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Eugene/Spring/Rose/Alb/Corv News Releases for Fri. Jan. 21 - 3:04 am
Police & Fire
Douglas County Coastal Towns Under Distant Tsunami Advisory
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/15/22 7:29 AM

DOUGLAS COUNTY, Ore. - An underwater volcanic eruption near Tonga has prompted the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to issue a distant tsunami advisory for Washington's southern coast and Oregon's northern and central coasts, which include Douglas County.

The impact to Douglas County coastal areas is expected to occurr around 8:00-8:30 am. 

LOCAL IMPACTS A tsunami capable of producing strong currents in bays and harbors that may be hazardous to swimmers and boats. Widespread danger away from the beach is not expected at this time.

  RECOMMENDED ACTIONS

If you are located in this coastal area, move off the beach and out of harbors and marinas. Do not go to the coast to observe conditions. Be alert to instructions from local emergency officials.

Stay tuned to your emergency services, local news sources and NOAA weather radio for further information and updates.


Update in the Wow Hall Shooting (updated victim name spelling)
Eugene Police Dept. - 01/18/22 2:58 PM

Note, we updated the spelling of two victims' names: 

Tristin C. Vanblokland

Reyshaun Dominique-Joseph Supuni

 

UPDATE JANUARY 18, 2022:

Eugene Police detectives want to reiterate the need for witness information and tips to help solve this case. There has been some cooperation, which is greatly appreciated, but having a healthy level of solid tips and cooperation is what is going to help investigators.

Violent Crimes Unit detectives are continuing their work on this. At this point, there is not enough to say if the event was random or targeted to individuals or a group. There is not an updated suspect description. All victims are in stable condition and/or  have been treated and released. Victim information is below.

The number to call and help with relevant tips is (541.682.5162).

Chief Skinner's comment about the need for tips (entire interview in a link included at end of this release)

The victims of the shooting are as follows:

  • Richard Daniel Lemmon, age 26, of Pendleton, Oregon. 
  • Jason Jamell Smith, age 25, of San Francisco, CA
  • Aaleigha Mechelle Tynan, age 25, of Eugene, Oregon
  • Reyshaun Dominique-Joseph Supuni, age 30, of Pendleton, Oregon.
  • Tristin C. Vanblokland, age 26, of Pendleton, Oregon.
  • Priscila Wavaline Camarena, age 21, Pendleton, Oregon.

 

PREVIOUSLY RELEASED INFORMATION

From: MCLAUGHLIN Melinda V  
Sent: Saturday, January 15, 2022 12:52 PM
Subject: Update Shots fired at WOW Hall, six people transported to local hospital

UPDATE POSTED AT 12:50 P.M. JANUARY 15: 

 Eugene Police are releasing a tip line for last night’s WOW Hall shooting (541.682.5162) and are seeking any witness information to help investigators with the case. The only potential suspect description at this time is a male with a hoody. There is no suspect in custody at this time. Detectives are actively working the investigation and ask the public to call with any relevant information or video/photos to that tip line.

On January 14 9:29 p.m., there were reports of multiple shots fired at WOW Hall, 219 W. 8th Avenue. Eugene Police and multiple law enforcement agencies responded, along with Eugene Springfield Fire. 

Police officers arrived within 2.5 minutes to a hectic scene of people who had been shot near the walkway/back entrance to Wow Hall, with  a loud and frantic crowd. The officers quickly provided medical aid to victims, including applying tourniquets and pressure to wounds, mitigating any potential threats, and coordinating with arriving Eugene Springfield Fire medic units for a safe response to further treat the injured victims. The response included 25 Eugene Police Patrol Units plus multiple detective units, with the first arrival. We are thankful to Lane County Sheriff’s Office, Oregon State Police, Springfield Police, and UO Police Department, who provided additional quick response alongside us. Eugene Springfield Fire responded with five medics, four paramedic engine companies and four chief officers. Eugene Police Forensic Evidence Unit responded as well. Central Lane 911 received at least 30 emergency calls. 

One victim remains in critical condition, and the remaining five are stable. All of the victims with the exception of one are from out of town and appear to have traveled here for the concert. Two are female and four are male. 

Five patients were transported last night to a local hospital and one patient self-transported as a walk-in to a hospital.

NEWS CONFERENCE VIDEO

Media, here is a private Vimeo link to raw interview footage that you are free to use without attribution.

https://vimeo.com/666250128

Case 22-00850

 


Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Video Chat Platforms (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 01/18/22 9:00 AM
TT - Voice Comms Systems - GRAPHIC - January 18, 2022
TT - Voice Comms Systems - GRAPHIC - January 18, 2022
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/3585/151260/thumb_TT_-_Voice_Comms_Systems_-_GRAPHIC.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. Today: Building a digital defense with video communication systems.

Over the past two years, many people have had crash courses in how to use video communications systems. Personal apps such as FaceTime and Skype have made it easier to keep in touch with friends and family during COVID times. Other services – such as Zoom, Teams, and Google Meet – were lifelines for schools, businesses, and community groups.

Just because most of us are back in school or back to work doesn’t mean the bad actors aren’t still trying to use these video communications systems to bilk your bank account.

Here are some reminders on how to stay safe:

  • Make sure to research what security settings are available – and turn them on – for whatever platforms you are using.
  • Avoid connecting your video communications apps or systems to your social media accounts whenever possible.
  • Don’t accept calls or chats from unknown people or numbers.
  • Review the app or service’s privacy and terms of service policies before using. Check back for updates periodically and only allow the app or service the minimal amount of permissions necessary.
  • Know exactly what kind of data the app or service is collecting about you and how it is storing, sharing, or selling that information.
  • Make sure group calls are password-protected and confirm participants’ identities before proceeding.
  • Make sure to leave or end the call every time. Don’t count on the host to do it.
  • Password protect your account and use multi-factor authentication whenever possible.
  • Check your visual background or use a virtual background. You may be leaking personal information about yourself or others.

If you are the victim of an online scam, you should report the incident to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office.  

###




Attached Media Files: TT - Video Comms - AUDIO - January 18, 2022 , TT - Voice Comms Systems - GRAPHIC - January 18, 2022

Jackson County Illegal Marijuana Enforcement Team Seized More Than A Million Pounds of Cannabis, Several Pounds Cocaine, Heroin, Meth, Fentanyl; $2.3 Million Cash, More Than 150 Firearms Last Year (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/19/22 1:03 PM
2021 IMET EOY Infographic
2021 IMET EOY Infographic
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JACKSON COUNTY, Ore. – The Illegal Marijuana Enforcement Team (IMET) has released their 2021 year-end seizure numbers. Last year, IMET detectives worked 145 cases, served 57 search warrants, and made 60 arrests. While serving the search warrants, investigators seized more than a million pounds of black-market marijuana, several pounds of other illicit drugs, 158 firearms, and more than $2.3 million in criminal forfeiture. 

These warrants led to the seizure of nearly 650 thousand live marijuana plants, equating to more than a million pounds of unprocessed cannabis. The team also seized more than 70 thousand pounds of processed cannabis ready for sale, worth an estimated $30 million. Investigators discovered 134 pounds of butane honey oil, a substance commonly extracted through a highly volatile process that started numerous fires in the County last year. Other cannabis derivatives seized included five pounds of liquid THC, nearly 53 gallons of marijuana concentrate, and more than five gallons of cannabinoid extract. 

While searching for black-market marijuana, detectives discovered other illicit drugs including more than a pound of cocaine, nearly 14 pounds of methamphetamines, and more than two pounds of heroin. Investigators also uncovered enough fentanyl to kill more than 16 thousand people; seizing nearly 33 grams with a lethal dose estimated to be around two milligrams. Other drugs seized included more than three pounds of psilocybin, and 551 doses of LSD.

The IMET task force includes personnel from Jackson County Sheriff’s Office, Medford Police Department, and the Jackson County District Attorney’s Office. IMET is funded by a grant from the Oregon Criminal Justice Commission. This upcoming year, the team is looking to increase illegal marijuana enforcement through additional state allocated funds. The team is optimistic that this potential additional funding will be a substantial help in diminishing the black-market marijuana problem in the Rogue Valley.

---End---




Attached Media Files: 2021 IMET EOY Infographic

Skeletonized Remains Discovered off Roxy Ann Peak Trail (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/19/22 11:23 AM
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JCSO Case 22-0173

Update: 01-19-22

The skeletal remains found January 10th off Roxy Ann Peak trail were positively identified as Armando Leigh Soto, 33, originally from Yuba City, California. Soto lived in the Medford area since 2015, and was reported missing June of 2020.

The positive scientific ID was confirmed by physical examination and comparison to dental records. The records were from 2019, obtained from the Oregon State Hospital.

An Oregon State Police (OSP) forensic pathologist performed an autopsy yesterday at the OSP Morgue in Central Point. The autopsy revealed no evidence of injury or trauma. The cause and manner of death are “Undetermined” due to advanced decomposition. There are no indications of suspicious circumstances.

---end--- 

Original Release: 1-12-22

MEDFORD, Ore. – A man walking his dog off the Roxy Ann Peak trail discovered skeletonized human remains Monday evening. The discovery prompted Jackson County Sheriff’s Office (JCSO) detectives to investigate. Tuesday morning, JCSO detectives recovered the body assisted by a Search and Rescue (SAR) ground team with Human Remains Detection (HRD) dogs. 

The skeletonized remains are in an advanced stage of decomposition. Investigations are ongoing by JCSO Medical Examiner detectives although there are no immediate indications of suspicious circumstances. An Oregon State Police forensic pathologist will conduct an autopsy to determine the cause and manner of death. The name of the decedent will be released pending a positive scientific identification and next of kin notification. There is no further information available at this time.

---end---




Attached Media Files: 2022-01/6186/151497/5A8A2985.jpg , 2022-01/6186/151497/5A8A2881.jpg , 2022-01/6186/151497/5A8A2879.jpg , 2022-01/6186/151497/5A8A2867.jpg , 2022-01/6186/151497/5A8A2823.jpg , 2022-01/6186/151497/5A8A2811.jpg , 2022-01/6186/151497/5A8A2784.jpg , 2022-01/6186/151497/5A8A2759.jpg , 2022-01/6186/151497/5A8A2743.jpg , 2022-01/6186/151497/5A8A2736.jpg

22-341 -- Vehicle theft suspect taken into custody after barricading himself
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/17/22 3:19 PM

 

A vehicle theft suspect is in custody after barricading himself in a stranger’s home in the Pleasant Hill area this morning. 

The Lane County Sheriff’s Office and Oregon State Police responded to the area of Edenvale Rd. and Filbert Ln. at approximately 8:30am. A citizen reported that their vehicle had been stolen from a location in Eugene and loaded onto a flatbed trailer. The citizen followed the vehicle until it became stuck in the mud at an address off of Edenvale Rd. 

Responding units arrived at which time the suspect fled on foot and barricaded himself in a nearby house.  Deputies and troopers quickly established a perimeter and began loud-hailing the suspect.  The Eugene Police Explosives Disposal Unit also responded and were able to safely approach the residence with the use of a remotely controlled robot.  The suspect was located by the robot hiding near a couch inside the residence.  He eventually surrendered and exited the residence.  He was taken into custody without incident.

A rifle was also located inside the suspect vehicle. 

The suspect was identified as 45 year old Joey Lee Whittaker of Springfield.  Whittaker will be lodged at the Lane County Jail.  Charges are still being determined.   


Tip of The Week For January 24, 2022 - Elk And Deer Winter Migration (Photo)
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/20/22 6:46 AM
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   TIP OF THE WEEK

 

Date:           January 20, 2022      FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:       Sheriff Curtis Landers

                   541-265-0654

                   lcsheriff@co.lincoln.or.us

 

Elk and Deer Winter Migration

 

The Central Oregon Coast is experiencing its seasonal cold weather. Although the weather slows down our daily commute, we are not nearly as affected as wildlife, specifically elk and deer. 

Natural food sources are lean in the upper elevations in the coast range during the winter as snow falls, covering the ground. This time of year with snow accumulation in the coast range and freezing temperatures periodically down to sea level, elk and deer may move to even lower elevations to find adequate food. 

These additional movements often mean that the animals are crossing major roads both day and night which creates hazards to motorists. The Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office would like motorists and spectators to be mindful of the animal movements. If you see one deer cross in front of you, chances are there is another one behind. 

Please take into account that the animals are often stressed due to additional migration in search of food. When spectating please keep a minimum distance of 100 yards from wildlife. If the animals begin to move from your presence, don’t follow them. Oregon Revised Statute 498.006 does protect the chasing or harassing of wildlife.

For more information and tips, visit our web site at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and Like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.




Attached Media Files: 2022-01/5490/151667/012022_Elk_And_Deer_Winter_Migration.pdf , 2022-01/5490/151667/Deer_and_Elk_Migrating.PNG

Deputies Investigating After Vehicle and House Struck by Gunfire (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 01/16/22 7:08 PM
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At approximately 7:00 a.m. this morning, Sunday, January 16, 2022, a 911 caller reported hearing gunfire on Deana Street NE near Monroe Avenue NE, in the unincorporated area of East Salem. The caller told deputies they were driving on their way to work when they passed by two unknown juveniles who began yelling at him. As the caller was driving away their car was struck by at least one bullet believed to have been fired by the juveniles.

As deputies searched the area they learned a nearby residence had been struck by gunfire as well. A Sheriff’s Office K-9 was called to the scene; none of the suspects involved were located. At this time, deputies have not located anyone who was injured during the incident.

Investigators are asking anyone who may have information about this incident to call our non-emergency dispatch at 503-588-5032 or to submit a tip by texting TIPMCSO and their tip to 847411.




Attached Media Files: 2022-01/1294/151598/Deana_St.jpg

Fatal Crash on Hwy 97-Deschutes County
Oregon State Police - 01/20/22 8:26 AM

On Wednesday, January 19, 2022, at approximately 9:30 PM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a vehicle versus pedestrian crash on Hwy 97 near milepost 129. 

Preliminary investigation revealed a pedestrian, identified as Anthony Manuel Hernandez (40) of Madras, was walking in the lanes of travel when he was struck by a southbound black Mercedes GI5, operated by Howard Dietrich (45) of Portland. Hernandez had run out of fuel and was walking back to his vehicle at the time of the crash. 

Hernandez sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. 

OSP was assisted by Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office and ODOT.


Fatal Crash on Hwy 20-Linn County
Oregon State Police - 01/20/22 8:06 AM

On Wednesday, January 19, 2022, at approximately 4:18 PM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a single motor vehicle crash on Hwy 20 near milepost 34. 

Preliminary investigation revealed an eastbound white 2004 Chevrolet Silverado, operated by Jasper June Keeney (18) of Sweet Home, lost control while negotiating a curve and rolled into the eastbound ditch, coming to rest on its top. 

Keeney suffered fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased on scene. 

Highway 20 was closed for 4.5 hours following the crash. 

OSP was assisted by the Sweet Home Fire & Rescue and ODOT.


*Update**-Fatal Crash on Hwy 361-Jefferson County
Oregon State Police - 01/19/22 4:58 PM

UpdateSuspect Arrested

On Tuesday, January 18, 2022 Sergio Suarez Sanchez was arrested after his release from the hospital. He was lodged in the Jefferson County Jail on the following charges: 

1. Manslaughter 1st Degree 

2. Manslaughter 2nd Degree

3. Criminally Negligent Homicide

4. Assault 3rd Degree (DUII)

5. DUII - Alcohol

6. Reckless Driving 

7. Reckless Endangering 

8. Criminal Mischief 2nd Degree 

___________________________________________________________

On Monday, January 17, 2022, at approximately 10:34 AM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle crash on Highway 361 near milepost 3. 

Preliminary investigation revealed a southbound black Chevrolet Tahoe, operated by Sergio Suarez Sanchez (36) of Madras, crossed into northbound lanes and collided head-on with a gray Ram 3500, operated by John Wallace (60) of Metolius. 

Both drivers were transported to area hospitals with injuries. The passenger in the Ram truck, Anna Wallace (56) of Metolius, sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the hospital. 

Hwy 361 was closed for approximately 5 hours for collision reconstruction. This crash is being investigated as a criminal matter. Updates will be given when appropriate. 

OSP as assisted by Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office and ODOT. 


**Update**Fatal Crash on Interstate 84-Baker County
Oregon State Police - 01/18/22 1:50 PM

Update-Pedestrian name released

The pedestrian has been identified as Luis Manuel Torres Rivera (44) of Lynnwood, Washington. 

________________________________________

On Sunday January 16th, 2022 at approximately 12:12 AM, Oregon State Police Troopers responded to a vehicle versus pedestrian crash on Interstate 84 near mile post 295.

Preliminary investigation revealed a westbound Volkswagen Passat, operated by Karli McKim (21) of La Grande, struck a pedestrian who was standing in the lane of travel. 

The pedestrian sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. The name of the pedestrian will be released when appropriate. 

OSP was assisted by Baker County Sheriff’s Office, Baker City Fire Department and ODOT. 


**Update**Fatal Crash on Hwy 99E-Clackamas County
Oregon State Police - 01/18/22 1:46 PM

Update-Name released of pedestrian

The pedestrian has been identified as Marcos Pinto Balam (30) of Milwaukie. 

_____________________________________________

On Sunday, January 16th, 2022 at about 7:45 AM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a pedestrian that appeared to be deceased on the shoulder of Hwy 99E near milepost 14. 

Preliminary investigation revealed an unknown vehicle struck a pedestrian. The name of the pedestrian will be released when appropriate. 

The pedestrian sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. Hwy 99E was closed for over three hours while the Oregon State Police investigated the incident.  

OSP was assisted by ODOT, Oregon City PD and Clackamas County ME's Office. 


Fatal crash on Hwy 58-Lane County
Oregon State Police - 01/16/22 8:03 AM

On Saturday, January 15, 2022, at approximately 6:46 PM, Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to report of a motor vehicle versus pedestrian crash near milepost 35 on Hwy 58 near milepost 35.

Preliminary investigation revealed a westbound white Kia Soul, operated by Robert Anthony Fraser (53) of Oakridge, struck a pedestrian, Dale Michael Roberts (71) of Oakridge, who was crossing the lanes of travel. 

Roberts sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased while being transported to an area hospital. Investigation revealed FRASER displayed indicators of impairment and was subsequently arrested for Driving Under the Influence of Intoxicants. Further charges will be determined by the Lane County District Attorney at the completion of the investigation. 

OSP was assisted by Oakridge Police Department, Oakridge Fire Department and ODOT. 


Fatal Crash on Hwy 42-Douglas County
Oregon State Police - 01/16/22 7:48 AM

On Friday, January 14, 2022 at approximately 5:25 PM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle crash on Highway 42 near milepost 75. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a 1999 Ford Ranger Pickup, operated by James Chittum Jr. (75) of Roseburg, was southbound on Landers Avenue approaching the Highway 42 intersection. The Ford Ranger entered Highway 42 and into the path of a westbound Harley Davidson Motorcycle, operated by Brian Porter (54) of Roseburg. The Harley Davidson motorcycle crashed with the Ford Ranger causing Porter to be ejected from the motorcycle. Two eastbound passenger cars, a Toyota Avalon, operated by Max GODEK (73) of Winston, and a Honda Civic, operated by Sylas Moore-Fain (28) of Dillard, collided with Porter in the roadway. 

Porter sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. Porter was wearing a helmet and all others involved were wearing safety belts.

OSP was assisted by the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, Winston Police Department, Douglas County Fire District 2, Winston-Dillard Fire Department and ODOT. 


