Emergency Reports | News Releases | Traffic | Participants
Sort by: Date | Category
Eugene/Spring/Rose/Alb/Corv News Releases for Sat. Jul. 20 - 5:07 pm
Sat. 07/20/24
Bureau of Land Management issues emergency fire closure in Lane County
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 07/20/24 4:40 PM

Dorena, Ore. — The Bureau of Land Management Northwest Oregon District has temporarily closed BLM-managed public lands because of multiple fires in the area southeast of Cottage Grove, within the Sharps Creek and Clark Creek areas. The closure is for public and firefighter safety, and to allow fire suppression crews to continue to safely respond to the incident. 

The closure order closes the Sharps Creek Campground and encompasses BLM-managed public lands southeast of the town of Dorena, surrounding Sharps Creek Road (County Road 2460 / BLM Road No. 23-1-12) and Clark Creek Road (BLM Road No. 23-1-13). This includes BLM lands in Township 22S, Range 1W, and Township 23S, Range 1W, Sections 1-3, 11-14, 22-24, 26-27, 33-34. The closure also includes Sharps Creek Road and Clark Creek Road. Members of the public may not enter closed areas, and all uses—including hiking, mining, hunting and dispersed camping—are prohibited. Sharps Creek Road and Clark Creek Road remain open to residents within the closure area. For additional information and the closure map, visit https://www.blm.gov/orwafire. 

As it becomes safe to do so, firefighters will begin to assess the closure and their impacts in alignment with sound risk management practices. 

BLM Northwest Oregon District has additional fire closures and fire restriction information available on BLM.GOV 

Please call 911 to report any signs of new fires. 

-BLM- 

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 western states, including Alaska, on behalf of the American people. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. Our mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. 




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/5514/173959/Emergency_Closure_Order_Lane1_Clark900.7.20.24-508wmap.pdf

Firefighters Tackle Rail Car Fire in Eugene (Photo)
Eugene Springfield Fire - 07/20/24 3:04 PM
2024-07/4466/173957/IMG_9478.jpeg
2024-07/4466/173957/IMG_9478.jpeg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/4466/173957/thumb_IMG_9478.jpeg

Eugene, OR.  Eugene Springfield Fire responded to a rail car fire at the Union Pacific rail yard in West Eugene Saturday morning. ESF was dispatched to the fire at 8:35 AM on July 20th.  At 7:00 AM  Central Lane Communications received multiple calls of a smoking box car with visible flames at times, as the train made its way to the yard from Oakridge.  Tower 2, Water Tender 2, and Battalion 2  from the Whiteaker Station nearby, responded as part of the initial alarm assignment.  On arrival, fire crews located the burning boxcar in the rail yard and made access with a hose-line attempting to extinguish the fire.  Firefighters encountered difficulty due to high piled shipping contents in the 53’ long cargo container.  Crews cut large holes in the metal box car and were forced to manually remove burning debris to access and extinguish the fire.  In all, 3 Engines, 1 Ladder, 1 Tower Company, 2 Water Tenders, a Battalion Chief, Logistical Support Unit, and an EMS Supervisor responded to the Incident.  The ESF Fire Marshal's  office is on scene investigating a cause. The main fire was contained to the train car of origin, and there were no injuries reported.




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/4466/173957/IMG_9478.jpeg , 2024-07/4466/173957/IMG_9470.jpeg , 2024-07/4466/173957/IMG_9464.jpeg , 2024-07/4466/173957/IMG_9465.jpeg , 2024-07/4466/173957/IMG_9475.jpeg

Barricaded Subject on NW Lance Way
Corvallis Police - 07/20/24 1:43 PM

7/20/2024 1:41 pm

 

Media Contact: 

Lt. Ben Harvey, Corvallis Police Department

(541) 766-6556 / cpdpio@corvallisoregon.gov


Barricaded Subject on NW Lance Way

 

On July 20, 2024, at approximately 7:53 am Corvallis Police Officers were dispatched to 2052 NW Lance Way for a report of an armed barricaded convicted felon in the garage who was making threatening statements related to a pending jail sentence. The family left the residence and called the police. 

Corvallis Police officers arrived and created a perimeter to contain the situation. The community was notified to avoid the area via Nixle and the community immediately proximate to the address was provided additional instruction via electronic notice.  

The Oregon State Police was notified, and their SWAT (Special Weapons and Tactics) team responded to assist. Personnel from the Corvallis Police Department aided by Benton County Sheriff’s Office and Oregon State Police contacted residents in the homes adjacent to the subject property in person to conduct evacuations. 

Contact was made through an Oregon State Police negotiator, and at approximately 1:21 pm, 27- year-old Jacob W. Jaeger of Corvallis exited the residence and peacefully surrendered to law enforcement personnel on site. Jaeger, who was uninjured, was arrested on the following charges:

 

ORS 166.270 Felon in Possession of a Certain Weapons

ORS 166.220 Unlawful Use of a Weapon 

ORS 166.250 Unlawful Possession of a Firearm

 

Jaeger was transported to the Benton County Jail and Lodged. 


Fri. 07/19/24
Another Busy Day for Sweet Home Fire (Photo)
Sweet Home Fire Dist. - 07/19/24 6:01 PM
2024-07/5505/173949/141174.jpeg
2024-07/5505/173949/141174.jpeg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/5505/173949/thumb_141174.jpeg

Sweet Home Fire has again responded to multiple vehicle crashes in the same day. Of the 11 emergency calls we've received since 7 am today, 2 were crashes, 1 was a structure fire, and 1 involved the use of lifeflight to air lift a firefighter from the Tally Creek Fire who was suffering from chest pains.

The first crash of the day was called in just after 8 am. The crash occurred on Highway 20 near Greenville Rd, and involved 1 vehicle which left the roadway striking a shrub and a fence. The single occupant was transported to a local hospital with non-life threatening injuries. The incident, which was initially reported to be a vehicle that crashed into a home, brought 2 ambulances, a rescue unit, an engine, and a command vehicle with a total of 9 firefighters. OSP was also on scene.

The structure fire was reported at 838 am on Highway 20 in the Cascadia area. The caller reported that smoke was filling the home from an unknown source. The Incident Commander arrived to find a duplex, with one unit charged with smoke that was escaping from the eaves. The occupants had all evacuated and had shut off the power to the breaker panels. An engine company with 5 firefighters, a water tender with 2 firefighters, and an ambulance with 1 firefighter arrived on scene shortly after the IC. Crews entered the structure and searched for the fire using a thermal imaging camera, but could not find a heat source. A positive pressure fan was used to clear the smoke which led firefighters to the source. A basket of laundry was found smoldering in the home, it was determined to contain linseed oil soaked rags which were the source of the fire. Two pet cats were rescued from the smoke charged building. Civilians who were on scene attempting to put water on the home prior to our arrival, and no injuries were reported. The smoke was removed from the home and no damages were assessed.

At around 1130 a medic unit which was standing by at the Tally Creek Fire was activated for a firefighter on the line who was suffering from chest pains. The crew evaluated the patient and activated lifeflight for transport. The medic crew was assisted by contract firefighting crews and crews from ODF, who worked together to pack the patient down from the fireline to the ambulance. The patient was then transported to the landing zone at Green Peter Dam, and flown to a nearby hospital. At last report that patient was still being evaluated in the ER, but was stable.

The second crash of the day was reported just before 4 pm. The crash happened at the intersection of Highway 20 and Pleasant Valley Rd. The crash involved 2 full-sized pickup trucks which collided in a glancing head-on style crash causing front-end damage to both vehicles. Four occupants from one of the vehicles were evaluated for minor injuries but declined ambulance transport to the hospital. This crash brought 2 ambulances, 1 rescue, and an Incident Command vehicle to the scene. Sweet Home Police and ODOT provided traffic control, and an OSP trooper also responded.




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/5505/173949/141174.jpeg , 2024-07/5505/173949/141175.jpeg , 2024-07/5505/173949/141176.jpeg

OSFM sends firefighters and equipment to Durkee Fire in Baker County, more out-of-state resources arrive
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 07/19/24 3:35 PM

SALEM, Ore. – On Friday, the Oregon State Fire Marshal sent structural protection resources to the Durkee Fire in Baker County through Immediate Response. The fire was reported Wednesday night off Interstate 84 near the community of Durkee. It has grown substantially since it was first ignited, prompting new level 3 evacuation notices.  

As of this morning, the lightning-sparked fire was estimated to be 2,699 acres and zero percent contained. 

On Friday, the Boneyard Fire in Grant County was put under the conflagration declared for the nearby Lone Rock Fire and is being managed by the OSFM’s Red Incident Management Team. The OSFM sent structural task forces to protect homes near the town of Monument. That fire is extremely active and continues to pose a threat to nearby communities. The fire was reported to be 3,123 acres as of Friday mid-day. 

Wildfires continue to tax resources and conditions remain at critical levels without much relief in the forecast. The Oregon State Fire Marshal requested and received three strike teams from California.  

The California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services (Cal OES) sent three strike teams with 15 fire engines and 80 firefighters. These added structural protection resources are assigned to the Falls Fire in Harney County. The firefighters and equipment are from local government fire agencies from Alameda, Calaveras, Kern, Merced, Nevada, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Francisco, and San Joaquin counties. This is made possible through the Emergency Management Assistance Compact.

“Our partnerships with California and Washington are strong,” Oregon State Fire Marshal Mariana Ruiz-Temple said. “Over the years, we’ve worked side-by-side to provide aid in times of need. These partnerships are invaluable. I want to say thank you to both California and Washington. Oregon will have your back if you need support in the future.”  

Since July 9, the Emergency Conflagration Act was invoked for five fires, causing a significant strain on resources. The OSFM is working in lockstep with its wildland partners at the Oregon Department of Forestry, Bureau of Land Management, tribal partners, the U.S. Forest Service, and others.  

The Oregon fire service has been resolute over the past 10 days. They’ve supported 23 task forces consisting of 305 firefighters, 92 engines, and 23 water tenders to protect communities while still maintaining staffing and equipment levels in their home districts. 

"I want to assure Oregonians that we are doing everything we can to respond to this wildfire emergency,” Ruiz-Temple said. “We have been working around the clock to protect communities across the state impacted by these wildfires.” 

The OSFM is asking Oregonians and visitors to pay close attention to the critical fire danger and take steps to avoid sparking another fire. With another round of lightning and gusty winds expected in the coming week, it is more important than ever to take these precautions. 


Republic Services Submits Conditional Use Permit Application for Coffin Butte Landfill Expansion (Photo)
Benton Co. Government - 07/19/24 3:28 PM
2024-07/4171/173940/BC_LUAppProcess-Quasi-judicial_final_06-25-24.png
2024-07/4171/173940/BC_LUAppProcess-Quasi-judicial_final_06-25-24.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/4171/173940/thumb_BC_LUAppProcess-Quasi-judicial_final_06-25-24.png

Today, July 19, 2024, Republic Services has submitted a Conditional Use Permit (CUP) application to expand the Coffin Butte Landfill. The Benton County Community Development Department is currently reviewing the application for completeness.  A Completeness Check is a planning term referring to a quality measure where an application is reviewed to ensure all required and requested information is included, along with any necessary supporting documents.

The review process involves several steps. County staff have a statutory 30-day period to assess whether the application is complete. If the application is deemed complete, the review process will start, and the County will complete the process within 150 days. If the application is incomplete, the applicant will have 30 days to provide the additional information.  

Once the application is complete, the County will conduct public outreach to ensure community engagement and transparency throughout the review process.

For detailed information on the Conditional Use Permit process, please refer to the Land Use Application Process flow chart.

For additional details on solid waste management in Benton County, please refer to the Solid Waste Management FAQ.




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/4171/173940/BC_LUAppProcess-Quasi-judicial_final_06-25-24.png , 2024-07/4171/173940/benton-county-logo-horizontal-full-color-rgb.png

7/19/24 - LCSO Case #24-3827 - Lane County Sheriff's deputies assist with McKenzie View Fire (Photo)
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/19/24 2:52 PM
Drone still
Drone still
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/6111/173941/thumb_IMG_0788.png

Yesterday, July 18th, Lane County Sheriff’s deputies responded to the area of McKenzie View at milepost 5 to assist firefighters by evacuating about 15 residences. While on scene, deputies assisted with transporting wildland firefighters closer to the flames and flew a drone to give real-time information to the fire crews.

The fire was quickly taken under control by fire crews, who continued to work the area overnight. The evacuation notice was lifted late last night. The cause of the fire is currently under investigation.

The Lane County Sheriff’s Office would like to thank the many fire agencies who have been responding and protecting the residents and visitors of our county.




Attached Media Files: Drone still , Transporting firefighters

Fatal Crash - Interstate 84 - Hood River County
Oregon State Police - 07/19/24 2:05 PM

Hood River County, Ore. 18 July 24- On Thursday, July 18, 2024, at 12:45 a.m., Oregon State Police responded to a two-vehicle crash on Interstate 84, near milepost 54, in Hood River County.

The preliminary investigation indicated a westbound Ford Econoline AMR Ambulance, operated by Amanda Hancock (42) of Benton City (WA), left the lane of travel and struck a Chevrolet Camaro, operated by Geraldean Edna Martin (55) of Portland, while it was disabled on the side of the roadway with a flat tire. The Chevrolet operator was outside of the vehicle at the time of the collision.

The operator of the Chevrolet (Martin) was declared deceased at the scene.

The operator of the Ford (Hancock) and passengers, Amy Ann Young (28) of Pasco (WA) and Jonathan David Farmer (23) of Pendleton, were not injured during the collision. Farmer was a patient in the ambulance at the time of the crash.

The highway was impacted for approximately four hours during the on-scene investigation. The cause of the crash is under investigation at this time and no further information is available for release.

OSP was assisted by the Hood River County Sheriff's Office and ODOT.

 

# # #

 

About the Oregon State Police
Oregon State Police (OSP) is a multi-disciplined organization that is charged with protecting the people, wildlife, and natural resources in Oregon. OSP enforces traffic laws on the state’s roadways, investigates and solves crime, conducts postmortem examinations and forensic analysis, and provides background checks, and law enforcement data. The agency regulates gaming and enforces fish, wildlife, and natural resource laws. OSP is comprised of more than 1,400 staff members – including troopers, investigators, and professional staff – who provide a full range of policing and public safety services to Oregon and other law enforcement agencies throughout Oregon.


Sheriff Expresses Concern Over 32-Hour Work Week for Law Enforcement
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/19/24 11:48 AM

July 19, 2024

I would like to take this opportunity to express my concerns on the concept of a 32-hour work week. This is an act introduced by U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders (Vermont) that would amend the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 to reduce the standard workweek from 40 hours per week to 32 hours per week.  A version of that act was recently adopted (June 10, 2024) by the City of Roseburg in conjunction with the 3-year union contract for the Roseburg Police Department. 

The Roseburg City contract would standardize a 32-hour workweek with no loss in pay.  For example, an officer working 32 hours in a week but getting paid for 40 hours would equate to a 20% increase in pay for that week, and it falls on the backs of the taxpayer.  This would also make Roseburg Police Officers among the highest paid officers in the state.  This contract/policy by the City of Roseburg will have substantial effects on city taxpayers and all law enforcement in Douglas County.  We are experiencing out of control drug abuse, mental health crisis, and homelessness at an all-time high in our communities.  This is the time to work more, not less. 

As stated earlier, a Roseburg city police officer can work 32 hours during their workweek but still get paid for 40 hours.  Any work hours beyond the 40 hours would be paid at their overtime rate.   Roseburg hopes to improve work conditions and morale through this policy change, thereby drawing more interest in position openings and increasing their recruitment numbers.   

The concept of a 32-hour work week will require Roseburg to either hire more officers to cover the reduced hours, or it will result in less police on the streets patrolling our neighborhoods. The concept is not right for ALL industries and is more geared toward remote work versus customer service.  32-hour work weeks are challenging to implement in industries like healthcare or customer service that requires urgency, and specific service hours. Both of which are commonplace within law enforcement. 

Furthermore, research has shown officers working 8 hour shifts average 3 times more overtime as those on 10-hour shifts, and 5 times more than those on 12-hour shifts. 

This 32-hour work week concept might be appropriate in certain industries and businesses where there is a profit margin to absorb the costs, but not in public service where the costs are on the taxpayer. 

It has been suggested that I and other public safety administrators are agreeable to, or supportive of this concept here in Douglas County.  Let me clarify.  I am NOT supportive of a 32-hour work week.  Law enforcement is not just a job, but rather it’s a calling.  You are either deeply inspired and dedicated to serve as a peace officer or you aren’t.  Improving interest in this work and improving recruitment is accomplished through well respected solid leadership, empowering employees through self-leadership principles, caring for and respecting your employees, and providing reasonable pay and benefits.   Attempting to create this culture by rewarding employees with higher than reasonable pay for less service is irresponsible.

I believe this is a reckless policy change on behalf of the City of Roseburg.  Paying employees for 40 hours but only requiring 32 hours of work simply feels unethical and wrong.   I encourage the city taxpayers to investigate the amount of money this trial period is going to cost you.  It is an irresponsible use of taxpayer dollars and if I were a city taxpayer, I would be furious.

Respectfully,

John W. Hanlin
Douglas County Sheriff




Attached Media Files: Open Letter Regarding 32 Hour Work Week Concerns

OHA climate report highlights opportunities to build resilience against wildfires, drought, extreme heat
Oregon Health Authority - 07/19/24 11:18 AM

Link to the report

July 19, 2024

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@oha.oregon.gov

OHA climate report highlights opportunities to build resilience against wildfires, drought, extreme heat

PORTLAND, Ore.— Communities that have been systemically marginalized continue to bear the brunt of extreme climate effects such as wildfires, drought and heat waves, according to a new Oregon Health Authority (OHA) report. But opportunities abound for building resilience against future disasters.

Publication of the OHA Public Health Division’s annual Climate and Health in Oregon report for 2023 is a stark reminder that as extreme climate effects continue, Oregon must continue to prioritize climate resilience and green infrastructure in communities at greater risk of the health impacts of climate change.

The report says Oregon communities hit hardest by the 2020 wildfires and 2021 heat dome are still recovering. But the report also says local, Tribal and state agencies and community-based organizations are learning from the disasters and have “made investments in strategies to prepare for the uncertain future.”

“The Climate and Health in Oregon report reflects the fact that extreme climate effects are our past, present and future, and we need to accept this reality by better understanding these events and helping communities mitigate the health risks associated with them,” said Cara Biddlecom, OHA’s interim Public Health Division director. “We must support an equitable approach to climate resilience, with community expertise as our guide.”

The Climate and Health in Oregon report shows numerous examples of direct links between heat and wildfire events and heat-related and respiratory illnesses – using emergency department (ED), urgent care, hospitalization and death data, and temperature and air quality data:

  • The number of nights that are warmer than 65 degrees is increasing across Oregon. Warmer nights mean homes without air conditioning do not cool overnight, and people can’t get relief from high daytime temperatures, especially during consecutive days of high heat.
  • OHA is seeing health effects on days when the Heat Index – a measure of how hot it feels when relative humidity is factored in with the actual air temperature – is at or above 80 degrees. In 2023, people sought emergency or urgent care at higher-than-expected levels during high Heat Index days.
  • Although 2021 saw 109 heat-related deaths and 2022 had 22, the eight health-related deaths in 2023 were still more than the annual count of heat-related deaths in the decade before 2021, when the number of heat deaths did not exceed four per year. During 2021-2023, cardiovascular disease was a contributing cause of 25% of heat-related deaths, and people 50 and older accounted for 87% of heat deaths.
  • Levels of particulate matter, or PM2.5, from wildfire smoke are expected to double or triple by the end of the century. The increases in smoke are predicted to cause excess asthma-related ED visits and hospitalizations at a rate of 42 excess asthma events per 10,000 population in 2050. Smoke-related ED visits and hospitalizations for asthma are expected to add nearly $100 million to health care costs in Oregon by that decade.
  • American Indian/Alaska Native, Black/African American and Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander people in Oregon have rates of health care visits for air quality-related respiratory illness that are double or near-double the statewide rate of 22 per 1,000 residents.
  • Twelve counties – Crook, Deschutes, Douglas, Jackson, Jefferson, Josephine, Klamath, Lake, Lane, Linn, Marion and Umatilla – exceed the state average for both air quality days at or above moderate Air Quality Index, or AQI, and heat index above 80 degrees.
  • Nearly 40% of Oregonians (1.7 million) live in the 12 counties that experienced 14 or more days with heat at or above 80 degrees and compromised air quality occurring on the same day during May to September 2023. All these counties are home to Oregonians who report a higher chronic disease burden than the state average.
  • In September 2023, more than half of Oregon’s land area experienced severe drought (52%), while 30% experienced extreme drought.

But the report also points to signs of hope in the form of investments that local, Tribal and state government agencies and nonprofit organizations have made in recent years to help Oregon communities prepare for, better respond to, recover from, and build resilience against future disasters:

  • Oregon public health modernization investments prioritized by Governor’s budgets and legislative appropriations are helping OHA, all local public health authorities, 57 community-based organizations and the nine Federally Recognized Tribes of Oregon identify climate hazards and at-risk populations, and develop and implement protective strategies.
  • OHA’s Public Health Division in 2023 established indicators to measure the public health system’s progress in building community resilience to health effects of climate change, including reducing incidence of heat-related and respiratory illnesses.
  • Also in 2023, state and federal leaders increased investments to protect people in Oregon at highest risk of health effects from climate change-driven risks, to make homes more resilient to extreme weather, and to increase tree canopies statewide to reduce heat island effects.
  • The Oregon Legislature enacted Senate Bill 1536 in 2022, directing OHA to establish an air conditioner and air filter deployment program, which has since provided thousands of devices to low-income households.

