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Eugene/Spring/Rose/Alb/Corv News Releases for Thu. Nov. 21 - 10:24 pm
Thu. 11/21/19
Shooting Investigation Update
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/21/19 6:19 PM

JCSO Case #19-24374

This is an update on 112119 at 1820 hours regarding a shooting in the 6600 block of Ponderosa Street Central Point, Oregon. The case was reported initially at 1536 hours by a neighbor who heard a gunshot. Jackson County Sheriff's Office Deputies arriving on scene found a male adult deceased outside at the scene. All involved persons are accounted for and the investigation is continuing. The Jackson County Major Assault and Death Investigation Unit has been activated and is investigating the case.

Further details will be released on Friday 112219.


Deputies on Scene of Shooting
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/21/19 5:04 PM

On 112119 at 1536 hours, deputies from the Jackson County Sheriff’s Office responded to a report of gunshots heard at a residence in the 6600 block of Ponderosa St. Central Point. Deputies arriving on scene found one subject deceased.  The scene is contained and there is no continuing threat to the safety of the public.

Further details will be released later this evening.


Oregon Securities Broker Charged with Investment Churning and Tax Evasion
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 11/21/19 3:10 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A 13-count indictment was filed in federal court today charging James W. Millegan, 62, a former Oregon securities broker, with investment account churning and tax evasion.

Millegan, who currently resides in McMinnville, Oregon, owned and operated J.W. Millegan, Inc., a commission-based investment advisory business serving clients primarily located in the Portland and Salem, Oregon metropolitan areas.

According to the indictment, beginning in March 2012 and continuing until May 2017, Millegan is alleged to have churned the investment accounts of 12 different clients. Churning occurs when a securities broker engages in excessive buying and selling in a client’s account to generate commissions benefitting the broker with no reasonable expectation the client will benefit from the trading. When accounts are churned, clients are prevented from earning investment profits on the money they pay in excessive fees and commissions.

Millegan’s alleged actions generated more than $2.5 million in trading commissions and cost these 12 investors more than $4.3 million in estimated unrealized investment gains.

Additionally, between July 2006 and September 2016, Millegan is alleged to have willfully evaded payment of more than $3.3 million in personal income taxes. To conceal approximately $3.7 million in commissions from the IRS, Millegan allegedly transferred funds to hidden bank accounts and filed false financial statements.

This case was investigated by the FBI and IRS-Criminal Investigation and is being prosecuted by Seth D. Uram, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release , Indictment

Oregon Veterans' Affairs Advisory Committee's final meeting of 2019 to be held in Salem
Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs - 11/21/19 1:25 PM

The final 2019 meeting of the Advisory Committee to the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs will be held from 9:30 a.m. to noon Wednesday, Dec. 4, at the Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training, 4190 Aumsville Hwy S.E. in Salem. 

The committee is made up of veterans appointed by the governor to provide counsel on veteran issues and represent veteran concerns across Oregon. Its nine members serve in a vital advisory role to the director and staff of the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs.

Their meetings are held at different locations across the state on the first Wednesday in March, June and December, as well as the second Wednesday in September. The public is invited to attend and participate.

For those planning to attend the December meeting, please be advised that the dress code at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training prohibits blue jeans and all other denim attire.

More information can be found online at www.oregon.gov/odva/Pages/advisory.aspx or to contact the Advisory Committee, please email vaac@odva.state.or.us.


Western Oregon University Board of Trustees approves Aquarium Science program
Western Oregon University - 11/21/19 11:24 AM

MONMOUTH, Ore. – During its quarterly meeting Wednesday, the Western Oregon University Board of Trustees approved a new Bachelor of Science in Aquarium Science that encompasses a partnership with Oregon Coast Community College.

In the new academic program, WOU students will study three years in Monmouth followed by a final year at OCCC where they will take their aquarium science coursework and an experiential summer internship. Of the dozen or so universities in the U.S. offering four-year degrees in zoo or wildlife sciences, only three have a degree that emphasizes aquarium science.

“We are excited about this program for many reasons, including the fact that it will save time and money for students who are eager to pursue a career in aquarium science,” said WOU President Rex Fuller. “We know that employers in this field want professionals to have four-year degrees, and we are happy to partner with Oregon Coast Community College to meet this market demand and set graduates up for success in the work force.”

The next steps will be approval by the Higher Education Coordinating Commission and notification to WOU’s accrediting body, the NWCCU. If approved, the program would begin in fall 2020.

At the meeting, the board also:

  • Approved a new undergraduate certificate in Professional Writing, which will be offered at both the Monmouth campus and WOU:Salem
  • Approved a new graduate certificate in Interpreting Studies: Teaching Interpreting. The online program will meet the demand for advanced interpreting studies education to prepare educators in the Pacific Northwest and nationwide 
  • Approved the establishment of a $5 million revolving line of credit
  • Adopted the Fiscal Year 2020 Proposed Adjusted Budget
  • Heard a summary of the economic impact study of Oregon’s Technical and Regional Universities. The four institutions account for more than 2,500 campus jobs and support a total of 7,500 jobs in Oregon. The combined value of all goods and services associated with TRU spending from operations, construction and visitor spending is more than $1 billion.

For additional information about the board meeting, visit wou.edu/board

About Western Oregon University

Western Oregon University, founded in 1856 and located in Monmouth, is the state’s oldest public university. Serving approximately 5,000 students, WOU is a mid-sized, NCAA Division II institution with about 70 percent of the student population being from Oregon. A significant portion of attendees are members of under-represented groups, veterans or non-traditional students. WOU is Oregon’s campus of choice for those seeking a transformative education in a supportive, student-centered learning community where classes are taught by faculty. Together we succeed.

 

# # #


[Update: photo] Oregon Recreation Trail Advisory Council presents Doug Newman award at Oregon Trails Summit (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 11/21/19 9:42 AM
Becky Wolf holds her Doug Newman Memorial Award (Photo credit: Daniel Sharp)
Becky Wolf holds her Doug Newman Memorial Award (Photo credit: Daniel Sharp)
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/1303/129456/thumb_Becky_Wolf_credit_Daniel_Sharp.jpg

Update 9:45 a.m. - See attached photo of Becky Wolf.

ROSEBURG, Ore. – The Oregon Recreation Trails Advisory Council (ORTAC) presented the Doug Newman Memorial Award to Becky Wolf at the 2019 Oregon Trails Summit Oct. 4 in Roseburg.

Wolf has been a community trails advocate for more than 30 years and has contributed thousands of volunteer hours to improving Oregon’s trail systems. A resident of Molalla, Wolf is the fourth woman to be individually recognized with the award.

Summary of Wolf’s contributions:

  • Former member of ORTAC and the Recreational Trails Program Grant Advisory Committee.
  • Board member for nonprofit Molalla River Watch and the Oregon Trails Coalition.
  • Active member of nonprofit Oregon Equestrian Trails.
  • Caretaker of a section of the Pacific Crest Trail in the Mt. Hood National Forest for 21 years.
  • Former director of public lands and director of Leave No Trace education for the Back Country Horsemen of Oregon.
  • Food coordinator and lead cook for the Pacific Crest Trail Association’s annual Trail Skills College.

The Doug Newman Memorial Award recognizes an Oregonian whose efforts have inspired, benefitted and contributed the state’s trails and trail users. The award pays tribute to Doug Newman, an avid outdoorsman, author and journalist for The Eugene Register-Guard. Diagnosed with polio as a child, Newman died in 1992.

ORTAC was established by the Legislature in 1971 to advise Oregon Parks and Recreation Department and its partners in the development and promotion of high quality non-motorized trail systems throughout Oregon.

For more information about the Doug Newman Award or ORTAC, contact Jodi Bellefeuille at jodi.bellefeuille@oregon.gov or 503-986-0716.




Attached Media Files: Becky Wolf holds her Doug Newman Memorial Award (Photo credit: Daniel Sharp)

SAIF offers free agriculture safety seminar December 4 in Corvallis
SAIF - 11/21/19 8:30 AM

What: SAIF will be presenting a free, half-day seminar on agriculture safety and health on Wednesday, December 4.

Who should attend: The seminars are designed primarily for people working in agriculture, but are open to anyone interested in ag safety and health—they don't have to be insured by SAIF.

When: Wednesday, December 4 from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Lunch is included.

Where: Benton Co. Fairgrounds, Guerber Hall, 110 SW 53rd Street

More information: Below and at www.saif.com/agseminars. SAIF safety management consultants are available for interviews on the seminars and ag safety. Photos from last year’s seminars are available by request.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________

FREE FARM SAFETY SEMINARS HELD IN 17 CITIES ACROSS OREGON

Summary: SAIF’s annual ag seminars will be held in 17 cities across the state and online in English and Spanish.

__________________________________

Farm work is a whole lot safer than it used to be. But as far as SAIF is concerned, even one injury or illness is too many.

That’s why SAIF is offering 29 free ag safety seminars in 17 cities across Oregon. The first will be in La Grande on October 28, and they’ll continue through March. Nine of the seminars will be presented entirely in Spanish. Last year, more than 2,180 workers and employers attended SAIF’s seminars.

“We purposely hold these in the off-season to encourage attendance,” said Courtney Merriott, senior safety management consultant at SAIF and presenter at this year’s seminars. “Our goal is to provide the latest safety content for the industry, so that every ag worker goes home safe and healthy each night.”

This year’s seminars will focus on four topics: respiratory personal protective equipment, working at elevation, safety leadership for anyone, and incident analysis—a structured process for identifying what happened and reducing recurrence of injuries moving forward.

In March, SAIF will also offer webinars online in English and, new this year, Spanish.

The seminars are designed primarily for people working in agriculture but are open to anyone interested in ag safety and health—they don’t have to be insured by SAIF.

In-person seminars will be held in Bandon, Central Point, Clackamas, Corvallis, Eugene, Hermiston, Hillsboro, Hood River, Klamath Falls, La Grande, Madras, Milton-Freewater, Ontario, Salem, The Dalles, Wilsonville, and Woodburn.

Spanish seminars will be held in Central Point, Eugene, Hermiston, Hillsboro, Hood River, Salem, The Dalles, Wilsonville, and Woodburn.

All will run from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., and lunch will be provided.

Employers with small ag businesses who attend the seminar, or watch the webinars, will meet OSHA’s instructional requirement—one of four requirements that exempt small agricultural operations from random OSHA inspections.

Three hours of technical and one hour of business continuing education credits will be offered if approved by the Landscape Contractors Board. Producer continuing education credit hours for licensed insurance agents have been requested and are pending approval by the Department of Consumer and Business Services.

More information—including registration details—can be found at www.saif.com/agseminars.

About SAIF

SAIF is Oregon's not-for-profit workers' compensation insurance company. Since 1914, we've been taking care of injured workers, helping people get back to work, and striving to make Oregon the safest and healthiest place to work. For more information, visit the About SAIF page on saif.com.