Salem Police searching for suspect in bank robbery (Photo)
Salem Police Department - 01/20/22 3:15 PM
2022-01/1095/151694/salem-police_smp22001096_suspect-image-3.jpg
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

DATE:      Thursday, January 20, 2022

 

Salem, Ore. — Salem Police detectives, with assistance from the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Portland Office, are seeking information related to a bank robbery at a Columbia Bank branch located in the 3300 block of Commercial ST SE. The robbery occurred near closing time on Friday, January 14, 2022 at 5:55 p.m.

The male suspect entered the bank through the front doors displaying a handgun. The suspect demanded money from the employees, who complied with his demands. After receiving the money, the suspect left through the front door of the business. 

Salem Police officers quickly arrived on scene but were unable to locate the suspect. The suspect was described by witnesses as a white, male adult, approximately 5’10” to 5’11” tall with a bigger build. He was last seen wearing a black mask, gray hooded sweatshirt, black jacket, black pants, and black gloves. 

Anyone with information regarding the robbery is asked to call the Salem Tips Line at 503-588-8477.

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Attached Media Files: 2022-01/1095/151694/salem-police_smp22001096_suspect-image-3.jpg , 2022-01/1095/151694/salem-police_smp22001096_suspect-image-2.jpg , 2022-01/1095/151694/salem-police_smp22001096_suspect-image-1.jpg

Officers make arrest in park stabbing incident
Salem Police Department - 01/19/22 1:50 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

DATE:      January 19, 2022

Salem, Ore. — On the evening of January 17, 2022, officers were dispatched to Marion Square Park in downtown Salem on the report of a stabbing. Officers from the Community Action Unit (CAU) located a male individual suffering from a stab wound to the back. Paramedics arrived on scene and transported the individual to Salem Health with serious but non-life-threatening injuries.

CAU and patrol officers were able to identify workable leads in the case after interviewing the victim and several witnesses and on January 18, 2022, arrested 22-year-old Jacob Joseph Cook. 

Cook, recently released from the Oregon State Penitentiary in mid-December, had an existing parole violation warrant issued on December 22, 2021. CAU arrested Cook on December 28, 2021 on the warrant. He was released from the Marion County Jail on January 12, 2022. The stabbing incident at the park occurred five days later. 

“Patrol and CAU officers worked swiftly to make an arrest in this incident,” said Lieutenant Treven Upkes who oversees CAU, the team of officers who patrol the downtown on bicycles. “Our officers patrol the parks as often as possible to create a presence and make the parks safer for everyone, including those who may be experiencing homelessness and living at encampments.”

Cook is charged with assault in the first degree and unlawful use of a weapon (knife). He is due to be arraigned today, January 19, 2022, at 2:30 p.m. and all further inquiries on this case should be directed to the Marion County District Attorney’s Office.

# # #


Utilities
Renewable Natural Gas Sees Strong Support in the Northwest
NW Natural - 01/18/22 9:42 AM

Renewable Natural Gas Sees Strong Support in the Northwest

New polling shows that Northwest voters want a decarbonized pipeline – not gas bans – for our clean energy future

 

PORTLAND, Ore. — The rise in demand for renewable energy continues. A new survey conducted for NW Natural by DHM Research, an independent, leading opinion research firm, shows that 77% of Oregon and Southwest Washington voters overwhelmingly want access to all forms of renewable energy – hydro, wind, solar and renewable natural gas – for a balanced, low-carbon future. 

Renewable natural gas is rapidly expanding. In the first year of procuring renewable energy for its customers, NW Natural now has signed agreements with options to purchase or develop renewable natural gas totaling 3% of NW Natural’s annual sales volume in Oregon. For context, the U.S. is at about 11% for wind and solar generation.[1]

Amidst a small list of local governments discussing forcing electrification of new homes and businesses, the new survey from DHM shows that Oregon and Southwest Washington voters are demanding a different path.

  • 78% of voters value the natural gas system for its critical role in lowering emissions with both affordability and reliability as top priorities. 
  • 78% of voters support local government’s efforts to encourage the use of renewable natural gas. Only 12% said natural gas should be banned.
  • 73% of voters agree that families and businesses should have a choice of energy options to meet their needs and not have those choices limited or mandated by their local government. 

“NW Natural has been leading the way in our efforts to begin displacing conventional natural gas with renewables, and this new survey from DHM shows our communities strongly support this approach. Voters want decarbonization of the energy system through a comprehensive, diversified set of renewable energy options,” said Kim Heiting, senior vice president of operations at NW Natural. “Even in places with particularly ambitious climate goals, like Eugene, the survey shows the vast majority of voters oppose bans of new natural gas hookups. And over the course of the past two years, DHM’s polling shows that the more Eugene voters hear about gas bans, the more they oppose the idea.”

Across NW Natural’s service territory, DHM found that 70% of voters oppose a ban on new natural gas hookups in all homes and buildings. Only 21% support a ban. 

“There’s a misconception by some that electrification equates to decarbonization, which is not true. In fact, the number one user of natural gas in the U.S. today is electric utilities using it for power generation[1],” said Heiting. “A diverse energy system – with renewable electrons delivered over wires and renewable molecules delivered underground – gives our communities a more effective hedge against potential risks posed by more extreme weather, and a more cost-effective way to reduce emissions.” 

The survey showed that resiliency is a top energy concern in the region. An overwhelming majority (81%) of voters agree that communities with both natural gas and electricity are needed for energy reliability in case of heat waves, wildfires, and winter storms. 

DHM Research conducted its survey from November 6-14, 2021, with voters in NW Natural’s service territory, which includes the Willamette Valley, most of coastal Oregon, Clark County, Wash., and the Columbia Gorge. The service territory results are scientifically valid and have a margin of error of +/- 2.1%. 

At a glance

  • 8 in 10 recent and prospective homebuyers prefer natural gas over electricity for heating and cooking and feel it is an important feature when looking for their “ideal” single-family home.[2]
  • Of all the energy emissions in Oregon, only 6% come from NW Natural customers' residential and commercial use. On the other hand, electric generation accounts for about 29% of the state’s emissions.[3]
  • NW Natural has analyzed scenarios to achieve carbon neutrality by 2050 for the energy services we provide. Learn more about the renewables and new technologies we're pursuing at nwnatural.com/destinationzero.

 

About NW Natural

NW Natural is a local distribution company that currently provides natural gas service to approximately 2.5 million people in more than 140 communities through more than 780,000 meters in Oregon and Southwest Washington with one of the most modern pipeline systems in the nation. NW Natural consistently leads the industry with high J.D. Power & Associates customer satisfaction scores. NW Natural, a part of Northwest Natural Holding Company, (NYSE: NWN) (NW Natural Holdings), is headquartered in Portland, Oregon, and has been doing business for more than 160 years. NW Holdings owns NW Natural, NW Natural Renewables Holdings (NW Natural Renewables), NW Natural Water Company (NW Natural Water), and other business interests. We have a longstanding commitment to safety, environmental stewardship, and taking care of our employees and communities. Learn more in our latest ESG Report.    

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[1] https://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/electricity/electricity-in-the-us.php; https://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/natural-gas/use-of-natural-gas.php 

[2] https://www.nwnatural.com/get-natural-gas/homebuyer-energy-preference

[3] Oregon Public Utility Commission, 2015 Oregon Utility Statistics Statbook and Oregon DEQ In-Boundary GHG Inventory preliminary 2019 data.


Military
Oregon National Guard back in hospital support role (Broll) (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 01/18/22 6:09 PM
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SALEM, Ore. - Oregon National Guard Service Members started their second hospital relief mission on Jan. 18, 2022. This new activation will place approximately 1,200 Oregon Citizen-Soldiers and Airmen supporting up to 40 hospitals throughout the state. 

Since Jan. 10, 2022, the Oregon National Guard has stood up a Joint Task Force of Air and Army National Guardsmen to support this latest hospital effort. Over the past eight days, the Guard activated nearly 500 Oregon Service Members from six locations throughout the state, supporting approximately 40 medical facilities in Oregon. 

The Oregon National Guard will further increase support by approximately 700 additional Service Members over the next two weeks, further bolstering non-clinical hospital staff roles throughout the forecasted COVID-19 Omicron variant peak over the next thirty days. 

“We will continue to work together, and in alignment with our core values, remain confident that the Oregon National Guard will ‘Always be Ready, Always There’,” said Lt. Col. Brian J. Kroeller, Oregon National Guard Hospital Relie Joint Task Force Deputy Commander. 

This activation follows a successful prior deployment of over 1,500 Oregon National Guardsmen that provided the same non-clinical support rolls staffed from August of 2021 and ended in late December of 2021. 

 

The Oregon National Guard comprises over 8,000 Citizen-Soldiers and Airmen, dedicated to serving the communities they live in and maintaining the ability to serve the nation in times of war. The organization is the largest part-time employer in the state. Its members, on average, conduct duty one weekend a month with an additional two-week period a year while maintaining civilian employment.  

                                                                            -30-

 

Released Video:

B-roll link:  https://dvidshub.net/r/qwm9sc

Released Photos:

220118-Z-ZJ128-1001

Oregon Army National Guard member and site officer in charge, 2nd Lt. Jacob King, and his team of Soldiers assigned to the hospital relief mission receive a first-day orientation briefing from Nurse Arielle LeVeaux at West Valley Hospital in Dallas, Oregon, Jan. 18, 2022. The seven soldier team is part of the National Guards' second hospital relief mission tasked to place 1,200 guard members in approximately 40 hospitals across Oregon to address non-clinical staffing shortages. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, Oregon National Guard Public Affairs)

220118-Z-ZJ128-1002

Hospital Facilities Operations Manager Don Wilder gives Oregon Army National Gaurd hospital relief mission members a tour of West Valley Hospital in Dallas, Oregon, on Jan. 18, 2022, as part of the team's first-day orientation. The seven soldier team is part of the National Guards' second hospital relief mission tasked to place 1,200 guard members in approximately 40 hospitals across Oregon to address urgent non-clinical staffing shortages. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, Oregon National Guard Public Affairs)

220118-Z-ZJ128-1003

Hospital Emergency Room Nurse Director Shane Emmert leads a first-day orientation briefing to Oregon Army National Gaurd hospital relief mission members at West Valley Hospital in Dallas, Oregon, on Jan. 18, 2022. The seven soldier team is part of the National Guards' second hospital relief mission tasked to place 1,200 guard members in approximately 40 hospitals across Oregon to address urgent non-clinical staffing shortages. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, Oregon National Guard Public Affairs)

220118-Z-ZJ128-1004

Hospital administrators give Oregon Army National Guard hospital relief mission members a first-day orientation briefing at West Valley Hospital in Dallas, Oregon, on Jan. 18, 2022. The seven soldier team is part of the National Guards' second hospital relief mission tasked to place 1,200 guard members in approximately 40 hospitals across Oregon to address urgent non-clinical staffing shortages. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, Oregon National Guard Public Affairs)




Attached Media Files: 220118-Z-ZJ128-1004 , 220118-Z-ZJ128-1002 , 220118-Z-ZJ128-1001 , 220118-Z-ZJ128-1003

Federal
Idaho Power, PacifiCorp and BPA propose new plan for Boardman to Hemingway transmission line
Bonneville Power Administration - 01/19/22 1:19 PM

Portland, Oregon – Idaho Power, PacifiCorp and the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) have reached a non-binding agreement that would help meet growing customer demand, improve safety and reliability, and reinforce the Pacific Northwest transmission system. The agreement clarifies and updates roles and responsibilities for the Boardman to Hemingway (B2H) transmission line.  It would pave the way for all three organizations to deliver low-cost power to their customers and support each one’s clean energy goals. 

The proposed agreement is an important step for this 500-kilovolt, 290-mile transmission line, which would deliver 1,000 megawatts of reliable, affordable power in each direction between the Pacific Northwest and Mountain west. B2H is anticipated to come online in 2026. 

“B2H is a major piece of Idaho Power’s long-term plan to meet customer needs,” said Mitch Colburn, Idaho Power Vice President of Planning, Engineering and Construction. “This agreement solidifies and simplifies a path forward for a project that will help us continue our century-long tradition of reliable, affordable, clean energy.”

“This project is a key element of PacifiCorp’s expansive Energy Gateway transmission plan to enable our customers and communities to grow with greater grid resilience, lower costs and provide more renewable energy supply by increasing the connectivity between PacifiCorp’s diverse Western and Eastern systems,” said Rick Link, PacifiCorp Senior Vice President, Resource Planning, Procurement, and Optimization.

“This arrangement paves the way toward a promising and economic solution for serving all of the participants and supports efforts to meet the region’s clean energy goals,” said Kim Thompson, BPA vice president, Northwest Requirements Marketing. “B2H is an important project, and this proposal offers BPA a durable, cost-effective means of reliably delivering federal power to our southeast Idaho customers.”

Key elements of the agreement, which benefit each organization’s customers and stakeholders, are listed below:

  • Idaho Power and PacifiCorp will jointly own the B2H transmission line, with PacifiCorp owning 55% and Idaho Power owning 45%. 
     
  • Idaho Power will acquire an ownership interest in PacifiCorp transmission lines and other equipment between eastern Idaho and the Four Corners Substation in northwest New Mexico. B2H and those acquisitions amplify Idaho Power’s connections to key energy markets that will help the company meet rapidly growing customer demand.
     
  • The Bonneville Power Administration will transfer its ownership interest in B2H to Idaho Power and will not participate in construction or have any ownership interest in the transmission line project. Facilities currently used by PacifiCorp to serve BPA’s customers in and around Southeast Idaho will be transferred to Idaho Power.  BPA will acquire transmission service over Idaho Power’s transmission system, including the newly constructed B2H, to reliably and cost-effectively serve public utility customers in Idaho, Wyoming and Montana. More information about BPA’s effort to serve these customers and its public process to consider the agreement is available in BPA’s letter to the region
     
  • PacifiCorp will acquire Idaho Power transmission assets across southern Idaho that, combined with its majority stake in Boardman-Hemingway, will increase its contiguous power transfer capability between its Western and Eastern systems, and will acquire additional transmission service from BPA to enable it to serve its growing customer base in central Oregon.

With the non-binding term sheet developed, the three organizations will move into a negotiation phase to finalize the agreements and seek regulatory approval.  Concurrent with this press release, BPA is issuing a letter to its regional stakeholders and customers that outlines the proposal, describes the background and explains the process for engaging with BPA on this topic.  

 

The term sheet and background information about B2H is available at the project website.    

 

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Interior Department Announces Historic Launch of the Foundation for America's Public Lands
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 01/19/22 12:03 PM

Foundation will leverage public, private funds to benefit BLM-managed public lands

 

WASHINGTON – Taking historic action that will benefit the nation’s public lands for generations to come, the Foundation for America’s Public Lands launched today at a virtual event featuring remarks by Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland and Department leaders. This congressionally-chartered, non-profit foundation authorized by Congress in 2017 will help leverage public and private dollars to conserve, protect and restore lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management for the benefit of the American people.

“It is a privilege and honor to manage America’s public lands for the benefit of current and future generations. To do that right, we need a Bureau of Land Management ready for the future, not just with the right personnel, structure and resources but also with a support system of outside partners collaborating on its success,” said Secretary Haaland. “I’m proud to appoint visionary leaders who will take on the enormous task of building the Foundation from the ground up to create this legacy and ensuring that its work is closely aligned with the agency’s mission and priorities.”

“We are thrilled to begin working with these remarkable leaders to get the Foundation for America’s Public Lands off to a great start. Like its sister foundations at the Park Service, Forest Service and Fish and Wildlife Service, I’m confident this organization will play a historic role for our public lands,” said BLM Director Tracy Stone-Manning.

Secretary Haaland named four founding Board members, distinguished leaders with extensive experience who will oversee and guide the Foundation in its initial efforts. The Foundation for America’s Public Lands will operate and raise funds independent of the BLM, though its work will complement that of the agency and help the BLM better accomplish its mission. The four founding Board members include:

  • Governor Steve Bullock – Steve Bullock is a native Montanan who has worked tirelessly to protect Montana’s way of life, including protecting its public lands. Bullock served two terms as Montana’s 24th governor from 2013 to 2021. During his two terms, Governor Bullock worked across the aisle to strengthen Montana’s economy, invest in public schools, freeze college tuition and expand career training so that Montana’s kids can build a better future. He increased funding for state parks, created a state government position focused on opening up access to public lands, and launched the state’s first Office of Outdoor Recreation. He has a track record of bringing people together to get things done and has served as chair of both the Western Governors Association and the National Governors Association. Prior to serving as Attorney General and Governor, he was a union-side labor lawyer. 

 

  • Maite Arce – Founder of Hispanic Access Foundation, Maite Arce has 15 years of experience developing innovative outreach strategies that effectively mobilize under-represented populations. She has a proven track record of working with faith and community-based leaders, with whom she designs and executes data driven and measurable outreach initiatives. Arce formerly served as Vice President of Operations for the Hispanic Council for Reform and Educational Options (Hispanic CREO), increasing Latino parental involvement in education and public policy participation among Latino faith and community leaders. Arce received an honorary doctorate of Humane Letters from Logos Christian College in Jacksonville, Florida.

 

  • Neil Kornze – Neil Kornze is the Chief Executive Officer of the Campion Advocacy Fund and Campion Foundation. In this role he oversees grantmaking, policy initiatives, and operations, working closely with the trustees and staff to protect America’s last wild places and combat homelessness in Washington state and across the country. Previously, Kornze served as Director of the Bureau of Land Management from 2014 to 2017. Under his leadership, the BLM protected iconic American landscapes like Bears Ears National Monument in southeastern Utah and the San Juan Islands of Washington state. Kornze also worked as a Senior Advisor to U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and later founded his own strategy firm that helped clients protect land, water and wildlife.
  • Stacy Leeds – Stacy Leeds is an experienced leader in law, higher education, governance, economic development, and conflict resolution. In 2021, she joined the faculty at Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law, Arizona State University as the Foundation Professor of Law and Leadership. Leeds is Dean Emeritus, University of Arkansas School of Law (2011-2018) and the first Indigenous woman to lead a law school. She is a former Justice on the Cherokee Nation Supreme Court and former Chairperson of the Cherokee Nation Gaming Commission. She is currently a district court judge for Muscogee (Creek) Nation and an appellate court judge for other Indigenous Nations. She is frequently tapped for conflict resolution and management roles, including arbitration, mediation, and negotiations. She previously served on the National Commission on American Indian Trust Administration and Reform for the U.S. Department of the Interior.

 

In the coming months, Secretary Haaland will appoint an additional five founding Board members to staggered terms of four and six years to complete the Board. The BLM is working with the initial Board members to file papers of incorporation with the District of Columbia, where the Foundation will be officially located, and to apply to the Internal Revenue Service to secure 501(c)3 tax exempt status. 

On May 5, 2017, Congress authorized the creation of a BLM-affiliated Foundation in the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2017. As mandated by the legislation, the Foundation will:  (1) encourage, accept, and administer private gifts of money, real and personal property; and in-kind services for the benefit of, or in connection with the activities and services of, the Bureau of Land Management; (2) carry out activities that advance the purposes for which public land is administered; (3) carry out and encourage educational, technical, scientific, and other assistance or activities that support the mission of the BLM; and (4) assist the BLM with challenges that could be better addressed with the support of a foundation, including reclamation and conservation activities, activities relating to wild free roaming horses and burros, and the stewardship of cultural and archaeological treasures on public land.

The BLM will provide initial funding and support for the Foundation and is in the process of hiring a full-time liaison who will work closely with its Board and staff to ensure close coordination. Once operational, the Foundation will operate independently of the agency, though the BLM Director will serve as an ex officio Board Member.

-BLM–

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 western states, including Alaska, on behalf of the American people. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. Our mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations.

