: TT - Tech Support Fraud #2 - January 14, 2020 - AUDIO , TT - Tech Support Fraud #2 - January 14, 2020 - GRAPHIC

Theft Suspect Charged (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/16/20 12:10 PM
Tyson Chad Lee Sledge
Tyson Chad Lee Sledge
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/6186/130791/thumb_Sledge_mug.jpg

Case 19-25342

On December 7, 2019 the Jackson County Sheriff’s Office received a report of a Theft case involving an elderly victim under the care of an in-home care provider. The victim suffers from dementia and lives alone in the Shady Cove, Oregon area.

The investigation lead to the discovery of the care provider making multiple unauthorized cash withdrawals from the victim’s account using her ATM card at an ATM machine. The thefts occurred in October and November, 2019.

The suspect was arrested on January 10, 2020 at his home in Central Point.

The suspect is Tyson Chad Lee Sledge, DOB 04-23-88 of the 400 block of N. 1st St. Central Point, OR.

Sledge was lodged at Jackson County Jail and has been indicted by the Jackson County Grand Jury on four counts of Criminal Mistreatment First Degree, four counts of Identity Theft and one Count of Theft First Degree.

The suspect was employed by Interim Health Care. The company fully assisted in the investigation of this matter. They also notified all of their clients that the suspect worked for. It is believed Sledge may have had other clients he contracted with privately on his own. If you are concerned that you or someone you know may have been the victim of similar crimes involving this suspect, please contact Deputy Duke, Jackson County S.O. at 541-973-4126.




Attached Media Files: Tyson Chad Lee Sledge

Early Morning Fire in Lebanon Intentionally Set (Photo)
Lebanon Fire District - 01/15/20 1:55 PM
2020-01/1191/130755/IMG_0012.JPG
2020-01/1191/130755/IMG_0012.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/1191/130755/thumb_IMG_0012.JPG

An investigation into an early morning structure fire in Lebanon has determined that the fire was intentionally set. Firefighters were dispatched to a duplex under construction at 1375 S. Second Street in Lebanon at 6:06 a.m. and first arriving crews reported smoked showing from two garage bay doors. As the incident commander performed a 360-degree walkaround of the structure he encountered a civilian male exiting a rear door who appeared to be injured. An ambulance was called to the scene to evaluate the man who had suffered smoke inhalation and blunt force trauma when he fell into an open crawl space access hole while attempting to extinguish the fire. The man, who first discovered the fire and lives in a neighboring home, was transported to Samaritan Lebanon Community Hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.

Firefighters extinguished the fire and removed smoldering debris from the structure. The Lebanon Fire Marshal and Deputy Fire Marshal arrived at the scene and began an investigation into the cause and origin of the fire. Evidence examined at the scene revealed that a fire was built within the unfinished structure and spread to the nearby structural lumber and shower insert. Damage was limited to the shower insert, some wiring, and some wall studs and subflooring material. There was no electricity to the structure at the time of the fire.

Lebanon Fire Marshal Jason Bolen cautioned the public on the dangers of entering a structure believed to be on fire. “Fire can spread very rapidly, and a person can be overcome by smoke in a matter of seconds.” he said. “The best thing that a citizen can do is to call 911 immediately and stay out of the structure. If you escape the structure, do not go back inside and keep others from entering.”

If anyone has information about this fire, they are encouraged to contact the Lebanon Fire District at 541-451-1901. “At this point in time we don’t have enough information to determine if there was criminal intent or if this was a warming fire which got out of control.” said Bolen when asked about the status of the investigation. The Fire District is working in conjunction with the Lebanon Police Department on the investigation.

        

For HD Video of this and other LFD incidents, please subscribe to the Lebanon Fire District YouTube Channel at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjTxDBuPbD3DPAybCkCgEvg

For HD photos of this and other LFD incidents, please follow the Lebanon Fire District Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/LebanonFireDistrict/?ref=bookmarks

For updates on large scale incidents within the Lebanon Fire District, follow us on Twitter: @LebanonFD




Attached Media Files: 2020-01/1191/130755/IMG_0012.JPG

Lebanon Firefighters respond to early morning structure fire
Lebanon Fire District - 01/15/20 7:46 AM

Firefighters with the Lebanon Fire District responded to an early morning structure fire. The alarm came in around 6:00 am. The first arriving Battalion Chief found a duplex that was under construction and had a large volume of smoke coming from the garage doors. The fire was quickly contained and did not spread to any other strucures. There was one person transprted to a local hospital for treatment. No firefighters were injured during the incident. The cause of the fire is under investigation.


Tip of the Week for January 20 - Elk and Deer Winter Migration (Photo)
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/16/20 7:39 AM
2020-01/5490/130775/mule-deer-study-1-214x300.jpg
2020-01/5490/130775/mule-deer-study-1-214x300.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/5490/130775/thumb_mule-deer-study-1-214x300.jpg

Elk and Deer Winter Migration

The Central Oregon Coast is experiencing its seasonal cold weather. Although the weather slows down our daily commute, we are not nearly as affected as wildlife, specifically elk and deer.

Natural food sources are lean in the upper elevations in the coast range during the winter as snow falls, covering the ground. This time of year, with snow accumulation in the coast range and freezing temperatures periodically down to sea level, elk and deer may move to even lower elevations to find adequate food.

These additional movements often mean that the animals are crossing major roads both day and night which creates hazards to motorists. The Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office would like motorists and spectators to be mindful of the animal movements. If you see one deer cross in front of you, chances are there is another one behind. 

Please take into account that the animals are often stressed due to additional migration in search of food. When spectating please keep a minimum distance of 100 yards from wildlife. If the animals begin to move from your presence, don’t follow them. Oregon Revised Statute 498.006 does protect the chasing or harassing of wildlife.

 

For more information and tips, visit our web site at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and Like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.




Attached Media Files: 2020-01/5490/130775/012020-Elk_and_Deer_Migration.pdf , 2020-01/5490/130775/mule-deer-study-1-214x300.jpg

Linn County Sheriff's Office Assists in Search for Missing Woman from California (Photo)
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 01/17/20 1:31 PM
Vehicle surveillance footage 2
Vehicle surveillance footage 2
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/2993/130783/thumb_Redding_vehicle_2.png

UPDATE:  Yesterday, investigators located the van, depicted in the surveillance footage previously released, in Linn County Oregon.  Investigators also located the white male seen in surveillance and interviewed him.  He is considered a witness to Danielle Bisnell’s disappearance. 

Danielle Bisnell is still missing.  This investigation is active and ongoing. No further information will be released at this time.

Anyone with information into Danielle Bisnell’s disappearance is urged to contact Redding Police Investigations at 530-225-4200 or Shasta County Secret Witness at 530-243-2319. There is a $2,500 reward offered for any information leading to Danielle Bisnell’s whereabouts.

 

Linn County Sheriff Jim Yon reports his detectives are assisting Redding Police Department in the disappearance of a woman from California.  Danielle Renee Bisnell, (27 years old of Redding) was reported missing by family and friends on December 31st, 2019.  She has been known to frequent Northern California, Oregon, and Nevada. 

It is believed Danielle was traveling through Linn County on her way back to Redding on December 10th, 2019, when she stopped communicating with her family and friends.  Redding Police Department has shared surveillance footage of Danielle travelling with an unknown male in a mini-van.  Included is also a recent photo of Danielle. 

Anyone with information in this case, including the identity of the male and/or vehicle can contact Sergeant Danny Smetak of Redding Police Department at 530-225-4218.  If you have information and would like to remain anonymous you can also contact the Shasta County Secret Witness program at 530-243-2319.  There is a $2500 reward offered for any information leading to Danielle’s whereabouts.




Attached Media Files: Vehicle surveillance footage 2 , Vehilce surveillance footage 1 , Bisnell surveillance footage , Danielle Bisnell , Male with Bisnell

Two Search Warrants Served in Crabtree Yesterday (Photo)
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 01/16/20 12:47 PM
2020-01/2993/130794/Walter_James.jpg
2020-01/2993/130794/Walter_James.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/2993/130794/thumb_Walter_James.jpg

Sheriff Jim Yon reports the Line Team served two separate drug related search warrants yesterday around 5:30 a.m. in the community of Crabtree. 

The Linn County Regional SWAT served one search warrant at the address of 37565 Hungry Hill Drive where they detained twenty individuals.  There is a main residence, and numerous travel trailers and motorhomes where people were residing at this location.  Detectives seized methamphetamine, heroin, paraphernalia and firearms.  One of the firearms seized was confirmed to be stolen from Marion County.

After detectives from multiple agencies searched the property, eight females and eleven males were arrested on drug related crimes and were taken to the Linn County Jail.  The property owner, Steven John Maneatis, 62-years-old, was charged with Delivery of Methamphetamine, Unlawful Possession of Methamphetamine, and Felon in Possession of a Restricted Weapon.  He was additionally cited by the Linn County Building and Planning Department for multiple building code violations.

Heather Nicole Matney, 25-years-old, was charged with Delivery of Methamphetamine, Frequenting a Place Where Controlled Substances Are Used and outstanding warrants.  

Heather June Fries, 45-years-old, was charged with Delivery of Methamphetamine, Unlawful Possession of Methamphetamine (felony), Unlawful Possession of Heroin (felony) and Frequenting a Place Where Controlled Substances Are Used.

Robert Dean Jennings, 31-years-old was charged with Felon in Possession of a Firearm, Unlawful Possession of Methamphetamine (felony) and Frequenting a Place Where Controlled Substances Are Used.  Several others were charged with outstanding warrants and drug crimes.

LINE Detectives were assisted by the Marion County SWAT team in serving the second search warrant at the address of 37597 Crabtree Drive.  Detectives seized methamphetamine, paraphernalia and four firearms from the property.  Detectives arrested one female and four males on drug related crimes. 

James Walter Martin, 54-years-old, was charged with Felon in Possession of a Firearm and Unlawful Possession of Methamphetamine (felony).

Hilda Marie Kelley, 59-years-old, had a medical emergency during the search and was transported by medics to the hospital.  Charges including Delivery of Methamphetamine are pending on Kelley.

Others from both properties were charged with various other crimes, including Frequenting a Place Where Controlled Substances Are Used.  Several had outstanding warrants for their arrest unrelated to this case.

LINE detectives will continue the investigation.  




Attached Media Files: 2020-01/2993/130794/Walter_James.jpg , 2020-01/2993/130794/Matney_Heather.jpg , 2020-01/2993/130794/Maneatis_Steven.jpg , 2020-01/2993/130794/Jennings_Robert.jpg , 2020-01/2993/130794/Fries_Heather.jpg

Deputies Responding to Shots Fired Prompts SWAT Response (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/18/20 4:17 PM
K9 Zeke
K9 Zeke
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/1294/130848/thumb_K9.jpg

On January 18th, 2020, shortly before 3:00 am deputies from the Marion County Sheriff’s Office were dispatched to the report of shots fired in the 4500 block of Agate Drive SE, in the unincorporated area of Salem.  Deputies contacted multiple people near the residence and learned a male had come to the home a short time earlier and fired multiple shots in front of the residence prior to going inside.  Deputies learned the suspect was searching for someone at the residence and had pointed a handgun at another male inside the house, taking their wallet.  There were no reported injuries as a result of the shots being fired by the suspect.

The suspect, Jeffrey Jeno Garza, was reported to still be hiding inside of the home along with multiple other people.  Over the course of the next few hours, multiple additional people came out of the residence to safety.  Marion County Sheriff’s Office SWAT was activated and responded to the scene along with investigators from the Criminal Investigations Unit.

Negotiators from the Sheriff’s Office SWAT Team spent the next several hours attempting to get Garza to surrender peacefully.  After attempts to get Garza to surrender voluntarily were unsuccessful, he was ultimately located hiding in a crawl space beneath the home by a police K-9.

Garza, a 39 year-old Woodburn man, was taken to an area hospital for treatment for his injuries.  He will be lodged at the Marion County Jail for multiple charges including Robbery in the First Degree, Theft in the Second Degree, and Unlawful Use of a Weapon.




Attached Media Files: K9 Zeke , Jeffrey Jeno Garza , 2020-01/1294/130848/Negotiators.jpg , 2020-01/1294/130848/Scene_2.jpg , 2020-01/1294/130848/Scene.jpg

Medical
$5.1 million from Kaiser Permanente will house 300 Portland metro area seniors in 2020
Kaiser Permanente Northwest - 01/20/20 11:00 AM

$5.1 million from Kaiser Permanente will house 300 Portland metro area seniors in 2020

“Metro 300” initiative also kicks off new regional cross-sector investment fund

PORTLAND, Ore. – Kaiser Permanente Northwest is funding a $5.1 million project that will take an “anything necessary” approach to achieving the goal of housing 300 homeless, medically vulnerable seniors by the end of 2020.

“Without a safe, stable place to call home, it’s nearly impossible to focus on basic health and medical needs,” said Ruth Williams-Brinkley, president, Kaiser Foundation Health Plan and Hospitals of the Northwest. “This is especially true for our seniors, who are often dealing with chronic diseases and other complex health issues. Kaiser Permanente’s mission is to improve the health of the communities we serve, which is why we’re advancing bold ideas to reduce homelessness.”