The report also spotlights innovative local projects to bolster climate recovery and response, such as Jackson County’s Community Long-Term Recovery Group, which convenes multi-jurisdictional partners to plan post-disaster recovery and resilience operations; an Oregon Resilience Summit to help local agencies and nonprofits share knowledge, gather ideas and showcase local expertise in effective disaster response, recovery and prevention; and Portland Metro Region Heat Mapping Campaign to understand and reduce health impacts of extreme heat by tracking heat distribution patterns. More local projects are highlighted on this page.

“By building resilience to climate change in Oregon communities, we are making significant strides toward our goal of eliminating health inequities in the state by 2030,” Biddlecom said.

For more information, visit www.healthoregon.org/climate.


Downgraded evacuation notice for portion of High Prairie area north of Oakridge due to wildfire (Photo)
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/19/24 11:02 AM
2024-07/6111/173930/451488109_877202341119165_2988785594498215924_n.jpg
2024-07/6111/173930/451488109_877202341119165_2988785594498215924_n.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/6111/173930/thumb_451488109_877202341119165_2988785594498215924_n.jpg

 

The following area north of Oakridge is being downgraded to a Level 1 (Be Ready) evacuation notification:

  • East of High Prairie Road milepost 5.5, including Dead Mountain, Mountain View, Huckleberry and High Prairie Loop.

 

Level 1 means: Be aware of danger in your area, monitor emergency services websites and local news for information. This is the time for precautionary movement of people with special needs, mobile property and pets and livestock. If conditions worsen, emergency services personnel may contact you via an emergency notification system.

 

Continue to closely monitor your phone, local media and www.LaneCountyOR.gov/HighPrairieFire for information. 

 

The following area remains at a Level 1 (Be Ready) evacuation:

  • High Prairie area east of North Fork Road and north of Westfir-Oakridge Road to milepost 5.5 on High Prairie Road

 

Level 1 means you should be aware of the danger that exists in your area, monitor local media 

 

 

An evacuation map is available at www.LaneCountyOR.gov/HighPrairieFire.   

 

Residents are encouraged to sign up for emergency alerts at www.LaneAlerts.org.

 

More information is available at www.LaneCountyOR.gov/HighPrairieFire.   

 

 

###




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/6111/173930/451488109_877202341119165_2988785594498215924_n.jpg

Thu. 07/18/24
Level 2 BE SET Evacuation Notice Issued Due to Boulder Flat Fire
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/18/24 6:07 PM

TOKETEE, Ore. - A Level 2 BE SET evacuation notice has been issued for all homes in the Slide Creek area downstream to the Soda Springs area. This in inclusive of all addresses between these two points. 

A Level 2 - BE SET EVACUATION NOTICE means YOU MUST PREPARE TO LEAVE AT A MOMENTS NOTICE. This level indicates there is significant danger to your area, and you should either voluntarily relocate to a shelter or with family/friends outside of the affected area, or if choosing to remain, to be ready to evacuate at a moment's notice. You MAY have time to gather necessary items, but doing so is at your own risk. THIS MAY BE THE ONLY NOTICE YOU RECEIVE. Emergency services cannot guarantee that they will be able to notify you if conditions rapidly deteriorate. 

The implementation of this Level 2 BE SET notice is a result of the Boulder Flat Fire burning on the Umpqua National Forest near the Soda Springs/Pine Bench area. 

An interactive evacuation map can be found at https://www.dcso.com/evacuations. 


07-18-24 H.O.P.E. Drug Court Announces 106th Graduation Ceremony (Photo)
Douglas Co. Government - 07/18/24 5:04 PM
106th Drug Court Graduation
106th Drug Court Graduation
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/6789/173926/thumb_07-23-2024_Hope_Drug_Court_Graduation_.png

Joint Release: Douglas County Local Public Safety Coordinating Council, Honorable Judge Robert B. Johnson, Douglas County H.O.P.E. Drug Court Committee, Douglas County Circuit Court

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

July 18, 2024

H.O.P.E. Drug Court Announces 106th Graduation Ceremony

(Douglas County, OR) The Douglas County H.O.P.E. Drug Court is pleased to cordially invite you to the 106th H.O.P.E. Drug Court graduation scheduled for Tuesday, July 23, 2024, beginning at 5:15 p.m. This graduation will take place in a new location to allow more space, parking, and the opportunity for more people to be part of this special occasion. The event will be held in the Community Conference Hall building located at the Douglas County Fairgrounds at 2110 SW Frear Street in Roseburg.

H.O.P.E. Drug Court is distinct from other courts as it primarily focuses on the well-being of the participants who benefit from drug rehabilitation. This innovative program promotes fresh thinking, helping participants gain insights to better achieve acceptance and providing the necessary tools to build a support network, attend therapy sessions, develop coping mechanisms, achieve financial stability, re-establish family connections if applicable, gain employment or engage in education, and maintain personal growth and sobriety post-graduation.

The Honorable Judge Robert B. Johnson shares many insights to help participants in their recovery journey, including a recent statement: “A person is not defined by their mistakes because in life, you need to figure out how to thrive in the midst of adversity.” The specialized team approach within the Douglas County Specialty Courts structure is designed to reduce recidivism, address substance use disorders, and provide an opportunity to look beyond the criminal act to consider the larger context of participants' lives and futures. The focus is to help each participant transform, providing opportunities for personal growth, organizational success, societal development, and an internal shift that pushes them to reach a higher potential.

Professor Mark T. Harris, J.D., an active licensed member of the State Bar of California, Director of Pre-Law Studies at the University of California, and managing attorney for the Northern California and Central Valley offices of Ben Crump Law, will be the keynote speaker during the graduation ceremony.

To underscore the importance of this program, we highlight the following achievements from the five graduates:

  • 196 downward departure months: The amount of time that could have been spent in prison instead of our local program.
  • $1,022,414.40 saved in prison costs by staying local.
  • 17 months on average for these participants to complete/graduate the program.
  • 7 children and 4 grandchildren positively impacted by having a parent/grandparent in the program.
  • 3 RSAT graduates: RSAT is the Residential Substance Abuse Program in the Douglas County Jail that houses up to 12 men and 6 women for a 120–180-day treatment program separate from the regular jail population. Those who successfully graduate from RSAT continue into the H.O.P.E. Drug Court program.

This celebration recognizes the hard work and personal triumph of each graduate as they have met challenges and exceeded expectations. Graduation projects will be displayed and discussed during the ceremony. We would like to thank the Local Public Safety Coordinating Council (LPSCC) for their continued support of this program, Douglas County Commissioners Chris Boice, Tim Freeman, and Tom Kress, the State and Federal grant opportunities that help sustain the program, and the dedicated team consisting of Honorable Judge Robert B. Johnson, Court Coordinator Crystina Dunehew, Parole and Probation Officer Andie Cortes, DA’s Office, Adapt Integrated Health Care Treatment Staff, Oregon Department of Human Services, Umpqua Valley Public Defender, Veterans Services, and the Douglas County Circuit Court Team for making this a successful program.

To learn more about this program, visit Douglas County Supported Programs.




Attached Media Files: 106th Drug Court Graduation , LPSCC

Benton County Sheriff's Office Seeks Assistance for Public Indecency Case (Photo)
Benton Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/18/24 4:43 PM
2024-07/1505/173885/Lea.png
2024-07/1505/173885/Lea.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/1505/173885/thumb_Lea.png

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Benton County Sheriff’s Office (BCSO) is seeking assistance with a public indecency case involving 49-year-old Stephen Michael Lea, of Junction City, OR. 

BCSO arrested Lea on June 26, 2024, after he made online arrangements to meet an undercover deputy to make a sexually explicit video in a Corvallis park near a playground.

Lea has been convicted of public indecency in the past and BCSO believes there may be similar cases that have gone unreported in Benton, Linn, and Lane Counties going back to 2021.

If you have information related to the investigation of public indecency, to include masturbation, nudity, and/or sexual activity in public by who you believe to be Lea, please email entonCoSheriff@bentoncountyor.gov">BentonCoSheriff@bentoncountyor.gov or call the BCSO tip line at 541-753-TIPS (8477) and reference case #202401630.

###




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/1505/173885/Lea.png

Two Internationally Known Business Leaders to Join Bushnell University's Inventive New Office of Executive-in-Residence (Photo)
Bushnell University - 07/18/24 3:33 PM
2024-07/7128/173924/DSC01225-Pano.jpg
2024-07/7128/173924/DSC01225-Pano.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/7128/173924/thumb_DSC01225-Pano.jpg

EUGENE, Ore. - Next month, Bushnell University will kick off its new Office of Executive-in-Residence (EIR) with two seasoned executives in international business, financial services, and leadership. The format is structured to give executives with time constraints an opportunity to share their experiences with students, staff, faculty, and the general community.  

The program honors executives who have made substantial contributions to their fields. An Executive Director will oversee the office, and an Executive-in-Residence will provide focused engagement over a shorter period. In alignment with the University’s mission of wisdom, faith, and service, the EIR will illustrate to students, faculty, and the community ways of fulfilling one's calling in today’s workplace.  

“We see the EIR Office as one-of-a-kind, where executives will have many different opportunities to engage and share their knowledge,” said Dr. Latrissa Lee Neiworth, Dean of the College of Professional Studies, which will oversee the new office. The executives will be involved in the Bushnell community in many ways, which may include providing guest-lecturer appearances, teaching a course, helping develop new curriculum, delivering an auditorium presentation for the community, helping engage local business leaders as student mentors, or holding office hours with individuals or small groups of students. This flexibility of engagement will help differentiate Bushnell’s EIR Office, according to Neiworth.  

Larry Coburn, an experienced leader who combines faith and business, will serve as Executive Director. His business career includes nearly 30 years with sportswear giant NIKE, Inc., followed by over 15 years as an independent consultant. Coburn draws on his wide-ranging experiences in accounting, sales operations, IT, product development, and Lean Manufacturing to help clients improve processes. He has also lived and worked internationally, including extended time in Taiwan, the Philippines, Vietnam, and Sri Lanka. The highlight of his career was serving as Global Director of NOS (NIKE’s Lean Manufacturing Initiative), establishing and leading a global Lean Manufacturing learning center in Vietnam from 2003-2008. He holds an M.S. in Ministry from Pepperdine University. 

The office's first Executive-in-Residence for 2024-2025 will be John Iglesias, a seasoned financial industry leader who has left an indelible mark on the organizations he has led. His visionary and strategic thinking has produced significant growth and success in several organizations, including the Northwest Community Credit Union, Salal Credit Union, and Washington State Employees' Credit Union. As past President & CEO of Northwest Community Credit Union, Iglesias was responsible for overall operations, strategic direction, growth, and mergers and acquisitions strategy. Among his accomplishments, he created a new credit union service organization, Northwest Innovation Services, to provide innovative solutions to members’ issues, created an international business division, and developed a Korean-focused banking and affluent member services division. Last year, he shared expertise and best practices with the Korean National Association of Federal Credit Unions (NACUFOK). Prior to his roles in the credit unions, Iglesias worked at Bank of America for 10 years. 

Born and raised in Guam, Iglesias previously served in the US Navy, where he traveled extensively and worked with Japanese and Korean military leaders for more than 20 years, serving as an intelligence officer. He is recognized for his commitment to driving growth and success through strategic thinking and servant leadership. He holds an MBA in Finance and Marketing from Saint Martin’s University and is pursuing a Ph.D. in Leadership Studies there as well.  

Bushnell University’s Office of Executive in Residence will open in August 2024, with its activities coinciding with the beginning of Fall Term.




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/7128/173924/DSC01225-Pano.jpg , 2024-07/7128/173924/Larry_Coburn_Headshot.jpeg , 2024-07/7128/173924/John_Iglesias_Photo.jpg

Firefighters Contain Fire at West Eugene Encampment (Photo)
Eugene Springfield Fire - 07/18/24 2:40 PM
2024-07/4466/173923/IMG_6830.jpeg
2024-07/4466/173923/IMG_6830.jpeg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/4466/173923/thumb_IMG_6830.jpeg

Eugene, OR.  Eugene Springfield Fire responded to a homeless camp fire in West Eugene Thursday afternoon.  Fire crews were notified of a dark smoke column, possible brush fire near 15 Walis St at 1:50 PM on July 18th.  Arriving firefighters found an encampment that was burning next to the railroad tracks and extending to nearby brush.   Firefighters quickly contained the fire and no injuries were reported. 




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/4466/173923/IMG_6830.jpeg , 2024-07/4466/173923/IMG_6828.jpeg

Stolen vehicle investigation leads to four arrests--UPDATE: Additional arrest, second motorcyclist now in custody (Photo)
Salem Police Dept. - 07/18/24 1:55 PM
2024-07/1095/173741/SMP24058964_Items_seized_in_the_investigation.png
2024-07/1095/173741/SMP24058964_Items_seized_in_the_investigation.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/1095/173741/thumb_SMP24058964_Items_seized_in_the_investigation.png

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE              

Update 07/18/2024 | 1:55 p.m.

Stolen vehicle investigation leads to four arrests

Additional arrest, second motorcyclist now in custody

On July 17,  Felony Crimes Unit detectives arrested the second suspect in a shots-fired incident that occurred last week.

Brian Lee English, age 28 of Salem, was arrested for his involvement in a shooting incident on July 11. That day, while detectives were conducting a motorcycle theft investigation at a storage facility in the 1800 block of 22nd ST SE,  two motorcycle riders drove up near the business and one of the men fired a gun into the air in plain view of the officers.

The motorcyclists then fled the scene. One rider, Zayn Free Bristow, age 25 of Mill City, was apprehended after a p pursuit ensued when Bristow was located. Bristow was arrested; however, the second motorcyclist, English, escaped.

On Wednesday afternoon, detectives located English outside a residence in the 1500 block of B ST NE. English tried to flee but was apprehended a short time later with the assistance of a Marion County Sheriff’s Office K9 Team. A backpack was located near where English was hiding and was seized. A search warrant was obtained for the backpack, and a handgun was found inside. English is now lodged at the Marion County Jail on the following charges:

  • Unlawful use of a weapon, a firearm
  • Felon in possession of a firearm
  • Menacing
  • Reckless endangering

English will be arraigned today at 2:30 p.m. at the Marion County Criminal Court Annex.

# # #

Originally published 07/11/2024 | 8:55 p.m.

Stolen vehicle investigation leads to four arrests

Salem, Ore. — The Felony Crime Unit investigators arrested several individuals today as part of two separate investigations involving stolen motorcycles.

The overall investigation led the detectives to a storage facility in the 1800 block of 22nd ST SE. Detectives located one of the stolen motorcycles and three suspects, two adults and a juvenile. They attempted to escape in a vehicle but were apprehended. The service of a search warrant for the involved vehicle and the storage unit resulted in the seizure of a short-barreled shotgun, a handgun, body armor, and several pieces of stolen mail. 

At approximately 10:20 a.m., while detectives were still at the scene, two motorcycle riders arrived in the area in plain sight of the officers. One of the riders fired multiple gunshots into the air, then the two fled at a high rate of speed. 

The suspects were spotted about 15 minutes later near State ST and Lancaster DR, and a pursuit was initiated with one of the suspects. The pursuit ended near Lancaster DR and Rickey ST SE when the fleeing suspect hit the curb and crashed the motorcycle. The suspect was quickly apprehended. The second suspect on a motorcycle was not apprehended.

Arrested at the investigation scene were Zakiry Davis, age 18 of Salem, and Natalie Genene Hefley, age 32 of Mill City. The pair were lodged at the Marion County Jail, each on motor vehicle theft charges. A 15-year-old boy involved in the incident was also detained and transported to the Marion County Juvenile Department.

Zayn Free Bristow, age 25 of Mill City, was also lodged at the Marion County Jail on the following charges:

  • Unlawful use of a motor vehicle, two counts
  • Possession of a stolen vehicle, two counts
  • Felon in possession of body armor
  • Elude
  • Reckless driving
  • Mail theft
  • Identity theft

Arraignment follows for Bristow on Friday, July 12, at 2:30 p.m. at the Marion County Criminal Court Annex.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/1095/173741/SMP24058964_Items_seized_in_the_investigation.png , 2024-07/1095/173741/SMP24058964_Firearm_seized_in_follow-up_arrest_85.png

07-18-24 Douglas County Traffic Safety Commission Meeting (Photo)
Douglas Co. Government - 07/18/24 12:20 PM
2024-07/6789/173916/04-09-24_DC_Traffic_Safety_Commission_Logo.png
2024-07/6789/173916/04-09-24_DC_Traffic_Safety_Commission_Logo.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/6789/173916/thumb_04-09-24_DC_Traffic_Safety_Commission_Logo.png

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

July 18, 2024

 

MEETING NOTICE

Douglas County Traffic Safety Commission

Tuesday, July 23, 2024

 

 

(Douglas County, OR) The next meeting of the Douglas County Traffic Safety Commission will be held on Tuesday, July 23, 2024, at 6:30 pm in Room 216 of the Douglas County Courthouse located at 1036 SE Douglas Avenue in Roseburg, Oregon.  

 

In compliance with ORS 192.610 to 192.690, we will accommodate any member of the public who wishes to watch the meeting. To view the live stream or post meeting recording, please visit: https://video.ibm.com/channel/douglascountyoregon

 

For additional information about this meeting, please contact the Douglas County Public Works – Engineering Division by calling (541) 440-4481 or by email at ellior@douglascountyor.gov">paula.belloir@douglascountyor.gov. The meeting agenda can be found at https://douglascountyor.gov/

 

Douglas County attempts to provide public accessibility to its services, programs and activities.

If accommodation is needed to participate in this meeting, please contact (541) 440-4481

at least 48 hours prior to the scheduled meeting time.

 

 

###

 

Media Contact:  Tamara Howell | Douglas County Emergency Communications & Community Engagement Specialist | Public Information Officer | Public Affairs Office(541) 670-2804 cell | (541) 957-4896 office  a.howell@douglascountyor.gov.">tamara.howell@douglascountyor.gov




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/6789/173916/04-09-24_DC_Traffic_Safety_Commission_Logo.png

07-18-24 DC LPSCC - Behavioral Health and Housing Subcommittee Meeting (Photo)
Douglas Co. Government - 07/18/24 12:18 PM
2024-07/6789/173915/07-23-2024_Behavioral_Health_and_Housing_Subcommittee_Agenda_(002).jpg
2024-07/6789/173915/07-23-2024_Behavioral_Health_and_Housing_Subcommittee_Agenda_(002).jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/6789/173915/thumb_07-23-2024_Behavioral_Health_and_Housing_Subcommittee_Agenda_(002).jpg

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

July 18, 2024

 

Notice of Virtual Meeting

Douglas County Local Public Safety Coordinating Council (LPSCC)

Behavioral Health and Housing Subcommittee

Tuesday, July 23, 2024

 

(Douglas County, OR) The next meeting for the Douglas County Local Public Safety Coordinating Council’s (LPSCC) – Behavioral Health and Housing Subcommittee will take place on Tuesday, July 23, 2024, at 11:30 am via a virtual conference format.

 

In compliance with ORS 192.610 to 192.690, we will accommodate any member of the public who wishes to watch or listen to the meeting via video or by phone. For information on how you can watch or listen to this meeting, please see the agenda, or contact Koree Tate at ee.tate@douglascountyor.gov">koree.tate@douglascountyor.gov or call (541) 957-7790.

 

The meeting agenda is attached and can also be found at www.douglascountyor.gov.

 

  
 

Douglas County attempts to provide public accessibility to its services, programs, and activities.

If accommodation is needed to participate in this meeting, please contact (541) 957-7790 prior

to the scheduled meeting time.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

###

 

Media Contact: Tamara Howell, Douglas County Emergency Communications & Community Engagement Specialist | Douglas County Public Affairs Office | Office: (541) 957-4896 | Cell: (541) 670-2804 | Email: a.howell@douglascountyor.gov.">tamara.howell@douglascountyor.gov

 

Program Contact: Koree TatePrograms and Partnership Coordinator | Douglas County Juvenile Department | Phone: (541) 957-7790 | Email: ee.tate@douglascountyor.gov">koree.tate@douglascountyor.gov

 




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/6789/173915/07-23-2024_Behavioral_Health_and_Housing_Subcommittee_Agenda_(002).jpg

Recreational use advisory issued for Fairview Lake July 18
Oregon Health Authority - 07/18/24 11:30 AM

July 18, 2024

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, PHD.Communications@oha.oregon.gov

Recreational use advisory issued for Fairview Lake July 18

PORTLAND, Ore.—Oregon Health Authority (OHA) issued a recreational use health advisory today for Fairview Lake due to the presence of a cyanobacteria bloom. The lake is in Multnomah County.

People should avoid swimming and high-speed water activities, such as water skiing or power boating, in areas of the lake where blooms are present, as the major route of exposure is ingestion of water. Toxins are not absorbed through the skin. However, those with skin sensitivities may get a puffy red rash.

OHA encourages people to visit Fairview Lake and enjoy activities such as fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, bird watching, canoeing and kayaking. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray. Sprays could lead to the risk of inhaling cyanotoxins.

Drinking water

Drinking water directly from areas of the lake affected by a bloom is especially dangerous. Toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating water with camping-style filters. Contact park management or the local health department with questions about water available at nearby day use areas.

Not all private treatment systems are effective at removing cyanotoxins. People who do not use a well or public water system and draw in-home water directly from an affected area are advised to use an alternative water source.

Children and pets

Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. Dogs can get extremely ill and even die within minutes to hours of exposure to cyanotoxins by drinking the water, licking their fur or eating the toxins from floating mats or dried crust along the shore. This is regardless of a recreational use health advisory in place.

Dogs can become ill and die from water intoxication after drinking excessive amounts of water while swimming or fetching objects for long periods of time. Intoxication is a potentially fatal disturbance in brain function resulting from an imbalance of electrolytes in the body. Water intoxication and heat stroke can cause similar symptoms as exposure to cyanotoxins.

Symptoms

Exposure to cyanotoxins can be serious and cause a range of symptoms. Symptoms may be similar to food poisoning such as stomach cramping, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting. Symptoms may also be more serious, such as numbness, tingling, dizziness and shortness of breath. These symptoms may require medical attention.