 


Salem Drug Trafficker Sentenced to Federal Prison
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 01/20/22 8:30 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.—On January 19, 2022, a Salem, Oregon man on federal supervised release was sentenced to federal prison after he was found in possession of more than 1.5 kilograms of methamphetamine and 15 firearms, five of which were stolen.

Jorge Mozqueda-Alvarez, 33, was sentenced to 151 months in federal prison and five years’ supervised release.

According to court documents, in September 2019, detectives from the Salem Police Department’s Street Crimes Unit (SCU) began investigating Mozqueda-Alvarez for drug trafficking in the Salem area. Officers conducted two separate controlled purchases of methamphetamine from Mozqueda-Alvarez. On October 15, 2019, SCU executed a search warrant on Mozqueda-Alvarez’s Salem residence and located more than 1.5 kilograms of methamphetamine and 15 firearms, five of which had been reported stolen. Mozqueda-Alvarez was arrested without incident.

On October 17, 2019, Mozqueda-Alvarez was charged by federal criminal complaint with illegally possessing a firearm as a convicted felon and possessing with intent to distribute methamphetamine. One week later, on October 24, 2019, a federal grand jury in Portland returned a four-count indictment charging him with distribution of methamphetamine, possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine and felon in possession of a firearm.

On December 18, 2020, Mozqueda-Alvarez pleaded guilty to possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine and felon in possession of a firearm. To resolve a separate criminal case, Mozqueda-Alvarez also pleaded guilty to illegal reentry.

U.S. Attorney Scott Erik Asphaug of the District of Oregon made the announcement.

This case was investigated by the Salem Police Department with assistance from the FBI. It was prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon.

This case was brought as part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN). PSN is the centerpiece of the Department of Justice’s violent crime reduction efforts. PSN is an evidence-based program proven to be effective at reducing violent crime. Through PSN, a broad spectrum of stakeholders work together to identify the most pressing violent crime problems in the community and develop comprehensive solutions to address them. As part of this strategy, PSN focuses enforcement efforts on the most violent offenders and partners with locally based prevention and reentry programs for lasting reductions in crime.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Local Adoption Agency Bookkeeper Sentenced to Federal Prison for Scheme to Defraud Employer and Family
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 01/19/22 3:45 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A Hillsboro, Oregon woman was sentenced to federal prison today for engaging in a multi-year scheme to defraud her employer, a non-profit adoption and surrogacy agency operating in Oregon and Washington, and her extended family.

Melodie Ann Eckland, 56, was sentenced to 54 months in federal prison and three years’ supervised release. She was also ordered to pay more than $1.6 million in restitution.

“Melodie Eckland used her position of trust within a local adoption agency to steal funds intended to help children across the world find loving families. She further stole thousands of dollars from a deceased family member’s estate in a failed attempt to keep her employer from discovering her scheme. Eckland’s selfishness and greed caused great loss and hardship for many people and pushed her employer agency to the brink of insolvency,” said Scott Erik Asphaug, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

“Preying on the trust of her employers, her friends, and her family, Ms. Eckland stole from those who trusted her most. In doing so, Ms. Eckland irreparably hurt local families attempting to do just that – become families,” said Special Agent in Charge Bret Kressin, IRS Criminal Investigation (IRS:CI), Seattle Field Office. “Financial and tax crimes are not victimless, and today’s sentence is justice served for Ms. Eckland’s wanton disregard and theft from those around her.”

According to court documents, from at least 2011 and continuing until April 2018, Eckland was employed as a bookkeeper for a local adoption and surrogacy agency. Her duties included maintaining agency books and records, managing payroll, filing employment tax returns, and paying quarterly employment taxes to the IRS. Eckland also provided financial statements to the agency’s board of directors, but did not have signature authority over the organization’s business bank account.

Eckland used her position to steal funds from the agency by making unauthorized wire transfers and writing unauthorized checks to herself. Eckland also transferred agency funds in the form of bonuses to her personal bank account. To conceal her scheme, Eckland maintained two sets of financial records. One version, which she provided to the board of directors, showed the business books as they should have been maintained. The other version showed the true payments she made to herself over the course of her employment.

To cover the money she had stolen, Eckland applied for loans from at least five lending agencies on behalf of the adoption agency, using the names of the agency’s owners without their permission. Eckland altered agency financial records to make it appear as though she owned the agency and was authorized to enter into the loan agreements. Beginning in 2016, Eckland stopped making the agency’s quarterly employment tax payments to the IRS and stopped filing employment tax returns. As a result, the agency owed more than $94,000 in past due employment taxes.

To further conceal her scheme, Eckland stole funds from a bank account opened on behalf of her deceased brother-in-law’s estate. As executor of the estate, Eckland’s husband was tasked with selling his brother’s assets, paying estate bills, and preserving the remaining funds for the benefit of his brother’s children. Eckland forged her husband’s signature on unauthorized estate checks and made unauthorized wire transfers of estate funds to herself. She sent a portion of the more than $123,000 stolen from the estate to the adoption agency’s bank account to conceal her theft of agency funds.

IRS records indicated that Eckland did not report any of the embezzled funds on her federal income tax returns for 2013, 2014, and 2017. In 2015 and 2016, she reported more than $550,000 as “other income,” but failed to pay the taxes due. Between 2013 and 2017, Eckland failed to report more than $675,000 in income, resulting in a tax loss of more than $345,000. As a result of her scheme, Eckland’s victims—including the adoption agency and its owners, her brother-in-law’s estate, and the IRS—suffered a total loss of more than $1.6 million.

On June 2, 2021, Eckland was charged by criminal information with wire fraud, aggravated identity theft, filing a false tax return, and willfully failing to collect or pay payroll taxes. On June 29, 2021, she pleaded guilty to all four charges.

U.S. Attorney Asphaug and Special Agent in Charge Kressin made the announcement.

This case was investigated by IRS:CI and the Hillsboro Police Department. It is being prosecuted by Claire M. Fay, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

State
DPSST Corrections Policy Committee Meeting Scheduled 2-8-22
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 01/18/22 3:08 PM

CORRECTIONS POLICY COMMITTEE

MEETING SCHEDULED

 

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Corrections Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting on February 8, 2022, at 10:00 a.m in the Governor Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. For further information, please contact Shelby Alexander at (503) 378-2191.

The Corrections Policy Committee meeting will be live streamed on the DPSST Facebook page @ https://www.facebook.com/DPSSTOregon

 

1. Introductions

2. Approve November 9, 2021 Meeting Minutes

3. Case Review Process Overview/Updates

    Presented by Marsha Morin

4. Administrative Closures Consent Agenda (The following items to be ratified by one vote)

    Presented by Melissa Lang-Bacho

a. James Davis; DPSST No. 39124; DOC/Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution

    Basic Corrections Certification

b. Jose Garcia; DPSST No. 36656; DOC/Snake River Correctional Institution

    Basic and Intermediate Corrections Certifications

c. Andrew Lopez; DPSST No. 57172; DOC/Snake River Correctional Institution

    Basic Corrections Certification

d. Lisa Pittman; DPSST No. 40830; Washington County Community Corrections Center

    Basic, Intermediate, Advanced Parole and Probation Certifications

e. Thea Quintana; DPSST No. 45187; DOC/ Two Rivers Correctional Institution

    Basic Corrections Certification

5. Kimberly Way, DPSST No. 41941; DOC/Warner Creek Correctional Facility

    Presented by Melissa Lang-Bacho

6. Damien Chakwin, DPSST No. 45087; DOC/Columbia River Correctional Institution

    Presented by Melissa Lang-Bacho

7. Oscar Estrada-Herrera, DPSST No. 55548; Washington County Community Corrections Center

    Presented by Melissa Lang-Bacho

8. Michael Shane Palmer, Sr. DPSST No. 39580; DOC/Snake River Correctional Institution

    Presented by Melissa Lang-Bacho

9. Cameron Williamson, DPSST No. 56428

    Presented by Melissa Lang-Bacho

10. Program Manager Update

11. Director’s Comments

12. Next Corrections Policy Committee Meeting: May 10, 2022 at 10:00 a.m.

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Corrections Policy Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


154 arts organizations receive $1,265,166 in Operating Support awards from the Oregon Arts Commission (Photo)
Oregon Arts Commission - 01/20/22 10:24 AM
Changui Majadero, from Los Angeles, celebrate the last set of the 2021 Sisters Folk Festival at the Village Green stage on Oct. 3. The seven venues of the festival throughout town were filled with dynamic live music and joy. Photo credit Rob Kerr.
Changui Majadero, from Los Angeles, celebrate the last set of the 2021 Sisters Folk Festival at the Village Green stage on Oct. 3. The seven venues of the festival throughout town were filled with dynamic live music and joy. Photo credit Rob Kerr.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/1418/151678/thumb_Sisters_Folk_Festival_audience_2021.jpg

Salem, Oregon – Awards totaling $1,265,166 will be distributed to 154 Oregon arts organizations through the Oregon Arts Commission’s fiscal year 2022 Operating Support Program. There are six more recipients than in fiscal year 2021 due to a growing number of eligible organizations.

 Ranging from $2,000 to $ 25,000, the grant awards are available to nonprofit organizations with arts at the core of their mission and budgets over $150,000.

“We often hear that operating support is the most important type of award,” said Arts Commission Chair Jenny Green. “Especially now, as arts organizations struggle to recover from losses caused by the pandemic, these awards help relieve a bit of the economic pressure.”

In 2019 organizations receiving Operating Support from the Arts Commission expended $213 million, employed 11,681 FTE and produced events and activities that were attended by close to 3.7 million people.

Organizations with budgets under $150,000 are eligible to apply to the Small Operating Program. This program funds an additional 109 arts organizations. 

Fiscal year 2022 Operating Support Grants, sorted alphabetically by geographic region (see end of list for region/county key), were awarded to:

Central

BendFilm, Bend: $7,016 

Sisters Folk Festival, Inc., Sisters: $8,589 

Sunriver Music Festival, Sunriver: $4,899 

The High Desert Museum, Bend: $17,725 

Tower Theatre Foundation, Inc., Bend: $8,077 

Greater Eastern – North

Arts Council of Pendleton, Pendleton: $10,935 

Crow's Shadow Institute of the Arts, Pendleton: $5,429

Oregon East Symphony, Inc., Pendleton: $4,899

Greater Eastern – South

Four Rivers Cultural Center, Ontario: $8,536

Portland Metro

45th Parallel, Portland: $4,899 

Alberta Abbey Foundation, Portland: $6,147 

All Classical Public Media, Inc., Portland: $11,900

Artichoke Community Music, Portland: $5,934 

Art In The Pearl, Portland: $4,899 

Artists Repertory Theatre, Portland: $10,490 

A-WOL Dance Collective, Inc., Clackamas: $4,899 

Bag & Baggage Productions, Inc., Hillsboro: $7,531

BodyVox Inc. , Portland: $13,521 

Bosco-Milligan Foundation, Portland: $5,435 

Broadway Rose Theatre Company, Tigard: $11,265 

Caldera, Portland: $13,091 

Camp45 Contemporary, Portland: $5,506 

Cappella Romana Inc., Portland: $7,997 

Chamber Music Northwest , Portland: $13,226 

Children's Healing Art Project, Portland: $4,899 

Clackamas County Arts Alliance, Oregon City: $8,360

Clackamas Repertory Theatre, Oregon City: $4,899 

CoHo Productions Ltd, Portland: $4,899 

Corrib Theatre, Portland: $4,899 

Curious Comedy Productions, Portland: $6,657 

Echo Theater Company, Portland: $5,620 

Ethos Inc., Portland: $8,230 

Film Action Oregon dba Hollywood Theatre, Portland: $8,794 

Friends of Chamber Music, Portland: $9,200 

Hand2Mouth, Portland: $4,899 

Imago the Theatre Mask Ensemble, Portland: $4,899 

In a Landscape, Portland: $4,899 

Independent Publishing Resource Center Inc., Portland: $7,330 

Lakewood Theatre Company, Lake Oswego: $11,535 

Literary Arts Inc., Portland: $14,004 

Live Wire Radio, Portland: $8,705 

MetroEast Community Media, Gresham: $11,970 

Metropolitan Youth Symphony, Portland: $10,421 

Miracle Theatre Group, Portland: $20,854 

Music Workshop, Portland: $4,899 

My Voice Music, Portland: $6,511 

Northwest Children's Theater & School Inc., Portland: $11,162 

Northwest Professional Dance Project, Portland: $11,245

Old Church Society, Inc., Portland: $7,353 

Open Signal, Portland: $15,965 

Oregon Ballet Theatre, Portland: $11,114 

Oregon BRAVO Youth Orchestras, Portland: $9,670 

Oregon Center for Contemporary Art, Portland: $11,010

Oregon Center for the Photographic Arts, Portland: $6,116

Oregon Children's Theatre Company, Portland: $14,975

Oregon Repertory Singers, Gladstone: $5,400 

Oregon Symphony, Portland: $25,000 

Outside the Frame, Portland: $5,630 

Pacific Youth Choir, Portland: $7,512 

PHAME Academy, Portland: $9,318 

Polaris Dance Company, Portland: $7,833 

Portland Actors Conservatory, Portland: $4,899 

Portland Art Museum, Portland: $25,000 

Portland Baroque Orchestra, Portland: $11,637 

Portland Center Stage, Portland: $19,018 

Portland Columbia Symphony, Portland: $4,899 

Portland Experimental Theatre Ensemble, Portland: $4,899

Portland Gay Men's Chorus Inc., Portland: $7,490 

Portland Institute for Contemporary Art, Portland: $13,489

Portland Jazz Festival, Inc. dba PDX Jazz, Portland: $9,072 

Portland Opera Association, Portland: $22,309 

Portland Piano International, Portland: $6,442 

Portland Playhouse, Portland: $11,431 

Portland Street Art Alliance, Portland: $5,131 

Portland Symphonic Choir, Portland: $4,899 

Portland Youth Philharmonic, Portland: $7,642 

Profile Theatre Project, Portland: $7,477 

Regional Arts & Culture Council, Portland: $25,000

Rock 'n' Roll Camp for Girls, Portland: $4,899 

Shaking the Tree Theatre, Portland: $4,899 

Stumptown Stages, Lake Oswego: $4,899 

The Circus Project, Portland: $8,966 

The Portland Ballet, Portland: $8,667 

The Red Door Project, Portland: $7,939 

Third Angle New Music Ensemble, Portland: $5,217 

Third Rail Repertory Theatre, Portland: $8,611 

triangle productions, Portland: $6,178 

Vibe of Portland, Portland: $4,899 

Western Alliance of Arts Administrators, Portland: $6,972

White Bird, Portland: $11,124 

Write Around Portland, Portland: $9,822 

Young Audiences of Oregon, Portland: $8,192 

Young Musicians & Artists, Portland: $4,899 

Youth Music Project , West Linn: $6,390

Mid-Valley

Chehalem Center Association, Newberg: $8,536 

Children's Educational Theatre, Salem: $4,899 

Enlightened Theatrics, Salem: $2,000 

Historic Elsinore Theatre Inc., Salem: $6,922 

Oregon Symphony Association in Salem , Salem: $5,802 

Pentacle Theatre Inc., Salem: $5,087 

Salem Art Association, Salem: $11,775 

Salem Multicultural Institute, Salem: $7,071 

Willamette Art Center, Salem: $4,899 

Willamette University, Salem: $9,050

North Central 

Columbia Arts, Hood River: $6,952

North Coast

Liberty Restoration Inc., Astoria: $6,694

Northeast

Crossroads Creative and Performing Arts Center Inc., Baker City: $4,899 

Eastern Oregon Regional Arts Council, Inc., La Grande: $4,899 

Fishtrap Inc., Enterprise: $6,951 

Josephy Center for Arts and Culture, Joseph: $4,899

South Central

PLAYA, Summer Lake: $6,065

Ross Ragland Theater, Klamath Falls: $12,806

South Coast

Artula Institute for Art and Environmental Education/Washed Ashore, Bandon: $4,899

Coos Art Museum, Coos Bay: $5,598

Umpqua Valley Arts Association, Roseburg: $6,398

South Valley/ Mid Coast

Ballet Fantastique, Eugene: $5,420 

Chamber Music Amici, Eugene: $4,899 

Community Center for the Performing Arts, Eugene: $7,156

Corvallis Arts Center Inc., Corvallis: $6,749 

Corvallis Youth Symphony Association, Corvallis: $4,899

Cottage Theatre, Cottage Grove: $4,899 

Delgani String Quartet, Eugene: $5,003 

Eugene Ballet Company, Eugene: $11,668 

Eugene Concert Choir Inc., Eugene: $6,339 

Eugene Opera, Eugene: $5,863 

Eugene-Springfield Youth Orchestras, Eugene: $5,307

Eugene Symphony Association, Inc., Eugene: $18,011 

Joint Forces Dance Company, Eugene: $5,294 

Lane Arts Council, Eugene: $13,291 

Lincoln City Cultural Center, Lincoln City: $5,713 

Maude I. Kerns Art Center, Eugene: $4,899 

Newport Symphony Orchestra, Newport: $4,899 

Oregon Bach Festival, Eugene: $16,081 

Oregon Coast Council for the Arts, Newport: $11,885

Oregon Contemporary Theatre, Eugene: $6,784 

Oregon Folklife Network, Eugene: $4,899 

Oregon Mozart Players, Eugene: $4,899 

Pacific International Choral Festival, Eugene: $4,899

Shedd Institute for the Arts, The John G. , Eugene: $13,322 

Sitka Center for Art and Ecology, Otis: $6,533 

The Very Little Theatre, Eugene: $4,899 

University of Oregon, Eugene: $12,065

Whiteside Theatre Foundation, Corvallis: $2,000

Southern

Chamber Music Concerts, Ashland: $4,899 

Collaborative Theatre Project Inc., Medford: $4,899

Grants Pass Museum of Art, Grants Pass: $4,899 

Oregon Shakespeare Festival Association, Ashland: $25,000

Rogue Valley Art Association, Medford: $6,309 

Rogue Valley Chorale Association, Medford: $4,899 

Rogue World Music, Ashland: $4,899 

Southern Oregon Film Society, Ashland: $6,151 

Southern Oregon Repertory Singers, Ashland: $4,899 

Southern Oregon University Foundation, Ashland: $4,899

Youth Symphony of Southern Oregon, Medford: $4,899

Region and county key: 

Central (Jefferson, Deschutes and Crook Counties)

Greater Eastern North (Gilliam, Morrow, Umatilla, Wheeler and Grant Counties)

Greater Eastern South (Harney and Malheur)

Portland Metro (Multnomah, Washington and Clackamas Counties)   

Mid-Valley (Yamhill, Polk and Marion Counties) 

North Central (Hood River, Wasco and Sherman Counties)

North Coast (Clatsop, Columbia and Tillamook Counties) 

Northeast (Wallowa, Union and Baker Counties)

South Central (Klamath and Lake Counties) 

South Coast (Douglas, Coos and Curry Counties) 

South Valley/Mid-Coast (Lincoln, Benton, Linn and Lane Counties) 

Southern (Josephine and Jackson Counties) 

                 

The Oregon Arts Commission provides leadership, funding and arts programs through its grants, special initiatives and services. Nine commissioners, appointed by the Governor, determine arts needs and establish policies for public support of the arts. The Arts Commission became part of Business Oregon (formerly Oregon Economic and Community Development Department) in 1993, in recognition of the expanding role the arts play in the broader social, economic and educational arenas of Oregon communities. In 2003, the Oregon legislature moved the operations of the Oregon Cultural Trust to the Arts Commission, streamlining operations and making use of the Commission’s expertise in grantmaking, arts and cultural information and community cultural development. 