Tip of the Week for November 25 - Protecting Pets in Winter Weather (Photo)
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/21/19 8:28 AM
2019-11/5490/129471/pets_in_winter.jpg
2019-11/5490/129471/pets_in_winter.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/5490/129471/thumb_pets_in_winter.jpg

PROTECTING PETS IN WINTER WEATHER

Winter is a time we should pay close attention to the safety of our pets.  Here are some safety tips to follow:

  1. With the change in weather, it’s a good time to monitor your pet’s food intake. Pets who live outdoors should be fed a bit more in the winter because they need the extra calories to stay warm. Indoor pets typically receive less exercise during cold weather and may require fewer calories.  
  2. Oregon law requires all companion animals be provided shelter from the elements. They also should have fresh water put out a couple of times a day or consider a special bowl that prevents the water from freezing. In severe weather, allow your pet in your house or garage.
  3. If your pet goes outdoors, be aware of the temperature.  Pets can get frostbite very easily on the ears, tail and paws.
  4. When walking your dog in freezing conditions, check the paws to make sure that ice is not building up between the toes and that salt or gravel from the roads is not irritating the skin.
  5. If your dog is a swimmer, keep them on a leash around open water or unstable ice.  Hypothermia can set in quickly and your dog may be unable to get out of the water.
  6. Before you start your car, ensure no kitties have decided to nap in a warm spot by honking the horn or banging on the hood.
  7. If you are decorating for the holidays, keep ornaments out of the reach of your pets.  Remember that poinsettias, holly, mistletoe and other plants can be toxic if ingested.
  8. Ingesting anti-freeze can be fatal for your dog or cat.  It has a sweet taste and even a tiny amount can cause severe kidney damage and even death. You can use a pet-safe antifreeze--look for brands containing propylene glycol instead of ethylene glycol. If you spill anti-freeze, soak it up immediately.  (Clay kitty litter works well and discard the litter once the anti-freeze has been absorbed.)

For more information and tips, visit our website at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and Like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/5490/129471/112519-Protecting_Pets_in_Winter.pdf , 2019-11/5490/129471/pets_in_winter.jpg

Wed. 11/20/19
Elkton Schools - Update
Elkton Sch. Dist. - 11/20/19 2:27 PM

As of 2:20 pm we have received assurance from law enforcement and have lifted the lock-out.

Andy Boe

Superintendent


Elkton Schools -
Elkton Sch. Dist. - 11/20/19 2:17 PM

We received a phone call at about 1:00 from law enforcement concerning a person of interest that they were trying to locate. We chose to initiate a lock out for our School  District. There is no direct or imminent threat. We will remain in Lock Out until we receive word from law enforcement. In Lock Out no one is allowed in or out of the school. Our perimeter is secured and students go about their day inside the building. Please check back  as we will  update as information becomes available.

Andy Boe

Elkton Superintendent


Forest Deputies Arrest Two Washington County Men Preparing for Holiday Season ***Corrected Date of Incident***(Photo) (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/20/19 11:49 AM
2019-11/1294/129437/Fir_Boughs.jpg
2019-11/1294/129437/Fir_Boughs.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/1294/129437/thumb_Fir_Boughs.jpg

The original release incorrectly stated this occurred on November 19th.  The correct date is November 12th.

     As the holiday season is quickly approaching our Forest Patrol deputies will see an increase in people heading into the Willamette National Forest looking for the perfect tree.  Forest Patrol Deputies from the Marion County Sheriff’s Office will be in the area working with law enforcement from the U.S. Forest Service to not only keep people safe, but to be on the lookout for those involved in the theft of Special Forest Products.

     Recently, on November 12th, Forest Patrol Deputies stopped two Washington County men in a vehicle which was carrying approximately 3800 lbs of fir boughs on Highway 22 near Stayton.  During the traffic stop deputies learned the fir boughs had been unlawfully taken from the Willamette National Forest and were intended to be used commercially for creating holiday decorations.  Jose Lucas Lucas, 42, and Juan Lucas Perez, 31, were both charged with the Unlawful Cutting and Transport of Special Forest Products and seized the boughs.

     The illegal harvest and sales of Special Forest Products in Oregon is a continuing concern as we work to preserve the natural beauty of our outdoor recreational areas.  A few examples of Special Forest Products include; Christmas trees and boughs, cones, bear grass, salal and firewood.  Illegally harvested forest products are commonly used commercially in the creation of decorations, floral displays or shipped overseas.  Thefts of these products are not just limited to U.S. Forest Service land, but also directly impact lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management, Oregon Department of Forestry and private timber lands.

     Our Forest Patrol Deputies want to encourage members of our community to do their part to protect our outdoor spaces by reporting suspected theft of Special Forest Products.  For more information about Special Forest Products and permit requirements please visit:




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/1294/129437/Fir_Boughs.jpg , 2019-11/1294/129437/Fir_Boughs_3.jpg

Portland Man Sentenced to 15 Years in Federal Prison for Sexually Exploiting Two Children
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 11/20/19 11:46 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.—Juan Carlos Ramon, 33, of Portland, was sentenced today to 180 months in federal prison followed by a life term of supervised release after sexually exploiting two minor victims, aged six and eight, using musical.ly, a social media mobile application now known as TikTok.

According to court documents, on or about June 28, 2017, Ramon began communicating with two minors using the musical.ly app. He used the screen name “@lexithetiger” and pretended to be a minor female. Ramon encouraged his victims to play a “Simon Says” type game where he would send sexually explicit photos of a minor female and ask his victims to take and send him photos imitating the positions and acts depicted. The minor victims agreed and sent Ramon a series of progressively more explicit self-produced images. A relative of the two victims later discovered the communications and reported it to law enforcement.

Ramon was arrested on November 16, 2017. He admitted that for several years he had knowingly chatted with and requested pornographic images from minor females ranging in age from 10-13 years old. Ramon had spent much of his adult life working in education, non-profit programming and family services.

On May 22, 2019, Ramon pleaded guilty to two counts of production of child pornography.

This case was investigated by FBI Portland’s Child Exploitation Task Force (CETF) and prosecuted by Natalie Wight, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

This case was brought as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse. For more information about Project Safe Childhood, please visit www.justice.gov/psc.

The FBI’s Child Exploitation Task Force (CETF) conducts sexual exploitation investigations – many of them undercover – in coordination with other federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies. The Portland FBI’s CETF consists of agents and task force officers from the Beaverton Police Department, Portland Police Bureau, Tigard Police Department, Hillsboro Police Department, and the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office. The FBI’s CETF is committed to locating and arresting those who prey on children as well as recovering underage victims of sex trafficking and child exploitation.

Anyone who has information about the physical or online exploitation of children are encouraged to call the FBI at (503) 224-4181 or submit a tip online at www.fbi.gov/tips.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

SAIF offers free agriculture safety seminar December 3 in Salem
SAIF - 11/20/19 11:30 AM

What: SAIF will be presenting a free, half-day seminar on agriculture safety and health on Tuesday, December 3.

Who should attend: The seminars are designed primarily for people working in agriculture, but are open to anyone interested in ag safety and health—they don't have to be insured by SAIF.

When: Tuesday, December 3 from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Lunch is included.

Where: Oregon State Fair Expo Center, Cascade Hall, 2330 17th Street NE

More information: The seminar will be repeated in Salem on January 29 in English and on January 30 in Spanish. More information can be found below and at www.saif.com/agseminars. SAIF safety management consultants are available for interviews on the seminars and ag safety. Photos from last year’s seminars are available by request.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________

FREE FARM SAFETY SEMINARS HELD IN 17 CITIES ACROSS OREGON

Summary: SAIF’s annual ag seminars will be held in 17 cities across the state and online in English and Spanish.

__________________________________

Farm work is a whole lot safer than it used to be. But as far as SAIF is concerned, even one injury or illness is too many.

That’s why SAIF is offering 29 free ag safety seminars in 17 cities across Oregon. The first will be in La Grande on October 28, and they’ll continue through March. Nine of the seminars will be presented entirely in Spanish. Last year, more than 2,180 workers and employers attended SAIF’s seminars.

“We purposely hold these in the off-season to encourage attendance,” said Courtney Merriott, senior safety management consultant at SAIF and presenter at this year’s seminars. “Our goal is to provide the latest safety content for the industry, so that every ag worker goes home safe and healthy each night.”

This year’s seminars will focus on four topics: respiratory personal protective equipment, working at elevation, safety leadership for anyone, and incident analysis—a structured process for identifying what happened and reducing recurrence of injuries moving forward.

In March, SAIF will also offer webinars online in English and, new this year, Spanish.

The seminars are designed primarily for people working in agriculture but are open to anyone interested in ag safety and health—they don’t have to be insured by SAIF.

In-person seminars will be held in Bandon, Central Point, Clackamas, Corvallis, Eugene, Hermiston, Hillsboro, Hood River, Klamath Falls, La Grande, Madras, Milton-Freewater, Ontario, Salem, The Dalles, Wilsonville, and Woodburn.

Spanish seminars will be held in Central Point, Eugene, Hermiston, Hillsboro, Hood River, Salem, The Dalles, Wilsonville, and Woodburn.

All will run from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., and lunch will be provided.

Employers with small ag businesses who attend the seminar, or watch the webinars, will meet OSHA’s instructional requirement—one of four requirements that exempt small agricultural operations from random OSHA inspections.

Three hours of technical and one hour of business continuing education credits will be offered if approved by the Landscape Contractors Board. Producer continuing education credit hours for licensed insurance agents have been requested and are pending approval by the Department of Consumer and Business Services.

More information—including registration details—can be found at www.saif.com/agseminars.

About SAIF

SAIF is Oregon's not-for-profit workers' compensation insurance company. Since 1914, we've been taking care of injured workers, helping people get back to work, and striving to make Oregon the safest and healthiest place to work. For more information, visit the About SAIF page on saif.com.


*** Update** Linn County Undersheriff Paul Timm Reports Deputies are Assisting with a Structure Fire on Scravel Hill Road
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 11/20/19 9:56 AM

UPDATE

Linn County Undersheriff Paul Timm reports that after further investigation into the structure fire on Scravel Hill Road, his detectives arrested Jessica Erin Loper, 34, on charges related to the fire. 

Investigators found that Loper and her 8-month-old child were living in the residence with several other occupants.  Occupants of the residence initially reported the fire started in Loper’s locked bedroom and they believed they heard the baby crying inside.  Occupants attempted to force the door open which led to one receiving 1st and 2nd degree burns from the fire.  Responding deputies, also believing Loper and her baby were still inside the residence, attempted to enter the residence for life saving efforts but were driven out due to heavy smoke and flames.  Approximately three hours after the fire was reported, Loper and her baby were located hiding in the area.

Further investigation also revealed that although several dogs survived the fire, one dog died in the fire.  Loper was ultimately arrested and lodged at the Linn County Jail on the charge of Arson 1. 

 


Tue. 11/19/19
CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group (TAG) to meet November 21
Oregon Health Authority - 11/19/19 3:16 PM

November 19, 2019

Media contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us

Program contact: Pete Edlund, 503-931-8873, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group (TAG) to meet November 21

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group.

When: November 21, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Where: Five Oak Building (formerly Lincoln Building), 421 SW Oak St, Portland, OR, 8th Floor, Suite 850, Mary Conference Room (limited space available). The public also may join remotely through a webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/4851900018377321985 and conference line at 888-398-2342, participant code 5731389.