Dogs can experience weakness, difficulty walking, seizures, lethargy, loss of appetite and more. If a dog exhibits symptoms, veterinary treatment should be sought as quickly as possible.

Fishing

Fish caught from areas where cyanobacteria blooms are present may pose unknown health risks, so OHA recommends not eating fish from those areas. Those who decide to eat the fish should remove fat, skin and organs before cooking or freezing. Toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water.

For health information or to report an illness, contact OHA at 971-673-0482, or visit OHA’s Cyanobacteria (Harmful Algae) Blooms website.

###


State Government Artificial Intelligence Advisory Council Will Meet
State of Oregon - 07/18/24 10:51 AM

Salem, Oregon - The State Government Artificial Intelligence Advisory Council will meet at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, July 24, 2024. The meeting will take place remotely via the internet on Microsoft Teams and is open to the public. The agenda and handouts will be posted on the Council’s website.

  • What: Meeting of the State Government Artificial Intelligence Advisory Council  
  • When: Wednesday, July 24, 2024, 9:00 – 11:00 a.m.
  • Where: Join a Microsoft Teams Meeting by ID | Microsoft Teams 
  • Meeting ID:292 921 162 985 Passcode:njbMxw
  • Phone: +1 503-446-4951 Phone conference ID: 514 433 257#
  • Who: State Government Artificial Intelligence Advisory Council 

The State Government Artificial Intelligence Advisory Council is established by Governor Kotek’s Executive Order 23-26, Establishing a State Government Artificial Intelligence Advisory Council

The purpose of the Council is to recommend an action plan to guide awareness education, and usage of artificial intelligence in state government that aligns with the State’s policies, goals and values and supports public servants to deliver customer service more efficiently and effectively. The recommended action plan shall include concrete executive actions, policies, and investments needed to leverage artificial intelligence while honoring transparency, privacy, and diversity, equity, and inclusion. 

Meetings of the State Government Artificial Intelligence Advisory Council are open to the public. 

Public comment may be made during the meeting. Sign-up for public comment is required as spots are limited. Sign-up closes Monday, July 22 at 1:00 p.m. Written comment will also be accepted. Written comment can be submitted by mail to the Council Support Office, 550 Airport Rd SE Suite C, Salem, OR 97301 or online via the office form.

Accommodations can be arranged for persons with disabilities, and alternate formats of printed material are available upon request. Please contact Enterprise Information Services at 503-378-3175 at least 72 hours in advance of the meeting to request accommodations. Closed captioning is included on the Microsoft Teams meeting.

 

Links:


Recreational use advisory issued for Turner Lake July 18
Oregon Health Authority - 07/18/24 10:41 AM

July 18, 2024

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, PHD.Communications@oha.oregon.gov

Recreational use advisory issued for Turner Lake July 18

PORTLAND, Ore.—Oregon Health Authority (OHA) issued a recreational use health advisory today for Turner Lake due to the presence of a cyanobacteria bloom. The lake is in Marion County.

People should avoid swimming and high-speed water activities, such as water skiing or power boating, in areas of the lake where blooms are present, as the major route of exposure is ingestion of water. Toxins are not absorbed through the skin. However, those with skin sensitivities may get a puffy red rash.

OHA encourages people to visit Turner Lake and enjoy activities such as fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, bird watching, canoeing and kayaking. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray. Sprays could lead to the risk of inhaling cyanotoxins.

Drinking water

Drinking water directly from areas of the lake affected by a bloom is especially dangerous. Toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating water with camping-style filters. Contact campground management or the local health department with questions about water available at nearby campgrounds or day use areas.

Not all private treatment systems are effective at removing cyanotoxins. People who do not use a well or public water system and draw in-home water directly from an affected area are advised to use an alternative water source.

Children and pets

Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. Dogs can get extremely ill and even die within minutes to hours of exposure to cyanotoxins by drinking the water, licking their fur or eating the toxins from floating mats or dried crust along the shore. This is regardless of a recreational use health advisory in place.

Dogs can become ill and die from water intoxication after drinking excessive amounts of water while swimming or fetching objects for long periods of time. Intoxication is a potentially fatal disturbance in brain function resulting from an imbalance of electrolytes in the body. Water intoxication and heat stroke can cause similar symptoms as exposure to cyanotoxins.

Symptoms

Exposure to cyanotoxins can be serious and cause a range of symptoms. Symptoms may be similar to food poisoning such as stomach cramping, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting. Symptoms may also be more serious, such as numbness, tingling, dizziness and shortness of breath. These symptoms may require medical attention.

Dogs can experience weakness, difficulty walking, seizures, lethargy, loss of appetite and more. If a dog exhibits symptoms, veterinary treatment should be sought as quickly as possible.

Fishing

Fish caught from areas where cyanobacteria blooms are present may pose unknown health risks, so OHA recommends not eating fish from those areas. Those who decide to eat the fish should remove fat, skin and organs before cooking or freezing. Toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water.

For health information or to report an illness, contact OHA at 971-673-0482, or visit OHA’s Cyanobacteria (Harmful Algae) Blooms website.

###

 


Large Animal and Livestock Shelter Open
Lane Co. Government - 07/18/24 10:20 AM

A large animal and livestock evacuation shelter has been set up for those in the Level 2 (Be Set) evacuation area. If you are located in the Level 2 evacuation area, you can bring your large animals to the arena in Howard Buford Recreation Area (34901 Frank Parrish Road, Eugene). Turn left as you enter the park and follow the paved road past the trailhead until you come to the arena. 

 

Please call 541-285-8227 before you arrive to tell them what kind and how many animals you are bringing; it will help our staff and volunteers be prepared to greet you. 

If you need assistance evacuating your animals or supporting them to shelter in place, please call Lane County Animal Services at 541-285-8227. 

Visit www.LaneCountyOR.gov/HighPrairieFire for more information. 

 

###


Operation Ship Shape Enhanced Patrols, Round II (Photo)
Oregon State Marine Board - 07/18/24 10:00 AM
Expired motorboat registration stickers
Expired motorboat registration stickers
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/4139/173873/thumb_2123Decals.png

The Oregon State Marine Board, in partnership with 31 county sheriff’s offices and the Oregon State Police, will be looking for expired boat registrations and required equipment compliance on state waterways as part of a second round of “Operation Ship Shape.” 

“The agency leverages technology to improve boating safety as we can see boater compliance geospatially in real-time where our marine law enforcement partners are patrolling,” says Brian Paulsen, Boating Safety Program Manager for the Marine Board. “This data helps the agency work with our law enforcement partners for enhanced patrols in locations where there’s low compliance. Make sure you’ve renewed your registration and put the decals on your boat correctly, or you could face a $265 citation.” 

Any boat powered by a motor – electric, gas, diesel, and all sailboats 12 feet and longer must be currently registered when on the water, even when docked or moored. This includes any kayaks and drift boats with an electric motor. Paulsen added, “Each current boat registration brings in additional funding beyond the registration dollars which go back to boaters in the form of services such as life jacket loaner stations or boat ramp access improvements.” 

Paddlers with boats 10 feet and longer must carry a Waterway Access Permit. Three permit options are available: One week for $5, one calendar year for $17, and two calendar years for $30. Permit revenue goes into a dedicated fund for grants to eligible applicants to develop or improve nonmotorized access and on-water education programs specific to paddlers’ needs. 

Marine officers will also be looking for the required safety equipment. “Life jackets are the most important safety equipment boaters must carry, and there must be enough on board that properly fit every passenger,” Paulsen adds. “Looking at the boating fatalities so far this year, almost all the victims were not wearing a life jacket. Even though life jackets are required to be worn for kids 12 and younger, if everyone wore one, we’d see significantly fewer recreational boating deaths.” In 2023, 11 out of 13 victims were not wearing a life jacket. 

Boaters can renew their registration or purchase Waterway Access Permits through the agency’s Boat Oregon Store for the fastest service. After completing their online transaction, boaters with motorized boats can print off a temporary permit. Waterway Access Permits can be printed directly after purchase. Multiple purchases can be made under one online transaction. The agency’s online store has a $1.50 portal provider fee. If you need assistance online, please contact the Marine Board at ine.board@boat.oregon.gov">marine.board@boat.oregon.gov or call 503-378-8587. There's also an online help page acclimating new users to the store. 

For any titling and registration questions, visit Boat.Oregon.gov and click on the Title & Registration tab at the top of the page.




Attached Media Files: Expired motorboat registration stickers

Tip of the Week for the week of July 22, 2024 - Summer Scam Reminder (Photo)
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/18/24 10:00 AM
2024-07/5490/173425/Tip_of_the_Week_Images_-_Summer_Scam_Reminder.png
2024-07/5490/173425/Tip_of_the_Week_Images_-_Summer_Scam_Reminder.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/5490/173425/thumb_Tip_of_the_Week_Images_-_Summer_Scam_Reminder.png

SUMMER SCAM REMINDER

Summer can be a time for relaxation, adventure, reconnecting with loved ones, and time for taking those anticipated summer vacations. Even with the nice weather, scammers aren’t taking time off. This means you have to be aware and cautious throughout the year. Here are some common summer scams to watch for and tips on how to avoid them:

1. Law Enforcement Scams:

  • Scammers pose as law enforcement agencies and claim you missed jury duty, owe fees, or someone needs bail money. They urge you to pay the “fees” quickly to avoid serious consequences and accept bitcoin, gift cards, or other non-traditional payment forms.
  • Scammers pose as animal shelters or rescue organizations and claim they can reunite you with your lost pet for a large fee.
  • Prevent these by scams by
    • Verifying information is coming from an official source. When in doubt, hang up, look up the agency’s contact information and call or stop by their office to verify someone is trying to contact you. 
    • Save our contact information to quickly verify information is coming from the Sheriff’s Office:

2. Vacation Rental Scams:

3. Home Improvement Scams:

  • Contractors offer very low-cost services such as driveway repaving, house painting, etc.
  • Contractors claim repairs are urgently needed and encourage you to act quickly to avoid further damage or before prices increase.
  • They may take your money without completing the work, work without proper permits, or do low quality work.
  • Prevent this by avoiding unsolicited offers, getting multiple referrals or bids, and researching companies and contractors.

4. Employment Scams:

  • Scammers exploit job seekers by offering fake summer jobs.
  • Scammers post opportunities that promise high pay for minimal effort.
  • Prevent this by verifying job postings, researching organizations, and avoid sharing personal information until you have verified the company and posting is legitimate.
     

5.Travel Scams:

  • Beware of unsolicited travel deals or sweepstakes claiming you’ve won a free vacation.
  • Prevent this by verifying offers and information before sharing your personal information or payment.

6. Ticket and Event Scams:

  • Scammers sell counterfeit tickets to concerts, festivals, sporting events, and other activities.
  • Prevent this by purchasing tickets from authorized sellers and verifying websites or vendors before purchasing.

Staying informed, being cautious, and helping family and friends learn how to spot scams can help protect everyone throughout the year. 

For more information and tips visit our website at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon. 



 

###




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/5490/173425/07.18.24_-_Summer_Scam_Reminder.docx , 2024-07/5490/173425/07.18.24_-_Summer_Scam_Reminder.pdf , 2024-07/5490/173425/Tip_of_the_Week_Images_-_Summer_Scam_Reminder.png

Telecommunications Policy Committee Meeting Scheduled (08/07/2024)
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 07/18/24 9:58 AM

TELECOMMUNICATIONS POLICY COMMITTEE

MEETING SCHEDULED

 

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Telecommunications Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting on August 7, 2024, at 9:00 a.m. in the Governor Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Oregon Public Safety Academy located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. For further information, please contact Juan Lopez at (503) 551-3167.

Effective Jan. 1, 2024, the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training will be live streaming all public meetings via YouTube. Meetings will no longer be streamed on Facebook. To view the Telecommunications Policy Committee's live-stream and other recorded videos, please visit DPSST’s official YouTube page at https://www.youtube.com/@DPSST.

Amended Agenda Items

1. Introductions

2. Approve May 1, 2024, Meeting Minutes

3. Administrative Closures Consent Agenda (The following items to be ratified by one vote)

     Presented by Melissa Lang-Bacho

     a. Tabetha Daugherty; DPSST No. 53558

     Basic Emergency Medical Dispatcher and Basic and Intermediate Telecommunicator Certifications

     b. Cassandra Griffith; DPSST No. 43266

     Basic Emergency Medical Dispatcher and Basic, Intermediate, Advanced and Supervisory Telecommunicator Certifications

4. Agency Updates

5. Next Telecommunications Policy Committee Meeting: November 6, 2024, at 9:00 a.m.

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Telecommunications Policy Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


Draft wildfire hazard maps posted for public comment
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/18/24 9:00 AM

SALEM, Ore. — Draft versions of the statewide wildfire hazard and wildland-urban interface maps are available to the public for review and comment starting today on Oregon State University’s Wildfire Risk Explorer website. 

The wildfire hazard map's purposes are to:

  • Educate Oregon residents and property owners about the level of hazard where they live.
  • Assist in prioritizing fire adaptation and mitigation resources for the most vulnerable locations.
  • Identify where defensible space standards and home hardening codes will apply.

A series of open houses about the state’s new community wildfire risk reduction programs were held from June 3 to July 1 throughout Oregon. It was an opportunity to learn about wildfire hazard assessments, new defensible space and home hardening programs and standards, insurance concerns, and statewide wildfire policy. 

"Defensible space around your home and property is just one of the ways Oregonians can be better prepared for wildfire," Oregon State Fire Marshal Mariana Ruiz-Temple said. "No matter where you live, the simple actions you take to limit where an ember can land and catch fire can make all the difference, saving your home and protecting your community."

“Home hardening standards are extremely important because they help reduce the risk of ignition to the most vulnerable parts of a home by the embers of a wildfire,” said Andrew Stolfi, director of the Department of Consumer and Business Services. “Once the map is finalized, we will then initiate rulemaking to adopt the home hardening standards, which will be followed by a six-month phase-in period for education and outreach. Importantly, the standards will not apply retroactively. They will be required only in new construction, major additions, and such things as replacing a roof or siding if the home is in both a high wildfire hazard zone and the wildland-urban interface.”

Representatives from OSU, ODF, Oregon State Fire Marshal, Department of Consumer and Business Services Building Codes Division and Division of Financial Regulation, and the Wildfire Programs Advisory Council addressed hours of questions at the events and engaged with over 500 community members. 

“The level of engagement at these community meetings was impressive. I attended them all and hundreds of Oregonians had their questions addressed about community wildfire risk reduction programs and how the map supports protecting Oregon’s communities at highest hazard of experiencing wildfire,” said Dave Hunnicutt, Chair of the Wildfire Programs Advisory Council.

At those meetings, early maps depicting wildfire hazard were available, but property tax lot level maps were not yet available. However, draft maps are now ready for Oregonians to see the hazard designation of their specific address, and whether they’re in the wildland-urban interface.

“The maps are still drafts,” said Andy McEvoy, wildfire research scientist at Oregon State University. “The maps won’t become final until we receive input from counties on potential local anomalies, administrative rules are adopted by the Board of Forestry, and we evaluate input from the public.”

The draft maps reflect revisions from the last two years based on input received in 2022 from county governments and the public. Updates include:

  • Adjustments for hay and pasturelands.
  • Adjustments for northwest Oregon forest fuels.
  • Changes based on draft rules to include irrigation of agricultural crops as a mitigating factor in wildfire hazard assessments. Final maps will reflect rules as adopted by the Board of Forestry.

“Work on the wildfire hazard map hasn’t ceased over the last two years,” said Kyle Williams, Deputy Director of Fire Operations at ODF. “ODF and our partners at OSU have worked diligently to evaluate and address concerns about the accuracy of the map. These drafts are still based on the core principles of wildfire science but have been pored through to address expressed concerns. With one more round of public input, we will be well situated to finalize a hazard map that will contribute to advancing wildfire protection in Oregon as the Legislature intended.”

Comments can be sent to dmap@odf.oregon.gov">hazardmap@odf.oregon.govFind more information on ODF’s wildfire hazard web page.


Wed. 07/17/24
Conflagration invoked for Umatilla County wildfires, OSFM mobilizing firefighters, incident management team
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 07/17/24 11:17 PM

SALEM, Ore. – On Wednesday night, Oregon Governor Tina Kotek invoked the Emergency Conflagration Act for a series of fires in Umatilla County near Pilot Rock. The OSFM is mobilizing its Green Incident Management Team and three structural task forces from Benton, Marion, and Polk counties. One of those task forces was sent earlier in the afternoon through Immediate Response along with a type 1 helicopter.  

Significant lightning storms moved through Umatilla County Wednesday afternoon and have kept local fire agencies busy responding to wildfires. Gusty winds and dry conditions caused some of these fires to grow exponentially and threaten life and property.  

“The conditions our firefighters are up against are extraordinarily challenging and we are working to provide the needed resources to protect our communities from many wildfires burning across the state,” Oregon State Fire Marshal Mariana Ruiz-Temple said. “I can’t stress enough the importance of preventing any new fires and being prepared in case you need to evacuate.” 

The Umatilla County Sheriff’s Office has Level 3 (Go Now) evacuation notices in place. For the latest on evacuations, please follow the Umatilla County Sheriff on Facebook. Shelters are set up at the Pendleton Convention Center, 1601 Westgate in Pendleton, and Grant Union High School, 911 S Canyon Blvd in John Day.  

For information on being prepared for wildfire visit https://wildfire.oregon.gov/prepare 

The Emergency Conflagration Act allows the state fire marshal to mobilize state resources to protect life and property. Following ORS 476.510-476.610, Governor Kotek determined that threats to life, safety, and property exist because of the fire, and the threats exceed the capabilities of local firefighting personnel and equipment. 


Level 2 (Be Ready) evacuation notice for portion of High Prairie area north of Oakridge due to wildfire
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/17/24 8:04 PM

The following area north of Oakridge is being elevated to a Level 2 (Be Set) evacuation notification:

  • East of High Prairie Road milepost 5.5, including Dead Mountain, Mountain View, Huckleberry and High Prairie Loop.

 

Level 2 means: You must prepare to leave at a moment’s notice, and this may be the only notice that you receive.

 

Public safety personnel cannot guarantee they will be able to notify you if conditions rapidly deteriorate. Continue to closely monitor your phone, local media and www.LaneCountyOR.gov/HighPrairieFire for information. 

 

Lane County Animal Services will be opening a large animal and livestock shelter tomorrow, July 18. It will not be located at Lane Events Center. More information will be provided to people in the Level 2 evacuation area tomorrow. 

 

The following area remains at a Level 1 (Be Ready) evacuation:

  • High Prairie area east of North Fork Road and north of Westfir-Oakridge Road to milepost 5.5 on High Prairie Road

 

Level 1 means you should be aware of the danger that exists in your area, monitor local media outlets and telephone devices to receive further information. 

 

This is the time for preparation and precautionary movement of persons with special needs, mobile property, pets and livestock. 

 

 

An evacuation map is available at www.LaneCountyOR.gov/HighPrairieFire.   

 

Residents are encouraged to sign up for emergency alerts at www.LaneAlerts.org.

 

More information is available at www.LaneCountyOR.gov/HighPrairieFire.   

 

 

###


After 30 years, one of Oregon DOC's Most Wanted Fugitives has been arrested in the state of Georgia (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 07/17/24 5:15 PM
Steven Craig Johnson Left to right: Oregon Department of Corrections 1990s photo on wanted poster July 2024 Bibb County Sheriff's Office
Steven Craig Johnson Left to right: Oregon Department of Corrections 1990s photo on wanted poster July 2024 Bibb County Sheriff's Office
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/1070/173892/thumb_Johnson_Steven_C.png

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody who fled from a work crew in 1994 is back in custody. Steven Craig Johnson fled from a work crew at the Mill Creek Correctional Facility (MCCF) in Salem on November 29, 1994. 

Johnson was arrested in Macon, Georgia by the U.S. Marshals Service, Southeast Regional Fugitive Task Force (USMS SERFTF) on July 16, 2024. He was booked into the Bibb County Jail and is awaiting extradition back to Oregon. 

According to the USMS Steven Craig Johnson aka “William Cox,” 70, was taken into custody by the USMS SERFTF on July 16, 2024, at approximately 2:00 p.m. at an apartment complex located at 2087 Vineville Ave. in Macon. Johnson had been a resident there and living under the alias of William Cox since 2011. Johnson was wanted on an Oregon arrest warrant for escape. A copy of the USMS press release is attached. A copy of the DOC wanted poster is also attached.

MCCF was a minimum-security prison located five miles southeast of Salem on 2,089 acres. The facility was unfenced and housed approximately 290 adults in custody who were within four years of release. MCCF opened in 1929 as the Farm Annex of the Oregon State Penitentiary. The prison closed June 30, 2021, by order of Governor Kate Brown.

DOC is responsible for the care and custody of approximately 12,000 individuals who are incarcerated in 12 institutions across the state. 

####




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/1070/173892/Final_for_release_USMS_SERFTF_Steven_Craig_Johnson_arrest_7.17.24.pdf , 2024-07/1070/173892/johnson-most-wanted.pdf , Steven Craig Johnson Left to right: Oregon Department of Corrections 1990s photo on wanted poster July 2024 Bibb County Sheriff's Office

Summer EBT is available for a limited time, thousands of families may be eligible but must apply (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Human Services - 07/17/24 5:15 PM
Fariborz Pakseresht with children
Fariborz Pakseresht with children
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/973/173891/thumb_20240717_Summer_EBT_352.JPG

Captions for the attached photo files updated

(Salem) – Having enough to eat is crucial for good health and well-being. Yet hunger is a persistent problem across the country and here in Oregon. Feeding America reports that 1 in 6 children in Oregon face hunger. To help children get the food they need to thrive, the Oregon State Legislature approved the Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS) and the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) to offer Summer EBT this year. 