The Arts Commission is supported with general funds appropriated by the Oregon legislature and with federal funds from the National Endowment for the Arts as well as funds from the Oregon Cultural Trust. More information about the Oregon Arts Commission is available online at: www.oregonartscommission.org.




Attached Media Files: Changui Majadero, from Los Angeles, celebrate the last set of the 2021 Sisters Folk Festival at the Village Green stage on Oct. 3. The seven venues of the festival throughout town were filled with dynamic live music and joy. Photo credit Rob Kerr. , Rock n Roll Camp for Girls, Portland , Josephy Center for Arts and Culture, Joseph , Historic Elsinore Theatre, Salem , The multi-generational cast of Cottage Theatre’s 2019 production of “Oliver!”

28 Oregon artists receive Career Opportunity Program grant awards from the Oregon Arts Commission and The Ford Family Foundation (Photo)
Oregon Arts Commission - 01/18/22 2:22 PM
Jennifer Vaughn’s “Cumulative Skies Deep Soils,” 2020: Custom circuit board, speakers, crystallized urea, audio and SSTV radio transmissions LED lights, mycelium, meteorites, cement, tektite. Variable dimensions.
Jennifer Vaughn’s “Cumulative Skies Deep Soils,” 2020: Custom circuit board, speakers, crystallized urea, audio and SSTV radio transmissions LED lights, mycelium, meteorites, cement, tektite. Variable dimensions.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/1418/151627/thumb_Jennofer_Vaughn.JPG

Salem, Oregon – In the first of two rounds of FY2022 Career Opportunity Program grant awards, the Oregon Arts Commission and The Ford Family Foundation have awarded $88,234 to 28 artists for career development projects. The awards include $44,150 from the Oregon Arts Commission for all artistic disciplines and $44,084 in supplemental funding for 11 established visual artists through a partnership with The Ford Family Foundation’s Visual Arts Program. Individual grants range from $425 to $11,000. 

Career Opportunity Grants support individual Oregon artists by enabling them to take advantage of timely opportunities that enhance their artistic careers. Most grants support the artists’ participation in residencies, exhibitions or performance opportunities.

“This grant program invests in the career growth of talented Oregon artists,” said Christopher Acebo, the Arts Commissioner who chaired the review panel. “That support is critical now as artists continue to rebuild from losses related to the pandemic.”

The Ford Family Foundation funds are available to established Oregon visual artists who are producing new work in the fields of contemporary art and craft. 

"These awards allow artists to seize key opportunities in their careers. Even one exhibition or residency has the possibility of unlocking a new path, technique or business relationship that can alter an artist’s future in a significant way,” said Anne C. Kubisch, president of The Ford Family Foundation. “The Foundation is pleased to play a part in that."

FY2022 Career Opportunity Program grant award recipients are:

Laura Allcorn, Portland          

Oregon Arts Commission $2,000                     

To support Allcom’s travel to Science Gallery (Dublin, Ireland) in November 2021 to produce a performance program to be featured alongside a newly commissioned interactive installation entitled SKU-Market, a mini-market where visitors shop to learn about AI and social profiling for the exhibition BIAS.

Loo Bain, Portland     

Oregon Arts Commission $1,500

The Ford Family Foundation $587

To support travel, residency fees, materials and shipping for Bain’s attendance at The Icelandic Textile Centers textile lab in April to use the TC2 loom in Blondous Iceland to create work for an exhibit at Nordia House.

Rick Bocko, Eugene

Oregon Arts Commission $425

To support Bocko's singer/songwriter career by funding a professional recording of “Sunday Breakfast” to pair with a children's book to be published; the book will include the song lyrics, illustrations and music for read/sing/play along.

Srijon Chowdhury, Portland  

Oregon Arts Commission $2,000

The Ford Family Foundation $8,500

To support the production of large-scale paintings for Chowdhury’s solo exhibition at The Frye Art Museum in Seattle in October 2022.

Tomas Cotik, Portland

Oregon Arts Commission $1,300

To support a recording and international release of Cotik’s historically informed recording of Telemann for Solo Violin by Centaur Records, one of the oldest and largest independent classical labels.

Merridawn Duckler, Portland 

Oregon Arts Commission $900

To support Duckler’s housing for a month-long stay at Spokane’s Playwright Lab in February, where her full-length play has been accepted into an intensive developmental workshop Included will be teaching and mentoring opportunities at Gonzaga University and a public staged reading and performance.

Daniel Duford, Portland       

Oregon Arts Commission $1,500

To support Duford’s writing and creation of a shadow puppet performance with live music and actors combining the medieval poem “Sir Gawain and the Green Knight” with North American roots music, to be presented on the Winter Solstice as part of a three-week residency at Building Five in Northwest Marine Artworks.

Joshua Flint, Portland 

Oregon Arts Commission $1,500

The Ford Family Foundation $500

To support the development of Flint’s professional practice by producing an edition of lithographic works with professional lithographer Austin Armstrong.

Joan Gilbert, Enterprise        

Oregon Arts Commission $1,100

To support the preparation of Gilbert’s solo exhibit titled “Wallowa Lake: 55x55” at the Josephy Center for Arts & Culture, running September through October 2022. The exhibit represents the culmination of a three-year project exploring Wallowa Lake and mediums, styles and techniques.

Brian Gillis, Eugene   

Oregon Arts Commission $1,800

The Ford Family Foundation $5,000

To support a transdisciplinary, interinstitutional, collaborative project from May 1 through July 8 that ties the Alberta Abbey to its community by establishing a hub for service and access to resources and opportunities related to health, wellness and social justice.

Garrick Imatani, Portland

Oregon Arts Commission $2,000

The Ford Family Foundation $2,734 

To support Imatani’s exhibition, free online screening, book launch and public conversation for the 2021 Time-Based Arts Festival (TBA) at the Portland Institute for Contemporary Art (PICA) that will also include fabricated sculptures to be exhibited at the Chachalu Museum and Cultural Center (Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde) in early 2022.

Kendra Larson, Portland      

Oregon Arts Commission $2,000

To support Larson’s art residency at GilsfjordurArts in Gilsfjörður in the Westjords of Iceland, in the summer of 2022. The award will support travel, art supplies and documentation.

Niraja Lorenz, Eugene        

Oregon Arts Commission $2,000

The Ford Family Foundation $2,700

To support Lorenz’ participation in a two-week independent study with Nancy Crow in Indianola, Washington, in February/March 2022, The award will support tuition, travel, lodging and supplies.

Brenda Mallory, Portland

Oregon Arts Commission $1,975

The Ford Family Foundation $8,500

To support the creation of art for Mallory’s solo exhibition "The North Star Changes" at The Heard Museum in Phoenix.

Brenna Murphy, Portland

Oregon Arts Commission $2,000

To support Murphy’s performance and exhibition in collaboration with Birch Cooper and Jan Anderzen at Blank Forms in NYC.

Lamiae Naki, Portland

Oregon Arts Commission $1,500

To support Naki’s consultancy with the founder and CEO of Olivia Management, a professional artist management company, to manage publicity leading up to her upcoming album release and strategies for promotion.

Kristen Nekovar, Astoria

Oregon Arts Commission $1,000

To support the completion of custom, hardwood framing in preparation for Nekovar’s debut exhibition at Astoria Visual Arts Gallery from Jan. 8 to Feb. 5.

Aja Ngo, Nehalem

Oregon Arts Commission $2,000

The Ford Family Foundation $2,013

To support Ngo’s study at In Koko Mosaico in Ravenna, Italy, under the supervision of master mosaic artist Arrianna Gallo. The award will support travel, tuition and materials. 

Geraldine Ondrizek, Portland

Oregon Arts Commission $2,000

The Ford Family Foundation $9,000

To support an installation of Ondrizek’s “The First 100 Hours” in the upcoming Personal Structures exhibition at the European Cultural Center in Venice, to run parallel to the Venice Art Biennale from April 23 to Nov. 27.

Sara Parker, Portland 

Oregon Arts Commission $2,000

To support the inaugural production of Parker’s “the beast that blooms,” a multidisciplinary dance performance to be presented at BodyVox Dance Center on Feb. 4 and 5.

Mark Powers, Tigard 

Oregon Arts Commission $1,650

To support a unique one-on-one intensive training opportunity in the Los Angeles area to increase Powers’ knowledge of microphone, effects and drum mixing techniques for the continued growth of the artist’s remote recording home studio.

Alyson Provax, Portland      

Oregon Arts Commission $1,000

The Ford Family Foundation $2,750

To support Provax’ exhibition at Well Well Projects in North Portland scheduled for August,  focused on text-based letterpress works on paper.

William Ray, Portland

Oregon Arts Commission $2,000

To support an all-BIPOC crew for Hearts + Sparks Productions’ production of Ray’s film adaption of a section of M. Scott Peck’s book "People of the Lie." The film title is "tour de force" and will be shot from Sept. 24 to Sept. 30 mostly in Southeast Portland. Post production and editing will occur off-site at Desert Island Studios.

Lyla Rowen, Portland

Oregon Arts Commission $1,300                  

To support Rowen’s residency at the Icelandic Textile Center in April to work in the dye studio and digital loom lab to create weavings that will be shown at the museum and Nordia House.

Angela Saenz, Portland

Oregon Arts Commission $700

To support Saenz’ professional documentation and website services so that she is able to share her new works and details about her upcoming solo show in the gallery of The Armory at the Portland Center Stage.

Coleman Stevenson, Portland

Oregon Arts Commission $1,000

The Ford Family Foundation $1,800

To support the creation and installation of a Stevenson’s new body of text and image work for an exhibition in Brooklyn, NY, in May.

Jennifer Vaughn, Eugene

Oregon Arts Commission $2,000

To support the creation and installation of visual artwork for a Vaughn’s solo exhibition at Ditch Projects in Springfield, Oregon in September.

Phyllis Yes, Portland

Oregon Arts Commission $2,000

To support Yes’ travel to Los Angeles to work with a producer/director on the filming and editing of her movie script “Good Morning, Miss America.”

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The Oregon Arts Commission provides leadership, funding and arts programs through its grants, services, and special initiatives. The Arts Commission is supported with general funds appropriated by the Oregon legislature and with federal funds from the National Endowment for the Arts as well as funds from the Oregon Cultural Trust.




Attached Media Files: Jennifer Vaughn’s “Cumulative Skies Deep Soils,” 2020: Custom circuit board, speakers, crystallized urea, audio and SSTV radio transmissions LED lights, mycelium, meteorites, cement, tektite. Variable dimensions. , Joan Gilbert’s “Wallowa Lake Moody Blues,” 12” x 12”, oil & cold wax on board , Srijon Chowdhury’s “Pale Rider,” 2019, Oil on Linen, 84x192 inches. Photo courtesy the artist.

Oregon awards $2.1 million to support youth experiencing homelessness
Oregon Department of Human Services - 01/20/22 11:42 AM

Need to know

  • Approximately $2.1 million is being awarded to organizations across Oregon to expand services and support for youth experiencing homelessness
  • The money is being awarded to 19 organizations providing services to youth in 16 counties

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Youth Experiencing Homelessness program is awarding approximately $2.1 million to organizations that provide services and support to youth experiencing homelessness. 

Youth experiencing homelessness face many barriers to meeting their basic needs. They experience hunger and difficulty accessing clean clothes, a place to shower, supports and resources, and safe, stable housing. 

The COVID-19 pandemic has made these experiences even more difficult for young people, especially for youth of color, members of tribal nations, and LGBTQIA2S+ youth. 

To address these needs, ODHS is awarding approximately $2.1 million in grant funding to organizations across the state to improve services for youth experiencing homelessness. Most of these grant funds were appropriated by House Bill 2544 of the 2021 Session of the Oregon Legislature.

The approximately $2.1 million is being awarded to 19 organizations providing services in 16 counties to support:

  • Creation and expansion of outreach and drop-in prevention services 
  • Shelter expansion 
  • Transitional housing opportunities
  • Culturally-specific services
  • Expansion of mental health and substance use disorder services
  • Expansion of services in rural areas

Organizations receiving grant funding include: 

  • Alternative Youth Activities (Coos County)
  • AntFarm (Clackamas County)
  • Boys & Girls Aid Society (Washington County)
  • Family Faith & Relationship Advocates (Douglas County)
  • Hearts with a Mission (Jackson and Josephine Counties)
  • Home Plate (Washington County)
  • Integral Youth Services (Klamath County)
  • J Bar J Youth Services (Deschutes, Crook and Jefferson Counties)
  • Jackson Street Youth Services (Linn and Benton Counties)
  • Janus Youth Programs (Multnomah County)
  • Lincoln County Youth Tides Shelter (Lincoln County)
  • Mid-Willamette Valley Community Action (Marion and Polk Counties)
  • Native American Youth Services (Multnomah, Clackamas and Washington Counties)
  • New Avenues for Youth (Multnomah County)
  • Outside In (Multnomah County)
  • Parrott Creek (Clackamas and Multnomah County)
  • St. Vincent de Paul (Lane County)
  • Yamhill Community Action Partnership (Yamhill County)
  • Youth Era (Lane County)

Learn more about the ODHS Youth Experiencing Homelessness Program at https://www.oregon.gov/dhs/CHILDREN/Homeless-Youth/Pages/index.aspx

About the Oregon Department of Human Services

The mission of the Oregon Department of Human Services is to help Oregonians in their own communities achieve wellbeing and independence through opportunities that protect, empower, respect choice and preserve dignity. 

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State of Oregon warns investors about cryptocurrencies, NFTs
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 01/20/22 2:23 PM

Jan. 20, 2022

Salem – The Oregon Division of Financial Regulation is warning Oregonians to use caution when investing in cryptocurrencies, nonfungible tokens, or other new or volatile products.

Cryptocurrencies are digital assets that have no government backing. They are typically purchased, used, stored, and traded electronically through digital currency exchanges. They can be traded for goods and services, transferred from one person to another, or held for investment purposes.

A nonfungible token – or NFT – is a unique unit of data that is not interchangeable and is stored on a blockchain. They are often linked to digital works of art, photos, and videos.

There are nearly 10,000 active cryptocurrencies and they and NFTs are increasing in popularity. Regulation of these new asset types is still evolving. While there are often promises of big returns consumers often lose money when investing in them.

In fact, earlier this month, the North American Securities Administrators Association (NASAA) released its annual list of top investor threats, and investments tied to cryptocurrencies and digital assets topped the list.

“Scams promising big returns on cryptocurrencies and NFTs are flooding the Internet,” said TK Keen, administrator for the Division of Financial Regulation. “Investors wanting to purchase cryptocurrencies and NFTs should do their homework to make sure they fully understand these investments and their risks before getting involved.”

The Division of Financial Regulation encourages Oregonians to follow these tips before deciding to invest in cryptocurrency or NFTs:

  • Carefully research these types of investments. Many of these “investment opportunities” are speculative in nature. Before engaging in a transaction, make sure that you understand what you are purchasing, the value of the item purchased, the reason for the valuation, and how easy it is to sell the investment if you want to get out your money. 
  • Use a digital currency exchange that is licensed with the state to transmit cryptocurrency to someone else. Oregon law requires companies that transfer digital currency from one person to another to be licensed as money transmitters. Digital currency exchange companies that purchase or sell cryptocurrency from their own inventories are not required to be licensed. 
  • Do not spend money you need. The volatility of the digital currency and NFT markets means that you should not purchase cryptocurrency with money that is needed for essential purposes such as food, housing, and gas.

Consumers who have questions about these unregulated assets can call the division’s advocates at 866-814-9710 (toll-free).

###

The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit dfr.oregon.gov and dcbs.oregon.gov. 


Department of Forestry staff displaced by Labor Day 2020 wildfire move to temporary new office in Stayton (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 01/19/22 7:30 AM
An employee with the Oregon Department of Forestry is at work in a temporary new office in Stayton 16 months after the agency's Lyons office burned down in the Labor Day 2020 wildfires.
An employee with the Oregon Department of Forestry is at work in a temporary new office in Stayton 16 months after the agency's Lyons office burned down in the Labor Day 2020 wildfires.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/1072/151622/thumb_Employee_at_Stayton.JPG

STAYTON, Ore. — Oregon Department of Forestry staff whose Santiam Unit office in Lyons burned down in the wildfires of Labor Day 2020 are now in a new leased office in Stayton. 

Since the wildfire 16 months ago, staff had been working either from home, in available office space at ODF headquarters campus in Salem as well as the compound in Lyons. The Santiam staff serve eastern Marion, northern Linn and southern Clackamas counties. This includes assisting people in the Santiam Canyon as they recover from the same devastating wildfires that claimed ODF’s Lyons office.

“We’re happy to be back closer to the community we serve,” said Santiam Unit Forester Kyle Kaupp. “We thank all ODF staff, our cooperators, partners, forest landowners, adjacent districts, and the public for being patient with us as we set up at our new location.”

The structures housing fire engines and other fire equipment survived the 2020 wildfires on ODF’s compound in Lyons. ODF fire personnel are continuing to provide fire protection from that location. 

In accordance with Oregon pandemic workplace guidelines the office in Stayton is not yet open to the public. People can contact staff by email, phone or postal mail to 930 W. Washington St. Suite 20, Stayton, OR 97383. The phone number is 503-859-2151.

Kaupp said planning is still underway to determine a permanent replacement for the lost ODF office building in Lyons, but no final decisions have been made yet.                    

                                                          # # #

 




Attached Media Files: An employee with the Oregon Department of Forestry is at work in a temporary new office in Stayton 16 months after the agency's Lyons office burned down in the Labor Day 2020 wildfires.

ODF awards National Forest $100,000 to help reduce wildfire risk in Medford's watershed
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 01/18/22 7:30 AM

MEDFORD, Ore. – The Oregon Department of Forestry has given $100,000 to the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest (RRSNF) for forest restoration work that will reduce catastrophic wildfire risk on 20,000 acres of the Big Butte Springs watershed, which is the year-round source of water for Medford and surrounding communities.

The award is under the Planning Assistance and Categorical Exclusion or PACE funds administered by ODF’s Federal Forest Restoration (FFR) Program.

Kyle Sullivan, who leads ODF’s FFR Program, said “PACE investments provide contracting opportunities that assist federal forest managers to expand and accelerate planning efforts for forest restoration treatments. The Snowy Butte Forest Restoration Project will reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfire risk in the watershed supplying Medford and communities near it with drinking water.”

Sullivan said ODF received 18 project proposals for PACE funds for this year, totaling $1,085,480. Through a competitive selection process, ODF was able to award a total of $622,895 to the nine top projects. 

“These will help the Forest Service plan faster, for more acres, and/or for more complex projects,” said Sullivan. “These PACE investments work to alleviate a key bottleneck to forest restoration efforts in Oregon: the National Environmental Policy Act planning process.”

The highest scored proposal was submitted by the High Cascades Ranger District in the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest.  The project rated high due to strong partnerships and matching funds contributed through the non-profit Blue Forest Conservation and the Medford Water Commission (MWC). The awarded funds ($100,000) will be used to conduct 2,000 acres of heritage surveys, thus increasing the project footprint.   

“We’re very excited to receive the additional funding from ODF for this project,” said USDA Forest Service District Ranger Dave Palmer. “The project area provides drinking water to 140,000 people in the Rogue Valley, so there’s an immediate need to reduce wildfire risk as soon as possible.”

The goal of the project is to treat approximately 20,000 acres, which amounts to one-third of the watershed. The work includes non-commercial fuels reduction, habitat restoration, silviculture treatments, and fuel breaks, which are designed to reduce risk of catastrophic wildfire, protect drinking water quality, and promote resilience against stressors such as drought and insects. The project on this scale is necessary to achieving the level of widespread resilience necessary for sustaining and protecting this critical watershed. 