Agenda: Welcome and introductions; updates; EHR measure updates; Assessments for Children in DHS Custody – 2019 recommendations; 2020 postpartum care measure specifications – changes from HEDIS; continuous enrollment for 2020; adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at http://www.oregon.gov/OHA/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Metrics-Technical-Advisory-Group.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund at 503-931-8873, 711 TTY, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.u">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.u, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon Association of Nurseries recognizes elected officials as Friends of Nurseries (Photo)
Oregon Association of Nurseries - 11/19/19 2:42 PM
Rep. Rick Lewis (R-Silverton)
Rep. Rick Lewis (R-Silverton)
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/1413/129425/thumb_RickLewis_Blue.jpg

Wilsonville —November 19, 2019 — The Oregon Association of Nurseries (OAN) has announced the winners of its annual Friends of Nurseries awards.

The awards serve to recognize state and federal officials who listen to concerns and help protect the interests of Oregon’s nursery and greenhouse industry, which is the state’s top agricultural sector with nearly $1 billion in sales annually.

“Our products beautify the world while delivering numerous health and environmental benefits, but our growers face numerous challenges having to do with labor availability, water supply, regulation, taxation, market access and more,” OAN President Jim Simnitt said. “We like to recognize officials on both sides of the aisle who put in the effort to help us find constructive solutions.”

U.S. Senator Jeff Merkley (D-Oregon) was honored for his efforts to secure federal funding for the money-saving Smart Sprayer, which reduces the need for chemicals in production. He has been a staunch ally on resolving the labor crisis through immigration reform. He serves as the top Democrat on the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee
on Agriculture and Rural Development. It is his second time winning a Friend of Nurseries Award.

“Oregon’s nurseries have long played a critical role in our thriving agriculture sector by creating world-class products and countless jobs that families across the state can rely on,” Sen. Merkley said. “I’m grateful to have had the opportunity to work alongside Oregon’s nurseries, and will continue to use my position on the Appropriations Committee to fight for the federal investments in programs and research this industry needs and deserves to flourish for generations to come.”

U.S. Representative Suzanne Bonamici (D-Oregon, 1st District) has been a consistent voice in support of industry priorities. She has toured numerous nursery operations to learn more about the industry. The congresswoman, who served in the Oregon Legislature before her election to federal office, has demonstrated a willingness to cross party lines to support nursery priorities.

“Northwest Oregon is known for its world-class agricultural products, especially our beautiful nursery and greenhouse products,” Rep. Bonamici said. “In my visits to nurseries around Northwest Oregon, I’ve seen firsthand how this industry is an economic engine for our state. I’m honored to receive the Friend of Nurseries award, and I look forward to continuing to work with the industry and to advocate in Congress for policies like comprehensive immigration reform, robust workforce development, and bold action to address the climate crisis.”

U.S. Representative Kurt Schrader (D-Oregon, 5th District) has been a stalwart partner on numerous issues. Balanced and solution oriented, the congressman exemplifies OAN’s ideals of working across party lines to solve the state’s most vexing problems. It is the third time he has won a Friend of Nurseries Award.

“I am incredibly honored to be recognized for the third time by the Oregon Association of Nurseries as a ‘Friend of Nurseries,’” Rep. Schrader said. “I’m proud of the work I’ve done to support our nursery industry which is so critical to our state’s economy and creating jobs in rural Oregon. With nearly $1 billion in annual sales, Oregon remains one of the top nursery production states in the nation with three-quarters of our nursery products shipped out of the state or overseas. I’m grateful for our friendship and working together to help further strengthen Oregon agriculture, ensuring we remain a leader in producing some of the highest quality products for many years to come.”

State Sen. Betsy Johnson (D-Scappoose) was tabbed for her strong advocacy for industry concerns and objections regarding the business activity tax that harms agricultural operations. She also was an advocate for reasonable solutions to the debate on climate/carbon legislation.

“Oregon’s nursery, greenhouse and Christmas tree industries are national, if not global, leaders and incredibly important to the economy of the state,” Sen. Johnson said. “I am honored to be associated with this important segment of Oregon’s agricultural sector. We need to protect the high quality of nursery products and strive to keep production costs reasonable. I will remain committed to these outcomes as a legislator representing many of these fine companies.”

State Rep. Daniel Bonham (R-The Dalles) was appointed to serve in the legislature and right away dove into complex issues facing agriculture. Rep Bonham was an influential figure in the climate debate and was active on many of the OAN’s priorities. Balanced and fair, the representative deserves recognition.

“Few industries represent the neighbor helping neighbor spirit better than the Oregon Nursery industry, from supplying a Central Oregon homeowner with a native high desert plant appropriate to their landscaping dreams, to providing the orchard and root stock necessary for a vibrant cherry and apple industry in the Gorge,” Rep. Bonham said. “It’s truly an honor to be a voice in the Oregon Legislature for Oregon’s nursery industry.”

State Rep. Chrstine Drazan (R-Canby) was selected for her consistent outreach to the nursery industry during her first term in office. Her quick mind and forceful presence was very helpful in achieving the successes OAN accomplished this past year. Rep. Drazan listened very carefully to the nursery and greenhouse industry concerns and worked hard to help.

“The vibrant and successful greenhouse and nursery industry is a homegrown success story here in Oregon,” Rep. Drazan said. “These products are our state’s most valuable agricultural commodity year after year, bringing in nearly $1 billion in 2018. I am honored to receive the Friends of Nurseries award, and will continue to work to ensure that this industry can thrive. Oregon’s future depends on it.”

State Rep. Rick Lewis (R-Silverton) was chosen for his consistent advocacy, understanding and support for the nursery industry, which has a large presence in his district that includes not just nursery growers, but also an abundance of Christmas tree growers.

“It is a great privilege to represent the rural areas of Marion and Clackamas counties, home to some of the most agriculture communities in the Willamette Valley,” Lewis said. “Oregon nurseries are an economic force that strengthens our economy statewide. I am humbled and honored by OAN’s recognition and I will continue to work to safeguard their success throughout our state.”

State. Rep. Caddy McKeown (D-Coos Bay) is a trusted ally to the nursery and greenhouse industry for consistent advocacy for reasoned policy. A central figure in an effort to pass the driver’s license bill, Rep. McKeown has led on critical issues facing the state. Rep. McKeown has won this award twice for her bipartisan and “solutions first” approach.

“It is an honor to be recognized as a 2019 Friend of Nurseries -- as an OSU horticulture alum the industry has always been near and dear to my heart,” Rep. McKeown said. “It is pleasure to work with the OAN team in Salem -- from natural resource policy to transportation infrastructure, they can be counted on to advocate for commonsense positions that reflect
Oregon values.”

State Rep. Shelly Boshart Davis (R-Tangent) was chosen as New Legislator of the Year for her strong efforts to listen to and represent nursery industry concerns. The representative was a critical player in the debate on carbon and was an effective voice for agriculture. She demonstrated tenacity of commitment to agriculture and her strong support and understanding of the nursery and greenhouse industry.

“I am so honored to be named New Legislator of the Year by the Oregon Association of Nurseries, but really, I am just doing my job!” Rep. Boshart Davis said. “My district, and this state, rely so heavily on the agricultural industry, and working to make sure they can continue to thrive is one of my top priorities.”

# # #

The Oregon Association of Nurseries, based in Wilsonville, represents more than 700 wholesale growers, retailers, landscapers and suppliers. Oregon’s ornamental horticulture industry is the state’s largest agricultural commodity, with annual sales of $996 million in 2018. It is also a traded sector, with about 75 percent of the nursery plants grown in Oregon being shipped out of state. For information, visit www.oan.org or call 503-682-5089.




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/1413/129425/Press_Release_-_Friends_of_Nurseries_20191119.pdf , Rep. Rick Lewis (R-Silverton) , Rep. Shelly Boshart Davis (R-Tangent) , U.S. Rep. Kurt Schrader (D-Oregon 5th District) , U.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-Oregon) , Rep. Daniel Bonham (R-The Dalles) , Sen. Caddy McKeown (D-Coos Bay) , U.S. Rep. Suzanne Bonamici (D-Oregon 1st District) , Sen. Betsy Johnson (D-Scappoose) , Rep. Christine Drazan (R-Canby)

Albany Police Department Awarded National Accreditation by CALEA
Albany Police - 11/19/19 2:33 PM

The Albany Police Department was awarded national accreditation on November 16, 2019 by the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies, Inc. (CALEAÒ) in the Advanced Law Enforcement program. The Albany Police Department is currently the third law enforcement agency in Oregon to achieve national accreditation.

Following a multi-year self-assessment phase and a meticulous site-based assessment of community engagement, policy, procedures, equipment and facilities by CALEA assessors, Chief Mario Lattanzio, Captain Brad Liles and Accreditation Manager Merab Smith attended the CALEA conference in Covington, Kentucky.  Each agency being reviewed, goes before the CALEA’s 21-member Board of Commissioners where the commission reviews all findings and determines the agencies’ accreditation status.

Following the hearing and review proving compliance of 356 standards, Executive Director Craig Hartley, Jr. and Commission Chair Anthony Purcell awarded Albany Police Department with accreditation, signifying excellence in public safety and commitment to community.  This is Albany Police Department’s first award of national accreditation. 

About CALEA

The Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies, Inc., (CALEA®) was created in 1979 as a credentialing authority through the joint efforts of law enforcement's major executive associations: International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP); National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives (NOBLE); National Sheriffs' Association (NSA); and the Police Executive Research Forum (PERF).

The purpose of CALEA’s Accreditation Programs is to improve the delivery of public safety services, primarily by maintaining a body of standards, developed by public safety practitioners, covering a wide range of up-to-date public safety initiatives; establishing and administering an accreditation process; and recognizing professional excellence.

Specifically, CALEA’s goals are to: Strengthen crime prevention and control capabilities; Formalize essential management procedures; Establish fair and nondiscriminatory personnel practices; Improve service delivery; Solidify interagency cooperation and coordination; and Increase community and staff confidence in the agency.

The CALEA Accreditation Process is a proven modern management model; once implemented, it presents the Chief Executive Officer (CEO), on a continuing basis, with a blueprint that promotes the efficient use of resources and improves service delivery - regardless of the size, geographic location, or functional responsibilities of the agency.

This accreditation program provides public safety agencies an opportunity to voluntarily demonstrate that they meet an established set of professional standards based on industry best practices and approved by an all-volunteer board of commissioners.  Accreditation is for four years, during which the agency must submit annual reports attesting continued compliance with these standards under which it was initially accredited.

Benefits of CALEA

Increased Community Advocacy - Accreditation embodies the precepts of community-oriented policing. It creates a forum in which law enforcement agencies and citizens work together to prevent and control challenges confronting law enforcement and provides clear direction about community expectations.

Greater Accountability within the Agency - CALEA standards give the CEO a proven management system of written directives, sound training, clearly defined lines of authority, and routine reports that support decision-making and resource allocation.

Stronger Defense Against Civil Lawsuits - Accredited agencies are better able to defend themselves against civil lawsuits. Also, many agencies report a decline in legal actions against them, once they become accredited.