With support from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food and Nutrition Service (FNS), Summer EBT provides eligible families $120 per child for groceries when school is out, and children lose access to food programs offered at schools. Help us spread the word—thousands of families may be eligible for this new benefit and not know it.

Thirty-seven states, all five U.S. territories, and two tribes have committed to making Summer EBT available to kids and families in their communities this summer. This initiative is backed by a decade of demonstration projects and rigorous evaluation showing that it works to reduce child hunger and support healthier diets, including increased consumption of whole grains, dairy, fruits, and vegetables and decreased consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages. Summer EBT works in tandem with other nutrition programs like the USDA Summer Nutrition Programs, Summer Food Oregon and Oregon Food Bank’s Food Finder.

At a July 17 media event, representatives from ODHS, ODE, the USDA, the Boys and Girls Clubs of Salem, Marion, and Polk Counties and the Oregon Food Bank spoke to raise awareness about the new Summer EBT program. The Boys and Girls Clubs offer summer meals to children. 

"Driven by the ongoing economic fallout of COVID-19, the end of pandemic safety nets and the rising cost of food and housing, we are in an ongoing hunger crisis,” said Sammi Teo, Public Policy Advocate at the Oregon Food Bank. “Last year, we saw 1.9 million visits to food assistance sites through the Oregon Food Bank Network — a 14 percent increase from the previous year and a record number of visits. For families facing food insecurity, June has long marked a time when kids no longer have easy access to breakfast and lunch at school. Many parents and caregivers must come up with at least 10 additional meals per week, per child. Summer EBT helps bridge the hunger gap during the summer. By having Summer EBT on a card that families can use when grocery shopping, they can better accommodate dietary needs and cultural preferences.

“There are many people who still don’t know about the program. There is a short window to apply, and there is a short window to use the benefits,” said USDA FNS Western Region Administrator Jesus Mendoza, Jr. “While it’s a new program nationwide, this program has been tested here in Oregon. We learned that this program does help address food insecurity for children during the summer months.”

ODE Director Dr. Charlene Williams said, “Just like Summer Learning addresses unfinished learning between school years, accelerates academic achievement and strengthens student well-being, Summer Meals keep students connected to proper nutrition so they can stay active and engaged while classes are out. And its why Oregon jumped at the chance to provide Summer EBT to eligible families this year. Giving our families more access to groceries during the summer means students will show up for the first day of class ready to learn."

ODHS Director Fariborz Pakseresht said, “On June 28, 2024, more than 321,000 children were automatically enrolled in Summer EBT because they participate in other programs like the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, or receive services through Medicaid. So far, 322,500 children have received Summer EBT. This adds up to $38.7 million in federal funds that families are spending at grocery stores and farmers' markets in their communities.”

ODHS estimates another 30,000 children in Oregon may be eligible for Summer EBT if they apply. To be eligible, children must:

  • Attend a school participating in the national school lunch or breakfast programs.
  • Be in households with incomes at or below 185 percent of the Federal Poverty Level.

ODHS encourages families to visit the Summer EBT website in English and Spanish to review eligibility criteria. If a family believes their children may be eligible, please call the Summer EBT Call Center to verify that they need to apply. The Summer EBT Call Center number is 833-673-7328 and can provide customer service in many languages. 

Families that need to apply can do so online in English or Spanish, or by email or regular mail in multiple languages. 

Don’t delay—the deadline to apply is Sept. 2, 2024. Families have 122 days from the day they received Summer EBT food benefits before they expire. For example, if benefits were issued on June 28, 2024, families have until Oct. 28, 2024, to use Summer EBT benefits. 

Speakers from the event:

  • Sue Bloom, CEO, Boys and Girls Clubs of Salem, Marion and Polk Counties
  • Sammi Teo, Public Policy Advocate, Oregon Food Bank (she, her)
  • Jesus Mendoza, Jr., USDA FNS Western Region Administrator
  • Fariborz Pakseresht, ODHS Director (he, him)
  • Dr. Charlene Williams, ODE Director (she, her)

Video resources:

Additional resources:




Attached Media Files: Fariborz Pakseresht with children , Dr. Charlene Williams with children , Jesus Mendoza, Jr. with children

Update: Body of Drowning Victim Recovered (Photo)
Benton Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/17/24 4:56 PM
2024-07/1505/173831/Press_Release_UPDATE_7.17.24.png
2024-07/1505/173831/Press_Release_UPDATE_7.17.24.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/1505/173831/thumb_Press_Release_UPDATE_7.17.24.png

CORVALLIS, Ore.This morning, July 17, 2024, at about 10:00 am, the deceased body of Naomi Pomeroy was located on the Willamette River about a half mile upstream of Hyak Park between Corvallis and Albany.

People canoeing on the river spotted a body and called 9-1-1.

BCSO marine deputies arrived shortly after, located a deceased female on a shallow section of bedrock near the middle of the river with about one to two feet of water.

According to the victim’s description, the female was identified as Naomi Pomeroy, missing since July 13, 2024.

Deputies released Naomi to a funeral home and notified her family of the recovery.

###


CORVALLIS, Ore. – Benton County Sheriff’s Office (BCSO) continues search efforts for their first drowning victim of the year, 49-year-old Naomi Pomeroy, of Portland, OR

On Saturday, July 13, 2024, at about 8:25 pm, Naomi drowned in the Willamette River near river mile 132 in Corvallis, about 100 yards upstream from the Mary’s River.  

An investigation by BCSO determined three floaters on tubes and a paddle board, secured together, were caught on an exposed snag in the water. One of the floaters, Naomi, was pulled under the water and held by the paddle board leash. 

Corvallis Fire Department was first on scene with a boat and was unable to recover Naomi. BCSO responded shortly after and quickly began searching downriver from the incident site, both by land and water.

Corvallis Fire Department personnel recovered the two other floaters on the shore and safely transported them to a boat launch.

BCSO deputies searched the area using all available tools, including sonar, underwater cameras, and drones, but were unable to locate any signs of Naomi in the area due to heavy debris.

After all usable daylight diminished, search efforts were suspended due to boat safety and dive teams not being able to respond or deploy due to conditions.  

A BCSO boat has been on the water every day since Saturday to recover Naomi and plans to continue search.  BCSO will continue to re-assess the recovery mission daily. 

The public can assist by keeping an eye out for Naomi’s body and are encouraged to wear a life jacket and follow other boating laws and safety precautions. If located, immediately call 9-1-1 dispatch; do not attempt recovery efforts.

 “I am dedicated to locating Naomi to bring her home to her family and loved ones”, said Sheriff Van Arsdall. “I want to thank all involved in the search and recovery mission and support during this difficult time.”

Rivers are inherently dangerous with current and hazards. Know and/or scout rivers before you go at https://willamettewatertrail.org/plan-your-trip/

If you float rivers, do not tie yourself to a paddle board unless you have a quick release leash. Also, do not tie two or more inner tubes together; this requires you to have a life jacket for each person. Kids 12 and younger must wear life jacket. BCSO continues to remind paddlers of all laws at https://www.oregon.gov/osmb/pages/propulsion-landing-pages/go-paddling.aspx

BCSO would like to thank the Corvallis Fire Department, Corvallis Police Department, Linn County Sheriff’s Office Dive Team and Albany Fire Department for their assistance. 

###




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/1505/173831/Press_Release_UPDATE_7.17.24.png

Trail Fire Evacuation Notices Issued (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/17/24 4:23 PM
Smoke from the Trail Fire looking toward Mt. Thielsen from Diamond Lake
Smoke from the Trail Fire looking toward Mt. Thielsen from Diamond Lake
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/5204/173889/thumb_Trail_Fire_at_Diamond_Lake.jpg

DIAMOND LAKE, ORE. - 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐓𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐥 𝐅𝐢𝐫𝐞 𝐚𝐭 𝐃𝐢𝐚𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐝 𝐋𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐢𝐧 𝐃𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐥𝐚𝐬 𝐂𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐭𝐲 𝐡𝐚𝐬 𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐮𝐥𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐢𝐦𝐩𝐥𝐞𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐄𝐯𝐚𝐜𝐮𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐍𝐨𝐭𝐢𝐜𝐞𝐬.

𝐋𝐄𝐕𝐄𝐋 𝟑 - 𝐆𝐎 𝐍𝐎𝐖!

𝟏. 𝐏𝐚𝐜𝐢𝐟𝐢𝐜 𝐂𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐭 𝐓𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐥 𝐢𝐬 𝐜𝐥𝐨𝐬𝐞𝐝 𝐟𝐫𝐨𝐦 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐈𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐨𝐟 𝐇𝐢𝐠𝐡𝐰𝐚𝐲 𝟏𝟑𝟖 𝐄𝐚𝐬𝐭 𝐚𝐭 𝐭𝐡𝐞 “𝐍𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐡 𝐂𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐓𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐥𝐡𝐞𝐚𝐝” (𝐬𝐨𝐮𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐧 𝐜𝐥𝐨𝐬𝐮𝐫𝐞 𝐩𝐨𝐢𝐧𝐭) 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐞𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐰𝐢𝐭𝐡 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐔𝐒𝐅𝐒 𝐌𝐚𝐢𝐝𝐮 𝐋𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐓𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐥 #𝟏𝟒𝟒𝟔 (𝐧𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐧 𝐜𝐥𝐨𝐬𝐮𝐫𝐞 𝐩𝐨𝐢𝐧𝐭) 𝐧𝐞𝐚𝐫 𝐌𝐢𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐫 𝐋𝐚𝐤𝐞.
𝟐. 𝐔𝐒𝐅𝐒 𝐍𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐡 𝐂𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐓𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐥 #𝟏𝟒𝟏𝟎
𝟑. 𝐔𝐒𝐅𝐒 𝐒𝐮𝐦𝐦𝐢𝐭 𝐑𝐨𝐜𝐤 / 𝐂𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐓𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐥 #𝟏𝟒𝟓𝟕
𝟒. 𝐔𝐒𝐅𝐒 𝐌𝐭. 𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐞𝐥𝐬𝐞𝐧 𝐓𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐥 #𝟏𝟒𝟓𝟔
𝟓. 𝐔𝐒𝐅𝐒 𝐒𝐩𝐫𝐮𝐜𝐞 𝐑𝐢𝐝𝐠𝐞 𝐓𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐥 #𝟏𝟒𝟓𝟖
𝟔. 𝐔𝐒𝐅𝐒 𝐇𝐨𝐰𝐥𝐨𝐜𝐤 𝐌𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐭𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐓𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐥 #𝟏𝟒𝟒𝟖
𝟕. 𝐔𝐒𝐅𝐒 𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐞𝐥𝐬𝐞𝐧 𝐂𝐫𝐞𝐞𝐤 𝐓𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐥 #𝟏𝟒𝟒𝟗

𝑨 𝑳𝑬𝑽𝑬𝑳 𝟑 - 𝑮𝑶 𝑵𝑶𝑾 𝑬𝑽𝑨𝑪𝑼𝑨𝑻𝑰𝑶𝑵 𝑵𝑶𝑻𝑰𝑪𝑬 𝒎𝒆𝒂𝒏𝒔 𝒕𝒐 𝑳𝑬𝑨𝑽𝑬 𝑰𝑴𝑴𝑬𝑫𝑰𝑨𝑻𝑬𝑳𝒀! 𝑫𝒂𝒏𝒈𝒆𝒓 𝒕𝒐 𝒕𝒉𝒆 𝒂𝒓𝒆𝒂 𝒊𝒔 𝒄𝒖𝒓𝒓𝒆𝒏𝒕 𝒐𝒓 𝒊𝒎𝒎𝒊𝒏𝒆𝒏𝒕 𝒂𝒏𝒅 𝒚𝒐𝒖 𝒔𝒉𝒐𝒖𝒍𝒅 𝒆𝒗𝒂𝒄𝒖𝒂𝒕𝒆 𝒊𝒎𝒎𝒆𝒅𝒊𝒂𝒕𝒆𝒍𝒚. 𝑰𝒇 𝒚𝒐𝒖 𝒄𝒉𝒐𝒐𝒔𝒆 𝒕𝒐 𝒊𝒈𝒏𝒐𝒓𝒆 𝒕𝒉𝒊𝒔 𝒂𝒅𝒗𝒊𝒔𝒆𝒎𝒆𝒏𝒕, 𝒚𝒐𝒖 𝒎𝒖𝒔𝒕 𝒖𝒏𝒅𝒆𝒓𝒔𝒕𝒂𝒏𝒅 𝒕𝒉𝒂𝒕 𝒆𝒎𝒆𝒓𝒈𝒆𝒏𝒄𝒚 𝒔𝒆𝒓𝒗𝒊𝒄𝒆𝒔 𝒎𝒂𝒚 𝒏𝒐𝒕 𝒃𝒆 𝒂𝒃𝒍𝒆 𝒕𝒐 𝒂𝒔𝒔𝒊𝒔𝒕 𝒚𝒐𝒖 𝒇𝒖𝒓𝒕𝒉𝒆𝒓. 𝑫𝑶 𝑵𝑶𝑻 𝒅𝒆𝒍𝒂𝒚 𝒍𝒆𝒂𝒗𝒊𝒏𝒈 𝒕𝒐 𝒈𝒂𝒕𝒉𝒆𝒓 𝒂𝒏𝒚 𝒃𝒆𝒍𝒐𝒏𝒈𝒊𝒏𝒈𝒔 𝒐𝒓 𝒎𝒂𝒌𝒆 𝒆𝒇𝒇𝒐𝒓𝒕𝒔 𝒕𝒐 𝒑𝒓𝒐𝒕𝒆𝒄𝒕 𝒚𝒐𝒖𝒓 𝒃𝒆𝒍𝒐𝒏𝒈𝒊𝒏𝒈𝒔. 𝑻𝑯𝑰𝑺 𝑾𝑰𝑳𝑳 𝑩𝑬 𝑻𝑯𝑬 𝑳𝑨𝑺𝑻 𝑵𝑶𝑻𝑰𝑪𝑬 𝒀𝑶𝑼 𝑹𝑬𝑪𝑬𝑰𝑽𝑬.

𝐋𝐄𝐕𝐄𝐋 𝟐 - 𝐁𝐄 𝐒𝐄𝐓

𝟏. 𝐃𝐢𝐚𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐝 𝐋𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐇𝐨𝐫𝐬𝐞 𝐂𝐨𝐫𝐫𝐚𝐥𝐬
𝟐. 𝐃𝐢𝐚𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐝 𝐋𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐂𝐚𝐦𝐩𝐠𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝 (𝐞𝐚𝐬𝐭 𝐬𝐢𝐝𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐥𝐚𝐤𝐞) -𝐀𝐋𝐋  𝟐𝟑𝟖 𝐬𝐢𝐭𝐞𝐬, 𝐀𝐋𝐋 𝐋𝐨𝐨𝐩𝐬: 𝐀, 𝐁, 𝐂, 𝐃, 𝐄, 𝐆, 𝐇, 𝐊, 𝐋, & 𝐌
𝟑. 𝐃𝐢𝐚𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐝 𝐋𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐑𝐕 𝐏𝐚𝐫𝐤- 𝐀𝐋𝐋 𝟏𝟏𝟎 𝐬𝐢𝐭𝐞𝐬

𝐍𝐎𝐓 𝐀𝐅𝐅𝐄𝐂𝐓𝐄𝐃 𝐀𝐓 𝐓𝐇𝐈𝐒 𝐓𝐈𝐌𝐄 : 𝐓𝐡𝐢𝐞𝐥𝐬𝐞𝐧 𝐕𝐢𝐞𝐰 𝐂𝐚𝐦𝐩𝐠𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝, 𝐁𝐫𝐨𝐤𝐞𝐧 𝐀𝐫𝐫𝐨𝐰 𝐂𝐚𝐦𝐩𝐠𝐫𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝, 𝐒𝐨𝐮𝐭𝐡 𝐒𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐏𝐢𝐜𝐧𝐢𝐜 𝐀𝐫𝐞𝐚, 𝐃𝐢𝐚𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐝 𝐋𝐚𝐤𝐞 𝐑𝐞𝐬𝐨𝐫𝐭 𝐨𝐫 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐫𝐞𝐬𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐚𝐥 𝐜𝐚𝐛𝐢𝐧𝐬 𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐰𝐞𝐬𝐭 𝐬𝐢𝐝𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐃𝐢𝐚𝐦𝐨𝐧𝐝 𝐋𝐚𝐤𝐞. 

𝑨 𝑳𝑬𝑽𝑬𝑳 𝟐 - 𝑩𝑬 𝑺𝑬𝑻 𝑬𝑽𝑨𝑪𝑼𝑨𝑻𝑰𝑶𝑵 𝑵𝑶𝑻𝑰𝑪𝑬 𝒎𝒆𝒂𝒏𝒔 𝒀𝑶𝑼 𝑴𝑼𝑺𝑻 𝑷𝑹𝑬𝑷𝑨𝑹𝑬 𝑻𝑶 𝑳𝑬𝑨𝑽𝑬 𝑨𝑻 𝑨 𝑴𝑶𝑴𝑬𝑵𝑻𝑺 𝑵𝑶𝑻𝑰𝑪𝑬. 𝑻𝒉𝒊𝒔 𝒍𝒆𝒗𝒆𝒍 𝒊𝒏𝒅𝒊𝒄𝒂𝒕𝒆𝒔 𝒕𝒉𝒆𝒓𝒆 𝒊𝒔 𝒔𝒊𝒈𝒏𝒊𝒇𝒊𝒄𝒂𝒏𝒕 𝒅𝒂𝒏𝒈𝒆𝒓 𝒕𝒐 𝒚𝒐𝒖𝒓 𝒂𝒓𝒆𝒂, 𝒂𝒏𝒅 𝒚𝒐𝒖 𝒔𝒉𝒐𝒖𝒍𝒅 𝒆𝒊𝒕𝒉𝒆𝒓 𝒗𝒐𝒍𝒖𝒏𝒕𝒂𝒓𝒊𝒍𝒚 𝒓𝒆𝒍𝒐𝒄𝒂𝒕𝒆 𝒕𝒐 𝒂 𝒔𝒉𝒆𝒍𝒕𝒆𝒓 𝒐𝒓 𝒘𝒊𝒕𝒉 𝒇𝒂𝒎𝒊𝒍𝒚/𝒇𝒓𝒊𝒆𝒏𝒅𝒔 𝒐𝒖𝒕𝒔𝒊𝒅𝒆 𝒐𝒇 𝒕𝒉𝒆 𝒂𝒇𝒇𝒆𝒄𝒕𝒆𝒅 𝒂𝒓𝒆𝒂, 𝒐𝒓 𝒊𝒇 𝒄𝒉𝒐𝒐𝒔𝒊𝒏𝒈 𝒕𝒐 𝒓𝒆𝒎𝒂𝒊𝒏, 𝒕𝒐 𝒃𝒆 𝒓𝒆𝒂𝒅𝒚 𝒕𝒐 𝒆𝒗𝒂𝒄𝒖𝒂𝒕𝒆 𝒂𝒕 𝒂 𝒎𝒐𝒎𝒆𝒏𝒕'𝒔 𝒏𝒐𝒕𝒊𝒄𝒆. 𝒀𝒐𝒖 𝑴𝑨𝒀 𝒉𝒂𝒗𝒆 𝒕𝒊𝒎𝒆 𝒕𝒐 𝒈𝒂𝒕𝒉𝒆𝒓 𝒏𝒆𝒄𝒆𝒔𝒔𝒂𝒓𝒚 𝒊𝒕𝒆𝒎𝒔, 𝒃𝒖𝒕 𝒅𝒐𝒊𝒏𝒈 𝒔𝒐 𝒊𝒔 𝒂𝒕 𝒚𝒐𝒖𝒓 𝒐𝒘𝒏 𝒓𝒊𝒔𝒌. 𝑻𝑯𝑰𝑺 𝑴𝑨𝒀 𝑩𝑬 𝑻𝑯𝑬 𝑶𝑵𝑳𝒀 𝑵𝑶𝑻𝑰𝑪𝑬 𝒀𝑶𝑼 𝑹𝑬𝑪𝑬𝑰𝑽𝑬. 𝑬𝒎𝒆𝒓𝒈𝒆𝒏𝒄𝒚 𝒔𝒆𝒓𝒗𝒊𝒄𝒆𝒔 𝒄𝒂𝒏𝒏𝒐𝒕 𝒈𝒖𝒂𝒓𝒂𝒏𝒕𝒆𝒆 𝒕𝒉𝒂𝒕 𝒕𝒉𝒆𝒚 𝒘𝒊𝒍𝒍 𝒃𝒆 𝒂𝒃𝒍𝒆 𝒕𝒐 𝒏𝒐𝒕𝒊𝒇𝒚 𝒚𝒐𝒖 𝒊𝒇 𝒄𝒐𝒏𝒅𝒊𝒕𝒊𝒐𝒏𝒔 𝒓𝒂𝒑𝒊𝒅𝒍𝒚 𝒅𝒆𝒕𝒆𝒓𝒊𝒐𝒓𝒂𝒕𝒆.

𝐂𝐮𝐫𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐭 𝐞𝐯𝐚𝐜𝐮𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐥𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐥𝐬 𝐜𝐚𝐧 𝐛𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝 𝐨𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐢𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐜𝐭𝐢𝐯𝐞 𝐦𝐚𝐩 𝐥𝐨𝐜𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐚𝐭 𝐰𝐰𝐰.𝐝𝐜𝐬𝐨.𝐜𝐨𝐦/𝐞𝐯𝐚𝐜𝐮𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐬

𝐏𝐥𝐞𝐚𝐬𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐨𝐰 𝐨𝐧𝐥𝐲 𝐨𝐟𝐟𝐢𝐜𝐢𝐚𝐥 𝐬𝐨𝐮𝐫𝐜𝐞𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐢𝐧𝐟𝐨𝐫𝐦𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐫𝐞𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨 𝐭𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐢𝐧𝐜𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐧𝐭.
 