Given the importance of the watershed as a drinking water source, the project has enjoyed widespread support and significant engagement from local partners including: 

  • Medford Water Commission
  • Southern Oregon Forest Restoration Collaborative (SOFRC)
  • The Nature Conservancy
  • Lomakatsi Restoration
  • Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife
  • American Forest Resource Council.

The watershed is identified as a priority area in the Rogue Basin Cohesive Forest Restoration Strategy, published by the collaborative in 2017. 

                                                             # # #


Oregon's Unemployment Rate Edged Down to 4.1% in December
Oregon Employment Department - 01/20/22 10:00 AM

Oregon’s unemployment rate was 4.1% in December, edging down from 4.2% in November. This was the 20th consecutive month of declines in Oregon’s unemployment rate. The U.S. unemployment rate dropped from 4.2% in November to 3.9% in December. 

Nonfarm payroll employment in Oregon rose by 8,200 in December, following a revised gain of 9,200 jobs in November. Throughout 2021, monthly job gains averaged 8,900. In December, gains were largest in leisure and hospitality (+2,600 jobs), health care and social assistance (+1,200), manufacturing (+900), and professional and business services (+900). None of the major industries had a big drop in jobs during December.

Leisure and hospitality added 2,600 jobs in December, following a gain of 3,700 in November. Despite these gains, leisure and hospitality still accounts for a large share of Oregon’s jobs not recovered since early 2020, with 23,200 jobs left to recover to reach the prior peak month of February 2020. The industry has regained 79% of jobs lost early in the pandemic.

Manufacturing added 900 jobs in December and 1,000 jobs in November, continuing its steady recovery over the past year and a half. Recent job gains were strongest in nondurable goods manufacturing, including food manufacturing which employed 28,700 in December, a level close to each of the four Decembers prior to the recession.

Administrative and waste services added jobs at a fast clip, averaging 1,400 per month over the past four months. Demand is hot for temporary help supply and employee leasing firms, as the employment services industry added 9,500 jobs, good for 25% growth, over the year. These gains were countered by declines in another component industry: business support services, which has steadily declined from 16,000 jobs six years ago to 9,900 jobs in December 2021. Reductions within the category were concentrated in telephone call centers, and to a lesser extent, copy shops.

Next Press Releases

The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the December county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Tuesday, Jan. 25, and the next statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for January on Tuesday, Mar. 8.
 

The PDF version of the news release can be found at QualityInfo.org/press-release. To obtain the data in other formats such as in Excel, visit QualityInfo.org, then within the top banner, select Economic Data, then choose LAUS or CES. To request the press release as a Word document, contact the person shown at the top of this press release.

To file a claim for unemployment benefits or get more information about unemployment programs, visit unemployment.oregon.gov.

###

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: 2022-01/930/151671/employment_in_Oregon_--_December_2021_--_press_release.pdf

Oregon Employment Department to Hold Media Availability
Oregon Employment Department - 01/18/22 2:11 PM

WHO:                David Gerstenfeld, Acting Director, Oregon Employment Department 

WHEN:              Wednesday, 1 p.m. PST, Jan. 19, 2022

WHAT:           The Oregon Employment Department is hosting a video conference media availability with Acting Director David Gerstenfeld and State Employment Economist Gail Krumenauer.  

WHERE:            Via Zoom video conference: Members of the media must RSVP by emailing  OED_Communications@employ.oregon.gov by 12 p.m. PST on Wed., Jan. 19. Video conference information will be provided to all reporters who RSVP. RSVPs must indicate if the reporter wants to ask a question of the presenters.

OTHER:             The Oregon Employment Department is updating a claims processing progress data dashboard weekly. Visit this link for weekly updates. After the briefing concludes, a recording of the video conference will be emailed to reporters who RSVP’d. 

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Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 953-2366. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services. 




Attached Media Files: 2022-01/930/151621/2022.01.19_Comms_Media_availability_FINAL.pdf

Oregon reports 10,034 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 8 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 01/20/22 5:30 PM

January 20, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 10,034 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 8 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are eight new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 5,916, Oregon Health Authority (OHA) reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 10,034 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 559,960.

OHA hosts media availability

OHA will host a media availability at 11 a.m. on Friday, Jan. 21, featuring Dr. Dean Sidelinger, state health officer and state epidemiologist. Members of the media can participate by joining this Zoom link.

COVID-19 weekly cases rise, hospitalizations and deaths decline

OHA’s COVID-19 Weekly Report released today shows an increase in daily cases and a drop in hospitalizations and deaths.

OHA reported 52,337 new cases of COVID-19 during the week of Monday, Jan. 10, through Sunday, Jan. 16. That is an 11% increase from the previous week and another weekly high for the pandemic.

There were 320,710 tests for COVID-19 for the week of Jan. 9 through Jan. 15, a 24% increase over the previous week and a new weekly high. The percentage of positive tests rose to 22%, up from 21% last week.

There were 441 new COVID-19 hospitalizations, down from 486 last week.

There were 83 reported COVID-19-related deaths, down from the 113 reported the previous week.

Today’s COVID-19 Weekly Outbreak Report shows 210 active COVID-19 outbreaks in senior living communities and congregate living settings, with three or more confirmed cases and one or more COVID-19 related deaths.

OHA releases new COVID-19 vaccine breakthrough report

OHA’s most recent update on COVID-19 breakthrough cases, released today, reported 55,612 cases of COVID-19 during the week of Jan. 9 to Jan.15.

Of those cases, 45,042, or 81%, were unvaccinated people and 10,570, or 19%, were vaccine breakthrough cases.

The average age of the breakthrough cases during that period was 38. Fifty-three breakthrough cases involved residents of care facilities, senior living communities or other congregate care settings. There were 958 cases in people aged 12 to 17.

To date, there have been 88,293 COVID-19 vaccine breakthrough cases in Oregon. The average age of all cases is 42. Breakthrough cases have been reported in all 36 counties.

Cases of COVID-19 are far more common in unvaccinated people. The report shows that the rate of COVID-19 in unvaccinated people is more than five times higher than in vaccinated people.

To date, 3.2% of all vaccine breakthrough cases have been hospitalized and 0.8% have died. The average age of vaccinated people who have died is 81.

Vaccination remains the most effective tool to reduce the spread of COVID-19. Oregonians are encouraged to get vaccinated and, if eligible, to get a booster shot.

The latest breakthrough report can be found here.

Pediatric cases update

COVID-19 cases continue to be high among children ages 0 to 17 with the spread of the highly contagious Omicron variant, according to the latest weekly dashboard report of pediatric COVID-19 case data in Oregon.

Pediatric dashboard and Weekly Data Report update

In the face of rapidly rising Omicron cases, public health authorities are focused on responding to outbreaks in high-risk settings and no longer required to interview individual cases and conduct contact tracing.

With the transition to an opt-in model of case investigation, data on timely public health follow-up (percentage of COVID-19 cases where public health initiated follow-up within 24 hours) and the percentage of COVID-19 cases traced to a known source (cases with an epidemiologic link other than sporadic) will not be collected in the same way moving forward. As a result, we will no longer be reporting on these metrics and have updated the following reports to reflect this change.

  • The Epidemiologic Link visualization in the Pediatric Dashboard has been removed.
  • In the Weekly Data Report, the Epidemiologic Link, Interview and Follow-up sections have been removed as well.

More Oregonians receive COVID-19 booster doses

Oregon continues to move closer to meeting Gov. Kate Brown’s goal, announced Dec. 17, of getting 1 million more people in the state a booster dose of a COVID-19 vaccine by the end of January.

When the challenge began, 949,749 people had received a booster dose. Since then, 415,696 Oregonians have received a booster.

As of today, Oregon needs 584,304 people to get a booster to reach the goal and make our state safer from the Omicron variant. Find a booster here.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 981, which is 60 more than yesterday. There are 142 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is eight more than yesterday.

There are 45 available adult ICU beds out of 648 total (7% availability) and 251 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,146 (6% availability).

1/20/2022 Available Beds (and Percentage of Staffed Beds Available)

 

Statewide

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

Region 5

Region 6

Region 7

Region 9

Adult ICU beds available

45

(7%)

21

(6%)

2

(2%)

7

(8%)

5

(8%)

2

(20%)

7

(17%)

1

(4%)

Adult non-ICU beds available

25

(6%)

38

(2%)

7

(1%)

45

(8%)

35

(8%)

8

(16%)

83

(20%)

35

(29%)

Statewide regions are as follows:

Region 1: Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Multnomah, Tillamook and Washington counties

Region 2: Benton, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Polk and Yamhill counties

Region 3: Coos, Curry, Douglas and Lane counties

Region 5: Jackson and Josephine counties

Region 6: Hood River, Gilliam, Sherman and Wasco counties

Region 7: Crook, Deschutes, Grant, Harney, Jefferson, Klamath, Lake and Wheeler counties

Region 9: Baker, Malheur, Morrow, Umatilla, Union and Wallowa counties

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

Note: Please do not visit an emergency department for COVID-19 testing, unless you require emergency care for your symptoms.

Emergency departments in Oregon are under significant strain. You can find a test here. If you have a medical condition that doesn’t require emergency care, contact your provider. An urgent care center may also help you get the care you need and will save emergency departments from added strain.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 18,244 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry on Jan. 19. Of that total, 1,398 were initial doses, 941 were second doses and 5,509 were third doses and booster doses. The remaining 7,950 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry Jan. 19.

The seven-day running average is now 14,865 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 3,974,479 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 197,799 doses of Pfizer pediatric, 2,616,235 doses of Moderna and 262,498 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 3,103,690 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, and 2,809,173 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (25), Benton (278), Clackamas (776), Clatsop (79), Columbia (107), Coos (142), Crook (45), Curry (38), Deschutes (675), Douglas (204), Grant (65), Harney (4), Hood River (52), Jackson (508), Jefferson (128), Josephine (157), Klamath (146), Lake (4), Lane (747), Lincoln (169), Linn (575), Malheur (143), Marion (1,073), Morrow (50), Multnomah (1,434), Polk (226), Sherman (3), Tillamook (54), Umatilla (288), Union (61), Wallowa (13), Wasco (65), Washington (1,400), Wheeler (7) and Yamhill (293).

Oregon’s 5,909th COVID-19 related death is a 92-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive Jan. 11 and died Jan. 13 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,910th COVID-19 related death is an 85-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive Jan. 3 and died Jan. 17 at Providence Medford Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,911th COVID-19 related death is an 83-year-old man from Grant County who tested positive Dec. 26, 2021, and died Jan. 7 at St. Charles Bend. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,912th COVID-19 related death is a 71-year-old woman from Douglas County who tested positive Jan. 5, 2022, and died Dec. 30, 2021, at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,913th COVID-19 related death is a 71-year-old woman from Curry County who tested positive Jan. 13 and died Jan. 15 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,914th COVID-19 related death is an 80-year-old man from Malheur County who tested positive Jan. 9 and died Jan. 16 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,915th COVID-19 related death is a 65-year-old man from Lane County who tested positive Dec. 29, 2021, and died Jan. 18 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at RiverBend. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,916th COVID-19 related death is a 69-year-old woman from Josephine County who tested positive Dec. 23, 2021, and died Jan. 18 at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our web page (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.


Dental Pilot Project Advisory Committee meets Jan. 31
Oregon Health Authority - 01/19/22 4:46 PM

January 19, 2022

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, COVID19.Media@dhsoha.state.or.us">OrCOVID19.Media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Dental Pilot Project Advisory Committee meets Jan. 31

What: The state Dental Pilot Project Advisory Committee is holding its first advisory committee meeting; the meeting will cover Dental Pilot Project #300, “Dental Therapist: Dental Hygiene Model.”

Agenda: Overview of the Dental Pilot Project Program; role of Oregon Health Authority; presentations by Project Sponsor; role of the Advisory Committee; future planning of the committee.

When: Monday, Jan. 31, 9-11:30 a.m. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Via Zoom. Link: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1602121942?pwd=cG9IWU5abU1sK3lMRkI3V2pMdVNtdz09

Call in option: 669-254-5252  

Meeting ID: 160 7480 0622  

Passcode: 917391

Background: Dental Pilot Projects are intended to evaluate the quality of care, access, cost, workforce and efficacy by teaching new skills to existing categories of dental personnel; developing new categories of dental personnel; accelerating the training of existing categories of dental personnel; or teaching new oral health care roles to previously untrained persons.

Program contact: Sarah Kowalski, 971-673-1563, ah.e.kowalski@state.or.us">sarah.e.kowalski@state.or.us.

###

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services.  OHA provides free help.  Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sing language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sarah Kowalski at 971-673-1563, 711 TTY or ah.e.kowalski@state.or.us">sarah.e.kowalski@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon reports 8,538 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 15 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 01/19/22 3:19 PM

January 19, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 8,538 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 15 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 15 new COVID-19-related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 5,908, the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

OHA reported 8,538 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 549,942.

More Oregonians receive COVID-19 booster doses

Oregon continues to move closer to meeting Gov. Kate Brown’s goal, announced Dec. 17, of getting 1 million more people in the state a booster dose of a COVID-19 vaccine by the end of January.

When the challenge began, 949,749 people had received a booster dose. Since then, 403,059 Oregonians have received a booster.

As of today, Oregon needs 596,941 people to get a booster to reach the goal and make our state safer from the Omicron variant. Find a booster here.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 921, which is 10 more than yesterday. There are 134 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is 18 fewer than yesterday.

There are 47 available adult ICU beds out of 660 total (7% availability) and 235 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,109 (6% availability).

1/19/2022 Available Beds (and Percentage of Staffed Beds Available)

 

Statewide

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

Region 5

Region 6

Region 7

Region 9

Adult ICU beds available

47

(7%)

18

(5%)

3

(4%)

14

(15%)

3

(5%)

2

(20%)

5

(12%)

2

(8%)

Adult non-ICU beds available

235

(6%)

34

(2%)

9

(2%)

63

(11%)

33

(7%)

2

(4%)

57

(14%)

37

(31%)

Statewide regions are as follows:

Region 1: Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Multnomah, Tillamook and Washington counties

Region 2: Benton, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Polk and Yamhill counties

Region 3: Coos, Curry, Douglas and Lane counties

Region 5: Jackson and Josephine counties

Region 6: Hood River, Gilliam, Sherman and Wasco counties

Region 7: Crook, Deschutes, Grant, Harney, Jefferson, Klamath, Lake and Wheeler counties

Region 9: Baker, Malheur, Morrow, Umatilla, Union and Wallowa counties

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

Note: Please do not visit an emergency department for COVID-19 testing, unless you require emergency care for your symptoms.

Emergency departments in Oregon are under significant strain. You can find a test here. If you have a medical condition that doesn’t require emergency care, contact your provider. An urgent care center may also help you get the care you need and will save emergency departments from added strain.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 18,337 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry Jan. 18. Of that total, 1,398 were initial doses, 887 were second doses and 5,937 were third doses and booster doses. The remaining 10,038 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry Jan. 18.

The seven-day running average is now 15,033 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 3,964,755 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 196,288 doses of Pfizer pediatric, 2,609,844 doses of Moderna and 262,124 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 3,100,566 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, and 2,806,938 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (57), Benton (214), Clackamas (672), Clatsop (25), Columbia (105), Coos (115), Crook (93), Curry (46), Deschutes (675), Douglas (160), Grant (3), Harney (2), Hood River (109), Jackson (551), Jefferson (49), Josephine (183), Klamath (106), Lake (6), Lane (586), Lincoln (135), Linn (402), Malheur (124), Marion (1,031), Morrow (56), Multnomah (1,120), Polk (268), Tillamook (51), Umatilla (301), Union (52), Wallowa (22), Wasco (57), Washington (959) and Yamhill (203).

Oregon’s 5,894th COVID-19-related death is an 87-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive Jan. 9 and died Jan. 14 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,895th COVID-19-related death is a 92-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive Jan. 7 and died Jan. 12 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,896th COVID-19-related death is a 55-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive Jan. 5 and died Jan. 13 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,897th COVID-19-related death is an 87-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive Jan. 3 and died Jan. 12 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,898th COVID-19-related death is an 86-year-old man from Linn County who tested positive Jan. 16 and died Jan. 16 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,899th COVID-19-related death is a 91-year-old woman from Linn County who tested positive Jan. 11 and died Jan. 18 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,900th COVID-19-related death is a 37-year-old man from Linn County who tested positive Dec. 29, 2021 and died Jan. 17 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,901st COVID-19-related death is a 56-year-old man from Linn County who tested positive Dec. 28, 2021 and died Jan. 16 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,902nd COVID-19-related death is a 72-year-old woman from Lincoln County who died Dec. 5, 2021, at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,903rd COVID-19-related death is a 52-year-old woman from Lincoln County who tested positive Jan. 4 and died Jan. 16 at Providence Medford Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,904th COVID-19-related death is a 62-year-old woman from Josephine County who tested positive Jan. 12 and died at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. Date of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,905th COVID-19-related death is a 67-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive Dec. 29, 2021 and died Jan. 16 at Providence Medford Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,906th COVID-19-related death is a 75-year-old woman from Douglas County who tested positive Jan. 12 and died Jan. 18 at Mercy Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,907th COVID-19-related death is a 78-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive Jan. 5 and died Jan. 15 at OHSU Hillsboro Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,908th COVID-19-related death is a 64-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive Jan. 12 and died Jan. 13 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our web page (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

####


Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board meets Jan. 26
Oregon Health Authority - 01/19/22 12:44 PM

January 19, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board meets Jan. 26

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board.

Agenda: TBD

When: Wednesday, Jan. 26, 1-4 p.m.

Where: Via Zoom:

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/16054780370

Meeting ID: 160 5478 0370

Background: Established by Ballot Measure 109 (2020), the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board makes recommendations to OHA on available scientific studies and research on the safety and efficacy of psilocybin in treating mental health conditions, and makes recommendations on the requirements, specifications and guidelines for providing psilocybin services in Oregon.

The Board will also develop a long-term strategic plan for ensuring that psilocybin services will become and remain a safe, accessible and affordable therapeutic option for all persons 21 years of age and older in this state for whom psilocybin may be appropriate; and monitor and study federal laws, regulations and policies regarding psilocybin.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Meredith Rider at 971-341-1713, 711 TTY, or edith.rider@dhsoha.state.or.us">meredith.rider@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon Cannabis Commission meets via Zoom Jan. 25
Oregon Health Authority - 01/19/22 10:02 AM

January 19, 2022

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, COVID19.Media@dhsoha.state.or.us">OrCOVID19.Media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Cannabis Commission meets via Zoom Jan. 25

What: A Zoom meeting for the Oregon Cannabis Commission.

Agenda: TBD. The full agenda will be available at www.healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission.

When: Tuesday, Jan. 25, 1-4 p.m.

Where: Via Zoom. Members of the public may join remotely by phone at 1-669-254-5252; Meeting ID: 160 331 9000 Passcode: 444591

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight member-panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the senate. The commission provides advice to Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor and Cannabis Commission regarding Oregon Administrative Rules that govern medical cannabis as well as retail cannabis as it pertains to patients and caregivers.  Additionally, the commission is tasked with developing a long-term strategic plan for ensuring that cannabis will remain a therapeutic and affordable option for patients and monitoring federal laws, regulations, and policies regarding cannabis.

Visit www.Healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission for more information.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Megan Lockwood at 971-673-0620, 711 TTY or .lockwood@dhsoha.state.or.us">megan.r.lockwood@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Conference of Local Health Officials meets Jan. 20 via Zoom
Oregon Health Authority - 01/18/22 4:56 PM

January 18, 2022

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, COVID19.Media@dhsoha.state.or.us">OrCOVID19.Media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Conference of Local Health Officials meets Jan. 20 via Zoom

What: The monthly public meeting of the Conference of Local Health Officials (CLHO). 