Launch of Regional Supportive Housing Impact Fund

Kaiser Permanente’s $5.1 million investment in the “Metro 300” initiative will also catalyze the new Regional Supportive Housing Impact Fund, which uses an innovative approach that will make funding for housing available more quickly and efficiently. The RSHIF, which will pool contributions from health system, philanthropy and business partners, will be administered by Health Share of Oregon, a coordinated care organization that manages the state’s Medicaid resources for the Portland metro region.

With Health Share as the lead entity, the RSHIF will combine philanthropic dollars with Medicaid funds and deploy them to increase the availability of deeply affordable housing with services and to support housing stability for people with complex health needs.

By addressing a key driver of health – housing – Kaiser Permanente is working with partners to improve the health and well-being of the communities we serve, including our members. As a health care organization, Kaiser Permanente recognizes that individuals who are homeless have a higher rate of hospital re-admissions and emergency room visits while also suffering from poorer health outcomes and higher mortality rates.

“Homelessness is the number one issue facing our community, and solving it requires long-term solutions that address the underlying reasons people become and stay homeless,” said Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler. “It’s a complex problem that requires the creativity and collaboration of everyone in our community, and we appreciate that Kaiser Permanente and others in our region’s health care, philanthropic, business and government sectors are taking an active role in bringing new solutions to the table.”

Partners in the RSHIF include:

  • Cambia Health Foundation
  • CareOregon
  • Central City Concern
  • Collins Foundation
  • Health Share of Oregon
  • Kaiser Permanente
  • Legacy Health
  • Meyer Memorial Trust
  • OHSU (and Adventist, an OHSU partner)
  • Oregon Community Foundation
  • Portland Business Alliance
  • Providence Health & Services

How Metro 300 Works

This initiative is modeled on Kaiser Permanente’s successful partnership in Oakland, California, that housed 515 seniors during 2019. Health Share, as administrator of the RSHIF, will allocate the Kaiser Permanente funding to housing agencies in each county, and the agencies will deploy this flexible resource to quickly house a total of 300 homeless people.

To qualify for the Metro 300 funding, individuals will have one or more disabling conditions and/or will be referred from one or more systems of care or institutions, such as recuperative care programs, assertive community treatment, hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, coordinated entry/coordinated access waitlists, federally qualified health centers, or warming shelters.

The counties will collaborate with a network of providers to serve the 300 seniors through an “anything necessary” approach that includes housing navigation, move-in and rental assistance and ongoing supportive services to ensure ongoing permanent housing stability. The counties will track a by-name list of people served, and Health Share will analyze health utilization and outcomes as part of an evaluation of the project’s impact.

Kaiser Permanente was joined by Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler, Multnomah County Chair Deborah Kafoury and other local leaders to announce the initiative at a press conference held at Argyle Gardens — Transition Projects’ new low-income single adult housing development — during a Martin Luther King Jr. Day service project by 180 Kaiser Permanente volunteers. The  deeply affordable low-income single adult housing, funded by the State of Oregon and other partners (and unrelated to the RSHIF or Metro 300 projects), will provide more than 70 people with a safe, clean place to live, and volunteers were helping with finishing touches like painting, building garden beds and organizing a food pantry.

Kaiser Permanente’s commitment to health through housing

Safe, stable housing is essential to a person’s health, and Kaiser Permanente is leading efforts to end homelessness and preserve affordable housing by making impact investments, shaping policy and catalyzing innovation through partnerships.

Kaiser Permanente’s approach to housing includes a variety of mechanisms and is effecting change across the housing system, from ending homelessness to providing investments for affordable housing development and preservation and advocating for policy change.

Recent programs, partnerships and investments:

  • Housing for Health grant initiative: a $2.2 million investment to support nonprofits across the region in hiring traditional health workers (peer support specialists and community health workers) to help people to find, secure and maintain safe, stable housing.
  • Housing Is Health: a $4 million investment in partnership with Central City Concern and 5 other health systems to build 3 new residential buildings in Portland.
  • Commons on MLK: A $750,000 contribution to the Commons on MLK project in Eugene, a “housing first” development that will provide 51 studio apartments for the chronically homeless and medically fragile. 
  • Community clinic integration grant initiative: a $600,000 grant initiative with 10 social service organizations to address housing and other social needs of Kaiser Permanente members and the larger community, improve referrals and data sharing between social services and health care providers, and create a learning collaborative to inform a social service resource locator in the Northwest region.
  • Community network: in 2019 Kaiser Permanente launched a new social health network in Oregon and Southwest Washington that is creating connections between health care providers and social services agencies to address pressing social needs such as housing, food, safety, transportation and utilities.
  • Mayors and CEOs for Housing Investment: a coalition between Kaiser Permanente, Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler and others in “Mayors and CEOs for Housing Investment”, a coalition that is advocating at the federal level.

About Kaiser Permanente

Kaiser Permanente is committed to helping shape the future of health care. We are recognized as one of America’s leading health care providers and not-for-profit health plans. Founded in 1945, Kaiser Permanente has a mission to provide high-quality, affordable health care services and to improve the health of our members and the communities we serve. We currently serve 12.3 million members in eight states and the District of Columbia. Care for members and patients is focused on their total health and guided by their personal Permanente Medical Group physicians, specialists and team of caregivers. Our expert and caring medical teams are empowered and supported by industry-leading technology advances and tools for health promotion, disease prevention, state-of-the-art care delivery and world-class chronic disease management. Kaiser Permanente is dedicated to care innovations, clinical research, health education and the support of community health. https://about.kaiserpermanente.org/

 

 


UPDATED: MLK Day Press Event, 1/20 - Mayor Wheeler will join Kaiser Permanente to Announce New Housing Initiative
Kaiser Permanente Northwest - 01/17/20 11:31 AM

Hope to see you on Monday! The full media alert is below and I also wanted to share a few final details:

- There is a driveway on site where there will be room for 3 news trucks to park. Otherwise there is on-street parking. 

- When you arrive please come directly to the tent, there will be someone at the entry to point you in the right direction. You will also be able to go into Argyle Gardens to film the volunteer project, I'll have a waiver from the construction company for you to sign (this is a formality due to the fact that it is still technically a construction site.)

- If you plan to send someone over earlier than 9am, please let me know so I can be sure we're ready for them. 

Thanks!
Debbie

MLK DAY PRESS EVENT
Mayor Ted Wheeler and Multnomah County Chair Deborah Kafoury will join Kaiser Permanente to Announce New Portland Metro Area Housing Initiative

When:

Monday, January 20

  • 11:30 a.m.: Press briefing
  • 12:15–12:30 p.m.: Participants will be available for interviews

Where:

Argyle Gardens, 8550 N Argyle Way, Portland, OR 97217

Argyle Gardens is Transition Projects’ new Low Income Single Adult Housing Development in Kenton Neighborhood, which is opening soon.

The event will be held in a heated tent outside of the facility – there may be mud and dirt on the site, so appropriate footwear is recommended.

 

What:

 

Kaiser Permanente will announce a significant grant to help homeless seniors in Multnomah, Clackamas and Washington Counties. The grant will kick off a new larger initiative with Health Share of Oregon and other regional partners that will also be announced.

 

Visuals:

 

 

Who:

 

 

 

Background:

 

  • Argyle Gardens, the site of Kaiser Permanente’s MLK Day of Service volunteer event
  • 180 Kaiser Permanente volunteers completing a variety of projects, including painting, organizing a food pantry and building raised garden beds
  • Ted Wheeler, Mayor of Portland
  • Deborah Kafoury, Multnomah County Chair
  • Washington and Clackamas County Commissioners
  • Ruth Williams-Brinkley, President, Kaiser Health Plan and Hospitals of the Northwest

 

In recognition of the clear link between housing and health, Kaiser Permanente has made several significant investments in housing over the last four years, including:

  • A $4 million grant in 2016 as part of the unique "Housing Is Health" partnership (total of $21.5 million) with five other health care organizations and Central City Concern to address homelessness in the Portland region.
  • 2.27M in grants announced on MLK Day 2017 to help people with behavioral health challenges find and stay in housing.
  • A $750,000 contribution in 2019 to the Commons on MLK project in Eugene, a “housing first” development that will provide 51 studio apartments for the chronically homeless and medically fragile. 

This newest community investment reflects the continued need for innovative solutions and cross-sector partnerships as we look for ways to address the crisis of homelessness in our region.

Additionally, as part of Kaiser Permanente’s annual MLK Day of Service volunteer activities across the region, over 180 Kaiser Permanente employees, friends and family members will be volunteering at the new housing development by Transition Projects, where they will be painting, setting up kitchens with supplies, organizing a food pantry, cleaning, and building raised garden beds.

 

Contact:

 

Debbie Karman: 503-798-1223, bie.a.karman@kp.org">debbie.a.karman@kp.org

 


Utilities
Pacific Power crews restored service to approximately 1,000 customers last night with over 300 personnel continuing to make progress to restore remaining 500 customers  
Pacific Power - 01/20/20 10:11 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Jan. 20, 2020

Media contact: 800-570-5838

Pacific Power crews restored service to approximately 1,000 customers last night with over 300 personnel continuing to make progress to restore remaining 500 customers  

GRANTS PASS, ORE—Pacific Power restored service to approximately 1,000 customers last night– bringing the remaining customer count to approximately 500 – as crews made further progress clearing downed trees and making repairs. Damage from the destructive Jan. 16 winter storm left over 18,000 customers without service at its peak.

Pacific Power crews expect to see good restoration progress throughout today. The remaining pockets of outages are spread out from an area north of Grants Pass to south of Cave Junction, concentrated in the west side of Josephine County. Similar to previous days, repair work is taking place in difficult to reach, remote areas.  

Estimates put full restoration by the end of Tuesday or possibly Wednesday for certain individual customers with a large majority of the remaining 500 customers impacted by the winter storm outages having service returned by late Monday evening.

“We are thankful for our customers’ patience and understanding as our crews and contract personnel made steady progress over the past few days to restore service,” said David Lucas, vice president of transmission and distribution.“ 

Pacific Power encourages customers to report outages by calling 1-877-508-5088 or text OUT to 722797. Text STAT to 722797 to check the status of your outage. Customers and media representatives can also track outages of any size online. Updates will be made as new information becomes available or at least hourly at pacificpower.net/outage.

To ease the inconvenience of power outages and assist crews in restoring power, Pacific Power suggests the following tips and safety precautions:

  • Stay away from all downed power lines and utility lines. Even if the lines are not sparking, they could be energized and extremely dangerous. Call 911 and report the outage to Pacific Power at 1-877-508-5088.
  • Don’t drive over downed power lines.
  • Turn on your porch light. After crews complete repairs, they patrol the area of the power failure to see if any lights are still out
  • Check on your neighbors, especially those who may need special assistance. Also, check with others who have electricity, to see if you can visit.
  • If you have power at this time, keep mobile devices charged so that may be used in an emergency. Before anything happens, download the Pacific Power app to your smart device so you can have information readily available.
  • Remember your pets! Pets who spend a lot of time outdoors need more food in the winter because keeping warm depletes energy.
  • If you are using alternate heat or cooking sources, remember to allow plenty of ventilation. Never burn charcoal for heating or cooking indoors.
  • If you are using a generator, make sure to follow all manufacturer’s instructions. Make sure the generator is outside and not near any household air intakes. Do not connect the generator directly to your breaker box as this can create a dangerous situation for crews working on the powerlines. Instead plug essential appliances directly into the generator.

Pacific Power made additional restoration progress today returning service to approximately 1,500 customers
Pacific Power - 01/19/20 7:38 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Jan. 19, 2020

Media contact: 800-570-5838

Pacific Power made additional restoration progress today returning service to approximately 1,500 customers

GRANTS PASS, ORE—Pacific Power restored service to approximately 1,500 customers today – down from 3,000 at the beginning of the day – as crews continued to make further progress clearing downed trees and making repairs. Nearly 1,500 customers remain without power due to damaged lines and equipment from the destructive Jan. 16 winter storm that at its peak left over 18,000 customers without service.

The main challenge at this point are the hundreds of single outages spread across 60 to 70 miles with many of those single outages in outlying areas. Over 300 Pacific Power personnel will continue to work through the night and into next week to return service to all impacted customers.   

Pacific Power encourages customers to report outages by calling 1-877-508-5088 or text OUT to 722797. Text STAT to 722797 to check the status of your outage. Customers and media representatives can also track outages of any size online. Updates will be made as new information becomes available or at least hourly at pacificpower.net/outage.

To ease the inconvenience of power outages and assist crews in restoring power, Pacific Power suggests the following tips and safety precautions:

  • Stay away from all downed power lines and utility lines. Even if the lines are not sparking, they could be energized and extremely dangerous. Call 911 and report the outage to Pacific Power at 1-877-508-5088.
  • Don’t drive over downed power lines.
  • Turn on your porch light. After crews complete repairs, they patrol the area of the power failure to see if any lights are still out
  • Check on your neighbors, especially those who may need special assistance. Also, check with others who have electricity, to see if you can visit.
  • If you have power at this time, keep mobile devices charged so that may be used in an emergency. Before anything happens, download the Pacific Power app to your smart device so you can have information readily available.
  • Keep refrigerator and freezer doors closed. Most food requiring refrigeration can be kept safely in a closed refrigerator for several hours. An unopened refrigerator will keep food cold for about 4 hours. A full freezer will keep the temperature for about 48 hours. 
  • Remember your pets! Pets who spend a lot of time outdoors need more food in the winter because keeping warm depletes energy.
  • If you are using alternate heat or cooking sources, remember to allow plenty of ventilation. Never burn charcoal for heating or cooking indoors.
  • If you are using a generator, make sure to follow all manufacturer’s instructions. Make sure the generator is outside and not near any household air intakes. Do not connect the generator directly to your breaker box as this can create a dangerous situation for crews working on the powerlines. Instead plug essential appliances directly into the generator.