Attached Media Files: Smoke from the Trail Fire looking toward Mt. Thielsen from Diamond Lake , Evacuation Graphic

7/17/24 - LCSO Case #24-3656 - Lane County Sheriff's Office and Oregon State Police arrest motorcycle elude suspect in coordinated effort
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/17/24 3:48 PM

On July 10th, a Lane County Sheriff’s deputy assigned to the McKenzie District attempted to stop a motorcycle driving recklessly. The motorcycle eluded, driving at speeds well above 100 miles per hour. The next day, the motorcycle eluded the same deputy in a similar area. In both pursuits, the deputy terminated the pursuit for the safety of the public due to the recklessness of the motorcyclist. The Oregon State Police observed the same motorcycle driving recklessly several times on days following the pursuits. Photos of the suspect were also circulated online.  

With the combined investigative efforts of the Lane County Sheriff’s Office, Springfield Police Department, and the Oregon State Police, the rider of the motorcycle was identified as Joseph Tyler McVeigh, 27, of Vida.

This morning, July 17th at about 6:30 a.m., the rider was spotted traveling at a high rate of speed on McKenzie Highway by a deputy, and soon a trooper began following. An Oregon State Police aircraft was in the area and was able to track the vehicle into Eugene. Additional deputies and troopers responded to the area and moved in when the rider parked. McVeigh was arrested without further incident and lodged at the Lane County Jail for Attempt to Elude by Vehicle, four counts of Reckless Driving, and three counts of Reckless Endangering. 

The Lane County Sheriff’s Office would like to thank our partner agencies for their assistance in this case, as well as community members who reported their concern for McVeigh’s dangerous driving. 


Lane County Transportation Advisory Committee needs new member
Lane Co. Government - 07/17/24 12:14 PM

There is an at-large seat available on Lane County’s Transportation Advisory Committee (TrAC). An at-large seat means applicants can live anywhere in Lane County. 

 

The TrAC acts as a forum for public input into the County’s transportation system and serves as a liaison group in representing transportation concerns of the community to the Board of County Commissioners. 

 

“We all use our transportation system – although in different ways – and having a group of diverse voices at the table is how we work to make improvements that benefit everyone,” said Interim Transportation Planning Supervisor Cassidy Mills. “The TrAC is a great group if you are interested in getting more involved in the community.”

 

The Committee meets in the evening of every fourth Wednesday of every other month. Members have the option to participate online or in-person. There are a total of seven members – one from each commissioner’s district and two at-large members.

 

Applications are available at www.LaneCountyOR.gov/TrAC

 

 

###


Benton County Appoints April Holland as Health Department Director (Photo)
Benton Co. Government - 07/17/24 10:52 AM
2024-07/4171/173866/AprilHolland_resize.jpg
2024-07/4171/173866/AprilHolland_resize.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/4171/173866/thumb_AprilHolland_resize.jpg

Benton County is pleased to announce that April Holland has been officially appointed as the Benton County Health Department Director, effective today, July 17, 2024.

Holland has been serving as the Interim Health Department Director since March 2023, maintaining operational stability, and supporting leaders across various health sectors. She is known for her relationship-oriented leadership and commitment to a healthy workplace culture. With a background in epidemiology, Holland focuses on using data to improve health outcomes.

Her immediate plans include working with Community Health Centers Executive Director Lacey Mollel to finalize the Health Services structure and engage staff in defining a shared mission and strategic priorities.

Holland joined Benton County as the Deputy Director of Public Health in December 2020, during the COVID-19 pandemic. She led the community through the pandemic and other emergencies with effective collaboration.

Previously, Holland has managed Epidemiology, Communicable Diseases, Immunizations, Vital Statistics, and Public Health Preparedness programs. She holds a Master of Public Health degree from Oregon State University and has extensive experience in public health operations and policy.

The mission of the Benton County Health Department is to protect and improve the health of underserved individuals and the community with a vision to have engaged communities and blended services to achieve better health.

###

Benton County is an Equal Opportunity-Affirmative Action employer and does not discriminate on the basis of disability in admission or access to our programs, services, activities, hiring and employment practices. This document is available in alternative formats and languages upon request. Please contact Cory Grogan at 541-745-4468 or pioinfo@bentoncountyor.gov.https://rss.com/podcasts/bentonpublicpodcast




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/4171/173866/AprilHolland_resize.jpg

Missing child alert -- Lance Oyler is still missing and is believed to be in danger (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Human Services - 07/17/24 10:41 AM
2024-07/973/173871/Lance_Jan_2024.jpg
2024-07/973/173871/Lance_Jan_2024.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/973/173871/thumb_Lance_Jan_2024.jpg

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division, asks the public to help find Lance Oyler, age 14, a child who went missing from Hillsboro on June 2. Lance is still missing and is believed to be in danger, ODHS is searching for him to assess his safety.

ODHS asks the public for help in the effort to find Lance and to contact 911 or local law enforcement if they believe they see him.

Lance is suspected to be in Hillsboro, Beaverton and Portland area. He may have an injured arm. 

Name: Lance Oyler 
Pronouns: He/him 
Height: 121 pounds
Weight: 5-foot-4
Date of birth: Nov. 18, 2009 
Eye color: Brown and green
Hair color: Light Brown 
Hillsboro Police Department case #24-0010898
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children #2023214

Sometimes when a child is missing they may be in significant danger and ODHS may need to locate them to assess and support their safety. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and assess their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. 

###




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/973/173871/Lance_Jan_2024.jpg

Press Release: Oregon's Employment Situation Sees Little Change in June
Oregon Employment Department - 07/17/24 10:00 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
July 17, 2024

CONTACT INFORMATION:
umenauer@employ.oregon.gov">Gail Krumenauer, State Employment Economist
(971) 301-3771
Video and Audio available at 10 a.m.
David Cooke, Economist (971) 375-5288

Oregon’s Employment Situation Sees Little Change in June

Oregon’s unemployment rate was 4.1% in June and 4.2% in May and has been in a tight range between 4.0% and 4.2% since October 2023. The U.S. unemployment rate, at 4.1%, changed little in June.

In June, Oregon’s seasonally adjusted nonfarm payroll employment rose by 600 jobs, following a gain of 4,000 jobs in May. June’s gains were largest in health care and social assistance (+1,200 jobs); financial activities (+800); leisure and hospitality (+700); and other services (+700). Declines in June were largest in professional and business services (-1,800 jobs) and manufacturing (-600).

Health care and social assistance continued its rapid expansion. During the two-and-a-half-year period January 2022 through June 2024, it added 34,000 jobs, or 12.8%. Employment gains in social assistance have accelerated in recent months and the industry added 8,800 jobs, or 12.2%, during the past 12 months. Meanwhile, the three health care component industries each added more than 2,000 jobs since June 2023: nursing and residential care facilities (+2,700 jobs, or 5.1%); ambulatory health care services (+2,700 jobs, or 2.7%); and hospitals (+2,200 jobs, or 3.7%).

Despite large gains in health care and a few other industries recently, the list of declining industries is growing. Six major industries cut a substantial number of jobs in the past 12 months. Three of these major industries each declined by about 3,600 jobs since June 2023: retail trade (-3,600 jobs, or -1.7%); professional and business services (-3,600 jobs, or -1.3%); and manufacturing (-3,500 jobs, or -1.8%). The other major industries cutting at least 700 jobs in that time were construction (-2,700 jobs, or -2.3%); transportation, warehousing, and utilities (-1,100 jobs, or -1.4%); and information (-700 jobs, or -1.9%).

###




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/930/173862/employment_in_Oregon_--_June_2024_--_press_release.pdf

Level 1 (Be Ready) evacuation notice for High Prairie area north of Oakridge due to wildfire
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/17/24 8:54 AM

The following area north of Oakridge are on a Level 1 (Be Ready) evacuation notification:

  • High Prairie area east of North Fork Road and north of Westfir-Oakridge Road and north to High Prairie Loop

 

An evacuation map is available at www.LaneCountyOR.gov/HighPraireFire

 

Level 1 means you should be aware of the danger that exists in your area, monitor local media outlets and telephone devices to receive further information. 

 

This is the time for preparation and precautionary movement of persons with special needs, mobile property, pets and livestock. 

 

If conditions worsen, public safety personnel will make contact again using the emergency notification system.

 

Residents are encouraged to sign up for emergency alerts at www.LaneAlerts.org.

 

More information is available at www.LaneCountyOR.gov/HighPrairieFire.   

 

 

###


Two open positions on Lane County Planning Commission
Lane Co. Government - 07/17/24 8:30 AM

The Lane County Planning Commission is accepting applications to fill two positions: an at-large position and an in-city position. An at-large positions means that, while applicants must be Lane County residents, they do not need to live in a particular area of the county. An in-city position means that applicants must live within the city limits of one of Lane County’s 12 incorporated cities. 

 

“How we manage issues related to land use is, literally, how we build our community for ourselves and future generations,” said Lane County Planning Director Amber Bell. “The Planning Commission is an important part of that process and we hope people are interested in serving in that role.” 

 

The Lane County Planning Commission is a nine-member advisory board that makes recommendations to the Board of County Commissioners regarding land use, comprehensive plan issues and amendments, as well as other regional planning issues. The group generally meets twice per month in the evenings. 

 

Applicants must be residents of Lane County. 

 

To learn more or download an application, visit www.LaneCountyOR.gov/Planning_Commission

 

###


Private Security/Investigator Policy Committee Meeting Cancellation (08/20/24)
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 07/17/24 8:05 AM

PRIVATE SECURITY/INVESTIGATOR POLICY COMMITTEE

MEETING CANCELLED

 

Notice of Meeting Cancellation

The Private Security/Investigator Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training meeting scheduled for August 20th, 2024, at 1:30 p.m. has been cancelled due to lack of agenda items.

The next Private Security/Investigator Policy Committee meeting is scheduled for November 19th, 2024, at 1:30pm.


Tue. 07/16/24
Deputies Respond to Dunlap Lake Recreational Area, outside of Detroit (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/16/24 7:30 PM
2024-07/1294/173849/Media_Release_Twitter.png
2024-07/1294/173849/Media_Release_Twitter.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/1294/173849/thumb_Media_Release_Twitter.png

Yesterday morning, July 15, 2024, at just before 8:00 a.m. deputies were called to Dunlap Lake in rural Marion County for a possible drowning. A 3-year-old boy was reported to have fallen into the water and was found in the lake by their father. 

Emergency responders from the Idanha-Detroit Fire District, Lyons Ambulance Service, and the Marion County Sheriff’s Office responded to the rural lake. Life-saving efforts were attempted at the scene, tragically the child did not survive and was pronounced deceased at the scene.

The Marion County Medical Examiner’s Office was called to the scene to assist deputies with the investigation.

We offer our condolences to the child’s family during this difficult time.

Deputies want to remind visitors to recreational areas in Marion County to remain vigilant around water ways and encourage the use of life jackets.




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/1294/173849/Media_Release_Twitter.png

Lane County Man Who Negotiated Guns-for-Drugs Trade Sentenced to Federal Prison
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 07/16/24 5:25 PM

EUGENE, Ore.—A Lane County, Oregon man who negotiated the trade of methamphetamine for 17 firearms was sentenced to federal prison today.

Mark Villanueva, 38, was sentenced to 120 months in federal prison and five years’ supervised release.

According to court documents, in August 2020, special agents from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) obtained information that Villanueva was actively involved in distributing illegal narcotics, primarily methamphetamine, in and around Lane County, Oregon, and illegally possessed firearms as a convicted felon. In October and November of 2020, Villanueva sold methamphetamine to an undercover law enforcement officer on five separate occasions. During the fifth transaction, Villanueva began discussing his interest in buying or selling ammunition and firearms.

In December 2020 and continuing into January 2021, Villanueva negotiated the trade of multiple firearms for a large quantity of methamphetamine with his Los Angeles-based source of supply. However, on January 11, 2021, before Villanueva could complete the transaction, he was arrested in Florence, Oregon on an outstanding state arrest warrant. Despite his arrest, the guns-for-drugs trade moved forward and was completed on January 13, 2021, the same day Villanueva was released from state custody. Following his release was custody, Villanueva confirmed that 17 firearms had been traded for three pounds of methamphetamine with his source of supply in Los Angeles.

On January 13, 2021, Villanueva was charged by criminal complaint with distributing methamphetamine. Later, on May 20, 2021, a federal grand jury in Eugene returned an indictment charging Villanueva and three associates, including his then-wife and Los Angeles-based source of supply, with conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute methamphetamine, conspiracy to possess a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime, and possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime.

On February 16, 2023, Villanueva pleaded guilty to conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute methamphetamine.

This case was investigated by ATF with assistance from Eugene Police Department. It was prosecuted by Adam E. Delph, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

# # #




Attached Media Files: Sentencing-Villanueva

Recreational use advisories issued for North Santiam River, Big Cliff Reservoir and Detroit Reservoir July 16
Oregon Health Authority - 07/16/24 5:08 PM

July 16, 2024

Media contact: Larry Bingham, 971-239-6499, PHD.Communications@oha.oregon.gov

Note: This July 17 update upgrades the precautionary advisory to a full advisory for the North Santiam River from Mehama upstream to (and including) Big Cliff Reservoir and Detroit Reservoir.

Recreational use advisories issued for North Santiam River, Big Cliff Reservoir and Detroit Reservoir July 16

PORTLAND, Ore.—Oregon Health Authority (OHA) issued a recreational use health advisory today for the North Santiam River from the confluence with the South Santiam River upstream to (and including) Big Cliff Reservoir and Detroit Reservoir due to the presence of cyanotoxins above recreational use values for human exposure.

People should avoid swimming and high-speed water activities, such as water skiing or power boating, in areas of the river and reservoirs where blooms are present, as the major route of exposure is ingestion of water. Toxins are not absorbed through the skin. However, those with skin sensitivities may get a puffy red rash.

OHA encourages people to visit North Santiam River, Big Cliff Reservoir and Detroit Reservoir to enjoy activities such as fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, bird watching, canoeing and kayaking. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray. Sprays could lead to the risk of inhaling cyanotoxins.

Drinking water

Drinking water directly from areas of the river and reservoirs affected by a bloom is especially dangerous. Toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating water with camping-style filters. Contact campground management or the local health department with questions about water available at nearby campgrounds or day use areas.

Not all private treatment systems are effective at removing cyanotoxins. People who do not use a well or public water system and draw in-home water directly from an affected area are advised to use an alternative water source.

Children and pets

Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. Dogs can get extremely ill and even die within minutes to hours of exposure to cyanotoxins by drinking the water, licking their fur or eating the toxins from floating mats or dried crust along the shore. This is regardless of a recreational use health advisory in place.

Dogs can become ill and die from water intoxication after drinking excessive amounts of water while swimming or fetching objects for long periods of time. Intoxication is a potentially fatal disturbance in brain function resulting from an imbalance of electrolytes in the body. Water intoxication and heat stroke can cause similar symptoms as exposure to cyanotoxins.

Symptoms

Exposure to cyanotoxins can be serious and cause a range of symptoms. Symptoms may be similar to food poisoning such as stomach cramping, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting. Symptoms may also be more serious, such as numbness, tingling, dizziness and shortness of breath. These symptoms may require medical attention.

Dogs can experience weakness, difficulty walking, seizures, lethargy, loss of appetite and more. If a dog exhibits symptoms, veterinary treatment should be sought as quickly as possible.

Fishing

Fish caught from areas where cyanobacteria blooms are present may pose unknown health risks, so OHA recommends not eating fish from those areas. Those who decide to eat the fish should remove fat, skin and organs before cooking or freezing. Toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water.

For health information or to report an illness, contact OHA at 971-673-0482, or visit OHA’s Cyanobacteria (Harmful Algae) Blooms website.

###


 


Cottage Grove Woman Sentenced to Federal Prison for Threatening Coworkers on Facebook
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 07/16/24 5:05 PM

MEDFORD, Ore.—A Cottage Grove, Oregon woman was sentenced to federal prison today for threatening violence against her coworkers on Facebook.

Elizabeth Ballestros West, 56, was sentenced to six months and three weeks in federal prison and three years’ supervised release.

According to court documents, in late September 2023, the FBI received an anonymous tip that West was threatening coworkers on Facebook. Later, in November 2023, the FBI learned West had established an account on X (formerly known as Twitter) that she used to post and repost memes, videos and statements containing violent messages targeting particular ethnic groups. Several of West’s posts included what appeared to be self-produced photos of firearms including several handguns, a shotgun, and an AR-style assault rifle.

On January 3, 2024, West admitted to posting and reposting messages on X that contained hateful and violent rhetoric. West also admitted to possessing multiple shotguns and AR-15 assault rifles at her Cottage Grove residence.

One week later, on January 9, 2024, the FBI executed federal search warrants on West’s person, vehicle, and residence. They located and seized 12 handguns, 16 rifles, thousands of rounds of ammunition and firearm accessories, and a journal that appeared to contain writings and drawings that included additional hateful and violent statements. On January 12, 2024, West was charged by criminal complaint with transmitting a threat in interstate commerce and arrested by the FBI the same day at her workplace in Eugene.

Approximately one week later, on January 18, 2024, a federal grand jury in Eugene indicted West on the same charge. On May 29, 2024, West pleaded guilty.

This case was investigated by the FBI with assistance from the Cottage Grove Police Department, Eugene Police Department, and Lane County Sheriff’s Office. It was prosecuted by Adam E. Delph, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

# # #




Attached Media Files: West_Sentencing

Washington State Man Faces Federal Charges for Damaging Two Portland Area Energy Facilities
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 07/16/24 4:02 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A federal grand jury in Portland has returned an indictment charging a Tacoma, Washington, man with damaging two Portland area energy facilities.

Zachary Rosenthal, 33, has been charged with three counts of damaging an energy facility.

According to the indictment, on November 24 and 28, 2022, Rosenthal is accused of knowingly and willfully damaging two energy facilities—the Ostrander Substation in Oregon City, Oregon and the Sunnyside Substation in Clackamas, Oregon—with the intent of interrupting or impairing the function of both facilities. The indictment further alleges that Rosenthal caused damages exceeding $100,000 to the Ostrander Substation and $5,000 to the Sunnyside Substation. Both facilities are involved in the transmission and distribution of electricity.

A single accomplice, Nathaniel Adam Cheney, 30, of Centralia, Washington, is named alongside Rosenthal in charges stemming from the November 28, 2022, damage to the Sunnyside Substation.

A second indictment was also unsealed today charging Rosenthal with stealing firearms from a federal firearms licensee and illegally possessing firearms as a convicted felon. According to this indictment, in January 2023, Rosenthal is alleged to have stolen 24 firearms he was restricted from possessing from a federal firearms licensee in the Portland area.

Rosenthal made his initial appearance in federal court today before a U.S. Magistrate Judge. He was arraigned on both indictments, pleaded not guilty to all charges, and detained pending further court proceedings.

On April 10, 2023, Cheney made his first appearance in federal court. He was arraigned, pleaded not guilty, and released on conditions pending a two-day jury trial currently scheduled to begin on August 20, 2024.

Damaging an energy facility and causing more than $100,000 in damages is punishable by up to 20 years in federal prison and three years’ supervised release. Damaging an energy facility and causing more than $5,000 in damages is punishable by up to five years in federal prison and three years’ supervised release.

This case was investigated by the FBI. It is being prosecuted by Parakram Singh, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime, and defendants are presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

###




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

7/15/24 - LCSO Case #24-3762 - Deputies arrest two for disrupting services while attempting to steal wire (Photo)
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/16/24 3:51 PM
West Lane Arrest
West Lane Arrest
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/6111/173850/thumb_West_Lane_Arrest.png

On July 15th at about 10 a.m., employees with Blachly-Lane Electric Co-Op responded to the area of Siuslaw River Road and Richardson Upriver Road for a power outage. When they arrived, they found two males with a vehicle stuck in the mud near two power poles that had been cut down. 

A Lane County Sheriff’s deputy and an Oregon State Police trooper responded. The suspects were identified as Nathan Shawn Reynolds and Cody Ray Reynolds, both 32. 

Blachly-Lane estimated the damage to be more than $30,000. Century Link property was also damaged in the incident, estimated to be around $1,500. More importantly, these actions disrupted the vital services these lines provide to this rural area.

After investigating, Nathan and Cody Reynolds were both arrested for Theft in the 2nd Degree, Criminal Mischief in the 1st Degree, and Trespass in the 2nd Degree. Cody Reynolds was also arrested for Violation of a Restraining Order. Both were lodged at the Lane County Jail without incident. 

Thanks to the Oregon State Police for their assistance on this case, and to the utility companies who have worked diligently since the ice storms to maintain services to our rural areas.




Attached Media Files: West Lane Arrest

Dr. Naomi Adeline-Biggs named OHA's public health director
Oregon Health Authority - 07/16/24 3:39 PM

July 16, 2024

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@oha.oregon.gov

Dr. Naomi Adeline-Biggs named OHA’s public health director

She begins her new role at OHA Aug. 19 after two years as Polk County’s public health administrator

PORTLAND, Ore.—Naomi Adeline-Biggs, MBBS, MPH, Polk County’s public health administrator since 2022, has been appointed permanent director of Oregon Health Authority’s (OHA) Public Health Division, effective Aug. 19.

As Polk County Public Health administrator, Dr. Adeline-Biggs has overseen 25 programs. She commissioned the 2024-2027 Polk County Public Health Strategic Plan and piloted a Health Services Communication Assessment that incorporated administrative services, public health, behavioral health and developmental disability services to improve critical public health services and information sharing with communities. She also established an epidemiology team to improve collaboration between staff involved in disease investigation, data analysis and communications. And she relaunched the county’s Babies First! and CaCoon Home Visiting programs after a two-year hiatus due to COVID-19 and limited nurse capacity.

During her time at Polk County, Dr. Adeline-Biggs also served as board chair for the Oregon Coalition of Local Health Officials, where she presided over monthly board meetings, testified before state legislators in support of public health modernization, and presented about public health funding to the Association of Oregon Counties.