Staunch Support from Government Officials - Accreditation provides objective evidence of an agency’s commitment to excellence in leadership, resource management, and service-delivery. Thus, government officials are more confident in the agency’s ability to operate efficiently and meet community needs.

Reduced Risk and Liability Exposure - Many agencies report a reduction in their liability insurance costs and/or reimbursement of accreditation fees.

For further information, please contact:

CALEA Contact:

Travis Parrish

703-352-4225 x39

rish@calea.org">tparrish@calea.org

#  #  #

Albany Police Department Contact:

Merab Smith

Accreditation Manager
541-791-0229

Merab.smith@cityofalbany.net
 


$50,000 Powerball prize sold in Aurora to expire Thursday (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 11/19/19 1:58 PM
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November 19, 2019 - Salem, Ore. – One lucky person who purchased a Powerball ticket in Aurora, has two days to claim their $50,000 prize before it is set to expire.
On Thursday, Nov. 21 at 5 p.m., the winning Powerball ticket will expire, meaning the person who purchased the ticket in Aurora last year, will be unable to claim the $50,000 prize. Oregon Lottery tickets are valid for one year from the date of the drawing.
The $50,000 ticket was purchased in Aurora on the evening of Nov. 20, 2018 and the winning numbers are 07-14-23-38-55-18. As of Tuesday, Nov. 19, no one had claimed the prize.
“We are really down to the wire on someone claiming this $50,000 Powerball prize,” said Patrick Johnson, spokesman with the Oregon Lottery. “Anyone who purchased a Powerball ticket in Aurora last year, make sure you check your ticket. If you have the winning ticket, sign the back immediately and claim it at the Oregon Lottery before 5 p.m. Thursday.”
There are several other unclaimed Powerball prizes in addition to the one set to expire this week. In February, a $100,000 Powerball prize sold in Portland will expire. In March, another $50,000 Powerball prize sold in Medford will also expire.
All unclaimed prizes go into the state’s Economic Development Fund and is allocated to help provide funds to Lottery beneficiaries . Each year approximately $5 million in unclaimed prizes goes into the fund.
Lottery officials recommend that you always sign the back of your tickets with each Oregon Lottery game you play, to ensure you can claim any prize you may win. The Oregon Lottery reminds players to always sign the back of their Lottery tickets, regardless of the game. In the event of winning a jackpot, they should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 should contact the Lottery office to schedule an appointment to claim their prize.
Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $12 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org
 




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/4939/129422/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg , 2019-11/4939/129422/OL_LOGO_HORZ.jpg

Former Jacksonville, Oregon Residents Sentenced for Interstate Distribution of Marijuana, Money Laundering
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 11/19/19 12:45 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—Two former Jacksonville, Oregon residents were sentenced today in federal court for their roles in a conspiracy to traffic marijuana grown in Southern Oregon to Georgia, Illinois, and North Carolina, and launder the proceeds.

Alex David Koplin, 34, was sentenced to 31 months in federal prison and three years’ supervised release and Tina Marie Waterfield, 38, was sentenced to 5 years of probation.

According to court documents, in approximately 2011, Koplin moved from Georgia to Oregon to work in the marijuana industry. Within a few years, he purchased property in Jackson County, Oregon and started a marijuana farm. Koplin worked with other marijuana growers to combine harvests, broker sales, and transport marijuana from Oregon to other states. Between November 2014 and June 2016, Koplin coordinated the sale and interstate transport of approximately 260 kilograms of marijuana.

While investigating the interstate trafficking conspiracy, authorities discovered Waterfield, Koplin’s then-girlfriend, was receiving thousands of dollars in out-of-state payments to her PayPal account. Investigators later learned that Waterfield unlawfully manufactured, sold, and shipped marijuana edibles to East Coast customers and laundered the proceeds in an attempt to conceal their source. Between 2013 and 2016, Waterfield’s bank accounts showed approximately $494,000 in unexplained deposits.

In April 2017, investigators executed a federal search warrant on Koplin and Waterfield’s residence and seized marijuana plants; unprocessed cut marijuana; butane honey oil, a cannabis extract; and $44,226 in U.S. currency.

On August 19, 2019, both defendants pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit money laundering. Koplin also pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute a controlled substance.

As part of his plea agreement, Koplin agreed to pay $150,000 to satisfy a forfeiture money judgment. Waterfield agreed to forfeit the $44,226 in U.S. currency seized from the residence she shared with Koplin.

This case was investigated by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), IRS-Criminal Investigation (IRS-CI), Homeland Security Investigations (HSI), and Medford Police Department. It was prosecuted by Steven T. Mygrant and Julia E. Jarrett, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

This case was brought as part of the Justice Department’s Organized Crime and Drug Enforcement Task Force (OCDETF) program, the centerpiece of the department’s strategy for reducing the availability of drugs in the U.S. OCDETF was established in 1982 to mount a comprehensive attack on drug trafficking by disrupting and dismantling major drug trafficking and money laundering organizations. Today, OCDETF combines the resources and expertise of its member federal agencies in coordination with state and local law enforcement.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Add Fire Safety to Your Holiday Menu
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 11/19/19 12:25 PM

Thanksgiving is just around the corner, and State Fire Marshal Jim Walker wants to remind Oregonians to add fire safety to their cooking and holiday meal plans.

“The holiday is a time to give thanks and enjoy friends and family,” said Walker. “By following basic fire-prevention tips, you can keep yourself and loved ones safe and avoid cooking-related fires.”

In Oregon, cooking was the leading known cause of residential structure fires over the past five years (2013-17), causing an average of 19 percent of Oregon’s total residential structure fires, according to state fire agency data submitted to the National Fire Incident Reporting System.

On average, there are 533 cooking-caused residential structure fires in Oregon per year.

Statewide the range/stove was the most frequently reported equipment involved in cooking fires. Of these, 73 percent were from an electric-powered range/stove.

All told, there were 10 deaths in Oregon from residential cooking fires during the past five years, or an average of two deaths per year.

Cooking safety tips:

  • Don’t leave cooking food on your stovetop unattended, especially when frying and sautéing with oil.
  • While your turkey is cooking, check on it frequently.
  • Use a timer to monitor cooking times when simmering, baking, or roasting foods that require long cooking times. Check the stove or oven frequently.
  • Remember to keep items that may catch fire, like oven mitts, wooden utensils, food wrappers, and towels, at least three feet from the cooking area.
  • Roll up your shirt sleeves and avoid using clothing that may come in contact with open flames or other heat sources.
  • Don’t cook if you are drinking alcohol or using other substances that make you drowsy.
  • Keep children three feet or more away from all cooking areas, hot food, and liquids to avoid burns.
  • Keep pot and pan handles turned inward on the stove to avoid bumping them and spilling hot foods.
  • Heat cooking oil slowly and never leave it unattended.

If you have a cooking fire:

  • Always keep a lid nearby to smother small grease fires. Smother the flames by carefully sliding the lid over the pan. Turn off the burner and don’t move the pan until it is completely cool.
  • Never pour water on a grease fire; it can splatter the grease and spread the fire.
  • In the event of a fire in your oven or microwave, turn the appliance off and keep the doors closed.
  • When in doubt, get out! Call 9-1-1 after you leave.

Make sure you have smoke alarms on every level of your home, outside each sleeping area, and in every bedroom. Test smoke alarms monthly and replace them if they are 10 years old or older.

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Linn County Undersheriff Paul Timm Reports Deputies are Assisting with a Structure Fire on Scravel Hill Road (Photo)
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 11/19/19 11:05 AM
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Update

Linn County Undersheriff Paul Timm reports that on November 19, 2019, at approximately 7:00 a.m., the Linn County Sheriff’s Office received a report of a structure fire in the 38000 block of Scravel Hill Road in Albany.  Initial reports indicated the structure was fully engulfed and that not everyone from the residence was accounted for. The Jefferson and Albany Fire Departments responded to the scene and extinguished the fire.

Upon further investigation, all persons and animals that were inside the structure when the fire started have been accounted for.  One adult male was transported to the Albany General Hospital with minor injuries.

The cause of the fire is still under investigation.  The Linn County Sheriff’s Office is being assisted by the Oregon State Police Arson Unit, the Oregon State Fire Marshall’s Office, and the Marion Polk Fire Investigation Team.   




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/2993/129414/IMG_8019.JPG

Meeting Notice Update for November 25, 2019
Coos Bay Sch. Dist. - 11/19/19 9:19 AM

Update to the Public Meeting Notice for November 25, 2019

The Coos Bay School District Board of Directors will hold a Special School Board Meeting for Data Review and an Executive Session at the Milner Crest Education Center, 1255 Hemlock Ave., Coos Bay Oregon, on Monday, November 25 at 5:30pm. After the public portion of the meeting, the board will dismiss to executive session to consider records exempt by law from public inspection (ORS 192.660(2)(f).

The agenda will be posted here the Friday before the meeting.

Executive Sessions are closed to the general public. Press may attend but are bound by the strict requirements of ORS 192.660(4), ORS 192.660(5) and 332.061. No decisions may be made in Executive Session.

The full Coos Bay School District Meeting Schedule can also be found on our website here or CBD9.NET > School Board > Coos Bay School District Meetings


OnPoint Community Credit Union Releases Free eBook on Personal Cybersecurity to Help Consumers Protect Against Fraud
OnPoint Community Credit Union - 11/19/19 9:00 AM

Portland, Ore., November 19, 2019As Cyber Monday approaches, OnPoint Community Credit Union is helping consumers stay safe while shopping online. OnPoint has released a free eBook, “The OnPoint Guide to Personal Cybersecurity” that shares in-depth and actionable information so consumers can protect against and recover from fraud.

According to statistics published by the Pew Research Center, eight in 10 Americans are online shoppers.  As online shopping and banking is on the rise, so is online fraud as cyber criminals target online shoppers. The Department of Homeland Security Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT) has identified three common ways attackers target online shoppers:

  1. Using fake websites and emails to get shoppers to share account information: Attackers pose as legitimate retailers, or pretend to be a charity, especially during the holidays or after a natural disaster
  2. Intercepting insecure transactions: If an online retailer does not use an encryption while processing payments, hackers can use this security flaw to intercept payment information. 
  3. Targeting vulnerable computers: Consumers need to take steps to protect their computers from viruses or other malicious code, so that an attacker cannot gain access to their computer and all of the information on it.

There are simple precautions online shoppers can do to help protect against attackers and fraud. In OnPoint’s free eBook, the company shares tips for staying safe online. Here are just a few:

  • Use a credit card in lieu of a debit card. If a fraudulent transaction takes place on your credit card, at least the funds won’t automatically be pulled from your checking account while you are settling the dispute. Also, protect yourself by only shopping on sites with HTTPS and a padlock icon to the left or right of the URL. The ‘s’ at the end of HTTPS stands for secure and ensures all communication between your browser and the web is encrypted.
  • Be proactive and routinely check all of your financial statements and history for suspicious or questionable charges. Contact your financial institution immediately if you find unauthorized activity on your accounts.
  • Don’t open attachments or click on URLs in unsolicited emails from vendors and people you don’t know. These may be phishing scams that contain links that will download malware on your computer or lure you into entering personal information. Be aware, the email may even appear to be from someone you know, but at a closer glance, it may look or sound suspicious.
  • Use strong passwords, and do not use the same passwords for multiple websites. Consider increasing the complexity of passwords or use phrases, and regularly change passwords for added security. Set up two factor authentication (2FA), when possible. Additional advice regarding secure password tips is included in the free eBook.
  • Most importantly, think before you click. If something seems off, it likely will require a little investigation before clicking the link or message. Resist the urge to respond to enticing subject lines that sound too good to be true. Stay alert and take protective measures to ensure online safety and security.