 


Service to nearly 3,000 Pacific Power customers in hard-hit Josephine County was restored yesterday and last night
Pacific Power - 01/19/20 10:31 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Jan. 19, 2020

Media contact: 800-570-5838

Service to nearly 3,000 Pacific Power customers in hard-hit Josephine County was restored yesterday and last night

GRANTS PASS, ORE—Pacific Power restored service to approximately 3,000 customers throughout yesterday as crews continued to make steady progress clearing downed trees and making repairs. Felled trees, blocked roads and hundreds of single outages spread across a large area have made the restoration work challenging. At its peak, more than 18,000 customers were impacted from the Jan. 16 winter storm. Approximately 3,000 customers remain without power.

“We’re thankful to all of our customers for their encouragement and understanding as our crews continue to make restoration progress in the wake of the winter storm,” said Dave Lucas, Pacific Power’s vice president of transmission and distribution. “We know how difficult it can be to go without power for an extended period. Our crews are focused on the task at hand and will continue to work around the clock to clear hazards, make repairs and restore service to our customers.”

Good weather will help aid restoration efforts today of the over 300 Pacific Power and contract personnel who are working in the area.

Pacific Power encourages customers to report outages by calling 1-877-508-5088 or text OUT to 722797. Text STAT to 722797 to check the status of your outage. Customers and media representatives can also track outages of any size online. Updates will be made as new information becomes available or at least hourly at pacificpower.net/outage.

To ease the inconvenience of power outages and assist crews in restoring power, Pacific Power suggests the following tips and safety precautions:

  • Stay away from all downed power lines and utility lines. Even if the lines are not sparking, they could be energized and extremely dangerous. Call 911 and report the outage to Pacific Power at 1-877-508-5088.
  • Don’t drive over downed power lines.
  • Turn on your porch light. After crews complete repairs, they patrol the area of the power failure to see if any lights are still out
  • Check on your neighbors, especially those who may need special assistance. Also, check with others who have electricity, to see if you can visit.
  • If you have power at this time, keep mobile devices charged so that may be used in an emergency. Before anything happens, download the Pacific Power app to your smart device so you can have information readily available.
  • Keep refrigerator and freezer doors closed. Most food requiring refrigeration can be kept safely in a closed refrigerator for several hours. An unopened refrigerator will keep food cold for about 4 hours. A full freezer will keep the temperature for about 48 hours. 
  • Remember your pets! Pets who spend a lot of time outdoors need more food in the winter because keeping warm depletes energy.
  • If you are using alternate heat or cooking sources, remember to allow plenty of ventilation. Never burn charcoal for heating or cooking indoors.
  • If you are using a generator, make sure to follow all manufacturer’s instructions. Make sure the generator is outside and not near any household air intakes. Do not connect the generator directly to your breaker box as this can create a dangerous situation for crews working on the powerlines. Instead plug essential appliances directly into the generator.

Power restorations in southern Oregon continued through the night as Pacific Power brings in additional crews to assist
Pacific Power - 01/18/20 11:20 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Jan. 18, 2020

Media contact: 800-570-5838

Power restorations in southern Oregon continued through the night as Pacific Power brings in additional crews to assist

Pacific Power has over 300 personnel working around the clock clearing downed trees and making repairs in aftermath of destructive winter storm

GRANTS PASS, ORE—Pacific Power restored power to approximately 1,900 customers during the night with additional crews and equipment coming in from across the region to assist with clearing downed trees and restoration efforts. Vegetation crews continue to focus on clearing away hundreds of felled trees and clearing debris from roads so line crews can safely make repairs to restore power to the remaining 6,000 customers impacted by the outages caused by the Jan. 16 winter storm that at its peak left more than 18,000 customers without power.

Crews have made steady progress during the night and expect to continue to restore more customers throughout today and into the evening. Restoration efforts have been hampered by the sheer number of outages spread across vast, difficult to access terrain and hundreds of felled trees.

More than 300 Pacific Power personnel and contractors are working around the clock in the area. Pacific Power estimates between 1,500 and 2,000 customers could be restored by this evening, but cautions some customers could remain without power into next week. 

Red Cross Shelters. Red Cross has opened emergency shelters in areas that are experiencing extended outages.

  • Illinois Valley High School:  625 E River St, Cave Junction, OR 97523,
  • Josephine County Fairgrounds, Pavilion Building:  1451 Fairgrounds Road, Grants Pass, OR, 97527. 

Pacific Power encourages customers to report outages by calling 1-877-508-5088 or text OUT to 722797. Text STAT to 722797 to check the status of your outage. Customers and media representatives can also track outages of any size online. Updates will be made as new information becomes available or at least hourly at pacificpower.net/outage.

To ease the inconvenience of power outages and assist crews in restoring power, Pacific Power suggests the following tips and safety precautions:

  • Stay away from all downed power lines and utility lines. Even if the lines are not sparking, they could be energized and extremely dangerous. Call 911 and report the outage to Pacific Power at 1-877-508-5088.
  • Don’t drive over downed power lines.
  • Turn on your porch light. After crews complete repairs, they patrol the area of the power failure to see if any lights are still out
  • Check on your neighbors, especially those who may need special assistance. Also, check with others who have electricity, to see if you can visit.
  • If you have power at this time, keep mobile devices charged so that may be used in an emergency. Before anything happens, download the Pacific Power app to your smart device so you can have information readily available.
  • Keep refrigerator and freezer doors closed. Most food requiring refrigeration can be kept safely in a closed refrigerator for several hours. An unopened refrigerator will keep food cold for about 4 hours. A full freezer will keep the temperature for about 48 hours. 
  • Remember your pets! Pets who spend a lot of time outdoors need more food in the winter because keeping warm depletes energy.
  • If you are using alternate heat or cooking sources, remember to allow plenty of ventilation. Never burn charcoal for heating or cooking indoors.
  • If you are using a generator, make sure to follow all manufacturer’s instructions. Make sure the generator is outside and not near any household air intakes. Do not connect the generator directly to your breaker box as this can create a dangerous situation for crews working on the powerlines. Instead plug essential appliances directly into the generator.

 


Pacific Power restoring power to southern Oregon customers after damaging snowstorm
Pacific Power - 01/17/20 3:08 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
3 p.m. Jan. 17, 2020

Media contact: 800-570-5838

Pacific Power restoring power to southern Oregon customers after damaging snowstorm
Progress is being made, but some customers may be without power through weekend

GRANTS PASS, ORE—Pacific Power crews and equipment drawn from across the Northwest are concentrated on restoring power to approximately 9,200 Pacific Power customers in southern Oregon and northern California. At peak, more than 18,000 customers were without power Thursday in the area.

Downed trees and limbs strewn across a rugged landscape are complicating the work of more than 250 Pacific Power crews and contractors working around the clock in the area on more than 200 individual outages.

Restoration work has been challenging due to the large number and geographically dispersed outages.  Especially in the remote areas where Snowcats and other special equipment are needed to deal with conditions. Crews are making steady progress now and expect to continue to restore more customers into the evening.

 The hardest hit area is Grants Pass and surrounding areas with 9,100 without power. Another 100 customer are out in Yreka and Mount Shasta, Calif.

Shelters. Pacific Power is working with the Red Cross and local emergency management to open shelters in areas that are experiencing extended outages. Shelters, where residents can get warm beverages and charge phones, are open at:

  • Illinois Valley High School:  625 E River St, Cave Junction, OR 97523,
  • Josephine County Fairgrounds:  1451 Fairgrounds Road, Grants Pass, OR, 97527. 

“We know our communities are shouldering the storm’s aftermath,” said Christina Kruger, Pacific Power’s regional business manager. “We are working with local agencies and the Red Cross to try to ease that stress and appreciate everyone’s patience as we work to get power back on as safely and quickly as possible given the challenges we can all see out there. If you know of any specific areas that are hard hit and isolated, let us know.”

Pacific Power encourages customers to report outages by calling 1-877-508-5088 or text OUT to 722797. Text STAT to 722797 to check the status of your outage. Customers and media representatives can also track outages of any size online. Updates will be made as new information becomes available or at least hourly at pacificpower.net/outage.

To ease the inconvenience of power outages and assist crews in restoring power, Pacific Power suggests the following tips and safety precautions:

  • Stay away from all downed power lines and utility lines. Even if the lines are not sparking, they could be energized and extremely dangerous. Call 911 and report the outage to Pacific Power at 1-877-508-5088.
  • Don’t drive over downed power lines.
  • Turn on your porch light. After crews complete repairs, they patrol the area of the power failure to see if any lights are still out
  • Check on your neighbors, especially those who may need special assistance. Also, check with others who have electricity, to see if you can visit.
  • If you have power at this time, keep mobile devices charged so that may be used in an emergency. Before anything happens, download the Pacific Power app to your smart device so you can have information readily available.
  • Keep refrigerator and freezer doors closed. Most food requiring refrigeration can be kept safely in a closed refrigerator for several hours. An unopened refrigerator will keep food cold for about 4 hours. A full freezer will keep the temperature for about 48 hours. 
  • Remember your pets! Pets who spend a lot of time outdoors need more food in the winter because keeping warm depletes energy.
  • If you are using alternate heat or cooking sources, remember to allow plenty of ventilation. Never burn charcoal for heating or cooking indoors.
  • If you are using a generator, make sure to follow all manufacturer’s instructions. Make sure the generator is outside and not near any household air intakes. Do not connect the generator directly to your breaker box as this can create a dangerous situation for crews working on the powerlines. Instead plug essential appliances directly into the generator.

 

###


Heavy, wet snow causes widespread outages in southern Oregon, northern California
Pacific Power - 01/16/20 5:00 PM

Contact:  Pacific Power media hotline:                                    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

                   1-800-570-5838                                                              Jan. 16, 2020

 

Heavy, wet snow causes widespread outages in southern Oregon, northern California
Pacific Power crews are working to restore power to approximately 18,000 customers and have called in additional support from outside of the area

 

GRANTS PASS, Ore. – Approximately 18,000 Pacific Power customers from Glendale to Mount Shasta to Rogue River are without power due to winter weather conditions. Additional resources and crews have been called in from outside the area to help with restoration.

 

Given the extensive storm-related damage to power lines, the number of repairs that are necessary, and persistent storm conditions, Pacific Power is working to provide estimated times for restoration. However, customers in more remote areas with significant damage should plan to remain without service through the upcoming weekend.

 

“We’re tackling a challenging restoration effort because some of the impacted facilities are located in remote, hard to access areas,” said David Lucas, Pacific Power vice president of operations. “We’re bringing in additional internal crews, contractors and equipment to help with assessing damage and continue repairs. We appreciate our customers’ patience during all of this and will give updates as more information becomes available.”

 

Communities experiencing significant outages as of 5 p.m.:

  • Grants Pass and nearby communities, 15,000
  • Mt. Shasta/Yreka, 1,400
  • Medford and nearby communities, 700

 

Crews have been working non-stop since the storm began early Thursday morning, assessing damage and making repairs. Crews often have to cut their way through downed trees into many of the trouble spots. Approximately 120 crew members are at work on more than 200 outages. However, heavy snow is still causing more road closures, more trees to fall and additional damage to power lines. Crews are working as quickly and safely as possible to restore power.

 

Pacific Power is coordinating with local emergency agencies and the Red Cross to potentially open warming centers in coming days. The company will share that information as it becomes available.

 

Pacific Power encourages customers to report outages by calling 1-877-508-5088 or text OUT to 722797. Text STAT to 722797 to check the status of your outage. Customers and media representatives can also track outages of any size online. Updates will be made as new information becomes available or at least hourly at pacificpower.net/outage.

 

To ease the inconvenience of power outages and assist crews in restoring power, Pacific Power suggests the following tips and safety precautions:
 

  • Stay away from all downed power lines and utility lines. Even if the lines are not sparking, they could be energized and extremely dangerous. Call 911 and report the outage to Pacific Power at 1-877-508-5088.
  • Don’t drive over downed power lines.
  • Turn on your porch light. After crews complete repairs, they patrol the area of the power failure to see if any lights are still out
  • Check on your neighbors, especially those who may need special assistance. Also, check with others who have electricity, to see if you can visit.
  • If you have power at this time, keep mobile devices charged so that may be used in an emergency. Before anything happens, download the Pacific Power app to your smart device so you can have information readily available.

 

Pacific Power also thanks customers in advance for their patience as we work to restore power. Crews make every effort to keep outage durations to a minimum and to restore power safely and quickly.