Dr. Adeline-Biggs came to Oregon after serving the World Health Organization (WHO) during the COVID-19 pandemic in Seychelles in East Africa, providing incident management expertise and leadership in communicable diseases, HIV/AIDS, geographic information systems (GIS), laboratory services and immunizations.

“I’m delighted to join Oregon Health Authority at a time when the agency pursues a critical 2030 goal of eliminating health inequities – a goal I enthusiastically support,” Dr. Adeline-Biggs said. “I’m looking forward to collaborating with the Public Health Division staff and partners across the state to improve the lives of everyone in Oregon.”

OHA Director Dr. Sejal Hathi said she’s “thrilled to have Dr. Adeline-Biggs join the OHA leadership team and lead our state Public Health Division work as we continue to pursue our 2030 goal of eliminating health inequities.”

“Dr. Adeline-Biggs has demonstrated, throughout her career, a genuine commitment to ensuring all people and communities can achieve optimum physical, mental, and social well-being through partnerships, prevention, and access to quality, affordable health care,” Dr. Hathi said.

As a physician in her home country of Seychelles, Dr. Adeline-Biggs advocated for large-scale policy changes that led to reduced health disparities and widespread promotion of health literacy, particularly among LGBTQ+ and incarcerated patients. During the pandemic, as a WHO employee, she stood up preparedness and response efforts and developed a rapid data reporting system.

Cara Biddlecom, who has served as the Public Health Division’s interim director since October 2023 and at OHA since 2008, is leaving the agency Friday, July 19, when she plans to relocate to the East Coast.

Biddlecom has brought “transformational leadership to the Public Health Division at a critical time for our state and our agency,” said Dr. Hathi. “She has helped grow the division, implement public health modernization, increase investments in local, Tribal, community-based and state public health, and sustain infrastructure for health equity in the Public Health Division. I’m incredibly grateful for her leadership and wish her the very best.”

Kirsten Aird, the Public Health Division’s interim deputy director, will serve as interim state public health director until Dr. Adeline-Biggs starts Aug. 19.

###


DPSST Corrections Policy Committee Meeting 08/13/24
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 07/16/24 3:00 PM

CORRECTIONS POLICY COMMITTEE

MEETING SCHEDULED

 

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Corrections Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting on August 13, 2024, at 10:00 a.m. in the Governor Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. For further information, please contact Juan Lopez at (503) 551-3167.

Effective Jan. 1, 2024, the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training will be live streaming all public meetings via YouTube. Meetings will no longer be streamed on Facebook. To view the Corrections Policy Committee's live-stream and other recorded videos, please visit DPSST’s official YouTube page at https://www.youtube.com/@DPSST.

Agenda Items

1.   Introductions

2. Approve May 8, 2024, Meeting Minutes

3. Administrative Closures Agenda (The following items to be ratified by one vote)
    Presented by Jennifer Levario

    a) Megan Chapman, DPSST No. 59132
        Basic and Intermediate Probation and Parole Certifications

    b) Michael Winters, DPSST No. 52762
        Basic Corrections and DPSST Instructor Certifications

4. Nicholas Alberts, DPSST No. 58569; Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office
    Presented by Melissa Lang-Bacho

5. Milan Fietz, DPSST No. 46944; DOC/Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution
    Presented by Jennifer Levario

6. Traci Hubler, DPSST No. 45406; Clatsop County Sheriff's Office
    Presented by Jennifer Levario

7. Mark Mahlum, DPSST No. 36794; Coos County Sheriff's Office
    Presented by Jennifer Levario

8. Ryan McKone, DPSST No. 48453; Washington County Sheriff's Office
    Presented by Jennifer Levario

9. Nicholas Mitchell, DPSST No. 58076; DOC/Santiam Correctional Institution
    Presented by Melissa Lang-Bacho

10. Diego Saldana, DPSST No. 62469; DOC/Two Rivers Correctional Institution
    Presented by Jennifer Levario

11. Bonnie Smythe, DPSST No. 60693; DOC/Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution
    Presented by Jennifer Levario

12. Amanda Vincent, DPSST No. 60425; DOC/Deer Ridge Correctional Institution
    Presented by Jennifer Levario

13. Luis Vivanco, DPSST No. 63585; DOC/Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution
    Presented by Jennifer Levario

14. Agency Update

12. Next Corrections Policy Committee Meeting: November 12, 2024, at 10:00am

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Corrections Policy Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


OSP Fish and Wildlife seeks public assistance -- Jefferson County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/16/24 2:34 PM
Mule deer doe shot with arrow
Mule deer doe shot with arrow
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/1002/173840/thumb_NR_7-16-24_F_and_W_Poaching_Madras.JPG

JEFFERSON COUNTY, Ore. 16 July 2024 – Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife is investigating the unlawful take and waste of a mule deer doe. 

On June 13, 2024, Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife troopers received a report of a dead mule deer doe shot with an arrow. The doe was found in the area of NW Hart Street in Madras. The doe had likely been killed the same day and left to waste. The specific location where the deer was shot is not known. 

The Fish and Wildlife Division is asking for the public’s assistance in identifying the person(s) responsible for killing the doe. Anyone with information is asked to contact the TIP hotline at 1-800-452-7888, email TIP@osp.oregon.gov, or contact OSP dispatch at OSP (677). Please reference case number SP24187072. 

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators 

The Turn In Poachers (TIP) program is a collaboration between the Oregon State Police, Oregon Hunters Association, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Oregon Wildlife Coalition, Oregon Outfitter and Guides Association, and the Oregon State Marine Board. 

The TIP program offers preference point rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of big game mammals.  

Preference Point Rewards
5 Points: Bighorn Sheep
5 Points: Rocky Mountain Goat
5 Points: Moose
5 Points: Wolf
4 Points: Elk
4 Points: Deer
4 Points: Pronghorn Antelope
4 Points: Bear
4 Points: Cougar

The TIP program also offers cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of the following fish and wildlife species. Cash rewards can also be awarded for habitat destruction, illegally obtaining hunting or angling license or tag, lending or borrowing big game tags, spotlighting, or snagging.

Cash Rewards

Oregon Hunters Association (OHA) cash rewards:
$2,000 Bighorn Sheep, Mountain Goat, or Moose 
$1,000 Elk, Deer, or Antelope 
$600 Bear, Cougar, or Wolf
$300 Habitat destruction 
$200 Illegally obtaining Oregon hunting or angling license or tags
$200 Unlawful lending/borrowing big game tag(s)
$200 Game Fish & Shellfish
$200 Game Birds or Furbearers
$200 Spotlighting
$200 Snagging/Attempt to Snag

Oregon Wildlife Coalition (OWC) Cash Rewards:
$500 Hawk, Falcon, Eagle, Owl, Osprey
$500 Cougar, Bobcat, Beaver (public lands only), Black bears, Bighorn Sheep, Marten, Fisher, Sierra Nevada Red Fox
$1,000 Species listed as “threatened" or “endangered" under state or federal Endangered Species Act (excludes fish)

Oregon Outfitters & Guides Association (OOGA) Cash Rewards:
$200 Acting as an Outfitter Guide for the Illegal Killing of Wildlife, Illegally Obtaining Oregon Hunting or Angling Licenses or Tags, or Illegally Offering to Act as an Outfitter Guide as defined in ORS 704.010 and 704.020.

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity: 
TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP (677)
TIP email: TIP@osp.oregon.gov (monitored Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.)
For more information visit: www.oregon.gov/osp/programs/fw/Pages/tip.aspx

 

# # #

 

About the Oregon State Police
Oregon State Police (OSP) is a multi-disciplined organization that is charged with protecting the people, wildlife, and natural resources in Oregon. OSP enforces traffic laws on the state’s roadways, investigates and solves crime, conducts postmortem examinations and forensic analysis, and provides background checks, and law enforcement data. The agency regulates gaming and enforces fish, wildlife, and natural resource laws. OSP is comprised of more than 1,400 staff members – including troopers, investigators, and professional staff – who provide a full range of policing and public safety services to Oregon and other law enforcement agencies throughout Oregon.




Attached Media Files: Mule deer doe shot with arrow

Marine Board to Paddleboarders - Leash Type is Critical (Photo)
Oregon State Marine Board - 07/16/24 2:03 PM
Boating Safety Advocate Luke Martinez from Curry County wearing a quick release leash attached to his life jacket
Boating Safety Advocate Luke Martinez from Curry County wearing a quick release leash attached to his life jacket
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/4139/173837/thumb_LukeMartinezSUPQR.png

The Oregon State Marine Board is urging people operating stand up paddleboards (SUPs) on moving water (primarily rivers) to always wear a life jacket and never wear an ankle or leg leash designed for general flatwater use.

"There’s an emerging trend when we look at the causes for fatalities in recent years where a person, otherwise well outfitted, died because their leash to the SUP became entangled in brush or other debris on area rivers," said Brian Paulsen, Boating Safety Program Manager for the Marine Board. "Most ankle leashes used by SUP users are not designed for quick release. If you get it tangled on rocks or downed trees, the leash could hold you underwater."

Most SUPs are equipped with a leash so the paddleboard can stay within reach if the user falls off. On a lake or other still water, this is an excellent safety tool when used in conjunction with a life jacket. On moving water though, the leash can be deadly. "Quick-release leashes are available and designed specifically for moving water. It's worn around the waist or can attach to the life jacket. Leashes attached to a jacket are easier for the paddler to grab and deploy," says Paulsen.

2024 is shaping up to be another high-fatality boating year. In June there were six fatalities and four so far this month. Combined with one in January, there have been 11 recreational boating fatalities. Tragically, many were preventable, had the operator taken a basic safety precaution, like wearing a life jacket.

"SUPs are very popular, available at big box stores, provide access to local waterways and are a lot of fun," says Paulsen. "But understanding the basics is crucial." Paulsen suggested people review safety information for SUPs and visit the Marine Board’s Paddling page for trip planning, with safety in mind. There’s also a FREE online paddling course in both English and Spanish that covers basic strokes, different environmental conditions to consider, and safety equipment.

###




Attached Media Files: Boating Safety Advocate Luke Martinez from Curry County wearing a quick release leash attached to his life jacket

Fatal Crash - HWY 34 - Linn County
Oregon State Police - 07/16/24 1:16 PM

Linn County, Ore. 15 July 24- On Monday, July 15, 2024, at 11:51 a.m., Oregon State Police responded to a two-vehicle crash on Hwy 34, near milepost 4, in Linn County.

The preliminary investigation indicated an eastbound Chevrolet Tahoe, operated by Gemini Uvon Soules (21) of Albany, crossed into the westbound lanes and struck a Dodge Ram 2500, operated by Justin Koehler (51) of Silverton, head-on. 

The operator of the Chevrolet (Soules) was declared deceased at the scene.

The operator of the Dodge (Koehler) was transported to an area hospital with serious injuries.

The highway was impacted for several hours during the on-scene investigation. The cause of the crash is under investigation.

OSP was assisted by the Linn County Sheriff's Office and ODOT.

# # #

About the Oregon State Police
Oregon State Police (OSP) is a multi-disciplined organization that is charged with protecting the people, wildlife, and natural resources in Oregon. OSP enforces traffic laws on the state’s roadways, investigates and solves crime, conducts postmortem examinations and forensic analysis, and provides background checks, and law enforcement data. The agency regulates gaming and enforces fish, wildlife, and natural resource laws. OSP is comprised of more than 1,400 staff members – including troopers, investigators, and professional staff – who provide a full range of policing and public safety services to Oregon and other law enforcement agencies throughout Oregon.

 


Fatal Crash - HWY 101 - Curry County
Oregon State Police - 07/16/24 1:01 PM

Curry County, Ore. 14 July 24- On Sunday, July 14, 2024, at 11:40 p.m., Oregon State Police responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 101, near milepost 298, in Curry County.

The preliminary investigation indicated a southbound Ford F250, operated by James Franklin Mickelson (36) of Sixes, left the roadway for unknown reasons, traveled approximately 400 feet through a field, and struck a tree. The collision caused the vehicle to become engulfed in flames.

The operator of the vehicle (Mickelson) and passengers, Joseph Frances Kurka (20) of Sixes and Dereck Eugene Stroop (35) of Port Orford, were all declared deceased at the scene.

The highway was not impacted during the on-scene investigation. The cause of the crash is under investigation.

OSP was assisted by the Port Orford Fire Department, Sixes Fire, Coos Forest Patrol, Coos Fire, the Curry County Sheriff's Office, and ODOT.

# # #

About the Oregon State Police
Oregon State Police (OSP) is a multi-disciplined organization that is charged with protecting the people, wildlife, and natural resources in Oregon. OSP enforces traffic laws on the state’s roadways, investigates and solves crime, conducts postmortem examinations and forensic analysis, and provides background checks, and law enforcement data. The agency regulates gaming and enforces fish, wildlife, and natural resource laws. OSP is comprised of more than 1,400 staff members – including troopers, investigators, and professional staff – who provide a full range of policing and public safety services to Oregon and other law enforcement agencies throughout Oregon.


Oklahoma Man Sentenced to Federal Prison for Sexually Exploiting a Child
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 07/16/24 12:10 PM

EUGENE, Ore.—On July 10, 2024, an Oklahoma City man was sentenced to federal prison for sexually abusing a child and capturing the abuse on video.

Jeremy Lee Peterson, 44, was sentenced to the statutory maximum sentence of 360 months in federal prison and a life term of supervised release. 

According to court documents, on February 18, 2022, Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) agents received information from the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC) regarding a video depicting child sexual abuse. Agents reviewed the video’s file data and suspected it was created in a specific apartment in Eugene, Oregon. The agents identified distinctive physical characteristics of the abuser in the video, including a scorpion tattoo on the man’s chest.

On February 24, 2022, investigators searched the apartment and identified furniture and bed sheets consistent with those appearing in the abuse video. Investigators also found photos of Peterson on social media and obtained a booking photo from a previous arrest, both of which matched the likeness and physical attributes, including the scorpion tattoo, as depicted in the abuse video. During their investigation, agents learned the minor victim and the victim’s parent had recently moved to a residence in Oklahoma that matched Peterson’s most recent address. 

On February 28, 2022, agents in Oklahoma executed a search warrant on Peterson’s address and found the minor victim and parent living there. Peterson was arrested and the child was rescued. Soon after, agents learned that Peterson had recently helped the victim and the victim’s parent move to his residence in Oklahoma.

On March 15, 2022, a federal grand jury in Portland returned a one-count indictment charging Peterson with sexually exploiting a child and producing child pornography. 

Months after Peterson was charged, his minor victim contacted law enforcement to discuss the abuse in Oregon and disclose additional abuse in Oklahoma.

On March 27, 2024, Peterson pleaded guilty to sexually exploiting a child.

This case was investigated by HSI in the District of Oregon and the Western District of Oklahoma, with assistance from the Eugene Police Department. It was prosecuted by William M. McLaren, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

Anyone who has information about the physical or online exploitation of children are encouraged to contact HSI at (866) 347-2423 or submit a tip online at report.cybertip.org.

Federal law defines child pornography as any visual depiction of sexually explicit conduct involving a minor. It is important to remember child sexual abuse material depicts actual crimes being committed against children. Not only do these images and videos document the victims’ exploitation and abuse, but when shared across the internet, re-victimize and re-traumatize the child victims each time their abuse is viewed. To learn more, please visit the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children at www.missingkids.org.

This case was brought as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse. For more information about Project Safe Childhood, please visit www.justice.gov/psc.

###




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Oregon Dept. of Forestry hires two new support specialists to help communities deal with emerald ash borer (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/16/24 12:06 PM
Kat Bethea joined the Oregon Dept. of Forestry recently as one of two new Emerald Ash Borer Support Specialists. She worked previously with the City of Portland's Urban Forestry program.
Kat Bethea joined the Oregon Dept. of Forestry recently as one of two new Emerald Ash Borer Support Specialists. She worked previously with the City of Portland's Urban Forestry program.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/1072/173830/thumb_Kat_Bethea.jpeg

SALEM, Ore. – Two people newly hired by the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) are now available to help Oregonians prepare for emerald ash borer (EAB) and mitigate its potentially devastating effects on their urban and natural area ash trees. 

Matt Mills comes to ODF from the Oregon Dept. of Agriculture where he has been coordinating that agency’s EAB response in Washington County. This included overseeing the state’s slow-the-spread work in and around Forest Grove. Mills has prior experience as a park ranger with Oregon State Parks and for many years worked as a zookeeper. He has a bachelor’s degree in Ecology and Evolution from the University of Oregon.

Kat Bethea joins ODF from the City of Portland Urban Forestry. There, as a Botanic Specialist they worked on inventorying street trees. Bethea holds bachelor’s degrees in Biology and in Forensic Science from the University of Central Oklahoma. They then spent several field seasons as a field technician on projects ranging from specimen collection for museums to invasive insect surveys in Oregon.

“We had a very competitive selection process with great candidates. We are pleased to have found two who are so well qualified and highly motivated to do this important work,” said Scott Altenhoff, ODF Urban and Community Forestry Program Manager. Mills and Bethea started on July 15. 

The two previous EAB Support Specialists – Lilah Gonen and Evan Elderbrock – have moved into permanent Community Assistance Forester positions in ODF’s Urban and Community Forestry Program. Gonen is now serving as overall coordinator for ODF’s EAB response.

Mills and Bethea join a grants administrator and four new community assistance foresters hired since March – up from just one for the whole state. Altenhoff credits funding from the Oregon Legislature and the USDA Forest Service through the Inflation Reduction Act (IRA) and Bipartisan Infrastructure Law (BIL) for helping ODF add staff to address many longstanding urban forestry issues as well as new concerns, such as helping cities adapt their urban forests to climate change and an onslaught of introduced pests and diseases.

“I’m excited that with more staff we can now engage with more of Oregon’s 241 cities and towns spread over 90,000 square miles,” said Altenhoff. “We’ll be able to better help them plan and manage their urban trees in accordance with best practices and the latest scientific research. And Matt and Kat will play crucial roles in that effort.”

                                                          # # #




Attached Media Files: Kat Bethea joined the Oregon Dept. of Forestry recently as one of two new Emerald Ash Borer Support Specialists. She worked previously with the City of Portland's Urban Forestry program. , Matt Mills is one of two Emerald Ash Borer Support Specialists hired by the Oregon Dept. of Forestry to help communities prepare for this invasive insect and mitigate its impact. He worked in a similar role for the Oregon Dept. of Agriculture coordinating its response to this invasive insect.

Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission to meet July 30 online
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/16/24 9:31 AM

News Release // Oregon Parks and Recreation Department // July 16, 2024

Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission to meet July 30 online

SALEM, Oregon — The Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission will convene online at 3 p.m. on July 30, 2024 for a business meeting.

The draft agenda includes requests to:

  1. Approve the 2025-2029 Oregon Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan for submission to the National Park Service. The plan, updated every five years, is required to maintain Oregon’s eligibility for certain federal grants.
  2. Approve the agency requested budget for 2025-27 prior to its submission to the Governor.
  3. Open rulemaking to take public comments on restricting camping on the ocean shore in the city limits of Brookings in Curry County. The change is being requested by local residents and will be brought back to the commission with a recommendation after a public comment period. The public comment period will start with a separate announcement.
  4. Approve state park construction contracts.

The full agenda and supporting documents will be posted on the commission web page before the meeting.

People who wish to attend may watch the meeting live on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/@oprddirectorsoffice5783/streams, or come to the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department office at 725 Summer St NE, Salem OR 97301 to observe the video livestream. Please submit written public comments by 5 p.m. July 26 to is.havel@oprd.oregon.gov">chris.havel@oprd.oregon.gov. Public comments will not be accepted live during this special meeting, but comments will be accepted as usual at the regularly scheduled meeting in September.

The Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission promotes outdoor recreation and heritage by establishing policies, adopting rules, and setting the budget for the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. The seven members are appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. They serve four-year terms and meet several times a year at locations across the state. 

###

Media Contact

Chris Havel
503-931-2590
is.havel@oprd.oregon.gov">chris.havel@oprd.oregon.gov


Emergency Conflagration Act invoked for Lone Rock Fire (Photo)
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 07/16/24 9:28 AM
Courtesy: Gilliam County Sheriff's Office
Courtesy: Gilliam County Sheriff's Office
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/1062/173823/thumb_Gilliam_Co_Sherriff_-_Lone_Rock_7-16_(3).jpg

SALEM, Ore. – The fast-moving Lone Rock Fire in Gilliam, Morrow, and Wheeler counties is Oregon’s latest conflagration. On Monday, Governor Tina Kotek invoked the Emergency Conflagration Act. The Oregon State Fire Marshal has been actively engaged on the fire with its partner agencies. Over the weekend, the OSFM sent resources through Immediate Response. 

The OSFM’s Red Incident Management Team will be in unified command with Northwest Team 2 starting at 10 Tuesday morning. Structural task forces from Benton, Clackamas, Lane, Linn, Marion, Multnomah, and Yamhill counties are assigned to the fire. The Linn County task force was sent Sunday along with other resources through Immediate Response, a tool the OSFM uses to send firefighters and equipment outside of a conflagration.

“The next few days are going to be extremely challenging with excessive heat, red flag warnings, and forecasted lightning,” Oregon State Fire Marshal Mariana Ruiz-Temple said. “We are watching the weather forecast closely and have plans in place if new fires start.”

The Lone Rock Fire 10 miles southeast of Condon sparked on July 13. Gusty winds and dry conditions pushed the fire to grow to more than 30,000 acres as of last report. 

The OSFM is actively battling the fire along with its partners from the Oregon Department of Forestry, the Bureau of Land Management, and local responders. 

The Gilliam, Morrow, and Wheeler counties sheriffs’ offices have levels 2 and 3 evacuations in place. 

Because the threat to homes near the Cow Valley Fire in Malheur County has diminished, the OSFM was able to demobilize and reassign their Red Incident Management Team and several of the task forces. 