OnPoint is committed to helping consumers stay safe while shopping online. For actionable tips and information on avoiding cybercrime, check out OnPoint’s free personal cybersecurity guide here.

ABOUT ONPOINT COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION

OnPoint Community Credit Union is the largest credit union in Oregon, serving more than 385,000 members and with assets of $6.1 billion. Founded in 1932, OnPoint Community Credit Union’s membership is available to anyone who lives or works in one of 13 Oregon counties (Benton, Clackamas, Columbia, Crook, Deschutes, Jefferson, Lane, Linn, Marion, Multnomah, Polk, Washington and Yamhill) and two Washington counties (Skamania and Clark) and their immediate family members. More information is available at: 503-228-7077 or 800-527-3932.

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Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Calendar Fraud (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 11/19/19 9:00 AM
TT - Online Calendars - November 19, 2019 - GRAPHIC
TT - Online Calendars - November 19, 2019 - GRAPHIC
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Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. Today: Building a digital defense against calendar fraud.

Yes, I said calendar fraud. For some, the chaos of the modern world can only be tamed by a color-coded calendar with every meeting, dinner plan, and sports practice neatly posted. It’s technology’s promise that if you document every work, family, friend, school, and sport obligation online – you might just make it to Friday. 

But, with every tool comes a threat. In this case, the threat is an oldie-but-goodie – a phishing attack. It is the delivery method that is new. 

Scammers have started sending online users calendar invites. In many cases, the calendar’s default settings allow the invitation to simply appear on your account. The fraudster could be offering you a prize or an invitation to some special, swanky event. Just click on the link and you can register… or click, put in your credit card number, and you are on your way to winning the jackpot. 

Of course, these are fakes. At the very least, the sender is able to access your bank account… at most he’s loaded malware onto your device and now has access to all of your passwords, personal info, and more. 

How do you protect yourself? 

  • Never click on a link or open an attachment – or in this case a calendar invitation – that you aren’t expecting or is from someone you don’t recognize. 

  • Report calendar phishing attempts to the calendar service you use. That will help the providers block such spam attempts in the future. 

  • Set your calendar permissions so that invitations do not automatically load in your system. Do a simple internet search to find out how to increase the security settings for whichever calendar option you are using.  

As always, if you have been victimized by a cyber fraud, be sure to report it to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at?www.IC3.gov or call your local FBI office.

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Attached Media Files: TT - Online Calendars - November 19, 2019 - AUDIO , TT - Online Calendars - November 19, 2019 - GRAPHIC

Linn County Undersheriff Paul Timm Reports Deputies Are Assisting with a Structure Fire on Scravel Hill Road
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 11/19/19 8:35 AM

Linn County Undersheriff Paul Timm reports deputies are assisting Jefferson, Albany and Scio Fire Departments at a structure fire on Scravel Hill Road in Albany.  Scravel Hill Road is closed in the area near Teddy Avenue and Steckley Drive.  Please avoid the area.  More information will be provided when available.


Mon. 11/18/19
Fatal Crash on Hwy 221 - Yamhill County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 11/18/19 7:53 PM
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On Monday, November 18, 2019 at approximately 11:50 A.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel  responded to a two vehicle collision on Hwy 221(Wallace Rd) near Milepost 10.5.

Preliminary investigation revealed a gray 2004 Volkswagen Passat, operated by Krista Ashley (33) of Salem, was northbound on Hwy 221 when for unknown reasons crossed into the southbound lane striking a black 2019 Chevy Cruz, being operated by Susie Valdez (69) of Salem.

Valdez and her passenger, Robert Valdez (70) of Salem both sustained fatal injuries and were pronounced deceased.

Ashley was transported to Salem Hospital with serious injuries.

There were three passengers in the Passat driven by Ashley:

A juvenile female sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at Salem Hospital. 

Daniel Norris (28) of Salem was transported to Salem Hospital with serious injuries.

A juvenile female was transported to Salem Hospital with serious injuries.

Hwy 221 was closed for approximately 4.5 hours.

Oregon State Police was assisted by the Yamhill County Sheriff’s Office, Dayton Fire, and ODOT.

Investigation is continuing 




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/1002/129399/20191118_133712.jpg , 2019-11/1002/129399/20191118_133608.jpg

Portland Couple Pleads Guilty to Fraud Scheme Targeting Elderly Couple
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 11/18/19 4:30 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A Portland couple pleaded guilty today in federal court to defrauding a local elderly couple of approximately $1.8 million in a scheme lasting more than two years.

Ronnie Stevens aka Tim Ephrem, 50, and Tina Ephrem aka Lisa Ann Peterson, 43, each pleaded guilty today to a one count of conspiracy to commit wire fraud.

According to court documents, between September 2016 and December 2018, Stevens and Ephrem conspired with one another to defraud an elderly couple, Adult Victim 1 (AV1) and Adult Victim 2 (AV2).

The scheme began in September 2016 when AV1, who was 76 years old at the time, offered a commercial trailer for sale at his business. Stevens claimed he brokered vehicle sales and could sell the trailer in exchange for a cut of the profit. Stevens did not ultimately sell the trailer, but quickly ingratiated himself with the victim.

Stevens later approached AV1 with an alleged lucrative investment opportunity. Stevens claimed that a friend named Tammy Ward was set to inherit an estate valued in excess of $100 million from her recently deceased father, but could not come up with the fees and legal costs necessary to release the estate. Stevens told AV1 that if he could advance the funds to release the estate, AV1 would receive a substantial return when the estate closed.

AV1 made multiple payments to Stevens over a period of time as Stevens told him various stories about delays and increased costs associated with the release of the estate. As part of the conspiracy, AV1 and AV2 both spoke to a woman on the phone who claimed to be Tammy Ward. Investigators revealed that Tammy Ward was a fictitious identity used by Stevens and Ephrem as part of the fraud scheme.

Between 2016 and 2018, Stevens placed more than 5,000 outgoing calls to AV1 and AV2 and, along with Ephrem, stole more than $1.8 million from their two victims. Stevens and Ephrem spent the stolen money on rent, utility bills, restaurants, cigars, luxury retail purchases and repeated travel to Las Vegas, Nevada and other locations including Hawaii, Anaheim, California, and Spirit Mountain Lodge in Grand Ronde, Oregon.

Stevens and Ephrem were arrested on January 11, 2019. They made their initial appearances in federal court the same day and were ordered detained.

Stevens and Ephrem each face a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison, a $250,000 fine and three years of supervised release. They will be sentenced on February 13, 2020 before U.S. Chief District Court Judge Michael W. Mosman.

As part of the plea agreement, Stevens and Ephrem have agreed to pay full restitution to their victims as determined and ordered by the court.

This case was investigated by the Tigard Police Department and the FBI and is being prosecuted by Donna Maddux and Julia Jarrett, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

Elder abuse is a serious crime against some of our nation’s most vulnerable citizens, affecting nearly 10% of older Americans every year. Together with our federal, state, local and tribal partners, the Department of Justice and U.S. Attorney’s Office is steadfastly committed to combatting all forms of elder abuse and financial exploitation through enforcement actions, training and resources, research, victim services, and public awareness.

If you or someone you know are in immediate danger, please call 911.

If you or someone you know needs help, abuse complaints may be filed with the FTC at www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov or at 877-FTC-HELP. The Department of Justice provides a variety of resources relating to elder abuse victimization through its Office of Victims of Crime, which can be reached at www.ovc.gov.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

SB 1041 CCO Financial Reporting Advisory Group meets November 20
Oregon Health Authority - 11/18/19 4:15 PM

November 18, 2019

Media contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us

Program contact: Jeff Scroggin, 541-999-6983, ey.scroggin@dhsoha.state.or.us">jeffrey.scroggin@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

SB 1041 CCO Financial Reporting Advisory Group meets November 20

What: A public meeting of the SB 1041 CCO Financial Reporting Advisory Group.

When: November 20, 8-10 a.m.

Where: Five Oak Building, 421 SW Oak St, Suite 775, Portland. Members of the public can call in to listen by dialing 888-808-6929, participant code 915042#.

Agenda: Welcome and introductions; group purpose and charter review; National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) lessons learned; public testimony; Exhibit L initial review.

Background: The group is charged with recommending ways to reconcile the differences between the financial reporting required by the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) and the financial reporting that OHA needs to regulate coordinated care organizations (CCOs).

For more information on the meeting, visit the group’s meeting page.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jeff Scroggin at 541-999-6983, 711 TTY at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Repeat Offender Sentenced to 60 Months in Federal Prison for Illegal Firearm Possession
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 11/18/19 4:00 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—Dante Emmanuel Hall, 32, of Portland, was sentenced today to 60 months in federal prison and three years’ supervised release for illegally possessing a firearm as a convicted felon.

According to court documents, Hall was involved in an early-morning fight in a downtown Portland parking lot on September 30, 2018 that resulted in two shootings. Surveillance video obtained from an adjacent business recorded Hall arriving with a large group of people and stashing an item near the tire of a parked vehicle. This item was later determined to be a loaded Walther 9mm handgun.

The fight began when an individual attempted to punch Hall in the face. In response, Portland resident Patrick Kimmons brandished a firearm and fired three shots into the chest of Hall’s assailant. One of the rounds struck Hall in the hip. Kimmons was then shot and killed by police after running at officers with a firearm and failing to comply with their commands. Within minutes of the shooting, Hall and another subject arrived at Legacy Emanuel Hospital with gunshot wounds and police were notified.

After attempting to get a statement from a belligerent and uncooperative Hall, the responding officer applied for, obtained and executed a federal search warrant on Hall’s hospital room. The officer located and seized Hall’s cell phone hidden beneath the hospital bed mattress. A search of the phone revealed numerous photos and videos of Hall in possession of three different firearms including what appeared to be the same Walther 9mm handgun found in the parking lot where the fight and shootings occurred.

Hall has a long history of firearm-related offenses and convictions.

On September 6, 2012, he pleaded guilty in federal court to being a felon in possession of a firearm and was sentenced to 21 months in prison. Four days after his release from prison after serving just eight months, Hall was involved in a gang-related shooting during which he fired a handgun outside a Portland strip club. He was convicted of unlawful use of a weapon in Multnomah County Circuit Court and sentenced to 40 months in prison.

Within months of his release from state prison and recommencing federal supervised release, Hall once again violated his supervision terms. On August 9, 2017, he was arrested riding in a car with a known Rollin’ 60s gang member who was driving and eluded police. As a result, on October 19, 2017, he was sentenced to 12 months and one day in prison for the violation with no re-imposition of supervised release.