 

 

-30-

 


Transportation
High winds force clean-up crews out of High Cascades area (Photo)
ODOT: SW Oregon - 01/15/20 2:59 PM
2020-01/1202/130764/Oregon_230_near_JacksonDouglasCo_Line_Jan15_2020.JPG
2020-01/1202/130764/Oregon_230_near_JacksonDouglasCo_Line_Jan15_2020.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/1202/130764/thumb_Oregon_230_near_JacksonDouglasCo_Line_Jan15_2020.JPG

UNION CREEK -  High winds pushed crews out of the High Cascades closure area this afternoon.

Due to the hazard to public and crew safety, the Oregon 62 closure is back to Prospect from Union Creek. These winds have halted progress for the day due to hazard trees. Crews will re-evaluate in the morning. But with another foot of snow in the forecast tonight and tomorrow, clean-up work will be evaluated day by day.

Current High Cascade closures:

  • Highway 138 closed from Toketee to U.S. 97
  • Oregon 62/230 closed at Prospect



Attached Media Files: 2020-01/1202/130764/BlowingnearUnionCreek.JPEG , 2020-01/1202/130764/Oregon_230_near_JacksonDouglasCo_Line_Jan15_2020.JPG , 2020-01/1202/130764/BlowerClearingOR138_230JunctionNearDiamondLake_Jan152020.JPG

Oregon 138E closure extended west to Dry Creek (Photo)
ODOT: SW Oregon - 01/14/20 7:50 AM
2020-01/1202/130701/LoggersPickUp_18inchTreeFall_noInjury_OR62MP58_Jan13_2020.jpg
2020-01/1202/130701/LoggersPickUp_18inchTreeFall_noInjury_OR62MP58_Jan13_2020.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/1202/130701/thumb_LoggersPickUp_18inchTreeFall_noInjury_OR62MP58_Jan13_2020.jpg

GLIDE - Oregon 138E closure, 30 miles east of Glide: Due to slides and fallen trees, the closure has moved west to MP 47 at Dry Creek.
Crews are evaluating the corridor this morning. As conditions permit, their plan is to shorten the closures and re-establish the connection between Diamond Lake and U.S. 97. and on Oregon 62 from Prospect to Union Creek.

There have been several reported near misses in the area from falling trees, including an 18 inch tree that fell on a loggers pick-up yesterday near Union Creek. No injuries have been reported 

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-01/1202/130701/LoggersPickUp_18inchTreeFall_noInjury_OR62MP58_Jan13_2020.jpg , 2020-01/1202/130701/OR138East_Jan14_2020.jpg

Federal
BLM Releases Final Western Oregon Tribal Fairness Act Decision
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 01/17/20 11:38 AM

Portland, Ore. – Today the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) released the Decision Record for the reclassification of public domain lands as part in one of the final steps of the implementation of the Western Oregon Tribal Fairness Act.

The Act, signed into law by President Trump on January 8, 2018, directed the BLM to transfer 14,708 acres of public lands to be held in trust for the benefit of the Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua, and Siuslaw Indians, and 17,812 acres to be held in trust for the benefit of the Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians. Of these conveyed lands, 31,132 acres were lands managed under the Oregon and California Lands (O&C lands) Act of 1937.

In addition to transferring these lands into trust for the Tribes, the Act also required the BLM to identify and convert public domain lands to replace the conveyed O&C lands. Reclassifying these lands as O&C lands will allow 18 western Oregon counties to share in a portion of receipts from timber sales on these lands.

The selected alternative in the Decision Record ensures that BLM will meet the requirements of the law by converting lands of approximately equal acreage and condition. This will ensure that these converted lands have the potential to provide approximately equal timber receipt payments to O&C counties as the conveyed O&C lands would have.

The selected alternative will also reclassify plots to best match the condition of the conveyed O&C lands that were transferred to the tribes. This means that the selected alternative will also match the estimated average annual payments to O&C counties from timber sales on reclassified lands that the O&C counties would have received from timber sales on the conveyed tribal lands.

The reclassification of public domain lands to O&C lands does not change the management of the land, which is governed by the 2016 Northwestern and Coastal Oregon Resource Management Plan and the Southwestern Oregon Resource Management Plan. Additional information about the effort is available online at: https://www.blm.gov/oregon-washington/serving-america/western-oregon-tribal-fairness-act

-BLM-

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. Diverse activities authorized on these lands generated $96 billion in sales of goods and services throughout the American economy in fiscal year 2017. These activities supported more than 468,000 jobs.

 


BLM takes steps to improve administration of grazing regulations on public lands
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 01/17/20 11:00 AM

Public scoping meetings scheduled on proposals covering nearly 18,000 permits, leases on 155 million acres

WASHINGTON – The Bureau of Land Management has published a Notice of Intent in the Federal Register to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement to consider proposed revisions to the agency’s grazing regulations. The BLM currently manages livestock grazing on 155 million of the 245 million acres of public land and administers nearly 18,000 grazing permits and leases.

“Administration of sustainable livestock grazing on public lands is a key part of the Bureau of Land Management’s multiple-use mission. We continue to seek ways to improve and streamline the grazing permit process to achieve greater efficiencies and service to permittees,” said Acting Assistant Secretary of Land and Minerals Management Casey B. Hammond. “This rulemaking effort is designed to strengthen and improve our administration of grazing permits across the West, and we welcome public and stakeholder ideas and perspectives.”

The proposed revisions will update, modernize and streamline the grazing regulations and provide greater flexibility for land and resource management. Through this rulemaking, the BLM seeks to improve existing land-use planning and grazing permitting procedures, while simultaneously promoting public lands conservation. The BLM hopes to improve its stewardship of the nation’s rangeland resources by strengthening controls to prevent unauthorized grazing, enhancing environmental protections across various non-grazing land-use programs, and improving public input opportunities.

The BLM is currently managing 11 demonstration projects in six states as part of our outcome-based grazing authorizations initiative. These demonstration projects provide BLM, working in partnership with ranchers and other partners, with opportunities to improve our guidance and best management practices to use when issuing grazing permits. Lessons learned from developing cooperative monitoring plans and land health evaluations under this initiative may also be incorporated into this regulatory process.

By publishing this Notice of Intent, the BLM is informing the public about the proposed revisions and how interested parties can comment. Public scoping meetings will be held in in February to further inform the public about this project. These meetings include:

  • Miles City, Montana: February 6, at the Sleep Inn and Suites, 1006 S. Haynes Ave., from 4:30-7:30 p.m.;
  • Las Cruces, New Mexico: February 11 at the Las Palmas Grill, 201 East University Ave., from 4:30-7:30 p.m.;
  • Elko, Nevada: February 18 at the Elko Convention Center, 700 Moren Way, from 4:30-7:30 p.m.; and
  • Casper, Wyoming: February 20, at the Casper Events Center, 1 Events Dr., from 4:30-7:30 p.m.

Comments on the proposed regulation revisions may be submitted in writing until Feb. 28, 2020. Meeting information, announcements, instructions on how to provide comments, and pertinent documents can be found at the BLM website at https://go.usa.gov/xyMqb.

For more information, contact Seth Flanigan, BLM Project Manager, at 208-384-3450 or sflanigan@blm.gov.

-BLM-

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. Diverse activities authorized on these lands generated $96 billion in sales of goods and services throughout the American economy in fiscal year 2017. These activities supported more than 468,000 jobs. 

 


BLM Announces Upcoming Fee-Free Days on Public Lands in 2020
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 01/16/20 4:26 PM

WASHINGTON – To encourage visitation and appreciation for America’s public lands, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) announced that it will waive recreation-related visitor’s fees during five 2020 Fee-Free Days. On these five days, recreation-related fees for all visitors to agency-managed public lands across the nation will be waived.

“One of the greatest assets we have in this country is our public lands,” says Deputy Director of Policy and Programs for the BLM, William Perry Pendley, exercising the authority of the BLM Director. “With our fee-free days, we hope that Americans will get outside to enjoy these national treasures – the 245 million acres of public lands across our nation, most of which are in the West and Alaska.”   

The Fee-Free Days for 2020 are: January 20 (Martin Luther King, Jr. Day), February 17 (President’s Day),   June 13 (National Get Outdoors Day), September 26 (National Public Lands Day), and November 11 (Veterans Day).

BLM-managed public lands offer a wide array of recreational opportunities, including hiking, hunting, fishing, camping, mountain biking, horseback riding, boating, whitewater rafting, off-highway vehicle driving, rock climbing, and more. Americans make approximately 67 million visits annually to BLM-managed lands, supporting approximately 48,000 jobs nationwide and contributing almost $7 billion to the U.S. economy.

On fee-free days, site-specific standard amenity and day-use fees at BLM recreation sites and areas will be waived for the specified dates. Other fees, such as overnight camping, cabin rentals, group day use, and use of special areas, will remain in effect.

For more information on recreation opportunities on BLM-managed public lands, visit https://www.blm.gov/programs/recreation or www.recreation.gov


State
DPSST Corrections Policy Committee Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 01/17/20 8:18 AM

For Immediate Release                                        

January 16, 2020

Contact:       Mona Riesterer
                    503-378-2431

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Correction Policy Committee will hold a regular meeting at 1:30 p.m. on February 11, 2020.  The meeting will be held in the Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

Meeting will be live streamed to DPSST Facebook Page

https://www.facebook.com/DPSSTOregon/

Agenda Items:

1.  Introductions

2.  Approval of November 11, 2019 Meeting Minutes

3.  Administrative Closures: Corrections and Parole & Probation

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

4.  Matson, Christopher DPSST #60104: Application for Training & Subsequent Certification – Department of Corrections (TRCI)

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

5.  Randleas, Lucas DPSST #60182: Application for Training & Subsequent Certification – Grant County Sheriff’s Office

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

6.  Rich, Jackson DPSST #60438: Application for Training & Subsequent Certification – Josephine County Sheriff’s Office

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

7.  Thomason, Timathy DPSST #54396: Basic Corrections Certifications – Department of Corrections (TRCI)

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

8.  Ruiz, Juan DPSST #60370: Application for Training & Subsequent Certification – Department of Corrections (OSP)

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

9.  Ingram, Trent DPSST #60342: Application for Training & Subsequent Certification – Department of Corrections (EOCI)

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

10. Vines, Christopher DPSST #60273: Application for Training & Subsequent Certification – Department of Corrections (SRCI)

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

11. Lindsey, Devon DPSST #56903: Basic Corrections Certification – Douglas County Sheriff’s Office

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

12. Proposed Rule Changes for OAR 259-008-0005, 259-008-0020, 259-008-0025 and 259-008-0085: Establishing a Firearms Training Requirement for Armed Parole and Probation Officers

Presented by Jennifer Howald

13. Five-Year Review of the Adoption of OAR 259-008-0078 – Informational Only

Presented by Jennifer Howald

14. Department Update

15. Next Regularly Scheduled Meeting – May 12, 2020 at 1:30 p.m.

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Corrections Policy Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Patricia Patrick-Joling, public member, serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.

 

 


DPSST Telecommunications Policy Committee Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 01/17/20 7:57 AM

For Immediate Release                                        

January 16, 2020

Contact:        Mona Riesterer  
                     503-378-2431

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Telecommunication Policy Committee will hold a regular meeting at February 5, 2020 @ 9:00 a.m.  The meeting will be held in the Governor Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom.  The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

 

 Meeting will be live streamed to DPSST Facebook Page

https://www.facebook.com/DPSSTOregon/

Agenda Items:

1.  Introductions

2.  Minutes of November 6, 2019 Meeting
Approve Minutes of November 6, 2019 Meeting

3.  Administrative Closures – Emergency Medical Dispatcher

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

4.  Elliott, Heidi DPSST #59214: Application for Training and Subsequent Certifications – American Medical Response

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

5.  Coyne, Kinsey DPSST #55676: Basic Telecommunicator and Basic Emergency Medical Dispatcher Certifications – Washington County Consolidated Communications

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

6.  Downing, Michael DPSST #49155: Basic Telecommunicator and Emergency Medical Dispatcher Certifications – Baker County Sheriff’s Office

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

7.  Haltom, Angela DPSST #53236: Basic Telecommunicator and Emergency Medical Dispatcher Certifications – Harney County Sheriff’s Office

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

8.  Parker, Andrea DPSST #38668: Basic Telecommunicator and Emergency Medical Dispatcher Certifications – Prineville Police Department

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

9.  Proposed Rule Changes for 259-008-0064: Adding First Aid and CPR Certification Requirements to DPSST Telecommunicator and EMD Maintenance

Presented by Jennifer Howald

10. Proposed Rule Changes for 259-008-0064: Recommended Housekeeping Amendments for Telecommunicator and EMD Maintenance

Presented by Jennifer Howald

11. Five-Year Review of the Adoption of OAR 259-008-0078 – Informational Update

Presented by Jennifer Howald

12. Staff Update

13. Next Telecommunications Policy Committee Meeting May 6, 2020
Wednesday, May 6, 2020 at 9:00 a.m.

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Patricia Patrick-Joling, public member, serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.