As the team gets settled in, the OSFM will post updates about the fire to the OSFM Incident Information blog and its social media channels.




Attached Media Files: Courtesy: Gilliam County Sheriff's Office

7/16/24 - Evacuation lifted for Green Hill Road and Bodenhamer Road
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/16/24 8:48 AM

UPDATE - 7/16/24 - Evacuation lifted for Green Hill Road and Bodenhamer Road

The Level 1 evacuation notice for the area south of Bodenhamer Road and west of Greenhill Road has been lifted. Fire crews may be in the area for some time. If you observe flames, please call 911.

Thanks to the many firefighters who responded and law enforcement partners who assisted with evacuation notices.

Map and updates at www.lanecounty.org/bodenhamer

REMINDER – Sign up for Lane Alerts! These emergency alerts can be received by email, text, or phone call, and are specific to the address in Lane County you provide. More info at www.lanecounty.org/government/county_departments/lane_county_emergency_management/emergency_alerts

--

UPDATE - 7:30 p.m. - Evacuation downgrade areas corrected

The areas south of Bodenhamer Road and west of Greenhill Road have been downgraded to Level 1 (Be Ready). Level 1 means you should be aware of the danger that exists in your area. Monitor local media outlets and telephones to receive further information. 

The Level 1 evacuation notice has been lifted for areas south of Royal Avenue from Greenhill Road to Fern Ridge Lake.

Map and updates available at www.lanecounty.org/bodenhamer

--

UPDATE - 6 p.m.

There is currently a wildfire in the area south of Bodenhamer Road and west of Greenhill Road. These areas have been upgraded to a Level 3 (Go Now) evacuation notice.

Level 3 means leave immediately! Do NOT take time to gather things. GO NOW!

If you evacuate or are looking for someone who has evacuated, please reunify at Prairie Mountain School, 5305 Royal Avenue, Eugene.

Areas south of Royal Avenue from Greenhill Road to Fern Ridge Lake, have been issued a Level 1 (Be Ready) notice. Level 1 means you should be aware of the danger that exists in your area. Monitor local media outlets and telephones to receive further information. 

Updates available at www.lanecounty.org/bodenhamer

--

There is currently a wildfire in the area south of Bodenhamer Road and west of Greenhill Road. These areas have been issued a Level 2 (Be Set) evacuation notice. 

Level 2 means: you must prepare to leave at a moment’s notice, and this may be the only notice that you receive.   

If you evacuate or are looking for someone who has evacuated, please reunify at Prairie Mountain School, 5305 Royal Avenue, Eugene.


Lane County Technology Services recognized as 2024 Digital Counties Survey winner for second year in a row
Lane Co. Government - 07/16/24 7:30 AM

Lane County Technology Services tied for sixth place in this year’s Digital Counties Survey, rising from ninth in 2023. 

 

Lane County was recognized for its work to create a comprehensive cyber risk assessment, vulnerability scan and response plan for at least four types of threats. Other noteworthy efforts include use of data dashboards to visualize information and trends to help make better decisions about services, increasing broadband access in unserved areas, incorporating a focus on equity in its decision-making, and upgrades to technology that keeps critical information safe.

 

“It’s exciting to be recognized at a national level for our work to use technology to provide important services to community members, create transparency and access when it comes to local government, keep private information safe, and protect our systems against cyber threats,” said Lane County Chief Information Officer Michael Finch. “At the end of the day, technology is one of the most important tools we have to help improve lives across Lane County.”

 

Conducted by the Center for Digital Government (CDG) and the National Association of Counties (NACo), the survey evaluates counties across the nation, recognizing those that demonstrate excellence in the strategic use of technology to address local challenges, increase government efficiency, and enhance citizen engagement. 

 

 

About the Digital Counties Survey

The survey was developed in partnership by NACo and conducted by CDG to identify the best technology practices among counties in the United States. NACo unites counties, serving nearly 40,000 county elected officials to advocate for county government priorities in federal policymaking. CDG is a national research and advisory institute focused on technology policy and best practices in state and local government. 

 

 

###


Oregon Seeks Volunteers for Selective Service Boards (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 07/16/24 6:13 AM
SSS Volunteer Recruiting Poster
SSS Volunteer Recruiting Poster
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/962/173816/thumb_SSS_Volunteer_Recruiting_Poster.PNG

SALEM, Ore. — As global tensions rise and military recruitment faces challenges, the Oregon National Guard is playing a vital role in supporting the Selective Service System, ensuring the state remains prepared for potential national emergencies.

The Selective Service System, an independent agency within the executive branch, is responsible for rapidly providing personnel to the military in a fair and equitable manner if the President and Congress authorize conscription. While the United States has maintained an all-volunteer force for decades, the system remains a crucial component of national defense readiness.

"The Selective Service is a vital pillar in our national defense posture," said Michael Kalberg, Oregon's State Director for the Selective Service System. "Even though it may be overlooked by some, it's an important component of our government."

In Oregon, the Selective Service State Headquarters is located at the Salem Armory on 17th St. The state's mission includes maintaining staffing for local draft boards, preparing to activate a fully operational state headquarters if needed, and supporting the ongoing registration of 18-year-old males.

Lt. Col. Robert Earhart, the Selective Service Reserve Service Member for Oregon, explained the system's role: "Most people are familiar with the draft during World War Two through Vietnam. It's been a volunteer force for the past several decades, so the draft has not been going on. But every state needs to have an apparatus in place in case the President and Congress reinitiate conscription."

The Oregon National Guard provides critical support to the Selective Service mission. This partnership includes sharing facilities, logistical support, and personnel. In addition to occupying space at the Salem Armory, National Guard Armory facilities and administrative equipment would be made available for temporary operations in the event of activation.

"We've had a lot of success in Oregon over the last 50 years, and this office has been functional," Earhart said. "A lot of great people have come through, and a lot of great volunteers helping us along the way."

However, the system faces challenges, particularly in rural areas. Oregon is divided into 18 local boards, with nine single-county boards and nine multi-county boards. As of July 2024, five boards are inoperable due to volunteer board member vacancies across 14 counties.

"We have vacancies quite a few vacancies around the state," Earhart noted. To reach board capacity, "I could probably fill another 30 slots."

These local boards play a crucial role in the Selective Service process. In the event of a draft, board members would review and decide on draftee claims for exemptions, postponements, or deferments from military service.

"It's a big responsibility because you hold someone's future in your hands," Earhart explained. "It's a matter of trust, logic, and an understanding of the story being told to you."

The time commitment for board members is minimal during peacetime — approximately five hours in the first year and two hours annually thereafter. However, their role becomes expanded and critical if a draft is reinstated.

Kalberg emphasized the unique challenges Oregon faces in maintaining the Selective Service System. "Oregon is not a high-visibility military state. We don't have a lot of military footprint [in Oregon]," he said. For that reason, probably in particular, Oregonians have never had a history of high registration compliance when young men turn 18."

Despite these challenges, recent efforts to bolster the system have shown promise. Earhart has been conducting outreach with agency partners, the governor's office, county commissioners, and service organizations like the VFW and American Legion, which has resulted in several new volunteers in the pipeline.

The Selective Service is also adapting to potential changes on the national level. Congress is considering bills that could expand registration requirements, such as the automatic registration of 18-year-old males and including women in the draft. If passed, these changes would significantly increase the workload for local boards.

"If mandated, it'll be an interesting reaction," Kalberg said. "We're not worried about it, but we do need to get the numbers on the paper, get [board members] trained, and get them ready."

As geopolitical pressures mount and military recruiting struggles to meet its quotas, the importance of the Selective Service System has been identified as a backstop for national defense. Dr. Kathleen Hicks, Deputy Secretary of Defense, recently stated, "I don't want people to think the all-volunteer force is sort of alone when the United States must make major decisions. They do not stand alone."

The Oregon National Guard and Selective Service System are actively seeking volunteers to serve on local boards, particularly in rural areas. Interested citizens can apply online at sss.gov/volunteers to "Get Involved." Eligible individuals must be U.S. citizens, at least 18 years old, and willing to undergo training and dedicate time to this crucial role in national preparedness.

"We're looking for dedicated individuals who want to serve their community and country in this important capacity," Earhart said. "It's a unique opportunity to play a vital role in our national defense structure."
 
For more information on volunteering or the Selective Service System in Oregon, you can contact Lt. Col. Robert Earhart, SSS Reserve Service Member, at 503-779-9473 or rearhart@sss.gov.

 

                                                                                     -30-

 

Released Video Interview: https://dvidshub.net/r/9muf7h

 

Released Photo:

240713-Z-ZJ128-1002

Lt. Col. Robert Earhart, Selective Service Reserve Force Officer for Oregon, speaks during an interview on Saturday, July 13, 2024, at the Salem Armory in Salem, Ore. Earhart discussed the Oregon National Guard's support for the Selective Service System and the need for volunteers to serve on local draft boards. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, Oregon National Guard Public Affairs)

 

Included: SSS Volunteer Recruiting Poster

 




Attached Media Files: SSS Volunteer Recruiting Poster , 240713-Z-ZJ128-1002

Mon. 07/15/24
Douglas County Task Force Responds to Falls Fire
Douglas Co. Fire Dist. No.2 - 07/15/24 7:27 PM

On Sunday afternoon 7/14/24 the Oregon State Fire Marshalls office for activated Douglas County for a Conflagration to the Falls Fire near Burns, Oregon. The Task Force includes equipment and personnel from Central Douglas Fire & Rescue, Riddle Fire District, North Douglas Fire and Ems, Tenmile Fire District, and Lookingglass Fire District. The Task Force will be providing structure protection, infrastructure protection, and assisting wildland firefighters.




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/6158/173814/IMG_2070.HEIC

DOGAMI Governing Board to conduct special meeting on July 22
Oregon Dept. of Geology and Mineral Industries - 07/15/24 6:51 PM

PORTLAND, Ore. – The Governing Board of the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) will meet in a special session on Monday, July 22, to review and approve the Agency Request Budget. This public meeting will be conducted via teleconference from 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

The meeting agenda, including call-in information, is available at: https://www.oregon.gov/dogami/about/govboard/boardagenda_7_22_2024.pdf

The DOGAMI Governing Board sets policy, oversees general operations, and adopts a strategic plan every six years. The Board meets at least quarterly. As active members of their communities, Board members provide an important connection between Oregonians and DOGAMI’s mission of providing earth science information and regulation to make Oregon safe and prosperous.

###


7/14/24 - LCSO Case #24-3754 - Deputies arrest suspect after shooting in Veneta area
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/15/24 5:23 PM

UPDATE - 7/15/24:

Lane County Sheriff’s detectives determined the shooting occurred in the 25000 block of Hunter Avenue in Veneta. The victim was then transported to Perkins Peninsula Park by witnesses.

--

On July 14th at about 7:20 p.m., Lane County Sheriff’s deputies responded to Perkins Park Peninsula for a report of a female who had been shot. She was transported to an area hospital with a non-life threatening injury to the arm/shoulder area. 

During the investigation, deputies arrested Timothy Earl Shaw, 33, for Assault in the 1st Degree and Unlawful Use of a Weapon.  Another person contacted, Hannah Fetko, 32, was also arrested on a warrant. Both were lodged at the Lane County Jail without incident. 

Anyone with information about this incident is asked to call the Lane County Sheriff’s Office at 541-682-4141. 


Firefighters Keep Skinner Butte Fire Small (Photo)
Eugene Springfield Fire - 07/15/24 5:23 PM
2024-07/4466/173811/imagejpeg_0.jpeg
2024-07/4466/173811/imagejpeg_0.jpeg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/4466/173811/thumb_imagejpeg_0.jpeg

Eugene, OR.  Eugene Springfield Fire responded to a brush fire at the base of Skinner Butte Monday afternoon. Firefighters were called to a fire behind 139 Shelton McMurphy Blvd at 4:20 PM on July 15th.  A quick response kept the fire to an area of about 20’ x 80’ at the base of the butte, preventing a significant fire.  The cause is under investigation. 




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/4466/173811/imagejpeg_0.jpeg , 2024-07/4466/173811/imagejpeg_1.jpeg

Update - Oregon Department of Human Services announces that Marianna Bahena was found
Oregon Dept. of Human Services - 07/15/24 4:58 PM

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division, is thankful for the community support to find Marianna Bahena. She is a 2-year-old child who was last seen in Portland on July 11. She was found July 15. 

Sometimes when a child is missing they may be in significant danger and ODHS may need to locate them to assess and support their safety. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and assess their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. 


MEDIA ADVISORY: Albany Transportation Facilities Tour and Public Hearing
Benton Co. Government - 07/15/24 3:43 PM

Date and Time: July 16, 2024

Location: Tripp Theater, Takena Hall, Linn-Benton Community College, 6500 Pacific Blvd. SW, Albany, OR 97321

Purpose: The Joint Committee on Transportation's 12-stop Transportation Safety and Sustainability Outreach Tour aims to hear from Oregonians about how the Legislature can ensure Oregon has a safe, functional, and efficient multimodal transportation system now and for years to come. This event will feature transportation topics affecting Linn and Benton Counties. Benton County Commissioner Pat Malone will be attending alongside other local leaders.

Agenda:

  • Field Trip: 
    • 11:30 AM – 1:30 PM: ODOT-Hosted Tour of Albany-Area Transportation Facilities
    • 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM: Roundtable Discussion with Cascades West Area Commission on Transportation, Jurisdictional Leaders, Business Representatives, and Topic Area Experts

Note: Persons wishing to attend either the roundtable or tour should contact Patrick Brennan at 503-986-1674 or ick.h.brennan@oregonlegislature.gov">patrick.h.brennan@oregonlegislature.gov  in advance.

  • Public Hearing:
    • 5:00 PM – 5:10 PM: ODOT Transportation Funding Review
    • 5:10 PM – 7:00 PM: Public Comment

Contact for Additional Information: Patrick Brennan at 503-986-1674 or ick.h.brennan@oregonlegislature.gov">patrick.h.brennan@oregonlegislature.gov

Learn more: State Transportation Package Legislative Listening Tour | Association of Oregon Counties


Fatal Crash - HWY 62 - Klamath County
Oregon State Police - 07/15/24 3:10 PM

Klamath County, Ore. 13 July 24- On Saturday, July 13, 2024, at 7:22 p.m., Oregon State Police responded to a single-vehicle crash on Hwy-62, at the intersection with Sun Mountain Rd (MP 91), in Klamath County.

The preliminary investigation indicated a Ford Expedition, operated by Tina Marie Wickliffe (53) of Chiloquin, was traveling southbound on Sun Mountain Road at a high rate of speed and was unable to stop at the intersection with Hwy-62. The Ford traveled through the intersection and struck the embankment on the opposite side of the highway.

The operator of the Ford (Wickliffe) was not wearing a seatbelt and was declared deceased at the scene.

The highway was impacted for approximately an hour during the on-scene investigation. The primary cause of the crash is believed to be speed.

OSP was assisted by Chiloquin Fire and ODOT.

# # #

About the Oregon State Police
Oregon State Police (OSP) is a multi-disciplined organization that is charged with protecting the people, wildlife, and natural resources in Oregon. OSP enforces traffic laws on the state’s roadways, investigates and solves crime, conducts postmortem examinations and forensic analysis, and provides background checks, and law enforcement data. The agency regulates gaming and enforces fish, wildlife, and natural resource laws. OSP is comprised of more than 1,400 staff members – including troopers, investigators, and professional staff – who provide a full range of policing and public safety services to Oregon and other law enforcement agencies throughout Oregon.


Media Invitation *NOT FOR PUBLICATION OR AIR*
Oregon Health Authority - 07/15/24 3:07 PM

July 15, 2024

Media contact: Amber Shoebridge, 503-931-9586 amber.shoebridge@oha.oregon.gov 

NOT FOR PUBLICATION OR AIR 

Media Invitation

What: Oregon State Hospital Campus Naming Ceremony

When: Tuesday, July 16, 3-4:35 p.m.

Where: Please RSVP for exact location and parking information

Details: In accordance with Executive Order No. 22-25, the Oregon Health Authority is naming the state hospital facility in Salem the Peter Courtney Salem Campus of the Oregon State Hospital in honor of the state senator and his years of service. Attendees will include Governor Tina Kotek; Oregon Health Authority Director Sejal Hathi, M.D., MBA; and Oregon State Hospital Chief Medical Officer and Interim Superintendent Sara Walker, M.D.; as well as friends and family of Senator Courtney.

Senator Courtney served in the Oregon Legislative Assembly, both in the House of Representatives and the Senate, for 38 years, making him the longest-serving legislator in Oregon's history. He served a record 20 years as Senate President, after serving as House Democratic leader.

Senator Courtney was instrumental in the effort to replace the original 1883 Oregon State Hospital with new and refurbished facilities in 2011, including a public memorial to the unclaimed cremated remains of nearly 3,500 Oregonians who had died while patients at the Oregon State Hospital and other institutions in the area.

 

NOT FOR PUBLICATION OR AIR


Oregon Department of Administrative Services Improves Public Records Request Process (Photo)
State of Oregon - 07/15/24 2:54 PM
A screenshot of the new DAS GovQA public records request platform
A screenshot of the new DAS GovQA public records request platform
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/838/173802/thumb_DAS_GovQA.png

Salem, Oregon – The Oregon Department of Administrative Services (DAS) has made it easier for customers to request and receive public records, thanks to modernizing its public records software. 

Effective, July 15, 2024, DAS went live with Granicus GovQA software to efficiently process and manage requests for public records, such as procurement records, public employee data and risk management records.

As the volume of records requests has grown and their complexity increased, DAS looked to GovQA’s cloud-based solution for a secure, highly customizable platform that enhances transparency and tracking to improve customer service. 

The agency’s new records request system is a centralized, secure public records portal that allows requesters to track their public record requests online. An intake form helps refine each request, reducing the need for clarification and delivering improved accuracy. The system also standardizes workflows for agency employees, enhancing efficiency. 

Granicus GovQA is the largest provider of internet hosted service for government compliance with Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests. GovQA handles more FOIA requests for state and local governments across the country, including other government agencies in Oregon. DAS has provided a video tutorial on how to submit a DAS public records request using GovQA.

Visit the new GovQA portal to see the platform live.




Attached Media Files: A screenshot of the new DAS GovQA public records request platform

Episode 10 of the Benton County Public Podcast Now Available Highlighting Mental Health Services (Photo)
Benton Co. Government - 07/15/24 12:59 PM
The Benton County Children and Family Mental Health team pauses for a photo.
The Benton County Children and Family Mental Health team pauses for a photo.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/4171/173800/thumb_12.png

Benton County continues to lead in providing essential mental health services for residents of all ages. Episode 10 of the Benton County Public Podcast features an insightful interview with Barbara Christianson, BSN, RN, PHN, PMH-C, Public Health Nurse Program Manager at the Benton County Health Department. Christianson, who oversees Perinatal, Maternal, Child, & Family Health as well as WIC, Reproductive Health, & Immunization Programs, discusses her role within the County and emphasizes the critical importance of mental health services.

Benton County recently expanded the Benton County Children and Family Mental Health facility, enhancing its ability to serve the community. The new location, 4185 SW Research Way in Corvallis, hosted an open house on May 31. The event included tours of the facility, staff meet-and-greets, a resource fair, and family-friendly activities and prizes.

"The timing is perfect since we just settled into our new space and it’s also Mental Health Awareness Month," said Kristi Reher, Program Manager. "This new, bigger building allows our Children and Family program to enhance our current services by being in a more therapeutic and family-friendly space. It also offers opportunities for expansion, which will allow us to better meet the range of needs for our Benton County youth and families."

Don't miss Episode 10 of the Benton County Public Podcast to learn more about the vital mental health services provided by Benton County and the exciting developments at the Benton County Children and Family Mental Health facility.

###

Benton County is an Equal Opportunity-Affirmative Action employer and does not discriminate on the basis of disability in admission or access to our programs, services, activities, hiring and employment practices. This document is available in alternative formats and languages upon request. Please contact Cory Grogan at 541-745-4468 or pioinfo@bentoncountyor.gov.https://rss.com/podcasts/bentonpublicpodcast




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/4171/173800/BCPP-010.mp3 , The Benton County Children and Family Mental Health team pauses for a photo.

Oregon receiving out of state help to fight numerous wildfires
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 07/15/24 12:45 PM

The Oregon State Fire Marshal and the Oregon Department of Forestry are bringing in out-of-state firefighters and equipment to fight several wildfires impacting communities and resources across the state.

On Sunday night, the Oregon State Fire Marshal mobilized two task forces from Washington to add structural firefighter capacity. The two task forces are from Snohomish, Thurston, and Grays Harbor counties with 29 firefighters, eight engines, and two water tenders. The task forces are assigned to the Falls Fire in Harney County.

"We are bringing in additional support from the Washington fire service for the Falls Fire, the severe drawdown of Oregon resources, and the anticipated weather conditions,” Oregon State Fire Marshal Mariana Ruiz-Temple said. “Our strong relationship with the Washington fire service is invaluable, especially during their responses to Oregon in 2017 and 2020. We have a robust response system that transcends borders and supports our mutual missions. I can't thank the Washington fire service enough for their quick and reliable response to Oregon's needs."

The OSFM works with the Oregon Department of Emergency Management to mobilize these resources through the Emergency Management Assistance Compact, a national interstate mutual aid agreement that allows states to share resources during times of disaster.

The Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) received more than 58 resources from New Mexico, Idaho, Montana, Oklahoma, Texas, Georgia, Colorado, and Florida to assist with the Salt Creek and Larch Creek fires. The agency will receive 13 more firefighters from Florida in the coming days to assist the agency’s Incident Management Team 3 and wildfires.

A total of 71 resources are coming to Oregon through state-to-state mutual aid agreements and the Northwest Compact. The compact was created to facilitate assistance in wildland fire pre-suppression and suppression efforts between member agencies, which include Hawaii, Alaska, Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Montana and the Canadian provinces of Alberta, British Columbia, Saskatchewan, and the Yukon and Northwest Territories.