Agenda: Tobacco retail license scope of work and funding; school-based health center ARPA funding update; public health modernization updates.

Agenda is subject to change and is posted with meeting materials on the CLHO website at http://www.oregonclho.org/ prior to meeting.

There is no public comment period during this meeting.

When: Thursday, Jan. 20, 9:30-11 a.m.

Where: Via Zoom. Members of the public seeking to attend must register for the meeting at  

https://www.zoomgov.com/meeting/register/vJItde2trDIuHi77O3JM8PRXSEpfLh2L6YY

Background: The Conference of Local Health Officials provides recommendations to Oregon Health Authority on the foundational capabilities and programs and any other public health program or activity under ORS 431.147. (ORS 431.340).

Program contact: Danna Drum, 503-957-8869,  um@state.or.us">danna.k.drum@state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sara Beaudrault at 971-645-5766 711 TTY or um@dhsoha.state.or.us">danna.k.drum@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon reports 28,037 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 10 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 01/18/22 2:23 PM

January 18, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 28,037 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 10 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are10 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 5,893, the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

OHA reported 28,037 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 541,415. Today’s total also reflects the weekend and MLK Jr. holiday Jan. 17.

More Oregonians receive COVID-19 booster doses

Oregon continues to move closer to meeting Gov. Kate Brown’s goal, announced Dec. 17, of getting 1 million more people in the state a booster dose of a COVID-19 vaccine by the end of January.

When the challenge began, 949,749 people had received a booster dose. Since then, 390,311 Oregonians have received a booster.

As of today, Oregon needs 609,689 people to get a booster to reach the goal and make our state safer from the Omicron variant. Find a booster here.

Community Transmission Report and Public Health Indicators Dashboard update

Today, OHA updated the Community Transmission Report links to downloadable data published to Tableau. The most recent full week’s community transmission data are displayed on a map of Oregon’s counties on the associated Public Health Indicators dashboard. These data will be published weekly on the first day of the week.

In the face of rapidly rising Omicron cases, public health authorities are focusing more on outbreaks in high-risk settings and less on interviewing individual cases and conducting contact tracing. With the transition to an opt-in model of case reporting, the most recent Public Health Indicators: Public Health Response data from Jan. 11 will be archived in OHA’s COVID-19 Data Reports 

Data on timely public health follow-up (percentage of COVID-19 cases where public health initiated follow-up within 24 hours) and the percentage of COVID-19 cases traced to a known source (cases with an epidemiologic link other than sporadic) will not be collected in the same way moving forward.

The Public Health Indicators: Indicators of Severe Disease tab from Jan. 11 will also be archived as these data are now published daily instead of weekly:

  • Data on emergency department visits for COVID-19 like illness (CLI) are now available daily on Oregon’s COVID-19 Update: Emergency Department tab.
  • County-level COVID-19 cases by whether they were hospitalized during their illness are now available daily on Oregon’s Epidemiologic Curve here.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 911, which is 51 more than yesterday (1/17). There are 152 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is four more than yesterday.

There are 62 available adult ICU beds out of 662 total (9% availability) and 250 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,107 (6% availability).

1/18/2022 Available Beds (and Percentage of Staffed Beds Available)

 

Statewide

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

Region 5

Region 6

Region 7

Region 9

Adult ICU beds available

62

(9%)

28

(8%)

3

(4%)

16

(18%)

3

(5%)

2

(20%)

7

(16%)

3

(12%)

Adult non-ICU beds available

250

(6%)

49

(2%)

21

(4%)

63

(11%)

32

(7%)

2

(4%)

43

(11%)

40

(34%)

Statewide regions are as follows:

Region 1: Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Multnomah, Tillamook and Washington counties

Region 2: Benton, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Polk and Yamhill counties

Region 3: Coos, Curry, Douglas and Lane counties

Region 5: Jackson and Josephine counties

Region 6: Hood River, Gilliam, Sherman and Wasco counties

Region 7: Crook, Deschutes, Grant, Harney, Jefferson, Klamath, Lake and Wheeler counties

Region 9: Baker, Malheur, Morrow, Umatilla, Union and Wallowa counties

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

Note: Please do not visit an emergency department for COVID-19 testing, unless you require emergency care for your symptoms.

Emergency departments in Oregon are under significant strain. You can find a test here. If you have a medical condition that doesn’t require emergency care, contact your provider. An urgent care center may also help you get the care you need and will save emergency departments from added strain.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 11,430 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry Jan. 17. Of that total, 1,058 were initial doses, 637 were second doses, and 4,517 were third doses and booster doses. The remaining 5,154 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry Jan. 17.

The seven-day running average is now 15,482 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 3,954,935 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 194,737 doses of Pfizer pediatric, 2,603,575 doses of Moderna and 261,804 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 3,097,435 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,804,907 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (82), Benton (792), Clackamas (2,617), Clatsop (134), Columbia (197), Coos (339), Crook (228), Curry (121), Deschutes (2,081), Douglas (398), Gilliam (2), Grant (23), Harney (15), Hood River (43), Jackson (1,835), Jefferson (239), Josephine (453), Klamath (514), Lake (32), Lane (2,561), Lincoln (187), Linn (873), Malheur (75), Marion (2,764), Morrow (67), Multnomah (4,995), Polk (542), Sherman (2), Tillamook (81), Umatilla (703), Union (106), Wallowa (58), Wasco (30), Washington (4,093) and Yamhill (755).

Oregon reports 10,232 confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases on Jan. 14.

Oregon reports 6,062 confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases on Jan.15.

Oregon reports 4,558 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases on Jan. 16.

Oregon reports 7,185 confirmed and presumptive cases on Jan. 17.

Oregon’s 5,884th COVID-19-related death is a 74-year-old woman from Josephine County who tested positive Dec. 22, 2021 and died Jan. 13 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,885th COVID-19-related death is a 70-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive Jan. 5 and died Jan. 12 at Mercy Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,886th COVID-19-related death is a 90-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive Jan. 6 and died Jan. 11 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,887th COVID-19-related death is a 76-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive Dec. 28, 2021 and died Jan. 5 at Providence Willamette Falls Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,888th COVID-19-related death is a 79-year-old woman from Baker County who tested positive Jan. 9 and died Jan. 13 at St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise, ID. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,889th COVID-19-related death is a 67-year-old man from Baker County who tested positive Dec. 30, 2021 and died Jan. 14 at St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise, ID. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,890th COVID-19-related death is a 71-year-old woman from Josephine County who tested positive Jan. 13 and died Jan. 15 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,891st COVID-19-related death is a 65-year-old woman from Josephine County who tested positive Dec. 28, 2021 and died Jan. 13 at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,892nd COVID-19-related death is a 60-year-old man from Josephine County who tested positive Dec. 27, 2021 and died Jan. 14 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,893rd COVID-19-related death is a 72-year-old woman from Josephine County who tested positive Dec. 23, 2021 and died Jan. 15 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our web page (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

####


Nearly 35,000 Oregon households have received more than $243 million in rental assistance relief due to hardship from pandemic
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 01/20/22 1:54 PM

Jan. 20, 2022

 

Media Contact: Delia Hernández 

503-986-2051 

equests@hcs.oregon.gov">HCS.mediarequests@hcs.oregon.gov 

 

Nearly 35,000 Oregon households have received more than $243 million in rental assistance relief due to hardship from pandemic 

 

SALEM, Ore. — Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS) announced that as of Jan. 19, 2022, OHCS and local program administrators (LPAs) have paid $243.6 million in federal emergency rental assistance (ERA) to 34,900 households, up from $235.4 million and 33,770 applicants last week, through the Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program (OERAP). 

 

OERAP continues to be one of the nation’s top-performing programs and is ranked sixth in the nation, in the percentage of federal ERA funds paid out and obligated, as tracked by the National Low Income Housing Coalition.

 

Limited OERAP portal reopening on Jan. 26

 

OHCS will again begin accepting new applications for OERAP starting on Wed., Jan. 26, 2022. This will be a limited reopening based on availability of funds. The agency estimates to have sufficient funding to support between 6,700-9,300 renters. Households with the most need will have priority in accessing these resources, not a first-come, first-served basis. 

 

The agency says it’s important for renters to know that applications received on or after Jan. 26, 2022, will be processed after applications received before Dec. 1, 2021, and to expect a delay prior to processing and payment. Importantly, because of the passage of Senate Bill 891 (SB 891), tenants who apply on Jan. 26, 2022, or after may receive safe harbor protections that prevent landlords from evicting tenants until their OERAP application is processed. SB 891, passed by the Oregon State Legislature this past December, also directed OHCS to prioritize processing applications received before Dec. 1, 2021.

 

Other rental assistance is available in many localities in Oregon through local programs that are operating independently from OERAP. Tenants applying for these programs can qualify for  safe harbor eviction protections. People can contact 211 or Community Action Agencies in their area.

 

Progress and updated numbers  

 

Through its three-point plan, OHCS and its processing partner, Public Partnerships LLC (PPL), have made significant strides in the past several weeks to speed up application processing. Currently, 265 PPL staff are focusing on processing applications. In the past week alone, PPL paid 2,336 applications. This is in addition to the applications processed by LPAs working across the state to finish paying out ERA 1 funds. 

 

To date, OHCS and LPAs: 

  • Paid $243,618,433 to landlords and tenants to help 34,900 Oregon households, 84% of ERA 1 and 2 funds. 
  • Currently reviewing for payment 8,313 applications.
  • Need applicant or landlord response for 5,754 applications.

 

Visit the OERAP dashboard for more data. We have also attached the Spanish Translated Press Release.

 




Attached Media Files: Spanish , English

Marine Board Meeting Virtually January 25, 26
Oregon Marine Board - 01/18/22 2:17 PM

The Oregon State Marine Board will hold a work session on January 25, beginning at 1:00 pm, to discuss boating safety, and will hold their quarterly Board meeting on January 26, beginning at 8:30 am. Both the work session and Board meeting will be held virtually.

Agenda items include:

  • Aquatic Invasive Species Prevention Program Update
  • Small Grant Funding. Action: Board Approval
  • Request Regarding Foam Encapsulation Rules. Action: Consider the Possibility of Opening Rulemaking
  • Lower Willamette River Rules Evaluation, Year Two
  • Life Jacket Legislative Concept. Action: Board Direction
  • Possible Rulemaking via Petition to Amend OAR 250-010-0121, Muffling Devices. Action: Consider the Possibility of Opening Rulemaking
  • Consideration for Rulemaking OAR 250-021-0010, Applies statewide rules for personal watercraft to other small inboard jet pump powered boats. Action: Option to Adopt Rules

Written public comment will be accepted until 5:00 pm on January 21, 2022 and can be emailed to .cooper@boat.oregon.gov">jennifer.cooper@boat.oregon.gov or by U.S. Mail to Oregon State Marine Board, Attn: Jennifer Cooper, 435 Commercial St NE Ste 400 Salem, OR 97301. Verbal comments will be accepted during the public comment portion at the beginning of the virtual meeting. If you would like to provide oral testimony during the meeting, register with Jennifer Cooper, .cooper@boat.oregon.gov">jennifer.cooper@boat.oregon.gov, no later than January 21 at 5:00 pm.

To view the agenda, Board materials, and for a link to the meeting live stream, visit

https://www.oregon.gov/osmb/info/Pages/Board-and-Public-Meetings.aspx. Meetings are conducted using Microsoft Teams and viewing may require the installation of a free Teams app for mobile devices.

                                                                        ###


Tsunami advisory issued for Oregon Coast
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 01/15/22 9:38 AM

The National Tsunami Warning Center has issued a tsunami advisory this morning, Saturday, January 15, for the coast of Oregon, Washington and California, due to a large undersea volcanic eruption near Tonga. Residents in coastal areas are advised to move off beaches and out of harbors and marinas. Waves of 1 to 3 feet along the coast of Oregon and Washington are expected. The first waves arrived at the Oregon Coast around 8 a.m. and could continue for up to 24-hours.

“Stay away from port harbors and low-lying beaches because those strong currents can still cause a lot of damage, and you could be potentially risking your life,” Oregon Office of Emergency Management Geologic Hazards Coordinator Althea Rizzo said.

Rizzo said it is important to know if your home, work, school, etc., are in a tsunami inundation zone.

For information on tsunami and tsunami hazards visit: https://www.oregon.gov/oem/hazardsprep/Pages/Tsunami.aspx

###

You can get this document in other languages, large print, braille, or a format you prefer. For assistance, call 971-719-1183 or email language@oem.or.us. We accept all relay calls, or you can dial 711.


Learn about plans to improve the Oregon Coast Trail at virtual open house
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 01/20/22 9:30 AM

The public is invited to learn about plans to close gaps along the Oregon Coast Trail (OCT). Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is hosting an online open house and webinar for people to learn about the Oregon Coast Trail Action Plan that aims to improve safety, access and convenience for all trail users, with an emphasis on connecting trail gaps.

Visit the open house at bit.ly/OCTOpenHouse1 any time through Feb. 11 to view a presentation about the project and provide feedback.

The project team will also host a live webinar on Zoom from 12 – 1 p.m. Jan. 26 via bit.ly/OCT-Webinar1, or access the meeting by calling in:

Dial: (253) 215-8782 

Meeting: 992 0765 9206 

Password: 12622

The OCT stretches along the entire 362-mile coastline, from the border to border, offering hikers spectacular coastal vistas, lush forests and recreation opportunities for day hikers and long-distance hikers alike. Most of the trail is on sandy beaches, with sections of overland trail across headlands, forests, rivers and through some of the coast’s 28 cities. About 10 percent of the trail is disconnected, inconvenient, unsafe or inaccessible — mainly where the route requires people to hike on the shoulder of U.S. 101 or where it follows county roads and local streets. 

OPRD is leading the planning effort to close these gaps in partnership with the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), Association of Oregon Counties (AOC) and Oregon Solutions. The plan will identify gaps in the hiking experience and determine actions and funding needed to improve and maintain the trail over time.

The OCT was approved in 1971 by the Oregon Recreation Trails Advisory Council and developed and managed by OPRD as part of the state park system of Oregon. OPRD manages most of the trail; some sections are managed by the US Forest Service, Oregon Department of Transportation and cities through which the trail passes.

Individuals who require special accommodations to view the webinar or open house should contact Paul Reilly at eilly@oprd.oregon.gov">paul.reilly@oprd.oregon.gov or 541-272-7394.


Oregon Outdoor Recreation Committee to meet Feb. 10 to evaluate grant applications
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 01/20/22 8:00 AM

The Oregon Outdoor Recreation Committee (OORC) will meet online to evaluate grant applications for the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF). Committee members will rank and establish a priority list of applications from around the state for projects to develop or rehabilitate public outdoor recreation areas and facilities. Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) administers this federally funded grant program.

The meeting is scheduled for 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Feb. 10, 2022. It is open to the public, but no public comment time is scheduled. View the agenda at oregon.gov/oprd/GRA/Documents/LWCF-2022-OORC-Agenda.pdf for a list of project proposals and link to the online meeting.

Recommendations from the OORC will be submitted to the Oregon State Parks Commission for review and approval at their April meeting. OPRD will then forward approved project proposals to the National Park Service for final approval. 

The OORC is made up of nine members who represent a variety of interests and are appointed by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department director.

LWCF is a financial assistance program of the National Park Service. LWCF grants provide matching funds to state and local governments for acquiring and developing public outdoor recreation areas and facilities. Since 1964, this national grant has awarded more than $60 million for Oregon recreational areas and facilities. Information is on the LWCF web page on the OPRD website

Individuals who require special accommodations to view the meeting should contact Nohemi Enciso by Feb. 7 at 503-480-9092 or nohemi.enciso@oprd.oregon.gov


Grants available for historic properties and archaeology projects
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 01/20/22 7:04 AM

The State Historic Preservation Office is offering grants for work on historic properties and for archaeology projects. The annual grants fund up to $20,000 in matching funds for preservation projects. Both grant programs support the goals of the Oregon Historic Preservation Plan. 

The Preserving Oregon Grants fund preservation of historic properties listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Work may include non-maintenance preservation like window repair, roof work, foundation projects, plumbing, and electrical needs. Recently funded projects include preservation of the following historic properties.

  • Aurora Colony Historical Society
  • Churchill Baker LLC, Baker City
  • Creswell Library Building
  • Mt. Angel Blacksmith Shop
  • Santiam Pass Ski Lodge
  • Sodhouse Ranch, Malheur County
  • Union High School, Union
  • Willamette Grange Hall, Benton County

Preserving Oregon Grants can also fund archaeology projects for significant work contributing toward identifying, preserving and/or interpreting archaeological sites. Archaeology projects by Southern Oregon University, Willamette University and the Vanport Placemarking Project were funded last year. 

The Diamonds in the Rough Grants help restore or reconstruct the facades of buildings that have been heavily altered over the years. These grants return buildings to their historic appearance and potentially qualify them for historic register designation (local or national). Recent façade projects have taken place in Lincoln City, Oregon City, Rhododendron, and Wallowa. 

The online grant application is simple to use and includes plenty of support.  A free, online grant workshop specific to these grant programs and how to use the online grant application will be offered. Visit the Oregon Heritage grants webpage to register. 

  • March 9, 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. for Diamonds in the Rough building façade projects.
  • March 8, 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. for Preserving Oregon Grants archaeology projects. 
  • March 8, 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. for Preserving Oregon Grants historic property projects.
     

Recorded trainings and tips are also online. To learn more about the grants and workshops visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at i.Gill@oprd.oregon.gov">Kuri.Gill@oprd.oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.


Grants available for Oregon museum projects
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 01/19/22 8:14 AM

The Oregon Heritage Commission is offering grants to qualified museums for collections, heritage tourism, and education and interpretation projects. Awards typically range between $2,000 and $10,000.

Museums may apply for a variety of projects. Collections projects may include cataloging, archival storage, disaster preparedness, and conservation. Heritage tourism projects may include museum marketing and promotions, enhancing visitor experience, and training for museum staff. Education and interpretation projects may include exhibits, online education, school classes, workshops, and camps. Museums may also partner with other organizations for projects that might be outside of the museum, but still meet the museum’s mission. It is possible to enfold response to COVID-19 challenges into appropriate projects. 

“This program is quite broad and can be used to collect the full spectrum of Oregon’s history, preserve it and raise awareness of it. We hope to see both creative and practical proposals,” said Oregon Heritage Coordinator, Katie Henry. Past projects include:

  • Interpretation and education projects at the Albany Regional Museum, Elkton Community Education Center, Five Oaks Museum (Washington County), Willamette Heritage Center (Salem); 
  • Collections projects by Architectural Heritage Center, B-17 Alliance Foundation, Crater Rock Museum, Deschutes County Historical Society, Jordan Valley Owyhee Heritage Council, Keizer Heritage Foundation, Sheridan Museum of Historic, Willamette Heritage Center (Salem); and 
  • Tourism projects by the Hoover-Minthorn House (Newberg). 

The online grant application is simple to use and includes plenty of support.  A free online workshop specific to this grant and how to use the online grant application will be offered February 8, 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Advance registration is required. Recorded trainings and tips are also online.

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon’s heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are also nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The commission’s mission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity. The commission supports Oregon Heritage Plan goals that include: including more voices of Oregon’s history, access to Oregon’s historic resources, attaining best practices and promoting the value of heritage. 

To learn more about museum grants, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at i.Gill@oprd.oregon.gov">Kuri.Gill@oprd.oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.