Betty LaDuke's "Bountiful Harvest: Celebrating Oregon's Farm Workers" to be exhibited in the Governor's Office--Feb 3 - April 2 (Photo)
Oregon Arts Commission - 01/14/20 10:42 AM
“Pear Harvest,” 2012, Acrylic on plywood, 63 x 48 inches. Photo Robert Jaffe.
“Pear Harvest,” 2012, Acrylic on plywood, 63 x 48 inches. Photo Robert Jaffe.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/1418/130708/thumb_LaDuke_Oregon_Pear_Harvest_Ladder_postcard.jpg

Salem, Oregon – Ashland artist Betty LaDuke will exhibit “Bountiful Harvest: Celebrating Oregon’s Farm Workers” in the Governor’s Office of the Capitol Building in Salem from Feb. 3 to April 2.

LaDuke’s brightly colored and richly patterned paintings on shaped wood panels celebrate Oregon’s agricultural bounty and the individuals who labor to grow and harvest it. To create these works, the artist spends many hours in the fields sketching and connecting with migrant workers on Southern Oregon farms, vineyards and orchards. Later, in the studio, LaDuke transforms her sketches into energetic imagery that dignifies the migrant farm workers and their important labor.

Throughout LaDuke’s long artistic career she has created artwork inspired by the experiences of women, agrarian workers and tradespeople, and by folk art traditions, in places around the world. Writes curator Bonnie Laing-Malcolmson: “Her work asks the viewer to value and celebrate the beauty of other cultures, while recognizing humanity’s enduring hardships.” In “Bountiful Harvest,” the artist turns our attention to the lives of people closer to home—to the Latinx farmworkers who harvest Southern Oregon’s fertile lands. The works in the exhibition also can be found in the artist’s publication, “Bountiful Harvest: From Land to Table,” published in 2016 by White Cloud Press.

Born in the Bronx, New York, to Russian and Polish immigrant parents, LaDuke’s artistic training began at age 9 while attending the Workers Children’s Camp (Wo-Chi-Ca), under the tutelage of art program directors and African American artists Charles White and Elizabeth Catlett. By her teen years she was sketching stylized portraits of street vendors in New York City. Scholarships in the early 1950s brought LaDuke to the University of Denver, the Cleveland Institute of Art and the Instituto Allende in San Miguel, Mexico. Her time in Mexico, where she met Mexican modernists Rufino Tamayo, Diego Rivera and David Alfaro Siqueiros, and was first introduced to indigenous cultures, was a formative period. Back in the United States, LaDuke began to teach while continuing her studio practice, and in 1963 completed her master’s degree in printmaking at California State University (Los Angeles). In 1964 LaDuke moved to Oregon, accepting a position in the art department at Southern Oregon University (SOU) where she taught for 32 years.

Throughout LaDuke’s career, she has published films, articles and books, lectured and presented across the United States and internationally, and published her artwork on book and journal covers, while continuously developing and extensively exhibiting new work around socially-engaged multicultural themes. LaDuke has received numerous awards and special recognition for her artwork, scholarship, philanthropy and dedication to justice, peace and social change. These include the Oregon Governor’s Arts Award in 1993 and the 2019 Oregon Arts Medallion presented by the Oregon Center for the Arts at SOU. Regionally, her artwork can be found in public collections such as the Portland Art Museum, the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (Eugene), Oregon State University (Corvallis), the Hallie Ford Museum of Art (Salem), Schneider Art Museum (Ashland) and SOU, and permanent displays including one at the Rogue Valley International Airport (Medford). A retrospective exhibition featuring the breadth of LaDuke’s artistic work was first mounted at the Schneider Museum of Art in 2013, and has also traveled to the Brauer Art Museum, Valparaiso University (Valparaiso, Indiana), the Coos Art Museum (Coos Bay) and elsewhere. LaDuke’s current work centers around issues related to borders, immigration and social justice, both in her “Bountiful Harvest” series and in the circulating exhibition portfolio “Social Justice Revisited: Remembering, Reliving, Resisting.”

The Art in the Governor’s Office Program honors selected artists in Oregon with exhibitions in the reception area of the Governor’s Office in the State Capitol. Artists are nominated by a statewide committee of arts professionals who consider artists representing the breadth and diversity of artistic practice across Oregon, and are then selected by the Arts Commission with the participation of the Governor’s Office. Only professional, living Oregon artists are considered and an exhibit in the Governor’s office is regarded as a “once in a lifetime” honor. Artists whose work has previously been shown in the Governor’s office include Henk Pander, Michele Russo, Manuel Izquierdo, James Lavadour, Margot Thompson, Gordon Gilkey and Yuji Hiratsuka.

                   

The Oregon Arts Commission provides leadership, funding and arts programs through its grants, special initiatives and services. Nine commissioners, appointed by the Governor, determine arts needs and establish policies for public support of the arts. The Arts Commission became part of Business Oregon (formerly Oregon Economic and Community Development Department) in 1993, in recognition of the expanding role the arts play in the broader social, economic and educational arenas of Oregon communities. In 2003, the Oregon legislature moved the operations of the Oregon Cultural Trust to the Arts Commission, streamlining operations and making use of the Commission’s expertise in grantmaking, arts and cultural information and community cultural development. 

The Arts Commission is supported with general funds appropriated by the Oregon legislature and with federal funds from the National Endowment for the Arts as well as funds from the Oregon Cultural Trust. More information about the Oregon Arts Commission is available online at: www.oregonartscommission.org.




Attached Media Files: “Pear Harvest,” 2012, Acrylic on plywood, 63 x 48 inches. Photo Robert Jaffe.

Oregon Department of Human Services Hosts Stakeholder Meeting
Oregon Department of Human Services - 01/15/20 4:43 PM

(SALEM, Oregon) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (DHS) will host its

quarterly stakeholder meeting on January 22, 2020 in Salem. Join us in person or

online.

DHS Director Fariborz Pakseresht, along with the agency’s Executive Leadership

Team, will present brief agency and program division updates followed by a

question-and-answer period.

Updates will be provided on each of the agency’s program divisions: Aging and

People with Disabilities, Child Welfare, the Office of Developmental Disabilities,

Self-Sufficiency Programs, Vocational Rehabilitation, and Central and Shared

Services (Business Operations).

Date: Wed., January 22, 2020

Time: 2 to 3:30 p.m.

Participate:

· In-Person: Barbara Roberts Human Services Building, Room 137 B-D, 500

Summer Street NE, Salem

· Online: Join from any PC or mobile device browser using this link:

https://joinnoam.broadcast.skype.com/dhsoha.state.or.us/8516c6dcdf024d3d9e4a36110476f5d9

Follow along on Twitter by using #ORDHSforum.

Learn more about the services DHS offers: www.oregon.gov/dhs


Lori Graham appointed interim administrator of the Oregon Building Codes Division
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 01/15/20 2:48 PM

(Salem) –Lori Graham has been appointed as the interim administrator for the Oregon Building Codes Division by the Department of Consumer and Business Services, of which building codes is a part. Building Codes Division Director, Mark Long, announced his resignation recently to pursue a new career opportunity.

“Lori is a strong team builder with 20 years’ experience in building code issues,” said Lou Savage, acting director of DCBS.

Graham began her career in the building code industry in 1993 working with accessibility and plumbing codes at the Washington State Building Code Council.  In that role, she worked with the United States Department of Justice to establish the first building code in the nation to be certified as equivalent to Title III of the Americans with Disability Act Accessibility Guidelines.

In 1998, Graham joined the Portland Bureau of Development Services focusing on building codes and land use policy and was the liaison to the legislature for building code issues. She was with the Portland Bureau of Development Services for 10 years before joining the Oregon Building Codes Division to manage the ePermitting program. She later became the policy manager for the Policy and Codes Program. Graham was with building codes for 5 years before accepting her current position as Operations Division Manager with the Workers’ Compensation Division in 2013.

“I’m honored to work with the highly-skilled team at the Building Codes Division to facilitate a successful transition,” said Graham.

Graham will serve as the interim administrator until the permanent administrator has been hired. She will not seek the position.

###

About BCD: The Building Codes Division adopts statewide construction standards, which ensure a uniform and predictable regulatory environment in Oregon. For more information, visit www.oregon.gov/bcd.

About DCBS: The Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov. Follow DCBS on Twitter: twitter.com/OregonDCBS. Receive consumer help and information on insurance, mortgages, investments, workplace safety, and more.




Attached Media Files: Building Codes Division Leadership Transition

***Update - Back in Custody***Adult in custody walks away from Mill Creek Correctional Facility work crew (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 01/17/20 2:49 PM
Timofey Erofeeff
Timofey Erofeeff
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/1070/130829/thumb_Erofeeff_T.jpg

UPDATE

An adult in custody (AIC) who walked away earlier today from a Mill Creek Correctional Facility work crew is now back in custody.

Law enforcement officials arrested Timofey Erofeeff today at approximately 2:30 p.m. in Salem.

 

A Mill Creek Correctional Facility (MCCF) adult in custody (AIC) walked away from a work crew this afternoon. The crew was working near Salem’s Pringle Park. The Oregon State Police and the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) are investigating.

Staff discovered AIC Timofey Erofeeff missing from a work crew near Pringle Park, last seen heading towards Bellevue and Church Street at approximately 12:15 p.m. Erofeeff is a 29-year-old Caucasian male, 5 feet 10 inches tall, 185 pounds, with brown hair and brown eyes. Erofeeff was last seen wearing blue denim jeans and a navy-blue sweatshirt.

Erofeeff entered DOC custody on June 25, 2018, on two counts of burglary in the first degree out of Clackamas County, one count attempted burglary in the first degree, and one count eluding police out of Clatsop County. His earliest release date is January 2, 2021.

Anyone with information regarding his whereabouts is asked to call the Oregon State Police at 1-800-452-7888.

MCCF is an unfenced, minimum-security prison in Salem that houses approximately 290 adults in custody who are within four years of release. The facility concentrates on work opportunities, most of which are in the form of work crews contracting with state agencies, local organizations, and private industries within a 60-mile radius of Salem. MCCF opened in 1929 as the Farm Annex of the Oregon State Penitentiary, housing 50 individuals. The Farm Annex provided all of the milk, eggs, meat, fruit, and vegetables for the Oregon State Penitentiary and the State Hospital. The main building (as well as many of the out buildings that made up the farm) still stands today and, at 81 years old, it makes for the second oldest prison in the state.   


###




Attached Media Files: Timofey Erofeeff

Smoke Management Advisory Committee to meet in Salem on Jan. 30
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 01/17/20 11:44 AM

SALEM, Ore. — Oregon’s Smoke Management Advisory Committee will meet Jan. 30, 2020 in Salem. On the agenda are:

  • reports from the Department of Environmental Quality and ODF’s Protection Division
  • a summary of prescribed burning in 2019
  • a summary of smoke intrusions and incidents
  • a budget and fund balance update
  • an update on data systems
  • an update on the smoke management plan implementation, including community response plans.

In addition, the committee will discuss key performance measures.

The public is invited to attend and there will be a period for public comment in the morning. The meeting is in the Tillamook Room in Building C on the campus of the Oregon Department of Forestry, 2600 State Street in Salem. It will last from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. The meeting space is accessible to persons with disabilities. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting by contacting Shauna Morris at 503-945-7529.

Created by the Legislature in 1989, the five-member committee assists and advises the Oregon Department of Forestry in carrying out its Smoke Management Program. Members are appointed by the State Forester to serve a two-year term, which is renewable.

                                                                                    # # #


Be part of the state forests conversation: Advisory Committee seeks members
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 01/14/20 3:00 PM

Salem, Ore. -- A committee advising Oregon Department of Forestry staff on forest operations, projects and activities is currently seeking applications to fill a vacancy.

Formed in 2001, the State Forests Advisory Committee provides input on the implementation of the Northwest Oregon State Forest Management Plan. The committee represents a diverse range of forestry interests and serves as a forum to discuss agency opportunities for achieving forest management goals in these areas.

The committee specifically covers issues related to ODF district Annual Operations Plans, best practices for balancing a range of forest benefits, strategies for improving public outreach and participation, and other technical forest management topics.

ODF is seeking applicants to fill a non-affiliated position on the advisory board. The new member will serve a three-year term beginning in March 2020.

“This is an opportunity for Oregonians to take a seat at the table of today’s forestry conversation and provide insight and perspectives on how we are implementing the forest management plan. We look forward to hosting a diverse and experienced committee in the coming months,” said Andy White, Northwest Oregon Area Director for the Oregon Department of Forestry.

SFAC members attend three meetings per year and a summer field tour, and agendas are usually scheduled from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.   

To apply, complete a questionnaire by Feb. 7, 2020 and submit to April Davis at the Oregon Department of Forestry by email to il.r.davis@oregon.gov">april.r.davis@oregon.gov or mail to 801 Gales Creek Road, Forest Grove, OR 97116.

For specific questions about the committee, please contact Andy White at 503-359-7496 or ew.t.white@oregon.gov">andrew.t.white@oregon.gov. Additional SFAC background information can be found here (http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/SFAC.aspx).