“These mutual aid agreements help to bolster the complete and coordinated fire system in Oregon by giving us the ability to scale up as needed during peak times in the season” said Chris Cline, ODF protection division chief. “We appreciate our partners for sending us these much-needed resources as we manage several fires across the state.”

By creating a cache of reciprocal resources through mutual aid agreements, Oregon and other agencies can benefit from each other when fire seasons hit hard and resources become strained.

“This isn’t my first time to Oregon. It is always an honor to help our neighbors when they are in need. Oregon has come to help us several times in the past,” Task Force Leader Travis Hots said. “We are no stranger to how Oregon does business and are always impressed with how the Oregon State Fire Marshal treats its firefighters, so we are always glad to come down and offer a helping hand.”

On Friday, the Governor Tina Kotek issued a State of Emergency that allows the two agencies to request additional help from both in- and out-of-state partners.

With hot, dry, and windy conditions coupled with lightning in the forecast, Oregonians should take every precaution to avoid sparking a fire. Learn how to be #WildfireAware here. Look up your local fire restrictions.


Fatal Crash - HWY 211 - Yamhill County
Oregon State Police - 07/15/24 12:27 PM

Yamhill County, Ore. 11 July 24- On Thursday, July 11, 2024, at 9:53 p.m., Oregon State Police responded to a single-vehicle crash on Hwy-221, near milepost 9, in Yamhill County.

The preliminary investigation indicated a northbound Ford Ranger, operated by Zakary Ross Nasby (26) of Newberg, left the northbound travel lane onto the shoulder and overcorrected back across the roadway before leaving the roadway and striking a tree.

The operator of the Ford (Nasby) was declared deceased at the scene. The operator did not appear to be wearing a seatbelt.

The highway was impacted for approximately 3.5 hours during the on-scene investigation. The cause of the crash is under investigation.

OSP was assisted by the Yamhill County Sheriff's Office, Dayton Fire and Rescue, and ODOT.

# # #

About the Oregon State Police
Oregon State Police (OSP) is a multi-disciplined organization that is charged with protecting the people, wildlife, and natural resources in Oregon. OSP enforces traffic laws on the state’s roadways, investigates and solves crime, conducts postmortem examinations and forensic analysis, and provides background checks, and law enforcement data. The agency regulates gaming and enforces fish, wildlife, and natural resource laws. OSP is comprised of more than 1,400 staff members – including troopers, investigators, and professional staff – who provide a full range of policing and public safety services to Oregon and other law enforcement agencies throughout Oregon.

 


Oregon receiving out of state help to fight numerous wildfires
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/15/24 12:09 PM

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon State Fire Marshal and the Oregon Department of Forestry are bringing in out-of-state firefighters and equipment to fight several wildfires impacting communities and resources across the state. 

On Sunday night, the Oregon State Fire Marshal mobilized two task forces from Washington to add structural firefighter capacity. The two task forces are from Snohomish, Thurston, and Grays Harbor counties with 29 firefighters, eight engines, and two water tenders. The task forces are assigned to the Falls Fire in Harney County. 

"We are bringing in additional support from the Washington fire service for the Falls Fire, the severe drawdown of Oregon resources, and the anticipated weather conditions,” Oregon State Fire Marshal Mariana Ruiz-Temple said. “Our strong relationship with the Washington fire service is invaluable, especially during their responses to Oregon in 2017 and 2020. We have a robust response system that transcends borders and supports our mutual missions. I can't thank the Washington fire service enough for their quick and reliable response to Oregon's needs."

The OSFM works with the Oregon Department of Emergency Management to mobilize these resources through the Emergency Management Assistance Compact, a national interstate mutual aid agreement that allows states to share resources during times of disaster.

The Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) has received more than 58 resources from New Mexico, Idaho, Montana, Oklahoma, Texas, Georgia, Colorado, and Florida to assist in the Salt Creek and Larch Creek Fire. The agency will receive 13 more firefighters from Florida in the coming days to assist the agency’s Incident Management Team 3 and other severity efforts. 

A total of 71 resources are coming to Oregon through state-to-state mutual aid agreements and the Northwest Compact. The compact was created to facilitate assistance in wildland fire pre-suppression and suppression efforts between member agencies, which include Hawaii, Alaska, Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Montana and the Canadian provinces of Alberta, British Columbia, Saskatchewan, and the Yukon and Northwest Territories. 

“These mutual aid agreements help to bolster the complete and coordinated fire system in Oregon by giving us the ability to scale up as needed during peak times in the season” said Chris Cline, ODF protection division chief. “We appreciate our partners for sending us these much-needed resources as we manage several fires across the state.”

By creating a cache of reciprocal resources through mutual aid agreements, Oregon and other agencies can benefit from each other when fire seasons hit hard and resources become strained.

“This isn’t my first time to Oregon. It is always an honor to help our neighbors when they are in need. Oregon has come to help us several times in the past,” Task Force Leader Travis Hots said. “We are no stranger to how Oregon does business and are always impressed with how the Oregon State Fire Marshal treats its firefighters, so we are always glad to come down and offer a helping hand.”

On Friday, the Governor Tina Kotek issued a State of Emergency that allows the two agencies to request additional help from both in- and out-of-state partners.

With hot, dry, and windy conditions coupled with lightning in the forecast, Oregonians should take every precaution to avoid sparking a fire. Learn how to be #WildfireAware here. Look up your local fire restrictions at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/fire/pages/restrictions.aspx.




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/1072/173795/Joint_Release-Oregon_receiving_out_of_state_help_to_fight_wildfires_burning_across_the_state.pdf

Western Oregon University professor releases music album about his transformational life (Photo)
Western Oregon University - 07/15/24 10:12 AM
2024-07/1107/173793/Ronnie_Taylor.jpg
2024-07/1107/173793/Ronnie_Taylor.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/1107/173793/thumb_Ronnie_Taylor.jpg

MONMOUTH, Ore.Western Oregon University Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy Ronnie Taylor recently released a music album, That One Black Kid, under the name Dr. PDX.The album is autobiographical and includes music chronicling his decision to become a licensed Occupational Therapist–and how he came to teach the subject to others.

Taylor has been a musician since his teens and this album shares his remarkable journey from high school expulsion to college professor. During his junior year of high school, Taylor was kicked out of school and could not graduate. He eventually became an EMT and subsequently became a paramedic working in Massachusetts and Washington D.C. Later he went back to school at a community college before transferring to George Washington University, where he graduated Summa Cum Laude. He was then admitted to the Occupational Therapy doctorate program at Pacific University, graduating in 2019. Taylor specializes in hand therapy as an Occupational Therapist and last year, he joined the faculty at Western Oregon University as an assistant professor. He will teach the inaugural cohort of the Occupational Therapy doctorate program this fall.

Taylor says that during the pandemic, he found himself helping his kids with their school work at home during the day, and after failing to teach his daughter long division, he pivoted to teach them how to write songs and create music. After watching the movie Hamilton, his daughter Zadie asked if he could write the best hip-hop album of all time. Taylor replied, “I don’t know if I can do that, but I can write the best album I’ve ever written.” Taylor has published two prior albums Lazarus and Life, Love, Epic under the stage name Laz, and he says that his latest release is his best album to date.

Taylor shares that he wants to leave a legacy of his lived experience for his children and grandchildren, as a record of how his life played out from his perspective through this album. 

“I’m excited to begin teaching students this fall as well as sharing my own story through my new album,” says Taylor. “I want to show students–and others that even if they have a challenging start to life it is possible to reach your dreams and make a good life for yourself and your family.”

Taylor has also made many guest appearances, and performances, and is available as a guest speaker. Find him on X @taylor_ronald.

Learn more about Western’s Occupational Therapy Doctorate Program.

 

###

 

About Western Oregon University

Western Oregon University, established in Monmouth in 1856, proudly stands as Oregon’s oldest public university. Hosting around 4,000 students, Western embodies a mid-sized, NCAA Division II institution, with approximately 80% of its students hailing from within the state. Notably, its diverse student body comprises individuals from underrepresented backgrounds, veterans, and non-traditional learners. Western stands as the preferred campus in Oregon for those pursuing an enriching education within a nurturing, student-focused environment, characterized by faculty-led instruction. Where You Belong.


 




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/1107/173793/Ronnie_Taylor.jpg

Summer EBT media event July 17, 2024, interviews and visual opportunities
Oregon Dept. of Human Services - 07/15/24 10:11 AM

In Oregon, 1 in 6 children face hunger. Oregon provides a range of summer meal options to make sure children remain healthy and thrive during summer break when many lose access to free and reduced-price school meals. Summer EBT is a new program that helps bridge the summer hunger gap for children in Oregon.

The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS) and the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) are holding a media availability to discuss the Summer EBT program. Oregon is among 37 states, all five U.S. territories, and two Tribes that have committed to making Summer EBT available to children and families this summer. This initiative is backed by a decade of demonstration projects and rigorous evaluation, showing that it effectively reduces child hunger and supports healthier diets—including increased consumption of whole grains, dairy, fruits, and vegetables, and decreased consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages.

So far, more than 320,000 children in Oregon received Summer EBT benefits, totaling $38.5+ million. Another 30,000 children may be eligible for Summer EBT if their families apply before Sept. 2, 2024.

Representatives from ODHS, ODE, the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service, the Boys and Girls Clubs of Salem, Marion, and Polk counties and the Oregon Food Bank will speak to raise awareness about Summer EBT. Topics include hunger in Oregon, how to apply for Summer EBT and how enrollment works, and important deadlines for families. 

Sue Bloom, CEO of the Boys and Girls Clubs of Salem, Marion, and Polk Counties, will host the event. The Clubs also offer summer meals on location.

Details:

  • When: 11 a.m. Wednesday, July 17, 2024
  • What: Summer EBT program overview
  • WhereEpping Homestead Branch of the Boys and Girls Clubs of Salem, Marion and Polk counties. 3805 Lancaster Drive NE, Salem, 97305
  • Visuals: Children at the Boys and Girls Clubs of Salem, Marion and Polk Counties, interviews with representatives.

List of speakers

  • Jesus Mendoza, Jr., USDA FNS Western Region Administrator
  • Fariborz Pakseresht, ODHS Director (he, him)
  • Dr. Charlene Williams, ODE Director (she, her)
  • Sue Bloom, CEO, Boys and Girls Clubs of Salem, Marion and Polk Counties
  • Sammi Teo, Public Policy Advocate, Oregon Food Bank (she, her)

Please RSVP


Volunteers sought to advise on forest practices
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/15/24 9:57 AM

Salem, Ore—The Oregon Department of Forestry’s Regional Forest Practices Committees (RFPCs) are looking for new members.  The RFPCs play a key role in advising the Board of Forestry on current forestry issues and forest management approaches.

“Ideal candidates are forest landowners or have experience in forest operations, care deeply about our forests, and have a desire to work together to ensure forests serve the needs of all Oregonians,” said Don Everingham, ODF’s Northwest Area Director and non-voting coordinator of the RFPCs.

There are three regional committees: Eastern, Southwest and Northwest.  There are vacancies on all three committees.  The committees meet typically three times a year, but the frequency is determined by the committee chairpersons.  Although meeting in person is preferred there is also typically a virtual option for attendance.  These are volunteer positions with no compensation other than travel expenses.

The committees are looking for diverse viewpoints and candidates from communities that are not often represented.

“If you have an interest, then I encourage you to apply,” said Everingham.  “Other than the requirement to have a majority of members be forest landowners, the committees have flexibility to pick and confirm new members.”

For more information contact your local district forester, see the RFPCs webpage, or for written background information and an application packet email: egorio@odf.oregon.gov">emily.l.gregorio@odf.oregon.gov

The deadline for committee applications is July 31.


7/12/24 - LCSO Case #24-3690 - Lane County Sheriff's K9 Ripp catches suspect wanted by U.S. Marshals (Photo)
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/15/24 8:33 AM
2024-07/6111/173789/Ripp_with_Badge.png
2024-07/6111/173789/Ripp_with_Badge.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/6111/173789/thumb_Ripp_with_Badge.png

Early in the morning on July 12th, a Lane County Sheriff’s deputy following up on a theft case learned that a wanted person, Kirbie Lynne Hulsey, 40, was at a residence in the 24600 block of Demming Ridge Road. Hulsey had a federal warrant for her arrest from the U.S. Marshals Service.

After deputies arrived, Hulsey fled into the woods behind the property. Additional deputies responded with a drone and K9 Ripp. With Ripp’s assistance, deputies located Hulsey hiding in thick brush and arrested her without further incident. 




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/6111/173789/Ripp_with_Badge.png

Sweet Home Fire utilizes Life Flight 2 times in one day. (Photo)
Sweet Home Fire Dist. - 07/15/24 12:49 AM
2024-07/5505/173785/lfsunnyside.jpeg
2024-07/5505/173785/lfsunnyside.jpeg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/5505/173785/thumb_lfsunnyside.jpeg

Sweet Home Fire District has a busy day with technical rescues and a motorcycle wreck. Two patients were transported to local hospitals by Life Flight and a third by ambulance to another local hospital. 

A Sweet Home Medic unit responded to approximately milepost 34 of Quartzville Rd. at approximately 1243, for a reported motorcycle wreck involving one male patient. The Medic crew arrived on scene and activated Life Flight due to the severity of the patients injuries. Life Flight landed at Sunnyside Park where the medic crew met them and transferred patient care. Sweet Home Fire was assisted on scene by Linn County deputies.

At approximately 1715 hours, a Sweet Home Medic unit was dispatched to the Upper Calapooia river for a male patient who had jumped off a rock and broke his leg. The medic crew arrived on scene to find the patient was a quarter mile down a trail and laying in the water. With assistance from Linn County deputies, Linn County SAR, and Lane County SAR the patient was packaged in a stokes and a rope system was utilized to lift the patient to the trail. 

At 2059 hours Sweet Home Fire was dispatched to McDowell Creek Falls for a report of a female patient who had fallen and possibly broken her wrist and knee. Medics arrived on scene and hiked the trail finding the patient had fallen 75-80 off of a water fall. Due to the severity of this patients injuries the medic utilized Life Flight for the fastest transport to a local hospital. The patient was found in the water at the base of the waterfall. With assistance from Linn County deputies, Linn County SAR, and Lebanon Fire District, crews utilized rope systems, and a stokes basket to get the patient to the trail. 

Sweet Home Fire would like to thank our partners from the Linn County Sheriff's Office, Life Flight, Lebanon Fire District, and Lane County SAR for their assistance. The teamwork used to safely and efficiently treat these patients was outstanding.

 




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/5505/173785/lfsunnyside.jpeg , 2024-07/5505/173785/image1.jpeg , 2024-07/5505/173785/image0_(2).jpeg , 2024-07/5505/173785/image0_(1).jpeg

Sun. 07/14/24
Lebanon Fire District Hosted 6th Annual Linn County Young Women's Fire Academy (Photo)
Lebanon Fire District - 07/14/24 10:19 PM
2024-07/1191/173784/6E5A0161-CF8B-4E8C-A4B9-4E7B24B187A7.JPG
2024-07/1191/173784/6E5A0161-CF8B-4E8C-A4B9-4E7B24B187A7.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/1191/173784/thumb_6E5A0161-CF8B-4E8C-A4B9-4E7B24B187A7.JPG

This past weekend, the Lebanon Fire District proudly hosted the 6th annual Linn County Young Women’s Fire Academy. The event aimed to inspire young women aged 14 to 19 to explore careers in firefighting by providing them with firsthand experience in the responsibilities of firefighters.

Led by a dedicated team of 26 women firefighters from across Oregon, including one from Washington, the academy provided a supportive environment for participants to tackle challenging tasks. Highlights included scaling a towering 108-foot ladder truck and engaging in other hands-on activities.

Since its start in 2018, approximately 135 young women have participated in the academy, with many going on to pursue roles as volunteer and intern firefighters. Notably, two former participants have secured full-time positions within the Lebanon Fire District and now serve as instructors.

"Our goal with this academy is to show young women that firefighting is a rewarding and achievable career choice," stated Chief Joseph Rodondi.

Throughout the weekend, participants received training in essential firefighting skills such as operating fire hoses, ladder placement, vehicle extrication, rappelling techniques, SCBA usage, search and rescue procedures, and extinguishing car fires. Emphasis was also placed on teamwork, overcoming challenges, and building self-confidence.

Academy participant Sierra Nunes, 14, shared her excitement: "If I can do it, anyone can. I can't wait to come back next year!" This was Sierra's first camp, and she encourages other young women to participate in this academy to gain firsthand experience in firefighting.

The Linn County Young Women’s Fire Academy reflects the Lebanon Fire District’s commitment to supporting and encouraging young women interested in firefighting careers.

For more information about the academy, please visit www.lebanonfireoregon.gov, www.facebook.com/LCYWFA, or contact info@lebanonfireoregon.gov.




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/1191/173784/6E5A0161-CF8B-4E8C-A4B9-4E7B24B187A7.JPG , 2024-07/1191/173784/7D0C6FB0-0EA4-42E7-B8BA-91FAB1313137.JPG , 2024-07/1191/173784/53AAFCD4-9D1A-472B-A58B-EB5ED47EB401.JPG , Academy participant Sierra Nunes, 14 , 2024-07/1191/173784/3DF24907-7079-47F5-AC1A-CD564FCA25FE.JPG , 2024-07/1191/173784/4EF18FE0-5448-4B05-8590-6EA8701F8559.JPG , 2024-07/1191/173784/DA43236B-F3AE-4737-A6D6-F24165EFF0BA.JPG , 2024-07/1191/173784/D5D3A506-B88A-4371-A13A-511C3B0EE5B4.JPG , 2024-07/1191/173784/3B70D900-0CC6-48E2-B6E5-88096D3D7A4E.JPG , 2024-07/1191/173784/D26FFD28-4AC4-4534-BFFF-8D673927EDEF.JPG , 2024-07/1191/173784/C4430422-D737-424E-AED4-2C39E701E51A.JPG , 2024-07/1191/173784/A6091BD8-77C9-4BD8-863A-162FFD7DEE9A.JPG , 2024-07/1191/173784/78E47CF2-BEAD-4517-A841-9190B29422C6.JPG , Group Photo

Firefighters Contain West Eugene House Fire (Photo)
Eugene Springfield Fire - 07/14/24 8:55 PM
2024-07/4466/173783/IMG_2554.jpeg
2024-07/4466/173783/IMG_2554.jpeg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/4466/173783/thumb_IMG_2554.jpeg

Eugene, OR.  Eugene Springfield Fire responded to a house fire in West Eugene Sunday evening.  Firefighters were called to a house fire in the 1500 block of W 2nd Ave at 7:10 PM on July 14th.  Callers reported that 5 occupants made it out of the home safely with their pets prior to the arrival of fire crews.  Firefighters arrived to find smoke coming from the home. Upon entry, firefighters searched for remaining occupants and located the fire in a a bedroom.  Firefighters kept the fire contained to the room of origin.  There were no injuries and the cause is under investigation. 




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/4466/173783/IMG_2554.jpeg , 2024-07/4466/173783/IMG_2556.jpeg

OSFM sending firefighters, incident management team to Falls Fire in Harney County
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 07/14/24 12:38 PM

SALEM, Ore. - The Oregon State Fire Marshal is sending its Blue Incident Management Team and four task forces to the Falls Fire burning 20 miles northeast of Riley in Harney County. 

Hot, dry, and windy conditions caused the fire to grow rapidly on Saturday, pushing it to 55,000 acres with zero percent containment. 

“Within the last week, we mobilized three incident management teams to fires across Oregon. This highlights the substantial fire danger we are seeing,” Oregon State Fire Marshal Mariana Ruiz-Temple said. “With dry lightning expected to hit east of the Cascades on Sunday, I can’t stress enough the importance of taking action to prevent sparking another wildfire.”

The Grant and Harney County sheriffs' offices have evacuation orders in place. A map of Harney County evacuations can be found here. Grant County evacuations can be found here.

A Red Flag Warning remains in effect for Sunday with temperatures in the mid-90s and very low relative humidity. Afternoon thunderstorms are predicted for the area that may produce gusty outflow winds reaching 20-25 mph. Little to no precipitation is expected from these isolated thunderstorms.

For fire information, please follow the Falls Fire Facebook Page or the Falls Fire InciWeb page.


OSFM sends task force to Lone Rock Fire through Immediate Response
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 07/14/24 8:10 AM

The Oregon State Fire Marshal is mobilizing resources to assist locals battling the Lone Rock Fire in Gilliam County.  A task force from Linn County and a division supervisor were mobilized early this morning. The fire sparked Saturday afternoon and burned about 4,200 acres by evening. The Gilliam County Sheriff has Level 2 (Be Set) evacuation notices in place for the community of Lone Rock.  

For evacuation information, follow the Gilliam County Sheriff. 

This task force is an added resource for the local fire agencies that responded to protect the community of Lone Rock and the region. Firefighters from Gilliam County, the Oregon Department of Forestry, and the Prineville Bureau of Land Management have been fighting the fire since it sparked. 

“We are seeing critical fire danger across the state. It’s urgent, now more than ever, to take this threat seriously. I am calling on all Oregonians and visitors to be aware of the dry conditions and help us by preventing any new fire starts,” Oregon State Fire Marshal Mariana Ruiz-Temple said. “The weather predicted through the next week is extremely concerning, not only with these new starts but with lightning in the forecast. Our resources will continue to be challenged. These fires and the forecast add strain to the system.” 

The OSFM is constantly assessing needs across the state and will proactively respond as needed. 

In these dry conditions, a single spark can cause a lot of damage. Learn how you can prevent wildfires by visiting the Oregon State Fire Marshal’s wildfire prevention page. 

About Immediate Response 

Immediate Response is made possible through the OSFM’s Response Ready Oregon program created through Oregon’s wildfire omnibus bill, Senate Bill 762, signed into law in 2021.