Within 48 hours of his final release from federal prison, Hall possessed a firearm and was involved in a June 24, 2018 shooting outside a bar in Vancouver, Washington. The shooting injured an innocent bystander caught in the crossfire. This shooting occurred approximately three months prior to the September 2018 shooting in downtown Portland.

On April 25, 2018, Hall pleaded guilty to one count of felon in possession of a firearm.

This case was investigated by the Portland Police Bureau. It was prosecuted by Leah K. Bolstad and Thomas H. Edmonds, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

The case was brought as part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN). PSN is the centerpiece of the Department of Justice’s violent crime reduction efforts. PSN is an evidence-based program proven to be effective at reducing violent crime. Through PSN, a broad spectrum of stakeholders work together to identify the most pressing violent crime problems in the community and develop comprehensive solutions to address them. As part of this strategy, PSN focuses enforcement efforts on the most violent offenders and partners with locally based prevention and reentry programs for lasting reductions in crime.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

DPSST Police Policy Committee Meeting Scheduled **Amended Agenda - Item #10 added**
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 11/18/19 3:57 PM

For Immediate Release                                        

October 23, 2019

Contact:   Mona Riesterer  
                (503) 378-2431

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Police Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting at 10:00 a.m.  November 21, 2019 in the Governor Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon.  For further information, please contact Mona Riesterer at (503) 378-2431.

Agenda Items:

1.  Introductions

2.  Approve Meeting Minutes of the August 15, 2019 Meeting

3.  Administrative Closures – Police

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

4.  Lupton, Williams #41371; Basic, Intermediate and Advanced Police Certifications – Jacksonville Police Department

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

5.  Thomas, Nathan #53344; Basic and Intermediate Police Certifications – Roseburg Police Department

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

6.  Gibson, Zachariah #48800; Basic and Intermediate Police Certifications – Clatskanie Police Department

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

7.  Candiff, James #51133; Basic and Intermediate Police Certifications – Scappoose Police Department

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

8.  Evans, Timmy #29606; Basic, Intermediate and Advanced Police Certifications – Portland Police Bureau

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

9.  O’Malley, Patrick; Basic, Intermediate, Advanced and Supervisory Corrections Certification and Basic, Intermediate, Advanced and Supervisory Police Certifications – Lebanon Police Department

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

10. Saulo, Caleb #59701; Appeal of Academy Dismissal – Warm Springs Police Department

Presented by Linsay Hale

11. Proposed Rule Changes for OAR 259-008-0010; Establishing Pre-employment Psychological Screening Standards for Compliance with SB 423

Presented by Jennifer Howald

12. Proposed Rule Changes for OAR 259-008-0015: Background Investigations

Presented by Jennifer Howald

13. Proposed Rule Changes for OAR 259-008-0010, 259-008-0011 and 259-008-0067: Establishing the Expiration of DPSST Safety Professional Certifications

Presented by Jennifer Howald

14. Proposed Rule Changes for OAR 259-008-0070: Criminal Justice Moral Fitness Workgroup Recommendations and Review of Comments

Presented by Jennifer Howald

15. Department Update

16.  Next Police Policy Committee Meeting – February 20, 2020

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Police Policy Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have -disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement.  Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Patricia Patrick-Joling, public citizen representative, serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.

 


Newberg Man Sentenced to 9 Months in Federal Prison for Threatening School Shooting at California College
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 11/18/19 3:44 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—Vasiliy V. Barbiyeru, Jr., 25, of Newberg, Oregon, was sentenced today to nine months in federal prison and three years’ supervised release for transmitting threatening interstate communications.

According to court documents, on October 7, 2017, Barbiyeru sent a threatening email to several individuals and groups at Deep Springs College in Big Pine, California where he had been denied admission. Barbiyeru had previously posted a threat directed at the college on the 4chan message board and had sent similar threatening emails to the college’s president and other associated persons.

On March 1, 2019, Barbiyeru was charged with first degree disorderly conduct, a misdemeanor, in Clackamas County Circuit Court after making similar threats of violence to Lake Oswego High School. Barbiyeru was arrested a short time later by the Lake Oswego Police Department. His state charges are still pending.         

On August 22, 2019, Barbiyeru pleaded guilty to one count of threatening interstate communications.

This case was investigated by the FBI and the Newberg and McMinnville Police Departments and was being prosecuted by Hannah Horsley, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

FBI & Eugene Police Search for Female Bank Robber (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 11/18/19 1:48 PM
BR - 10-21-19 - OCCU Eugene 4
BR - 10-21-19 - OCCU Eugene 4
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/3585/129383/thumb_BR_-_10-12-19_OCCU_Eugene_-_4.png

The FBI is featuring the October 21, 2019, robbery at the Oregon Community Credit Union in Eugene on its Unknown Bank Robbers webpage in an effort to generate more tips to help identify the woman responsible. The FBI and the Eugene Police Department are working this case jointly.

At about 4:40 on that Monday afternoon, the woman walked into the branch, located at 2880 Chad Drive in Eugene, and demanded cash. Once she received an undisclosed amount of cash, she exited the bank and may have left the area in a silver pick-up truck, possibly a later-model Dodge 1500, double-cab.

Description:

White woman

Age:  Mid 30’s

Height: Approximately 5’6”

Build:  Heavy with a round face and cleft chin

Hair: Possibly bleach blonde

Other: Pierced ears and may wear glasses

Clothing: Black or dark grey v-neck long-sleeved shirt or sweater with 3 buttons at the top; black pants with light-colored flowers or circles; dark black and tan shoes; black purse with silver handles; dark grey or green beanie hat; and sunglasses with purple lenses.

 

The FBI’s unknown bank robber poster can be seen at https://bankrobbers.fbi.gov/robbers-container/2019-11-14.8556290648.  Anyone with information is asked to submit a tip Eugene Police Department at (541) 682-5111. You can also report information to https://tips.fbi.gov or call the nearest FBI office. In Eugene, the FBI can be reached at (541) 343-5222.

###




Attached Media Files: BR - 10-21-19 - OCCU Eugene 4 , BR - 10-21-19 - OCCU Eugene 3 , BR - 10-21-19 - OCCU Eugene 2 , BR - 10-21-19 - OCCU Eugene 1 , Truck

OEM Grant Program Provides Equipment to Help Oregon Communities During Emergencies (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 11/18/19 10:59 AM
State Preparedness and Incident Response Equipment (SPIRE) Grant Program Coordinator Jim Jungling (right) inspects a new power generator at City of Madras Public Works, Nov. 7, that will be used to serve the community during emergencies.
State Preparedness and Incident Response Equipment (SPIRE) Grant Program Coordinator Jim Jungling (right) inspects a new power generator at City of Madras Public Works, Nov. 7, that will be used to serve the community during emergencies.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/3986/129376/thumb_56kW_-_SPIRE_grant.jpg

Ten Oregon communities received an early holiday gift recently when 30kW and 56kW generators were delivered to their county or municipal office, thanks to the disbursement of money from the Resiliency Grant Fund. The fund’s purpose is the procurement of emergency preparedness equipment to help Oregon communities prepare for, respond to and recover from emergencies. The program is known as the State Preparedness and Incident Response Equipment (SPIRE) Grant program. 

One of the awardees, Lane County, received a 56kW power generator which will be used to power a pump for an emergency water supply system at Lane County Fairgrounds, and be an available asset in times of emergencies, according to Lane County Emergency Manager Patence Winningham.

“It’s a deployable asset we can move around to our area of greatest need,” said Winningham.  “The ability to supply power, especially to our rural communities, during emergencies is a huge benefit,” she said.

Other awardees include:

  • Lookingglass Rural Fire District, Douglas Co. (30kW generator)
  • City of Madras, Jefferson Co. (30kW generator)
  • City of Estacada, Clackamas Co. (30kW generator)
  • Lower Umpqua Hospital District, Douglas Co. (30kW generator)
  • Wallowa County Emergency Management (56kW generator)
  • City of Hubbard, Marion Co. (56kW generator)
  • City of Sublimity, Marion Co. (56kW generator)
  • City of Butte Falls, Jackson Co. (56kW generator)
  • City of St. Paul, Marion Co. (56kW generator)

In all, 80 grant jurisdictions around the state will receive SPIRE-funded equipment. While the recent awardees requested generators, eligible equipment covers four priorities: saving/sustaining lives, obtaining/maintaining situational awareness, incident stabilization and initiate recovery. 

SPIRE Grant Coordinator Jim Jungling said he believes the program makes sense for Oregon.

“This money is bringing practical equipment to communities that can save lives and property during emergencies,” Jungling said.  “It’s a project I’m proud to be working on because it’s a smart investment for Oregon that is getting communities better prepared.”

A total of $5 million has been allotted to procure emergency preparedness equipment to help Oregon communities prepare, respond and recover from emergencies.

The SPIRE grant is a result of HB 2867, which became effective in August 2017, established a grant program to distribute emergency preparedness equipment, which may include vehicles or other property, to local governments and other recipients to be used to decrease risk of life and property resulting from an emergency.




Attached Media Files: State Preparedness and Incident Response Equipment (SPIRE) Grant Program Coordinator Jim Jungling (right) inspects a new power generator at City of Madras Public Works, Nov. 7, that will be used to serve the community during emergencies. , A 56kW power generator purchased by the State Preparedness and Incident Response Equipment (SPIRE) Grant Program is parked at Lane County Emergency Management ready to deploy to Lane County Fairgrounds to power a pump for an emergency water supply if need

Fruit farm in The Dalles fined $37,800 for job safety violations (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 11/18/19 10:09 AM
DCBS logo
DCBS logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/1073/129375/thumb_DCBS_Logo_-_RGB.jpg

(Salem) – Oregon OSHA has fined Orchard View Inc., a fruit farm in The Dalles, $37,800 for five job safety violations – four of them repeat offenses – including failing to train employees in the safe operation of tractors. The failures exposed workers to serious injury or death.

The agency opened an inspection of the company in response to a confidential complaint. During the inspection, the agency found four tractor rollovers had occurred since 2012, resulting in three operators being injured. The most recent of those injuries happened in May when a tractor operator jumped from the vehicle when it rolled over on a steep incline.

The rollover problems prompted Oregon OSHA to expand its inspection of Orchard View.

The inspection found employees had raised concerns with the company about parking brakes on John Deere and Kubota tractors not being able to hold the loaded vehicles on the steep slopes in the orchard.

The company could have addressed those concerns by training employees to know when to avoid too-steep slopes, posting hazard signs indicating such situations, or allowing the tractor operator to stay in the cab – in control of the vehicle – by assigning another crew member to help with the work in the field.

Instead, Orchard View had this advice for tractor operators: Shove a piece of wood behind the wheels or drive on flat land.

In fact, four of the five violations cited by Oregon OSHA involved the company failing to follow requirements for safely operating tractors. Those violations are:

  • Failing to ensure that parking brakes can secure loaded tractors on any grade on which they park, and on any surface free of ice or snow.
  • Failing to train tractor operators to know when to stay off slopes too steep for safe operations in the orchard. Slopes that are too steep will likely cause a tractor to roll over. This was a repeat violation.
  • Failing to train tractor operators to fasten their seatbelts when the tractor has a rollover protective structure. This was a repeat violation.
  • Allowing employees to operate tractors on a sloped hillside without rollover protective devices in the upright position. This was a repeat violation.