Oregon's Operators of the Year named (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 01/14/20 12:01 PM
Jim Gahlsdorf, owner of Gahlsdorf Logging Inc. and new Operator of the Year for Northwest Oregon
Jim Gahlsdorf, owner of Gahlsdorf Logging Inc. and new Operator of the Year for Northwest Oregon
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/1072/130709/thumb_Jim_Gahlsdorf.png

SALEM, Ore. – Three Oregon loggers representing southwest, northwest and eastern Oregon have been chosen as 2019 Operators of the Year. The Oregon Board of Forestry will honor the recipients at its March 4 meeting in Salem. The awardees are:

  • Southwest Oregon – Pacific Forest Contractors, Inc., of Eagle Creek
  • Eastern Oregon – Steve Jackson of Steve Jackson Logging based in Ridgefield, Wash.
  • Northwest Oregon – Jim Gahlsdorf of Gahlsdorf Logging Inc., in Rickreall

The Board gives the Operator of the Year Awards to recognize those who, while harvesting timber or doing other forestry work, protect natural resources at a level that goes above and beyond requirements of the Oregon Forest Practices Act. That law requires people to manage forests responsibly and protect streams and water quality, protect and enhance habitat, and reduce landslide risks. The law also requires landowners to replant forests after harvesting. The awards honor operators who consistently meet or exceed Forest Practices Act regulations. Videos about each of the three Operators of the Year and the Merit Award winner C + C Logging can be viewed on the ODF website at  https://www.oregon.gov/odf/Working/Pages/default.aspx

Private Forests Division Chief Kyle Abraham said, “These operators have shown an outstanding ability to harvest the wood products Oregon and the nation need while protecting natural resources. We’re pleased to honor the care and diligence they exercise to protect soil and water during harvest operations, often in challenging circumstances.”

Pacific Forest Contractors of Eagle Creek was recognized as Operator of the Year for Southwest Oregon. They successfully harvested a unit severely damaged by a late winter snowstorm in 2019. Heavy snow bent many of the trees in a hazardous, helter-skelter pattern. There was only a narrow window

of time to harvest before summer fire restrictions would have curtailed logging. Crews also did an outstanding job of protecting trees bordering a salmon-bearing stream, lifting logs up and sending them via rigging across the stream over the tops of retained trees.

Steve Jackson earned the Eastern Oregon Operator of the Year award for a careful harvest along a scenic roadway in Hood River County leading to popular hiking trails. Jackson protected multiple pockets of young trees, jump starting natural regeneration on the steep slopes.  He was able to fell trees near an upper fork of the Hood River without harming trees in the protective buffer. And at the request of the U.S. Forest Service he also removed hazardous, non-merchantable trees along the roadside to improve public safety. The award also recognizes Jackson for decades of consistently applying best management practices to safeguard forest resources, even under challenging circumstances.

Jim Gahlsdorf, owner of Gahlsdorf Logging Inc., based in Polk County earned the Northwest Oregon Operator of the Year award for minimizing soil disturbance by using an elaborate rigging system that lifted logs off the ground and over a high ridge to the yarder landing. The operation was in a steep, remote part of the Coast Range during fire season, which prompted the owner to take extra firefighting precautions.

The Northwest Oregon Regional Forest Practices Committee also issued a Merit Award to C and C Logging for the firm’s safety consciousness and innovative use of technology, including using a drone to carry line into areas of fallen timber.

Regional Forest Practices committees select the operators of the year and merit award recipients from among nominees sent in by landowners, ODF staff and others.

In addition to the honors at the March Board meeting, special recognition is also provided at the Associated Oregon Loggers training and education event in January and the Oregon Logging Conference in February.

Oregon enacted the Forest Practices Act in 1971 as a national model for forest management laws. The law focuses on ensuring responsible forest operations and protecting natural resources in forestland. The Act has been updated many times based on new scientific information and values to create a balanced approach to natural resource management.

                                                                                                      # # #




Attached Media Files: Jim Gahlsdorf, owner of Gahlsdorf Logging Inc. and new Operator of the Year for Northwest Oregon , Alex Davis, co-owner of Pacific Forest Contractors, Inc., the new Operator of the Year for Southwest Oregon

2020 tax season opens January 27
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 01/15/20 11:07 AM

The Oregon Department of Revenue will begin processing state tax returns on January 27, the same day the IRS will begin processing federal returns. Taxpayers can submit their returns earlier, but processing won’t start until the tax season officially begins.

Once processing begins, returns will be processed in the order received. However, the Oregon Department of Revenue won’t be issuing personal income tax refunds until after February 15. This refund hold is part of the state’s tax fraud prevention activities and will allow confirmation that the amounts claimed on returns matches what employers report on forms W-2 and 1099. The IRS is also holding federal tax refunds until after February 15, but only for those taxpayers claiming the Earned Income Tax Credit or the Additional Child Tax Credit.

Federal changes from the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act directly impact Oregon’s personal income tax, including changes to calculating withholding allowances for tax year 2019. This may mean that more taxpayers have a tax to pay or may have more tax to pay than usual. The department encourages taxpayers to use its online withholding calculator to check their state withholding, so they can make any necessary changes to 2020 withholding. Also, because of these federal tax changes, Oregon now has its own W-4 called Form OR-W-4. Taxpayers can request the new form from their employer or download it at www.oregon.gov/dor, fill it out and return it to their employer.

It’s important to note that beginning January 1, 2020, any changes to your state withholding must be made using Form OR-W-4 because Oregon withholding is calculated using allowances, unlike the federal form.

Here are a few other things for taxpayers to keep in mind this tax season:

  • E-filing is the fastest way to get your tax refund. On average, taxpayers who e-file their returns and request their refund via direct deposit receive their refund sooner than those who file paper returns and request paper refund checks.
  • There are many free or low-cost preparation options available for both federal and Oregon tax returns.
    • Some software companies offer free software use and e-filing for eligible taxpayers. Be sure to access the software through the department's website, or the company may not allow you to take advantage of the free offer.
    • AARP and CASH Oregon provide free and low-cost tax preparation services throughout local communities.
    • All Oregon taxpayers preparing their own return can file electronically at no cost using Oregon’s free fillable forms.

For more information, visit www.oregon.gov/dor and click on “Free tax preparation services” under “More Topics” on the department’s homepage.

  • Taxpayers can order copies of past returns, letters, or other correspondence—from 2015 to current—through their Revenue Online account. They can also order and pay for these, or older documents, over the phone at 800-356-4222.
  • Anyone who needs a personal income tax return booklet can download and print it from the department’s website at www.oregon.gov/dor/forms. They can also order a copy online, by calling 503-378-4988 or 800-356-4222, or by mailing their request—along with their name, phone number, and mailing address to:

Forms

Oregon Department of Revenue

PO Box 14999

Salem, OR 97309-0990

  • Some eligible Oregonians may not be claiming the federal Earned Income Tax Credit. For more information about the credit and eligibility, visit the IRS website at www.irs.gov. Those who qualify for the EITC are also eligible to claim Oregon’s Earned Income Credit, which is 8 percent of their federal credit amount, or 11 percent if they have a qualifying dependent under 3 years old.

Employers must file their income tax withholding returns and reports and remit the income tax withheld from their employees’ paychecks by January 31. The department uses these returns and reports to validate the information on employees’ tax returns. Submitting returns and reports by the deadline helps ensure any personal income tax refunds owed to their employees won’t be delayed.

Employer returns and reports due by January 31 include:

  • Quarterly Employer Tax Report (Form OQ) for the fourth quarter of 2019.
  • Statewide transit tax return (Form OR-STT-1 and STT-2), also for fourth quarter.
  • Employee Detail Report (Form 132).
  • W-2s and 1099s for each employee or worker, electronically submitted through iWire.
  • Annual withholding reconciliation report (Form OR-WR).

For information about an employer’s filing or payment responsibilities, please visit the department’s website at www.oregon.gov/dor, call 503-945-8091, or email payroll.help.dor@oregon.gov.

You can visit www.oregon.gov/dor to get forms, check the status of your refund, or make payments. Call 503-378-4988 or 800-356-4222 (toll-free) or email questions.dor@oregon.gov for additional assistance. For TTY for hearing- or speech-impaired, call 800-886-7204.

—30—


Oregon Health Authority awarded up to $16 million to improve child health
Oregon Health Authority - 01/16/20 9:15 AM

January 16, 2019

Media contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Health Authority awarded up to $16 million to improve child health

Funds targeted to Marion, Polk, Crook, Deschutes, Jefferson counties

Statement from Dana Hargunani, MD, OHA chief medical officer

Oregon will receive millions in new federal funding to develop better ways to reduce health risks for children and prevent unnecessary hospital visits and foster care placements.

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has been awarded up to $16 million over seven years from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Integrated Care for Kids (InCK) Model to improve health for children and youth covered by Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) in five Oregon counties.

OHA will partner with the Oregon Pediatric Improvement Partnership (OPIP) at Oregon Health & Science University and local communities to better integrate services across behavioral health, physical health, and other family supports to meet the triple aim of better health, better care, and lower costs. OHA is one of eight awardees selected from across the country.

"This is an exciting opportunity to bring extra resources to this region, connecting community partners, health care providers and families to wrap resources around our kids," said Dana Hargunani, MD, OHA's chief medical officer. "We will be able to take what we learn from this work to help improve children’s health across the state."

The model will focus on supporting children and youth ages 0 to 21 who are covered by Medicaid and CHIP in Marion, Polk, Crook, Deschutes and Jefferson counties. The ultimate goal of the model is to provide effective child- and family-centered care in order to reduce hospital stays and out-of-home placements for children and youth such as foster care and residential behavioral health.

Research shows that many of the factors that determine health outcomes are related to social determinants of health and health equity. This funding aims to help health care providers align with other public programs such as child welfare, education, housing, nutrition, and maternal and child health to expand access to care for children and youth.

The funding includes up to $3 million for the first two years for planning and partnership development and up to $2 million for each of the five implementation years, with some funding contingent on performance.

The model will also help advance Governor Brown’s policy priorities for the Oregon Health Plan by: addressing social determinants of health and health equity, improving family behavioral health support, developing value-based payments for children’s health care, and reducing costs.

The award announcement can be found on the CMS website.

# # #

Disclaimer: The contents provided are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of HHS or any of its agencies.

The project described above was supported by Funding Opportunity Number CMS2B2-20-001 from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.


HERC Evidence-based Guidelines Subcommittee meets February 6
Oregon Health Authority - 01/14/20 1:44 PM

January 14, 2020

Media contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us

Program Contact: Daphne Peck, 503-373-1985, c.info@dhsoha.state.or.us">herc.info@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

HERC Evidence-based Guidelines Subcommittee meets February 6

What: A public meeting of the Health Evidence Review Commission’s Evidence-based Guidelines Subcommittee.

When: February 6, 2-5 p.m.

Where: Clackamas Community College Wilsonville Training Center, Rooms 111-112, 29353 SW Town Center Loop E, Wilsonville. The public also may attend by webinar and via a listen-only conference line at 888-204-5984, participant code 801373.

Agenda: The subcommittee will review public comments on the draft coverage guidance on planned out-of-hospital birth, as well as a new evidence-based report, Multicomponent Interventions to Improve Screening for Breast, Cervical or Colorectal Cancer.

For more information about the meeting, visit the committee’s website. The meeting agenda and materials will be available one week before the meeting.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Daphne Peck at 503-373-1985, 711 TTY or c.info@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">erc.info@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the event. Written comments are also welcome at c.info@dhsoha.state.or.us">herc.info@dhsoha.state.or.us.


"Laundered money" leads to $8.4 million Megabucks jackpot win (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 01/15/20 1:04 PM
2020-01/4939/130751/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg
2020-01/4939/130751/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/4939/130751/thumb_OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg

January 15, 2020 - Salem, Ore. – Laundry day got very exciting for a Portland man who accidentally washed his wallet, with an Oregon’s Game Megabucks ticket worth $8.4 million inside.

“I washed my wallet and then realized I had Lottery tickets in there,” said Scott Moe, who won the prize. “A couple of the tickets were destroyed, but not the jackpot ticket.”

Moe was piecing together his laundered lottery tickets right before bed, and after utilizing the Lottery’s ticket-scanning app for the first time and realizing he had won the $8.4 million jackpot, it was midnight. Moe said that luckily the ticket worth $8.4 million was the last one he bought and protected by other tickets in his wallet.

“I didn’t sleep until later the next day,” he said. “My mind was racing!”

Moe brought the ticket to the Oregon Lottery Friday, Jan. 10 to verify it was the winning ticket. Then he took advantage of leaving the ticket at the Lottery, while he determined the best way to claim his prize. Players can leave their validated tickets at the Oregon Lottery office for up to 60 days, while they decide how to take their prize, either in a one-time lump sum or 30 annual payments. When Moe came back Monday, he said he contacted a financial advisor and was working on a plan.

Moe took the bulk-sum option, which splits the prize in half to $4.2 million, and after taxes, Moe took home $2.85 million.

Moe purchased the ticket from the Buy2 on SW Oleson Road in Portland. Officials with the company said this was the first time one of their stores had sold a jackpot ticket, and they were very excited for Moe and to be a supporter of the Oregon Lottery.

“We are very happy to be able to help support such great state programs the Lottery helps to fund,” said Emily Valentine, marketing manager for Buy2.

For selling the winning ticket Buy2 will receive a 1-percent selling bonus of $84,000.

During the 2018 fiscal year, more than $90.1 million in Oregon Lottery proceeds were directed to economic development, parks, education, Outdoor School, Veterans services and watershed enhancement in Multnomah County, where Moe lives and purchased the ticket. Since 1985, Oregon Lottery players have won more than $38 billion in prizes.