Oregon Heritage Commission to meet January 31
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 01/18/22 1:19 PM

The Oregon Heritage Commission will meet via zoom at 9:00 a.m. on January 31. Its agenda includes a presentation on the Value of Heritage Resources in Community Resilience messaging tool recently completed and added to the Oregon Heritage Value of Heritage Toolkit.  interested parties must register through Zoom to receive access information. You can access the agenda and the registration information here

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon's heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The mission of the Oregon Heritage Commission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity. For more information, contact coordinator Katie Henry at (503) 877-8834 or katie.henry@oprd.oregon.gov.

Special accommodations for the meeting – including translation services – may be made by calling (503) 986‐0690 at least 72 hours prior to the start of the meeting.

For more information about the commissions, visit www.oregonheritage.org.


Counties/Regional
Douglas County COVID-19 Weekly Update #659 - January 19, 2022 (Photo)
Douglas Co. Government - 01/19/22 1:57 PM
2022-01/6789/151656/DC_COVID_19_Update_Logo.jpg
2022-01/6789/151656/DC_COVID_19_Update_Logo.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/6789/151656/thumb_DC_COVID_19_Update_Logo.jpg

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19, 2022

 

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 WEEKLY UPDATE

 

(Douglas County, Ore.)  DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 UPDATE #665

WEEKLY RECAP – THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 2022 - WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19, 2022

Total Number of New Local COVID-19 Cases Reported for the Week

Total Number of People w/ Positive PCR or Antigen Test Results Reported for the Week

Total Number of New Presumptives Reported for the Week

Total Number of COVID-19 Related Deaths Reported for the Week

824

781

43

3

Our COVID quick look includes the total number of new cases in Douglas County for the week, which combines people with positive test results and presumptives for the previous week. 

Douglas County, OR - COVID-19 – Seven Day Case Update Chart†

Date

Thursday,

January 13, 2022

Friday,

January 14, 2022

Saturday,

January 15, 2022

Sunday,

January 16, 2022

Monday,

January 17, 2022

Tuesday,

January 18, 2022

Wednesday,

January 19, 2022

Total COVID-19 Cases to Date

15,328

15,412

15,578

15,631

15,643

15,814

15,981

People w/ Positive PCR or Antigen Test Results

14,723

14,805

14,961

15,011

15,023

15,187

15,342

Presumptives

605

607

617

620

620

627

639

Total Currently Hospitalized

23

25

25

25

23

23

25

Total Hospitalized Patients NOT Fully Vaccinated

19 of the 23

21 of the 25

21 of the 25

21 of the 25

16 of the 23

16 of the 23

18 of the 25

Total COVID-19 Related Deaths

320

320

320

320

321

321

322

†Our COVID case update chart includes the total number of cases reported in Douglas County since the beginning of the pandemic in our county on March 8, 2020. The chart illustrates the combination of residents with positive test results and confirmed presumptives, as well as the breakout of each of those. There will be times when a presumptive will move to a positive test result, and our total case number will not change because the case has already been counted in our over-all total. We follow the CDC definition for fully vaccinated, which states that a fully vaccinated person is someone who has received both doses of a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine, or one dose of a single-dose COVID-19 vaccine and at least 14 days have passed since the individual’s final dose. 

 

DOUGLAS COUNTY COMMISSIONERS AND LOCAL MEDICAL COMMUNITY ARE PREPARING FOR AN OMICRON VARIANT SURGE

In preparation for the Omicron surge, the Douglas County Board of Commissioners, who continue to lead the Public Health charge in Douglas County as your Public Health Authority, along with local medical leaders have been anticipating a possible surge in COVID-related hospitalizations.  A surge could once again strain our hospital system, as it did back in August/September during the Delta variant surge.  To help alleviate the hospital surge, together we have established the following:

 

  • ENHANCED COVID HOTLINE: We have enhanced our local COVID Hotline (541) 464-6550, with referral services to local health care providers and case managers, in order to help alleviate unnecessary Emergency Room visits. 
  • DAILY TESTING AND VACCINE CLINIC: OHA has set up a daily COVID testing and vaccine clinic located in the parking lot at the corner of Fowler Street and Diamond Lake Blvd. (across from the Roseburg Public Library).  Clinic hours are 10:00 am to 5:00 pm daily, seven days a week. PCR testing, COVID first and second vaccine doses, as well as boosters and pediatric vaccine doses are available. We encourage people to utilize this resource if a test is needed, as well as utilize other local testing and vaccine providers and also home tests, and not visit the hospital for testing.
  • CHANGED TESTING GUIDANCE: DPHN has also temporarily changed our local COVID testing guidance in order to preserve testing for those that need it most and to preserve local inventory.  So, if you think you might have COVID, but are experiencing mild symptoms, we encourage you to contact your primary care provider or call our COVID hotline for a referral and follow their recommendations.  It may not be necessary to be tested to confirm a COVID diagnosis.
  • COMMISSIONERS PURCHASED OXIMETERS: The Douglas County Board of Commissioners funded the purchase of 2,000 pulse oximeters for DPHN to distribute to patients with COVID symptoms, so they can measure their own oxygen levels and perhaps avoid an emergency room visit.
  • COMMISSIONERS SECURE OXYGEN CONCENTRATORS:  The Douglas County Board of Commissioners worked with Lincare to secure 200 oxygen concentrators and make them available to Douglas County residents who need them.  At the current time, Lincare is able to meet the oxygen needs through their regular process, but if the demand outstrips their supply, these additional oxygen concentrators will be available locally.  Lincare does request that providers use their PARACHUTE ordering system to streamline orders.

 

LOCAL VACCINE AND BOOSTER AVAILABILITY IS HIGH

The COVID-19 vaccines and booster doses are readily available around the county.  Check with your health care provider, AVIVA Health, Umpqua Health, Lower Umpqua Hospital, local pharmacies, Cow Creek Public Health, Roseburg VA or attend a local drive-thru clinic.   

 

  1. Local COVID Hotline Still Active and Available. Our local COVID-19 hotline at (541) 464-6550 has been in operation since March of 2020.  They are ready and available to help answer your COVID-19 related questions about vaccine availability, how to isolate or quarantine, provide referrals for care and when/where to get tested.  The hotline is open 7 days a week from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm.  Just a reminder that the hotline does not provide medical advice.  If you need medical attention or advice, please contact your health care provider or a local urgent care facility. 
  2. DPHN’s EPI-Team is Still on the Job. As they have since the beginning, DPHN will continue to conduct local case investigations; provide case management and education; offer support services to isolated cases and maintain their tracking and reporting systems.
  3. Please Help to Protect our Emergency Systems. Please do not call 911 or a hospital to ask COVID-19 questions. We need our emergency systems to continue to function and be available for those that need it most.  If you are not seriously ill, but need medical advice or want testing, please contact your health care provider. If you don’t have a provider, please call our local COVID Hotline at (541) 464-6550 and they will try to help connect you with a local health care provider. 

 

WHAT CAN YOU AND YOUR FAMILY DO TO TRY AND STAY HEALTHY?

Our team continues encourage everyone, for the sake of our local businesses, services, economy and neighbors, to make the best decision for yourself and your family in order protect those around you from contracting or spreading the coronavirus disease.  We have provided education on implementing the widely proven and age-old safety measures to prevent the spread of respiratory illnesses, including COVID-19 and influenza.  Our team encourages you to access your risk and comfort level, and make the best choice for you.

 

  1. Please stay home from work, school, shopping or running errands if you are sick. 
  2. Please consider getting vaccinated, if you have not got the shot yet.  Get the booster dose too!
  3. Cover your coughs and sneezes with a tissue, and then throw the tissue in the trash.
  4. Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  5. If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
  6. Consider wearing a face covering when you are around those not from your immediate household or when you are in indoor settings.
  7. Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  8. Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.
  9. Never visit a hospital or long-term-care facility if you have a fever or cough due to an illness.
  10. Clean and disinfect surfaces that are often touched.
  11. Delay or limit travel to COVID hot spots or highly populated areas.
  12. Take care of your health overall. Staying current on your vaccinations, including flu vaccine, eating well and exercising all help your body stay resilient.

 

DOUGLAS COUNTY HOSPITALIZED PATIENT UPDATE

As of today, Wednesday, January 19, 2022, there are TWENTY-FOUR (25) Douglas County COVID-19 patients that are being hospitalized, twenty-one locally and four out-of-the-area. We continue to work with Mercy to provide information on our COVID patients being hospitalized locally, this last week they averaged 3 COVID-19 positive patients a day in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and 3 COVID-19 positive patients a day in the Progressive Care Unit (PCU).  This last week an average of 14% of their total hospitalized patients were COVID positive. Of our hospitalized patients today, EIGHTEEN (18) of the 25 patients are not fully vaccinated. 

 

NEWLY REPORTED COVID-19 RELATED DEATHS OF DOUGLAS COUNTY RESIDENTS

Douglas County Public Health has confirmed the deaths of more Douglas County residents related to the COVID-19 virus. Our team confirms and then reports all COVID-19 related deaths in the order that they are received.  Our three hundred and twentieth COVID-19 related death was a 69-year-old woman who was diagnosed with COVID-19 on Friday, November 26, 2021 and passed away on Tuesday, January 11, 2022.  She was not vaccinated.  Our three hundred and twenty-first COVID-19 related death was a 70-year-old man who was diagnosed with COVID-19 on Wednesday, January 5, 2022 and passed away on Wednesday, January 12, 2022.  He was not vaccinated.  Our three hundred and twenty-second COVID-19 related death was a 75-year-old woman who was diagnosed with COVID-19 on Wednesday, January 12, 2022 and passed away on Tuesday, January 18, 2022.  She was fully vaccinated.  In the interest of privacy for the loved ones of this resident, and as our ethical responsibility to follow all medical laws, no additional information will be released. Douglas County Public Health officials thoroughly scrutinize and investigate all deaths, and review all medical records to make sure that everyone we report has met the requirements for a COVID related death, as per the Oregon Disease Investigative Guidelines for COVID-19.  Each death related to COVID-19 is painful for all Douglas County residents, and a sad reminder of the terrible impact COVID-19 has had in our local communities. The Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Dr. Dannenhoffer, DPHN and our COVID-19 Communications Team extend our heartfelt condolences and sympathies to all family members, friends, relatives, co-workers and community members of those who have passed after contracting this deadly virus.

 

NOTIFICATION OF DELAYED COVID-19 RELATED DEATHS OF DOUGLAS COUNTY RESIDENTS

Douglas County Public Health has been receiving delayed reports of COVID-19 related deaths of Douglas County residents from Oregon Vital Records, hospice/long-term care facilities and out-of-state institutions.  Our team confirms and then reports all COVID-19 related deaths in the order that they are received.  We do not have any delayed COVID-19 related deaths to report his week.

 

COVID-19 VACCINATION WEEKLY UPDATE – WEEK ENDING SATURDAY, JANUARY 15, 2022

Douglas County’s vaccine pace continues to be high, with 2,145 doses given last week.  Although many (1,610) were boosters, there were 290 new vaccines.  The remaining vaccines are second and third non-booster doses.  We continue to compare and track our numbers using CDC’s vaccine data, as they more accurately represent our vaccination numbers. The data includes the Federally administered doses given at the Roseburg VA, that Oregon’s ALERT System only recently started including in their reports.   Our current numbers are as follows:

 

  • For those 18 years old and above in Douglas County who are fully vaccinated (as calculated by the CDC) we are at 60.8%
  • The percent of the ENTIRE population in Douglas County who are fully vaccinated (as calculated by the CDC) is currently 51.3%.  This percentage, plus the number of natural infections gives an idea of the level of community immunity. 
  • Those Douglas County residents who have received a booster (as calculated by the CDC).  These people have the best vaccine protection.  For the entire population 38.2%  are vaccinated and boosted and for those over 65, 56.1% are fully vaccinated and boosted.

 

Omicron is now the predominant variant in Oregon and likely in Douglas County.  For previous variants, prior infection provided good (approximately 85%) protection from infection, and we previously included that number in the number unlikely to get re-infected.  Unfortunately, with Omicron, previous infection with Alpha or Delta seems to provide less than 20% protection.  The primary series of vaccination provides some protection (35%) and protection for a boosted individual climbs to 55 to 80% against acquiring the disease and further protection against hospitalization.  Thus, only about 43% of people in Douglas County have good levels of protection against Omicron, and thus we might expect to see a large number of Omicron cases. 

 

It is not too late to get a COVID vaccine.  We encourage everyone to get your initial series, and if eligible, get a booster.  If you had a previous infection, a dose of the mRNA vaccine will increase your immunity.  The OHA vaccine clinic located in the parking lot at the corner of Fowler Street and Diamond Lake Blvd. (across from the Roseburg Public Library) is open every day from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm. 

 

HOME ANTIGEN TESTS MORE WIDELY AVAILABLE AND YOU CAN NOW ORDER YOUR FREE AT-⁠HOME COVID-⁠19 TESTS

Home antigen tests are now more widely available. Home antigen tests are being sold in local stores and on the web, and soon the state of Oregon and the federal government will be delivering home tests. 

 

HOME TESTS are ideal in the following situations:

  1. I am mildly ill with symptoms that could be COVID-related, but I do not need medical care.  In this case, the recommendation is to stay home and if symptoms are still there the next day, do a home test.  (Tests on the first day of symptoms may not show an infection).  If the test is negative, repeat the test in 2 days. If the test is positive, you almost certainly have COVID and should isolate for at least 5 days after the start of your symptoms. 
  2. I was directly exposed to someone who had COVID or might have had COVID.  In this case, the recommendation is to stay home for five days after the last exposure and test yourself on the 5th day.  If that test is negative, you can be pretty confident that you did not get COVID from your contact.
  3. I have no symptoms and am not a contact, but really want to know if I have COVID before visiting my sick grandmother. Home tests are not perfect in this situation, but a negative test is somewhat reassuring and a positive test means you should not definitely NOT visit.

 

We understand that many stores and some websites are currently out of tests. We are also getting reports of fraudulent tests being marketed nationwide, if you would like to check and see if your home test is FDA approved, please follow this link and look it up. https://www.fda.gov/medical-devices/coronavirus-disease-2019-covid-19-emergency-use-authorizations-medical-devices/in-vitro-diagnostics-euas-antigen-diagnostic-tests-sars-cov-2

 

Tests from the state are scheduled to arrive soon. These tests will be distributed through our rural fire stations.   You may receive up to four tests per household. There is no charge for these tests. Additionally, the United States government recently set up a program for U.S. households to order free at-home testing kits  Residential households in the United States are eligible to order one set of 4 free at-⁠home COVID-⁠19 testing kits. Here’s what you need to know about your order:

  • The tests are completely free. 
  • Limit of one order per residential address.
  • One order includes 4 individual rapid antigen COVID-19 tests.
  • The free tests are available online through the U.S. Postal Service.
  • Orders will usually ship in 7-12 days.
  • Orders will ship free starting in late January.

Simply fill out the online form with your contact and shipping information to order your tests. Log onto special.usps.com/testkits to order your at-home tests kits.  Order your tests now so you have them when you need them.  log onto www.covidtests.gov for more information. If you need a COVID-⁠19 test now, please check out other local testing resources for free testing locations in Douglas County below.

 

AVIVA HEALTH STANDS UP TEMPORARY OMICRON SURGE CALL CENTER IN NEW DOWNTOWN ROSEBURG LOCATION

Shared from Aviva Health.  Aviva Health is using donated downtown Roseburg commercial space as part of its omicron response effort, marking the organization’s return to the area where it first opened its doors in 1992.  While clinical care delivery is the long-term goal for the location, beginning today the building will house a temporary emergency call center to address community case-management needs during the COVID-19 omicron surge.  The building, located at 1128 S.E. Stephens Street, was donated to Aviva Health by Ron and Shirley Northcraft, longtime Roseburg residents who want the property to benefit underserved residents in the area.

 

The community has supported my wife and I for our entire careers,” Mr. Northcraft says. “To be able to give back and have it utilized is a good feeling for us.”

 

KC Bolton, CEO of Aviva Health, says the new clinic is perfectly located to serve individuals who currently lack access to reliable, high-quality health care. “We are deeply humbled by the generous gift from Mr. and Mrs. Northcraft. It’s a physical and literal representation of returning to our downtown Roseburg origins,” Bolton says. “This new building allows us to once again provide essential services to our underserved community who reside downtown and may have transportation challenges, removing a significant barrier many people face.”  But before medical care is offered, omicron case-management services are the priority. “Like the delta surge, one of our priorities is to protect hospital emergency department and inpatient capacity, so establishing case-management services to effectively link COVID-19 patients to appropriate sources of outpatient care is a priority of ours.”

 

Aviva Health is also considering relaunching its Acute Care Clinic, last activated during the delta surge, for individuals who are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 in dedicated space that limits interaction with well patients.  While Aviva Health providers will continue to see patients in-clinic, telehealth services are available for individuals whose care needs can be addressed remotely. As it has for several months, Aviva Health continues to offer COVID-19 vaccinations and boosters as well as testing services. Appointments are required. Online vaccination and booster self-scheduling is available here. Individuals can self-schedule a testing appointment online by clicking this link.  Helpful Omicron FAQs are available on the Aviva Health website.

 

REMINDER: DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 UPDATE HAS MOVED TO A WEEKLY PUBLICATION

As a reminder, as of Wednesday, December 1, 2021, we shifted to a weekly release for our Douglas County COVID-19 Update.  But, our team will continue to post our COVID-19 Seven Day Case Update Chart, as well as our updated information list of Local COVID-19 Resources to the county website (www.co.douglas.or.uson weekdays (except for holidays and observed holidays). 

   

STATE AND FEDERAL COVID-19 INFORMATION

The Federal and State Governments, and their agencies are the ones that set policy, issue mandates and provide the guidelines for a state of emergency like the current COVID pandemic. For information log onto U.S. Center for Disease Control (CDC) and the Oregon Health Authority (OHA).  If you have questions about the current guidelines, mandates or the recommendations, please contact them directly for more information. OHA posts their daily updates at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus. Please do not call 911, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office or Douglas County Offices to report issues with the State of Oregon, OHA or the Governor’s mandates.

 

ACCESS TO LOCAL COVID-19 RESOURCES

💻 LOCAL ONLINE ACCESS TO UPDATES: Stay up to date with accurate and local COVID-19 information by visiting the Douglas County Government Website or DCGOV Facebook page or the DPHN Website or DPHN Facebook page.  

 

📝 FREE LOCAL E-NEWSLETTER SUBSCRIPTION: You can also sign up for the free Douglas County e-Newsletter that publishes and sends out the update to our subscription base. Log onto: www.co.douglas.or.us

 

📞 DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 HOTLINE (541) 464-6550: Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners and DPHN continue to offer a local resource hotline for Douglas County residents for COVID-19. The hotline provides answers to frequently asked questions, basic COVID information and referrals to local resources and services. Our local hotline number is (541) 464-6550 and is staffed from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, 7 days a week. 

 

🔍 DPHN VACCINE INFORMATION: Want more information on the vaccines? Log onto: http://DougCoVaccine.com.

 

💉OHA OFFERING FREE DRIVE THRU VACCINE CLINIC IN ROSEBURG:  OHA is currently hosting a free drive-thru vaccination and booster clinic at 1530 NE Diamond Lake Blvd., at the corner of NE Fowler Street and Diamond Lake Blvd., adjacent to the Roseburg Public Library in downtown Roseburg.  They will be offering all three vaccines, boosters and pediatric doses.  They are open every day 10:00 am – 5:00 pm until further notice.  No appointment is necessary.  If you have questions about the clinic, please contact OHA directly at (971) 673-1222 or (971) 599-0496 or log onto: www.oregon.gov/OHA.

🔍 DPHN COVID-19 INFORMATIONAL VIDEOS: Check out DPHN’s YouTube Channel for locally produced informational videos about COVID-19, featuring Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, our Dougals County Public Health Officer.