“There are clear steps agricultural employers can take to control and eliminate hazards, and to provide proper safety training for their workers,” said Oregon OSHA Administrator Michael Wood. “As this case illustrates, ignoring such steps only serves to put people in harm’s way.”

Oregon OSHA also cited the company for failing to ensure its safety committee – after evaluating tractor rollovers – made recommendations to managers to prevent such potentially fatal accidents from happening again. This, too, was a repeat violation.

In addition to its enforcement activities, Oregon OSHA offers employers resources to help improve workplace safety and health.

The agency’s technical staff members can answer questions about rules and how to apply them:

Phone: 503-378-3272

Toll-free in Oregon: 800-922-2689

Email: tech.web@oregon.gov

Online contact form: https://osha.oregon.gov/Pages/Contact-Technical.aspx

Contact Oregon OSHA’s no-cost consultation services for help with safety and health programs:

Phone: 503-378-3272

Toll-free in Oregon: 800-922-2689

Field office locations and phone numbers: https://osha.oregon.gov/Pages/maps.aspx

Email: consult.web@oregon.gov

Visit Oregon OSHA’s A-to-Z topic page about safety and health in agriculture: https://osha.oregon.gov/Pages/topics/agriculture.aspx

###

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state’s workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit www.osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov.




Attached Media Files: Inspection document , DCBS logo , Oregon OSHA logo , Photo of tractor rollover accident

La Grande's Comfort named Oregon School Board Member of the Year (Photo)
Ore. School Boards Assn. - 11/18/19 8:52 AM
Merle Comfort, the 2019 Oregon School Board Member of the Year (credit: Moriah Ratner/Blue Chalk Media)
Merle Comfort, the 2019 Oregon School Board Member of the Year (credit: Moriah Ratner/Blue Chalk Media)
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/1312/129373/thumb_MR-OSBA-11162019-04.jpg

Merle Comfort, a member of both the La Grande School District and InterMountain ESD boards, has been named the 2019 Oregon School Board Member of the Year.

Comfort was recognized Saturday at the Oregon School Boards Association’s 73rd Annual Convention in downtown Portland. OSBA launched the Oregon School Board Member of the Year (link to http://www.osba.org/About-OSBA/OregonSchoolBoardMemberOfTheYear.aspx) award in 2018 to recognize outstanding volunteers who make a difference in their communities.

"Here is a person who gives a huge amount of time and energy and is totally dedicated to the welfare of his districts' kids," said OSBA Executive Director Jim Green.  

Comfort served La Grande schools from 1991 to 1999 and again from 2007 to the present. He has been on the InterMountain Education Service District board since the ESD was created in 2011.

“Merle epitomizes what a strong education leader is for rural Oregon,” said InterMountain ESD Superintendent Mark Mulvihill.

Comfort started school board service before his only child, Denise Comfort, was born in 1994. Comfort planned to have children, and he wanted to make sure the schools were as good as they could be.

Comfort’s daughter graduated from high school in 2013, but he has kept going. He said he stayed on to help the district pass its first bond in decades in 2014.

Colleagues credit Comfort for his leadership during the bond process, and he called it one of his proudest accomplishments.

“Until it passed, you have hopes and dreams,” he said. “When it passes, you see some of those hopes and dreams come to fruition.”

Comfort said the Student Success Act, passed in 2019, offers a chance to reverse the effects of three decades of property tax cuts. The act will raise about $1 billion annually for schools through a new business tax.

Nominees for the statewide award were considered for their advocacy efforts, leadership and support for student achievement. Comfort’s name will be placed on the OSBA website and engraved on a plaque in OSBA’s Salem office. He also will be able to register for OSBA events free for a year.

Green reminded school board members to keep an eye out for fellow members’ accomplishments and begin considering nominations when they open in January 2020.

OSBA is a non-profit member services agency for more than 200 locally elected boards serving school districts, education service districts and community colleges.

 




Attached Media Files: Merle Comfort, the 2019 Oregon School Board Member of the Year (credit: Moriah Ratner/Blue Chalk Media)

Sat. 11/16/19
Multiple Emergency Crews on Scene of Brush Fire in Rural Marion County
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/16/19 9:40 PM

On November 16th, shortly before 7:30 pm, emergency crews were dispatched to a report of a brush fire in the area of Spring Villa St SE near Grade Road SE, in rural Marion County.  Deputies are assisting fire officials with notifying residents nearby to be prepared for possible evacuations.  There are currently eight homes which have been placed in a “ready” status for evacuations.

At this time the fire is estimated to be approximately 10 acres in size.  Fire crews from Silverton Fire District, Drakes Crossing Fire District and Oregon Department of Forestry are on scene.  This area has limited roadway access which needs to remain clear for firefighting apparatus.  We are asking unnecessary traffic to avoid the area. The PIO is not responding to the scene.


Fatal Crash on Interstate 5 - Lane County
Oregon State Police - 11/16/19 7:58 AM

On Friday, November 15, 2019 at approximately 4:52 P.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel  responded to a pedestrian that had been struck on Interstate 5 near milepost 174, in Cottage Grove, OR. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that the pedestrian, identified as Andrew Evans (43) from Cottage Grove, entered the road from the southbound shoulder and into the path of a CMV operated by Ignacio Moncada (46) of Winton, CA.

Evans sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Moncada was not injured.

One southbound lane was closed for 2.5 hours. 

Oregon State Police was assisted by the Cottage Grove Police Department,  South Lane Fire and EMS, and ODOT.

.


Fri. 11/15/19
Helping Neighbors Heat Homes: NW Natural's Gas Assistance Program Gives $143,000
NW Natural - 11/15/19 2:23 PM

New giving season underway to help those in need

PORTLAND, Ore. — This past year NW Natural customers and shareholders contributed more than $143,000 to the Gas Assistance Program to help low-income families and seniors in the Pacific Northwest pay their heating bills during the cold winter months.

"Thanks to the generosity of our customers and the support of community action networks, we’ve been able to help those most in need with their heating costs for the past 37 years,” said Mary Moerlins, NW Natural corporate citizen manager. “We know the need will be great again this coming year so we’re committed to helping raise funds and match the first $60,000 in contributions this giving season.”

The new giving season is underway now through Aug. 31, 2020. NW Natural shareholders will match the first $60,000 in GAP contributions. Tax-deductible donations can be made via United Way at connect.unitedway-pdx.org/GAP or mailing a check to: Gas Assistance Program, 619 SW 11th Ave., Room 300, Portland, Oregon 97205-2646.

Also this season, in support of GAP, NW Natural is proudly sponsoring Christmas in the Garden at the Oregon Garden in historic Silverton, Oregon, where NW Natural employees will be onsite Dec. 14-15, 5-9 p.m., giving out holiday treats and GAP program information.

Since it began in 1982, NW Natural’s GAP has raised more than $6.3 million for community action groups that distribute the funds directly to those in need. NW Natural covers programs administrative costs so 100% of the funds can be donated.

Donation funds are distributed to the following community action networks, which screen all low-income recipients:

  • Clackamas County Social Services Division — Clackamas County
  • Clark Public Utilities District — Clark County
  • Community Action Organization — Washington County
  • Community Action Team, Inc. — Clatsop and Columbia Counties
  • Community Services Consortium — Benton, Lincoln and Linn Counties
  • Human Solutions, Inc. — Multnomah County
  • Impact Northwest — Multnomah County
  • Lane County Human Services Commission — Lane County
  • Mid-Columbia Community Action Council — Hood River, Wasco and Sherman Counties
  • Mid-Willamette Valley Community Action — Marion and Polk Counties
  • Self Enhancement, Inc. — Multnomah County
  • Yamhill Community Action Partnership — Yamhill County

About NW Natural

NW Natural provides natural gas service to approximately 2.5 million people in more than 140 communities through 750,000 meters in Oregon and Southwest Washington with one of the most modern pipeline systems in the nation. It consistently leads the industry with high J.D. Power & Associates customer satisfaction scores. NW Natural is part of Northwest Natural Holding Company, (NYSE: NWN) (NW Natural Holdings), which is headquartered in Portland, Oregon, and owns NW Natural, NW Natural Water Company, and other business interests and activities.

# # #


Northwest electric customers save millions with state-of-the-art recycling program
Bonneville Power Administration - 11/15/19 2:01 PM

Vancouver, Wash. — The Bonneville Power Administration’s innovative approach to recycling saved Northwest electric ratepayers nearly $3 million in 2018, with more savings projected for 2019. The agency’s sustainability efforts – from recycling transmission conductor and tower parts to auctioning off used equipment – are winning national sustainability awards.

One of BPA’s innovative approaches to recycling is its use of a machine known as the linear chopper. The device’s technology uses magnets to separate the aluminum and steel components of used high-voltage conductor wire – something BPA has a lot of. The agency owns 15,000 miles of transmission line across the west.

Once the used line is fed into the chopper, bits of steel and aluminum are separated and spewed out on opposite sides of the machine. The metal is then sent to regional smelters where it can fetch a healthy price. Since March of 2018, the machine has recovered more than 375 tons of aluminum valued at $700,000. That’s a lot of aluminum when you consider the Statue of Liberty weighs 225 tons.

“Our sustainability efforts go hand-in-hand with our commitment to being responsible stewards of the environment and accountable to our ratepayers,” says Robin Furrer, BPA’s chief administrative officer. “We recover approximately 90% of our used materials, so we throw away very little.”

Aside from the chopper, the agency’s other recycling efforts include auctioning off used equipment, recycling components from computers and electronic waste and donating used furniture.

In 2018, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency honored BPA with the Federal Green Challenge Materials Management Award. The EPA is honoring BPA again in 2019 for its outstanding sustainability efforts and care for the environment.

Video of the linear chopper is available upon request.

Contact David Wilson at wilson@bpa.gov">dbwilson@bpa.gov

About BPA

The Bonneville Power Administration, headquartered in Portland, Oregon, is a nonprofit federal power marketer that sells wholesale, carbon-free hydropower from 31 federal dams in the Columbia River Basin. It also markets the output of the region’s only nuclear plant. BPA delivers this power to more than 140 Northwest electric utilities, serving millions of consumers and businesses in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, western Montana and parts of California, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming. BPA also owns and operates more than 15,000 circuit miles of high-voltage power lines and 262 substations, and provides transmission service to more than 500 customers. In all, BPA provides nearly a third of the power generated in the Northwest. To mitigate the impacts of the federal dams, BPA implements a fish and wildlife program that includes working with its partners to make the federal dams safer for fish passage. It also pursues cost-effective energy savings and operational solutions that help maintain safe, affordable, reliable electric power for the Northwest. www.bpa.gov


Rogue River User Meeting (Photo)
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 11/15/19 1:53 PM
2019-11/5514/129349/IMG_8429.JPG
2019-11/5514/129349/IMG_8429.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/5514/129349/thumb_IMG_8429.JPG

Medford OR - The Bureau of Land Management and United States Forest Service are hosting the biennial Rogue River User Meeting on Thursday, November 21, 2019, from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. PST at the BLM/Forest Service Interagency Office, 2164 NE Spalding Avenue, Grants Pass, Oregon.