The Oregon Lottery reminds players to always sign the back of their Lottery tickets, regardless of the game. In the event of winning a jackpot, they should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 are advised to contact the Lottery office and schedule an appointment to claim their prize.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $12 billion for economic development, public education, Outdoor School, state parks, Veterans services and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-01/4939/130751/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg , 2020-01/4939/130751/OL_LOGO_HORZ.jpg , 2020-01/4939/130751/Megabucks_ticket.jpg

Valerie Vines Magee appointed to Oregon historic cemeteries commission
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 01/17/20 10:49 AM

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department Director Lisa Sumption has appointed a new member to the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries.

           

Valerie Vines Magee, from Rockaway Beach, has experience with parks, public commissions, historic cemeteries, and a historical society. She has used commission resources in the past, including a grant for the Nehalem American Legion Cemetery. According to Vines Magee “The commission has greatly assisted my efforts in bringing resources to the cemetery and major improvements have been made. This beautiful site, that is still operational, now has site signage, an information board, and a cedar, split rail boundary fence.  I hope to assist others, as well as bring additional knowledge and support to our site in Nehalem, with my appointment to the commission.”

 

“I am thrilled to welcome Val to the commission,” stated Kuri Gill, coordinator for the state historic cemeteries program. “Her local, award winning work, is a great model to share through the commission.”

 

The seven-member Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries supports OPRD historic cemetery preservation efforts by offering training, educational resources, coordination and grants. Its other members are Charlotte Lehan of Wilsonville, Bev Power of Medford, Milo Reed of Portland, Sarah Silbernagel of Pendleton, and Scott Stuemke of Bend.

 

For more information about the commission and the historic cemeteries program visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Historic Cemeteries Program Coordinator, Kuri Gill at i.Gill@oregon.gov">Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov or (503) 986-0685.


Governor's Task Force on the Outdoors meets Jan. 23 in Salem
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 01/16/20 1:00 PM

The Governor’s Task Force on the Outdoors will hold their final meeting 9 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Jan. 23 at the Willamette Heritage Center, 1313 Mill St. SE, Salem. The meeting is open to the public and will include designated time for public comment.

On the agenda: reviewing work to date; refining final recommended actions and criteria related to outdoor recreation funding; and clarifying next steps for the final report and implementation.

View the detailed agenda online.

The meeting is the final in a series of six that have been held throughout Oregon since May 2019. The meetings were convened by the Office of Outdoor Recreation.

Gov. Brown established the task force early in 2019 with a one-year directive to explore long-term strategies for elevating outdoor recreation in Oregon. The task force’s final report will be publicly released this spring and presented to the governor, state legislature and the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission.

Overall strategies developed by the group aim to support access to and participation in outdoor recreation, as well as supporting local and state economies. The group has identified potential actions for these specific strategies: 

  • Center efforts on diversity, equity and inclusion.
  • Strengthen collaboration and organizational effectiveness.
  • Accelerate investments in the outdoor recreation sector.
  • Catalyze innovative policies and legislation.
  • Empower local and statewide action.

View a draft of the task force’s strategies and actions report online.

Task force members were drawn from public and private sectors, and were appointed by the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission. View the full membership list online: oregon.gov/orec/Pages/Governors-Task-Force.aspx

Individuals who require special accommodations to attend the meeting should contact Carrie Lovellette, OPRD executive assistant, at least three days in advance: 503-986-0733 or rie.Lovellette@oregon.gov">Carrie.Lovellette@oregon.gov 


Courts/District Attorneys
Drunken Assault at Sea Nets Federal Prison Sentence for Winchester Bay Resident
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 01/16/20 11:27 AM

EUGENE, Ore.—Brandon Michael Vanderploeg, 39, of Winchester Bay, Oregon, was sentenced today to 18 months in federal prison and two years’ supervised release for assaulting his then-girlfriend aboard a fishing vessel in August 2018.

According to court documents, on August 16, 2018, members of the U.S. Coast Guard were dispatched to a situation at sea involving the report of a woman who had been assaulted by her boyfriend onboard a commercial fishing vessel. A coast guard helicopter located the vessel 17 nautical miles off the Oregon Coast. Two members of the coast guard boarded the vessel and made contact with Vanderploeg and the victim.

The victim reported that Vanderploeg had assaulted her on several occasions since leaving Winchester Bay. She specifically reported that Vanderploeg held her down, punched her repeated in the face, head-butted her in the nose, and slammed her head down on a tool box. The assault resulting in a three-inch laceration to her right cheek, a depressed nasal fracture, multiple contusions to her knees and arms, and a cervical strain.

During the investigation, the coast guard crew who boarded and conducted a sweep of the vessel, immediately noted a strong smell of alcohol coming from Mr. Venderploeg, who admitted to drinking. Mr. Vanderploeg tested positive for alcohol, registering a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of .183. An individual operating a commercial vessel is considered intoxicated at a BAC of .04 or more.

On September 30, 2019, Vanderploeg pleaded guilty to assault within the maritime jurisdiction of the U.S. and operating a commercial vessel under the influence of alcohol.

As part of his plea agreement, Vanderploeg agreed to pay restitution in full to his victim as ordered by the court. A restitution hearing will be held at a later date.  

This case was investigated by the U.S. Coast Guard Investigative Service (CGIS) and prosecuted by Gavin W. Bruce, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Banks & Credit Unions
OnPoint Community Credit Union Responds to Australian Wildfires
OnPoint Community Credit Union - 01/17/20 9:00 AM

PORTLAND, Ore., January 17, 2020—In response to the deadly wildfires that have ravaged Australia, OnPoint Community Credit Union announced today it will donate $10,000 to support the people, wildlife and environment relief efforts, which will be split between the Australian Red Cross and WWF Australia. OnPoint is encouraging its members and the community to join them in donating to the cause.  

“At OnPoint, our purpose is to help build strong communities and when a disaster of this magnitude occurs, we want to do our part to help,” said Rob Stuart, President and Chief Executive Officer, OnPoint Community Credit Union. “We are proud to donate on behalf of our members as Australia works to rebuild and recover.”

Australian officials report recent rainfall is helping with containment; therefore, this donation will offer support for the relief and ongoing recovery efforts for the people, animals and communities that have been impacted. The Australian Red Cross will utilize OnPoint’s donation to provide affected people with emergency assistance and recovery programs. WWF Australia will direct OnPoint’s donation toward its $30 million Australian Wildlife and Nature Recovery Fund supporting wildlife response, habitat restoration for people and wildlife, and long-term conservation strategies.  

As the largest credit union headquartered in Oregon, community support is of vital importance to OnPoint. In 2019 alone, it donated more than $1,052,836 to local nonprofits and allocated 12,080 paid volunteer hours to its employees for the causes they support. While OnPoint primarily directs its donations to the counties it serves, it has a demonstrated history of donating to worldwide disaster relief efforts, including the California Wildfires in 2018, Hurricane Harvey in 2017, Oso Mudslide in 2014, Philippines Typhoon in 2013, Hurricane Sandy in 2012, and the Haiti earthquake in 2010.

About Australian Red Cross

Relief in times of crisis, care when it's needed most, and commitment when others turn away. Red Cross is there for people in need, no matter who they are, no matter where they live. Its purpose is to reduce suffering across Australia and internationally through mobilizing the power of humanity.

With millions of volunteers worldwide and thousands of members, volunteers, and supporters across Australia, they can reach people and places like nobody else. For more information, click here: https://www.redcross.org.au/ 

About WWF Australia

WWF Australia is part of the WWF International Network, the world’s leading, independent conservation organization. Founded in 1961, it is active in over 100 countries and has close to five million supporters internationally.

In Australia and throughout the oceanic region, WWF Australia works with governments, businesses, and communities so that people and nature can thrive within their fair share of the planet’s natural resources.

WWF-Australia is a not-for-profit organization with nearly 70% of its annual income donated by our dedicated supporters. For more information, click here: http://www.wwf.org.au 

ABOUT ONPOINT COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION

OnPoint Community Credit Union is the largest credit union in Oregon, serving more than 390,000 members and with assets of $6.1 billion. Founded in 1932, OnPoint Community Credit Union's membership is available to anyone who lives or works in one of 13 Oregon counties (Benton, Clackamas, Columbia, Crook, Deschutes, Jefferson, Lane, Linn, Marion, Multnomah, Polk, Washington and Yamhill) and two Washington counties (Skamania and Clark) and their immediate family members. More information is available at www.onpointcu.com or 503-228-7077 or 800-527-3932.

###


Lane Co. Schools
Crow-Applegate-Lorane SD on 2 hour delay
Crow-Applegate-Lorane Sch. Dist. - 01/15/20 5:46 AM

Crow-Applegate-Lorane Schools and buses are on a 2 hour delay, Wed., January 15, 2020.


Linn Co. Schools
Snow routes
Lebanon Community Schools - 01/17/20 5:35 AM

Lebanon community school will be on snow routes today 1/17/20.


Snow Routes
Lebanon Community Schools - 01/15/20 5:37 AM

Lebanon Community School will be on AM snow routes


Snow Routes
Lebanon Community Schools - 01/14/20 5:49 AM

Lebanon buses will be running on snow routes today Tuesday 01/14/2020


Organizations & Associations
AARP Applauds Oregons Entire House Congressional Delegation for Standing Up for Older Workers
AARP Oregon - 01/16/20 3:31 PM

Clackamas – AARP Oregon praised Oregon’s entire House delegation vote today for bipartisan legislation to combat age discrimination – the “Protecting Older Workers Against Discrimination Act” (POWADA).  The House of Representatives vote approving the bill is the most important action yet in the long drive toward passage.

 

“Thank you Representatives Blumenauer, Bonamici, DeFazio, Schrader and Walden in sending a clear message that age discrimination must be treated as seriously as other forms of workplace discrimination,” said  Ruby Haughton-Pitts, AARP Oregon State Director.

 

“Today’s vote is especially heartening for older workers, who make vital contributions to society and to their work places, and whose numbers are growing.  The law must be strengthened because age discrimination is widespread, yet too often it goes unreported and unaddressed.  AARP urges the Senate to take up and pass these important protections,” she said.

 

Closer to home, AARP Oregon and other advocates are working to create an Age Discrimination Task Force in the hopes of passing legislation in 2021 to strengthen the state’s age discrimination laws. “It’s time to fight back and say that in our state, we don’t tolerate sexism, racism or ageism. All forms of discrimination must be rooted out of our society,” said Haughton-Pitts.

POWADA was first introduced, with AARP backing, after an adverse 2009 Supreme Court decision (Gross v. FBL Financial Services, Inc.) that made it much more difficult for older workers to prove claims of illegal bias based on age.  The legislation would restore longstanding protections under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA), which covers workers aged 40 and over.

 

In the Senate, the bipartisan companion legislation (S.485) is sponsored by Senators Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) and Bob Casey (D-PA).

 

The House action comes as older workers play an increasingly important role in the workforce. Estimates are that by 2024, 41 million people ages 55 and older will be in the labor force, nearly an eight percent increase from the current number.  In addition, next year the oldest millennials will start turning 40 and  they will be covered by the ADEA.

 

The percentage of those 65 and older in the workforce has been increasing incrementally for more than three decades, with more than one in five in that cohort currently working or seeking work.

 

At the same time, the 2018 AARP “Value of Experience” study showed that age discrimination remains alive and well. The survey found that 61 percent of older workers said they had either faced or observed age bias.

 

The 61 percent figure is consistent with past surveys on the question and parallels an Oregon survey which found that 62 percent of workers 40 and older had seen or experienced age discrimination in the workplace.

 

 


M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Announces Record Year of Giving
M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust - 01/16/20 7:53 AM

January 16, 2020

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Announces Record Year of Giving

 

Foundation invested more than $66 million in nonprofits serving the Pacific Northwest in 2019, including $20 million in Oregon

 

Vancouver, WA – Today, the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust announced a record year of giving with the publication of the foundation’s Fall 2019 Grants Report. As highlighted in the report:

 

  • The Murdock Trust invested $66.3 million in capacity building grants to nonprofits serving Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington throughout 2019.
  • This includes more than $20 million in grants to Oregon nonprofits.
  • In addition, the Murdock Trust set a new record for giving in a single quarter, awarding 93 grants totaling $18.7 million at the foundation’s Fall 2019 Grants Meeting.

 

“We are grateful to have the opportunity to partner with these organization that serve the diverse needs of communities across the Pacific Northwest in innovative ways,” said Steve Moore, executive director, M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust. “As we prepare to mark our 45th year of service to Pacific Northwest communities, we are excited to continue to identify programs and projects that help ensure every individual and family in our region has the opportunity to flourish and thrive.”

 

The Murdock Trust was founded in 1975 by the estate of Melvin J. “Jack” Murdock. The Murdock Trust awards grants four times annually to nonprofits serving Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Vancouver B.C. and Washington in the areas of Arts and Culture, Scientific Research, Health, Education and Human Services.

 

2019 was a banner year for the Murdock Trust in several areas. In addition to setting a new record for grants invested in the local community, the foundation also crossed the milestone of awarding $1 billion in cumulative grants since opening its doors.