 

👩‍⚕️ AVIVA HEALTH:  UPDATED 1-19-22

TESTING: Due to COVID-19 case surges and decreased availability of testing supplies, Aviva Health is following the current OHA guidelines to prioritize testing for people who need it. We are temporary suspending testing for non-medically necessary reasons, such as travel and other leisure activities. Please consult your PCP or call (541) 492-2067 if you have any questions.

 

Aviva Health continues to offer vaccinations and boosters to eligible people at our Vaccination Clinic located at 4221 NE Stephens Street in Roseburg. Appointments are required and can be self-scheduled online by visiting: https://consumer.scheduling.athena.io/?locationId=17792-24&practitionerId=17792-121.

 

COVID VACCINE:ALL vaccinations are by appointment only Aviva Health continues to offer free drive-through COVID-19 vaccination services to patients and non-patients, by appointment only. Patients must be Douglas County residents.  Residents may schedule a vaccine appointment by calling (541) 492-2067.  Vaccinations are also available on a limited basis, by appointment only at Aviva Health’s outlying clinics in North County, Sutherlin, Glide, and Myrtle Creek. People seeking vaccinations at their outlying clinics should call (541) 672-9596, to determine availability. 

COVID-19 BOOSTER VACCINES: ALL vaccinations are by appointment only Aviva Health is now offering the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 boosters to certain groups of people, by appointment only, at its vaccination clinic located at 4221 NE Stephens Street, Suite 101A, Monday through Friday, from 8:30 am to 11:30 am and 1:00 pm to 4:30 pm.  Please call (541) 492-2067 to schedule your booster appointment.  For more information please visit www.aviva.health/covid-19-resources/

 

🏥 LOWER UMPQUA HOSPITAL DISTRICT: Lower Umpqua Hospital District has a COVID-19 Vaccine Call Center for COVID-19 vaccine information in the Reedsport area. Call (541) 271-2175, Monday through Friday from 9 am to 4 pm.

 

👨‍⚕️👨‍⚕️👨‍⚕️ COW CREEK HEALTH AND WELLNESS CENTER: UPDATED 1-03-22 

VACCINATIONS:  For all general community members who would like to receive a COVID-19 vaccination, including booster and primary dose series, Cow Creek Public Health offers drive thru vaccinations (no appointment required) on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 9:00 am to 1:00 pm at 2360 NE Stephens Street in Roseburg, across from the Tribal Government office. Last vaccine is administered at 12:45 pm. Mondays and Wednesdays are reserved for Moderna primary dose series and boosters. CCPH has paused administering Johnson & Johnson vaccines due to CDC guidance recommending MRNA vaccines. Fridays are reserved for pediatric Pfizer patients ages 5-11. At this time, we advise community members 12 and older who would like a Pfizer vaccine to find a community provider or pharmacy with that vaccine. At the time of vaccination, all individuals will be required to sign a consent form. Due to staff limitations, CCPH is unable to vaccinate anyone with severe medical risks (such as history of heart attacks, epilepsy, previous allergic reactions to vaccines, etc.). It is recommended those individuals receive their vaccination in the presence of a primary care physician. For vaccine related questions or general inquiries please call (541) 677-5535.

 

TESTING: REMINDER: Cow Creek Health and Wellness Centers are no longer offering free community testing. Testing is available by appointment only for Cow Creek Health and Wellness Center patients, Tribal Members, employees of Cow Creek Government Offices and affiliated businesses at the new Roseburg Clinic at 2589 NW Edenbower Blvd. 

 

🏥 ROSEBURG VA HEALTH CARE SYSTEM: Veterans can set up an appointment COVID-19 vaccine, by calling the Roseburg VAMC at (541) 440-1000.

 

👵 DOUGLAS COUNTY SENIOR SERVICES can help seniors with questions, locating testing and vaccines at (541) 440-3677.

 

Please note for residents under the age of 14, this will require a parent or guardian to accompany them and give written consent for the vaccine.  Under Oregon law, minors 15 years of age and older may consent to medical treatment, including vaccinations, when provided by a physician, physician assistant, naturopath, nurse practitioner, dentist or optometrist, or other professionals operating under the license of these providers; however, families are encouraged to make decisions about vaccinations together.

 

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Contact Tamara Howell, Douglas County Public Information Officer & Emergency Communications & Community Engagement Specialist | Phone: (541) 670-2804 | Cell: (541) 957-4896 | Email: tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us 

 

Contact Vanessa Becker, Public Information Officer, Douglas Public Health Network | Cell: (541) 817-6552 | Email: vanessa@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org




Attached Media Files: 2022-01/6789/151656/DC_COVID_19_Update_Logo.jpg

Oregon Early Learning Division Releases New Isolation And Quarantine Guidance For Early Learning Settings
Lane Co. Government - 01/20/22 1:39 PM

The Oregon Department of Education’s Early Learning Division today released updated COVID-19 isolation and quarantine guidance for early childhood learning settings. 
 

Highlights include:

 · Any child or staff member who tests positive for COVID-19, regardless of vaccination status, for 10 days. The day they started having symptoms, or if asymptomatic, the day the positive test was taken is considered day zero. Day one is the first full day after symptom onset or the positive test was collected.

 

· Anyone not up to date with COVID vaccinations and exposed to a positive or presumptive case should quarantine for10 days. The day of their last exposure is considered day zero. Day one of quarantine is the first full day after the last exposure to a case.

 

· Anyone who has COVID-like symptoms, but no known exposure, it is recommended they be excluded for 10 days.


For additional information please visit the Oregon Department of Education website: https://oregonearlylearning.com/child-care-updates

 


Lane County Public Health January 20th COVID-19 Case Update
Lane Co. Government - 01/20/22 1:10 PM



Total Cases: 42,954 (+794)  

7 day rate per 100k: 1,193.6

Hospitalized: 58 (+5)
ICU: 11(+1) of the 58

Deaths: 364 (+1)

Infectious: 2912 (-201)
 


Lane County Public Health January 20th COVID-19 Case Update
Lane Co. Government - 01/20/22 10:53 AM



Total Cases: 42,954 (+794)  

7 day rate per 100k: 1,193.6

Hospitalized: 58 (+5)
ICU: 11(+1) of the 58

Deaths: 364 (+1)

Infectious: 2912 (-201)
 


Lane Events Center Open House on Thursday, Jan. 20
Lane Co. Government - 01/19/22 8:00 AM

Lane Events Center (LEC) is hosting an open house with virtual and in-person options to hear from residents about the future of the Fairgrounds.

 

The LEC is currently creating a master plan to help decide where and how to invest in the future of the property. The master plan process began before discussion of a multi-use facility and will include a much broader plan for the entire property. Many of the buildings are in need of maintenance and as the type of events held at LEC evolve the property must be ready to evolve with them.

 

Join LEC staff on Thursday, January 20, from 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. to weigh in on the master plan. Residents can attend in-person (LEC Performance Hall at 796 W. 13th Ave., Eugene) or get a link to attend virtually. The link will be available at www.LaneEventsCenter.org on Thursday. 

 

Masks are required for everyone attending in person. Seating will be socially distanced.

 

To learn more about a proposed multi-use facility for the fairgrounds, visit www.LaneCountyOR.gov/LECMultiUseFacility.

 

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Lane County Public Health January 18 COVID-19 Case Update
Lane Co. Government - 01/18/22 12:17 PM

Total Cases: 41,556 (+2526 since 3 PM on Friday)

 

7 day rate per 100k: 1016.3

 

Hospitalized: 53 (+9)

ICU: 6 of the 53 (+0)

 

Deaths: 363 (+0)

 

Infectious: 3,294 (-175)

 


Organizations & Associations
Oregon Hospital Briefing Today
Oregon Assn. of Hosp. and Health Systems (OAHHS) - 01/20/22 4:52 AM

Lake Oswego, Ore. – January 20, 2022 – As we move closer to the forecasted peak of the Omicron surge, Becky Hultberg, President and CEO of the Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems (OAHHS), will meet with reporters on January 20 to answer their questions about hospital capacity, COVID-19, and other related issues.

WHEN: January 20, 11:00 a.m. – Noon 

VENUE: Zoom. The briefing is for media only. Please register in advance by visiting:  https://oahhs-org.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZYqcumrqzMqEtIhGl5lESyictUvT5-Y1QZm  

Becky will speak briefly to start, then open it up for questions. 

 

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Attached Media Files: 2022-01/1635/151633/Press_Conference_01_20_Advisory.pdf

New Scholarship Reclaims the Place of Chinese People in Oregon History (Photo)
Oregon Historical Society - 01/20/22 2:47 PM
2022-01/2861/151693/Winter_2021.jpg
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-01/2861/151693/thumb_Winter_2021.jpg

Portland, OR — January 20, 2022 — In partnership with the Oregon Chinese Diaspora Project and guided by co-guest editors Jennifer Fang and Chelsea Rose, the Oregon Historical Society’s scholarly journal, the Oregon Historical Quarterly (OHQ), recently published the Winter 2021 “Chinese Diaspora in Oregon” special issue, which makes visible the long, complex, and geographically diverse history of Chinese Oregonians.

The Oregon Historical Society has made available for free online the introduction to the special issue, “Erasure and Reclamation: Centering Diasporic Chinese Populations in Oregon History,” written by Jennifer Fang. Readers can also access the introduction translated into Chinese, 抹杀和复原:聚焦俄勒冈史上的离散华人群体.

Focused on the period beginning in 1850 and continuing through the repeal of the Chinese Exclusion Act in 1943, this heavily illustrated special issue offers both new research and new conclusions about the history of Chinese people in Oregon — a subject that has been erased in Oregon’s public memory over the course of 200 years. In her introduction, Fang emphasizes the importance of this publication: “The works in this special issue compellingly demonstrate that reclaiming the place of Chinese people paves the way for nothing less than a new understanding of Oregon history.”

The special issue was over two years in the making and draws on the expertise of twenty authors, including historians, archaeologists, genealogists, and community knowledge-holders, who help readers better understand this part of Oregon’s past. Maps, images, and primary documents throughout the issue help to document complex transpacific networks and how early Chinese communities were integral to the shaping of Oregon. These communities existed in every corner of Oregon, in rural and urban areas, and thrived while navigating complex governmental, social, and cultural systems that were often unwelcoming and oppressive. 

The “Chinese Diaspora in Oregon” issue of OHQ begins with the findings of archaeological investigations that document the work, skills, and living conditions of Chinese miners in eastern Oregon and Chinese laborers in southern Oregon. Through these compelling histories, readers learn about highly skilled kongsi miners, who brought with them to Oregon in the 1860s over a hundred years of experience moving people, supplies, and gold over great distances in foreign lands. Authors also document the ways Chinese laborers accessed, lived, and worked at the remote Buck Rock Tunnel site, an abandoned tunnel on the Oregon & California Railroad’s Siskiyou Line. They explore early Chinese communities in Salem and Eugene that have been erased from the physical landscape and, until recent years, from public memory. A history comic illustrates the imagined life of a Chinese cowboy who lived and worked in Grant County and dispels misconceptions that often permeate the history of Chinese pioneers in America. 

The Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, building on the Page Act of 1876, dominated the experiences of many Chinese people and divided the Chinese community into two distinct classes: laborers and a privileged class that included merchants. Through the lives of Chinese merchants in Ashland, Salem, Eugene, Portland, and The Dalles, readers learn about the critical role merchants served in Chinese communities — as business owners and leaders who used their social mobility to resist and persist throughout history. The scrutiny and complicated documentation process that the U.S. government imposed during the Exclusion Era — on both American-born citizens and Chinese nationals — is documented in two articles that explore Chinese Exclusion Act case files held by the National Archives and Records Administration. Concluding the special issue is an invaluable guide on researching Chinese ancestry. These articles are all launching points for researchers, especially Chinese and Chinese Americans, to learn about and document their families’ diverse histories and continue the important work of reclaiming the place of Chinese people in Oregon history. 

Published continuously since 1900, OHQ brings well-researched, well-written history about Oregon and the Pacific Northwest to both scholars and general readers. OHQ is one of the largest state historical society journals in the United States and is a recognized and respected source for the history of the Pacific Northwest region. The Winter 2021 “Chinese Diaspora in Oregon” special issue and many back issues of the Oregon Historical Quarterly are available for purchase through the Oregon Historical Society’s Museum Store for $10, and a subscription to OHQ is a benefit of Oregon Historical Society membership. 
 


About the Oregon Historical Society

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state’s collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon’s history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon’s cannot be contained within a single story or point of view. 




Attached Media Files: 2022-01/2861/151693/Winter_2021.jpg

On the 49th, and Possibly Final, Anniversary of Roe v. Wade, Oregon Is Protecting and Expanding Access to Abortion
Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon - 01/20/22 11:46 AM

Saturday, January 22nd will mark the 49th anniversary of Roe v. Wade. At a time when abortion access is systematically being dismantled across the nation and reproductive rights are at risk like never before, Oregon is one of the few states in the country continuing to protect and expand access to abortion. The U.S. Supreme Court has already allowed the decimation of abortion access in Texas and green-lit the unraveling of abortion protections around the nation. With the court considering a case that could officially erase nearly 50 years of precedent and the constitutional right to abortion, abortion access could be at risk in more than half the states in the country.
 

In Oregon, state legislators protected and expanded abortion access by passing 2017’s Reproductive Health Equity Act, which safeguards abortion rights in Oregon no matter what happens to Roe. Yet the legal right to an abortion has never been enough when millions can’t access it. For so many, including some Oregonians, abortion is a right in name only. That is why Oregon continues to push beyond legal protection to enact policies that expand and ensure access to safe, quality reproductive health care. Last year Oregon passed the Telehealth Equity Act, which ensures coverage of telehealth services so Oregonians can access health care no matter where they are, and the Equal Access to Care Act, which protects access to essential health services, including reproductive health care, during mergers and acquisitions.
 

Statement from Lisa Gardner, President & CEO, Planned Parenthood of Southwestern Oregon:
 

“Access to abortion should not depend on your ZIP code. As safe and legal abortion access is under attack all across the country, Planned Parenthood health centers in Oregon are continuing to provide patients with expert, compassionate abortion care. We will continue providing care to all patients in our communities and those who travel to our state to access the abortion care they deserve.” 
 

Statement from Anne Udall, President & CEO, Planned Parenthood Columbia Willamette:
 

“Planned Parenthood health centers are utilizing technology and innovation to continue increasing access to medication abortion care through telehealth. Studies have shown that medication abortion is as safe and effective as medical abortions conducted in person. Still, there is more work to be done, especially to ensure access for those facing systemic barriers to care — Black, Brown and Native communities; LGBTQ+ people; people in rural areas; and those struggling to make ends meet.”
 

Statement from An Do, Executive Director, Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon:
 

“By this summer, the Supreme Court could officially erase nearly 50 years of precedent and gut the constitutional protections that millions rely on to legally access an abortion. Whether or not the Supreme Court explicitly overturns Roe v. Wade, we know that the right to an abortion has never been enough to guarantee access. We cannot be complacent. We must continue fighting for proactive measures to protect and expand abortion access across the country, and the U.S. Senate must follow the lead of our Oregon leaders, take action and pass the Women’s Health Protection Act as soon as possible.”
 

Less than two months ago, a majority of Supreme Court justices appeared prepared to overturn Roe during oral arguments in a case on a Mississippi abortion ban where the state explicitly requested the constitutional right be overturned. Should Roe be overturned, by this summer, politicians in about half of U.S. states may be able to control people’s personal reproductive decisions. About 36 million women — nearly half of the women of reproductive age (18-49) in the United States and more people who can become pregnant — could lose access to abortion.
 

Last year, in a historic vote, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the Women’s Health Protection Act (WHPA) with the support of Oregon Congresswoman Suzanne Bonamici, Congressman Peter DeFazio, Congressman Earl Blumenauer and Congressman Kurt Schrader. WHPA establishes a statuatory right to provide and receive abortion care, prohibiting states from implementing abortion bans and restrictions. The U.S. Senate must follow suit and pass WHPA as soon as possible to ensure everyone can make their own healthcare decisions without political interference.
 

Roe at Risk: Oregon Impact Report

With the U.S. Supreme Court poised to rule on a case that could render the constitutional right to an abortion meaningless, recent research from Planned Parenthood Federation of America and In Our Own Voice: National Black Women’s Reproductive Justice Agenda shows that nearly half of the women in the United States of reproductive age — more than 36 million women — and more people who can become pregnant, could lose abortion access if Roe v. Wade is overturned. 
 

Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, a petition to uphold Mississippi’s cruel 15-week abortion ban, could hollow out Roe and upend nearly 50 years of precedent. In fact, the state of Mississippi is asking the court to overturn both Roe v. Wade (1973) and Planned Parenthood v. Casey (1992), which would pave the way for 26 states to quickly move to ban abortion. 
 

Idaho is among 12 states with trigger laws that state governments could use to ban abortion immediately after a Supreme Court decision overruling or undermining Roe. Oregonians would be directly harmed as a result:
 

  • An analysis in The New York Times indicates that Eastern Oregonians could see a 35% reduction in abortion access, forced to drive hundreds of miles to the nearest provider in Bend. 
  • A study by The Guttmacher Institute indicates that Oregon health centers would experience a 234% increase in out-of-state patients if a 15-week abortion ban goes into effect.
  • Oregon health centers are already experiencing staffing shortages. In a post-Roe world, there would be real impacts for Oregonians who may have trouble getting appointments in their own communities.
     

We are at a crisis moment for abortion access. In 2021 alone, nearly 600 abortion restrictions were introduced nationwide, including 11 here in Oregon, with 108 enacted into law across the country — more than in any year since Roe was decided. 
 

For millions of Americans, abortion is already a right in name only. For far too many people, abortion is nearly inaccessible due to a shortage of abortion providers, lack of insurance coverage and an onslaught of draconian and medically unnecessary state restrictions — including mandatory waiting periods, forced ultrasounds, biased counseling, bans on safe abortion methods and telemedicine bans. 
 

  • The 36 million people who would lose access to abortion if Roe is overturned include 5.3 million Black people, 5.7 million Hispanic or Latino people, 1.1 million Asian people and nearly 340,000 American Indian or Alaska Native people of reproductive age (American Community Survey 2019). 
  • Those who receive abortions are 39% white, 28% Black, 25% Hispanic and 6% AAPI.
  • In 2019, nearly 1 in 9 women across the country lived in poverty — and those were disproportionately Black, Latina or Indigenous women, who experience poverty at twice the rate of non-Hispanic white women due to economic disparities rooted in racist policies.
  • Groups facing discrimination and systemic oppression in the healthcare system are more likely to have low incomes and more likely to use Medicaid — including people of color, LGBTQ+ people, people with disabilities and women. These insurance programs may not use federal funds to cover abortion because of the Hyde Amendment, a discriminatory restriction in effect for more than 40 years. The majority of abortion patients are forced to pay out-of-pocket for the procedure, which averages around $500 — a significant and unexpected expense for people with low incomes. 
  • The vast majority of abortion patients (75%) are people with low incomes, and 49% earn below the federal poverty level (a family of two earning an annual income of $15,730 or less). 
  • Access to abortion hinges not just on navigating the financial cost, but on managing logistical barriers like child care, time off work and travel.
     

THE BOTTOM LINE: THE THREAT TO THE CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHT TO AN ABORTION HAS NEVER BEEN GREATER. 
 

Abortion justice can only be achieved when people have the complete economic and social power and resources to make healthy decisions about their bodies, families and communities in all areas of their lives. It is time to depoliticize what should be a personal healthcare decision, support abortion access in all communities and support policies that increase access to abortion — rather than decimating people’s most basic rights, city by city and state by state.