This meeting is for permitted commercial guides, outfitters and private parties that utilize the Rogue River. Potential meeting topics include permitting, Leave No Trace, user etiquette, trail use, animal interaction, and how to get involved.

Teleconference participation is available for the first 25 callers for the first hour of the meeting. Phone lines open 5 minutes before the meeting starts.  The call-in number and other pertinent information will be available the day before the event on the BLM Rogue River Recreation web page: https://www.blm.gov/programs/recreation/permits-and-passes/lotteries-and-permit-systems/oregon-washington/rogue-river

We appreciate your interest in the Rogue River and look forward to your participation in the upcoming meeting. If you have questions, please contact BLM Commercial Permit Administrator,

For additional information please contact Patrick Kollodge, at 541-471-6648 or BLM_OR_MD_Rogue_River_Mail@blm.gov.

-BLM-

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. In fiscal year 2018, the diverse activities authorized on BLM-managed lands generated $105 billion in economic output across the country. This economic activity supported 471,000 jobs and contributed substantial revenue to the U.S. Treasury and state governments, mostly through royalties on minerals.




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/5514/129349/IMG_8429.JPG , 2019-11/5514/129349/IMG_8509.JPG , 2019-11/5514/129349/IMG_8505.JPG

Installation of new variable message boards/signs to cause I-5 delays
ODOT: Valley, No. Coast - 11/15/19 1:02 PM

The replacement of  variable message boards/signs at three locations on Interstate 5 in the mid Willamette Valley will cause evening delays over the next two weeks.   To safely remove the old boards and install the new ones, there will need to be evening lane closures.  The work is scheduled as follows:

Southbound I-5 at Arndt Road, milepost 281

The variable message board/sign will be replaced on Sunday-Tuesday, November 17-19 from 9 p.m. to 5 a.m. each evening.  At least one lane will remain open during the work.  Travelers should expect delays.

Northbound I-5 at Perkins Road, milepost 262

The variable message board/sign will be replaced on Wednesday-Thursday, November 20-21 from 9 p.m. to 5 a.m. each evening.  At least one lane will remain open during the work.  Travelers should expect delays.

Northbound at Lake Creek, milepost 214

The variable message board/sign will be replaced on Sunday-Wednesday, November 24-27 from 9 p.m. to 5 a.m. each evening.  One lane will remain open during the work.  In addition, there will be evening rolling traffic slowdowns starting at the Randy Pape Beltline (OR 569) in Eugene. Travelers should expect delays.

Travelers are encouraged to visit TripCheck.com for the very latest on traffic conditions. 

 

 


Unemployment Tax Rate Moves to Tax Schedule Two with an Average of 1.73 Percent
Oregon Employment Department - 11/15/19 10:00 AM

Unemployment tax rates for employers subject to Oregon payroll tax will move to tax schedule two for the 2020 calendar year. Tax schedule two includes an average rate of 1.73 percent for the first $42,100 paid to each employee. The specific rate each employer will pay under the new schedule depends on how much they have used the unemployment insurance system. 

Oregon adjusts employer tax rates annually using eight tax schedules based on the solvency of the Unemployment Insurance Trust Fund. Movement between the eight schedules of tax rates represents part of the self-balancing aspects of Oregon’s Unemployment Insurance Trust Fund law. Each September, a formula contained in statute, determines how much should be collected during the next year to maintain a solvent fund. Each schedule has a range of tax rates based on an employer’s previous unemployment insurance experience. Employers with more unemployment insurance claims have a higher tax rate than those with fewer claims. 

As a result of this approach, Oregon has one of the strongest trust funds in the nation. The trust fund provides support for temporarily unemployed workers, their families, and communities while minimizing the impact on employers. This approach allows support without having to reduce benefits to workers, increase employer taxes, or borrow from the federal government, as most other states had to do for the Great Recession. 

Because of Oregon’s innovative Unemployment Trust Fund model, we are well positioned to pay benefits in the next recession. Unlike other states, where employers had to pay additional taxes or surcharges when states borrowed to pay benefits, Oregon’s trust fund is earning interest. This reduces the amount that needs to be collected from Oregon employers to maintain the trust fund. 

Oregon’s unemployment rate has fluctuated slightly, generally remaining at or near a record low for three years. The low number of unemployed workers reflects a very tight job market. This creates some challenges for employers growing their workforce, and means far fewer Oregonians who unable to find a job. The jobs employers provide contribute to a vibrant Oregon economy and support the quality of life for Oregonians.

The Oregon Employment Department mailed notifications to businesses regarding their individual tax rates and encourages employers to wait until they receive their individual notice before attempting to contact the department with questions. Any employer who has not received their notice within the next couple of weeks should contact the Oregon Employment Department Unemployment Insurance Tax Section. Contact information may be found online at www.oregon.gov/employ.

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Oregon Employment Department is an equal opportunity employer/program.

Oregon Employment Department es un programa/empleador que respeta la igualdad de oportunidades.




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/930/129331/2020-UI-Tax-Rate-11-15-19.pdf

Shots Fired Call at Local School Turns Out to Be a Blown Transformer
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 11/15/19 9:10 AM

Linn County Undersheriff Paul Timm reports his deputies responded to Mari-Linn Elementary School in Lyons, for a report of shots fired at 6:26 a.m., this morning.  The caller reported hearing a gunshot and saw what she believed to be a muzzle  flash just outside the school.  There were only a few staff members at the school and children were just starting to arrive.  Deputies responded along with Oregon State Police and began investigating the incident, when Pacific Power arrived to check on a blown transformer. 

The transformer that blew was in the same location the caller said the “shots” came from.  After further investigation, it was confirmed the transformer had made the loud noise and flashed, which is what the caller thought was a “muzzle flash”.  Students were locked in a safe place as they arrived and there was no real threat to the school.  The school was determined to be safe about an hour after the call was made.


Oregon Heritage Commission grants awarded for history projects throughout the state
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 11/15/19 8:18 AM

Oregon Heritage Commission has awarded $379,785 in grants to 32 organizations throughout the state. The grants will help fund a variety of projects including collection preservation and access, research, education, exhibits, and film projects. Award amounts ranged $2,020 - $20,000.

Funded projects:

  • Abernethy Elementary School PTA, in Portland, for conservation of a WPA mural.
  • Architectural Heritage Center, in Portland, for an exhibit about the evolution of South Portland in the 20th century.
  • Astoria Scandinavian Heritage Association, in Astoria, for construction of a Nordic Heritage Park.
  • Bend Parks and Recreation District for collections care and interpretation of the Hollinshead-Matson Historic House.
  • Clackamas County Historical Society, in Oregon City, for proper storage of the textile collection at the Museum of the Oregon Territory.
  • Columbia Gorge Discovery Center, in The Dalles, for digitization of The Dalles Chronicle photographs, dating from 1940s to 1970s.
  • Four Rivers Cultural Center, in Ontario, to provide folk arts programming.
  • Frazier Farmstead Museum, in Milton-Freewater, to publish history booklets.
  • Harney County Library Foundation, in Burns, to digitize local oral history interviews.
  • High Desert Museum, near Bend, to develop an interpretive pan for the renovation of the museum’s permanent exhibition on the Indigenous Plateau.
  • Independence Heritage Museum, in Independence, to catalog and digitize the archival collection.
  • Josephy Center for Arts and Culture, in Joseph, to catalog and digitize the collections.
  • Lincoln County Historical Society, in Newport, to produce three videos.
  • METRO historic cemeteries, in Portland, to research historic records that highlight the history of women buried in METRO historic cemeteries.
  • Nehalem Valley Historical Society, in Manazanita, to complete a heritage memoir film about Mary Gerritse.
  • City of Oregon City to purchase and implement cemetery management software at Mountain View Cemetery.
  • Oregon Historical Society, in Portland, to provide teacher training through workshops.
  • Oregon Jewish Museum, in Portland, to create and install the “To Bear Witness: Extraordinary Lives” exhibit.
  • Oregon Paleo Lands institute, in Fossil, to create and install the exhibit “John Day, A River Flows Free.”
  • Oregon Rail Heritage Foundation, in Portland, to install a historic turntable.
  • Portland Japanese Garden to purchase whisper touring devises and design a new map and brochure.
  • Portland Youth Philharmonic to preserve sound recordings.
  • Restore Oregon, in Portland, to complete phase one of the Jantzen Beach Carousel preservation project.
  • City of Salem to stabilize the Ben Maxwell digital image collection.
  • Save the PT Boat, Inc., in Portland, to expand interpretive programming.
  • Southern Oregon University, in Ashland, to develop the Rogue Valley Women’s Movement Oral History project.
  • Talent Historical Society to develop local history curriculum.
  • The Vanport Mosaic, in Portland, to hold a gathering of people and organizations documenting Oregon’s past.
  • City of Tillamook for conservation of a mural and an art exhibit.
  • Tillamook County Pioneer Museum to create and install “Her-Story, The Women’s Suffrage Movement in Oregon and What It Means Today” exhibit and companion book.
  • University of Portland to digitize the student-run paper, The Beacon.
  • Vanport Placemaking Project, in Portland, to develop design content for interpretation at the Vanport site.

This competitive grant program is for qualifying organizations, and is offered once per biennium for projects that conserve, develop or interpret Oregon’s heritage. It is a program of the Oregon Heritage Commission. The Commission works to secure, sustain and enhance Oregon’s heritage. The Commission consists of nine members appointed by the governor and nine agency advisors. Members are chosen from state agencies and statewide organizations, and represent diverse geographical and cultural backgrounds.

The Commission is part of Oregon Heritage, a division of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. To learn more about the Oregon Heritage Grant or the Oregon Heritage Commission, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at i.gill@oregon.gov">Kuri.gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.


Linn County Undersheriff Paul Timm reports arrest of ex-attorney for Identity Theft (Photo)
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 11/15/19 8:18 AM
2019-11/2993/129332/Moeller.jpg
2019-11/2993/129332/Moeller.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/2993/129332/thumb_Moeller.jpg

Linn County Undersheriff Paul Timm reports that on November 14, 2019, detectives arrested Megan Marie Moeller, 39, a residence of Corvallis, in connection with a forgery investigation. 

In 2016, Megan Moeller, who was then Megan Perry, was a licensed attorney and had an office in downtown Albany.  Megan Moeller was hired by a client to provide representation in regards to a child custody issue.  Detectives found that during that representation, Megan Moeller provided her client with documents “proving” that legal papers had been served on the other party.  The investigation revealed that signatures on those documents had been forged and that the legal papers had not actually been served on the other party. 

Megan Moeller was arrested and charged with three counts of Identity Theft. 

In 2018, Megan Moeller submitted her resignation to the Oregon State Bar after facing multiple complaints from clients. At that time, Megan Moeller was disbarred from practicing law in Oregon. 




Attached Media Files: 2019-11/2993/129332/Moeller.jpg