 

“These are exciting moments for the Murdock Trust and our history. But, for our staff, it is a testament to the incredible spirit of service and generosity that is thriving in the Pacific Northwest,” added Moore. “We are able to celebrate these milestones only because there is a flourishing ecosystem of tens of thousands of individuals and nonprofit organizations inspiring one another and collaborating on innovative solutions to help uplift and support every individual and family in our community.”

 

 

In addition to grantmaking, the Murdock Trust also supports nonprofit organizations through a series of educational enrichment programs and by gathering diverse voices and community leaders for convenings on a variety of subjects throughout the year. To learn more, visit murdocktrust.org.

 

 

About M. J. Murdock Charitable Trust

The Murdock Trust, created by the will of the late Melvin J. “Jack” Murdock, provides grants to organizations in five states of the Pacific Northwest—Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington—that seek to strengthen the region’s educational, spiritual and cultural base in creative and sustainable ways. Since its inception in 1975, the Trust has awarded more than 6,800 grants totaling more than $1 billion. For more information, find the Murdock Trust on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, YouTube and on our website.

###


Inaugural Science and Service Event at OMSI Honors Humanitarian Legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
OMSI - 01/15/20 8:42 AM

PORTLAND, Ore. – In honor of the pioneering civil rights legacy of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) is hosting its first "Science and Service" event. 

OMSI and its corporate and community partners will assemble science, technology, engineering, art and math (STEAM) kits that will benefit students at the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. School and Beaverton School District. All kits will include LEGOs, Play-doh, a STEAM activity sheet, OMSI passes, and more.

Legislation signed in 1983 marked the start of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day as a federal holiday. Nearly 20 years later, in 1994, Congress designated this day as a national day of service to celebrate the civil rights leader’s life and legacy. 

Each year, on the third Monday in January, the MLK Day of Service is observed as a "day on, not a day off." 2020 marks the 25th anniversary of this day of service, which is intended to empower individuals, strengthen communities, bridge barriers, create solutions to social problems, and move us closer to Dr. King's vision of a "Beloved Community."

About OMSI
Founded in 1944, the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) is one of the nation’s leading science museums, a world-class tourist attraction, and an award-winning educational resource for the kid in each of us. OMSI operates the largest museum-based outdoor science education program in the country and provides traveling and community outreach programs that bring science learning opportunities to schools and community organizations in every county in Oregon and throughout the region. OMSI is located at 1945 SE Water Avenue, Portland, OR 97214. For general information, call 503.797.4000 or visit omsi.edu. 


First-Annual Oregon Housing Economic Summit Draws 400 Industry Stakeholders and Public Officials to Salem (Photo)
Oregon Bankers Assn. - 01/17/20 1:01 PM
Over 400 attended the first-annual Oregon Housing Economic Summit in Salem. Participants included representatives of the homebuilding, banking and real estate industries, as well as public officials and other stakeholders.
Over 400 attended the first-annual Oregon Housing Economic Summit in Salem. Participants included representatives of the homebuilding, banking and real estate industries, as well as public officials and other stakeholders.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/6671/130828/thumb_Attendees.jpg

Salem, Ore., January 17, 2020 – The first-annual Oregon Housing Economic Summit (“Summit”), presented by the Oregon Home Builders Association, the Oregon Bankers Association and the Oregon Association of REALTORS® was held yesterday in Salem. The event drew over 400 participants representing the homebuilding, banking and real estate industries, as well as public officials and other stakeholders.
 
Senior Economist and Director of Housing and Commercial Research at the National Association of REALTORS® Gay Cororaton, CBE, and Dr. Michael Wilkerson, partner and director of analytics with ECONorthwest, addressed economic and housing affordability issues. Policies impacting housing supply at the local level were tackled during a panel discussion with City of Tigard’s Community Development Director Kenny Asher and Sightline Institute’s Senior Researcher Michael Andersen.
 
For an on the ground perspective, industry representatives discussed trends and barriers to housing development, financing, and homeownership. Panelists included Susan Brown, senior vice president and construction production manager at Umpqua Bank, Chad Harvey, principal broker at Harvey Realty Group, and Justin Wood, vice president of Fish Construction NW.
 
Oregon Speaker of the House Tina Kotek (N/NE Portland) and two members of the House Interim Committee On Human Services and HousingChair Alissa Keny-Guyer (NE/SE Portland) and Vice-Chair Ron Noble (McMinnville) concluded the program with a discussion about recent housing-related legislation and their views about addressing Oregon’s housing affordability and availability challenges. The representatives fielded audience comments and questions from various industry perspectives.
 
The Summit succeeded in bringing together key stakeholders for a collaborative and productive dialogue about the challenges and potential solutions to housing affordability and availability in Oregon. The three industry groups plan to hold next year’s Oregon Housing Economic Summit in Salem on January 14, 2021. More information will be available at https://oregonhousingeconomicsummit.com.




Attached Media Files: Over 400 attended the first-annual Oregon Housing Economic Summit in Salem. Participants included representatives of the homebuilding, banking and real estate industries, as well as public officials and other stakeholders. , Oregon Speaker of the House Tina Kotek (center) was joined by Rep. Ron Noble and Rep. Alissa Keny-Guyer of the House Interim Committee On Human Services and Housing for a panel discussion during the Oregon Housing Economic Summit in Salem.

Oregon's Barry Bushue honored with Farm Bureau Founders Award (Photo)
Oregon Farm Bureau - 01/20/20 8:09 AM
Former OFB President Barry Bushue (center) is joined on stage at the AFBF Convention by (from left) AFBF Vice President Scott VanderWal, Helen Bushue, OFB President Barb Iverson, former OFB President Sharon Waterman, and Kentucky Farm Bureau President Mar
Former OFB President Barry Bushue (center) is joined on stage at the AFBF Convention by (from left) AFBF Vice President Scott VanderWal, Helen Bushue, OFB President Barb Iverson, former OFB President Sharon Waterman, and Kentucky Farm Bureau President Mar
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-01/5507/130861/thumb_barrybushue2.jpg

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
January 20, 2020

Oregon’s Barry Bushue honored with Farm Bureau Founders Award

The American Farm Bureau Federation presented one of its highest honors, the Farm Bureau Founders Award, to Oregon’s Barry Bushue during AFBF’s 101st Annual Convention in Austin.

The Farm Bureau Founders Award was established in January 2017 to recognize exemplary leadership, service or contributions to Farm Bureau by officers or employees of AFBF and state Farm Bureau organizations.

Barry Bushue served as the vice-president of AFBF from 2008-2016 and is known as a tireless worker, mentor and fundraiser. He served as the Oregon Farm Bureau President from 1999-2018 and on the AFBF Board of Directors, Executive Committee, Trade Advisory Committee and the Vision for Action Task Force. He is a firm believer that farmers and ranchers should get involved in education and the policy making process.

Bushue says, “Activism needs to be a part of your business plan. You budget for fertilizer, you budget for your seed, you budget for maintenance, you budget for all these things you do, new tractors, whatever it is you need. But, if you don’t have a line item that somehow represents an activist piece of what it is you do and show your passion for agriculture, then I think you are missing something on your farm.”

Bushue and his wife, Helen, invite members of the public to their family farm outside Portland, Oregon, to pick various fruits, vegetables, and a fall favorite, pumpkins. Bushue says opening his farm to the public comes with its challenges but he has developed a customer base that recognizes the value of agriculture.

Sharon Waterman, also a former president of the Oregon Farm Bureau, talks about Bushue’s affection for Farm Bureau, “Barry talks about the Farm Bureau family and what we can do as a Farm Bureau family because if we stand together for agriculture, we can move forward.”

Bushue says his father told him if he was going to farm smart, he needed to be part of Farm Bureau, adding, “He said, ‘We’re going to go to the [Farm Bureau] meeting tonight, and you’re going with me. I embraced it and I loved it. I’ve always had a passion for it, I think I inherited that, it’s probably genetics in our family.”

Barry Bushue was nominated by the Oregon Farm Bureau. A national Farm Bureau committee selected each of the winners.

VIDEO: See a YouTube video about Barry Bushue here: https://oregonfb.org/barryfoundersaward/

PHOTO CAPTIONS:

Barrybushue: Former Oregon Farm Bureau President Barry Bushue also served as the vice-president of AFBF from 2008-2016. He and his wife, Helen, invite members of the public to their family farm outside Portland to pick various fruits, vegetables, and a fall favorite, pumpkins.

Barrybushue1: Oregon’s Barry Bushue addressing a crowd of 6,000 Farm Bureau members after receiving the 2020 Founders Award at the AFBF 101st Annual Convention in Austin.

Barrybushue2: Former OFB President Barry Bushue (center) is joined on stage at the AFBF Convention by (from left) AFBF Vice President Scott VanderWal, Helen Bushue, OFB President Barb Iverson, former OFB President Sharon Waterman, and Kentucky Farm Bureau President Mark Haney.

###

Note to Editors: “Farm Bureau” is a registered trademark; please capitalize in all cases.

Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit, general farm organization representing the interests of farming and ranching families in the public and policymaking arenas. First established in Oregon at the county level in 1919 and the state level in 1932, Farm Bureau is organized in all 36 counties.

Oregon Farm Bureau President Barb Iverson, elected on Dec. 12, 2019, comes from a multigenerational family farm from Woodburn, raising industrial hemp, grass seed, squash, vetch seed, hazelnuts, wine and table grapes, and operating the Wooden Shoe Tulip Festival, which attracts over 160,000 visitors each year. She is OFB’s 17th president.




Attached Media Files: Former OFB President Barry Bushue (center) is joined on stage at the AFBF Convention by (from left) AFBF Vice President Scott VanderWal, Helen Bushue, OFB President Barb Iverson, former OFB President Sharon Waterman, and Kentucky Farm Bureau President Mar , Oregon’s Barry Bushue addressing a crowd of 6,000 Farm Bureau members after receiving the 2020 Founders Award at the AFBF 101st Annual Convention in Austin. , Former Oregon Farm Bureau President Barry Bushue also served as the vice-president of AFBF from 2008-2016. He and his wife, Helen, invite members of the public to their family farm outside Portland to pick various fruits, vegetables, and a fall favorite,

SAIF offers free agriculture safety seminars January 29-30 in Salem
SAIF - 01/15/20 11:03 AM

What: SAIF will be presenting a free, half-day seminar on agriculture safety and health on Wednesday, January 29 in English and on Thursday, January 30 in Spanish.

Who should attend: The seminars are designed primarily for people working in agriculture, but are open to anyone interested in ag safety and health—they don't have to be insured by SAIF. Registration is required.

When: Wednesday, January 29 and Thursday, January 30, from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Lunch is included.

Where: Oregon State Fair Expo Center, Cascade Hall, 2330 17th Street NE, Salem.

More information: Below and at www.saif.com/agseminars. SAIF safety management consultants are available for interviews on the seminars and ag safety. Photos from last year’s seminars are available by request.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________

FREE FARM SAFETY SEMINARS HELD IN 17 CITIES ACROSS OREGON

Summary: SAIF’s annual ag seminars will be held in 17 cities across the state and online in English and Spanish.

__________________________________

Farm work is a whole lot safer than it used to be. But as far as SAIF is concerned, even one injury or illness is too many.

That’s why SAIF is offering 29 free ag safety seminars in 17 cities across Oregon. The first was held in La Grande on October 28, and they’ll continue through March 2020. Nine of the seminars will be presented entirely in Spanish. Last year, more than 2,180 workers and employers attended SAIF’s seminars.

“We purposely hold these in the off-season to encourage attendance,” said Courtney Merriott, senior safety management consultant at SAIF and presenter at this year’s seminars. “Our goal is to provide the latest safety content for the industry, so that every ag worker goes home safe and healthy each night.”

This year’s seminars will focus on four topics: respiratory personal protective equipment, working at elevation, safety leadership for anyone, and incident analysis—a structured process for identifying what happened and reducing recurrence of injuries moving forward.

In March, SAIF will also offer webinars online in English and, new this year, Spanish.

The seminars are designed primarily for people working in agriculture but are open to anyone interested in ag safety and health—they don’t have to be insured by SAIF.

In-person seminars will be held in Bandon, Central Point, Clackamas, Corvallis, Eugene, Hermiston, Hillsboro, Hood River, Klamath Falls, La Grande, Madras, Milton-Freewater, Ontario, Salem, The Dalles, Wilsonville, and Woodburn.

Spanish seminars will be held in Central Point, Eugene, Hermiston, Hillsboro, Hood River, Salem, The Dalles, Wilsonville, and Woodburn.

All will run from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., and lunch will be provided.

Employers with small ag businesses who attend the seminar, or watch the webinars, will meet OSHA’s instructional requirement—one of four requirements that exempt small agricultural operations from random OSHA inspections.

Three hours of technical and one hour of business continuing education credits will be offered if approved by the Landscape Contractors Board. Producer continuing education credit hours for licensed insurance agents have been requested and are pending approval by the Department of Consumer and Business Services.

More information—including registration details—can be found at www.saif.com/agseminars.

About SAIF

SAIF is Oregon's not-for-profit workers' compensation insurance company. Since 1914, we've been taking care of injured workers, helping people get back to work, and striving to make Oregon the safest and healthiest place to work. For more information, visit the About SAIF page on saif.com.