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Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Weekday Update - June 23, 2021
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Our local COVID-19 updates represent the coordinated effort of the agencies that make up the DCCRT

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – June 23, 2021

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - WEEKDAY UPDATE

 

(Douglas County, Ore.) DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 UPDATE FOR WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, 2021

As of 12:00 pm today, Wednesday, June 23, 2021, there are ELEVEN (11) people with new positive test results to report since our noon update yesterday.  The total number of cases of people with positive test results and presumptives in Douglas County is now at 3,910. Currently, there are SIXTEEN (16) Douglas County COVID-19 patients that are being hospitalized, eight locally and seven out-of-the-area. Our Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, under the direction of the Douglas County Board of Commissioners, continue to devote all resources available to our local COVID response.

 

 

Douglas County, OR - COVID-19 - Case Update Chart

Date

Friday,

June 18, 2021

Saturday/Sunday

June 19&20, 2021

Monday

June 21, 2021

Tuesday

June 22, 2021

Today, Wednesday,

June 23, 2021

Total COVID-19 Cases

3,867

3,883

3,890†

3,899

3,910

People w/ Positive PCR or Antigen Test Results

3,686

3,700

3,707

3,714

3,725

Presumptive

181

183

183

185

185

Total Currently Hospitalized

11

13

15

15

15

Total Currently in Isolation

154

152

155

126

125

Total COVID-19 Related Deaths

83

84

84

84

84

Our daily update includes the total number of cases in Douglas County, which combines people with positive test results and presumptives, as well as a breakout of those case numbers. There will be times when a presumptive will move to a positive test result, and our total case number will not change because the case has already been counted. Please note that we have retracted ONE (1) positive case number from our totals from Monday, June 21, 2021. After investigation, we determined that one person with a positive test result is not a Douglas County resident and therefor, the case has been moved to their respective County. 

 

URGENT - WEATHER MESSAGE - EXCESSIVE HEAT WATCH

Shared from the National Weather Service and CDC.  The Douglas County Board of Commissioners, your Local Health Administrators, along with Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, our Douglas County Public Health Officer, and Douglas Public Health Network would like to share an urgent message from the National Weather Service about the Excessive Heat Watch notice released this morning and encourage you to stay safe this weekend.  The National Weather Service issued an Excessive Heat Watch beginning in the afternoon on Friday, June 25, 2021, and running through Tuesday, June 29, 2021. The Excessive Heat Watch is expected to affect all areas of Siskiyou and Modoc Counties in California, as well as the following counties in Oregon: Douglas, Curry, Josephine, Jackson, Klamath and Lake Counties.  They are expecting dangerously hot conditions with daytime temperatures up to 110°F possible West of the Cascades, and 100°F East of the Cascades.  They are also expecting higher than normal overnight conditions with overnight low temperatures expected as high as 75°F.  The extreme heat will significantly increase the potential for heat related illnesses, particularly for those working or participating in outdoor activities.  The high daytime temperatures combined with warm overnight lows will result in high heat risk, heat-related stress and heat-related illnesses. It is likely that daily high temperature records will be broken, with a chance that we might break the all-time June high temperature record. 

 

Extreme Heat Precautionary & Preparedness Tips:

  • Stay Informed: Monitor the latest forecasts and warnings for updates on this situation. National Weather Service
  • Learn: Know how to prevent, recognize and treat heat-related illnesses. CDC – Extreme Heat Information
  • Stay Hydrated.  Drink plenty of fluids, especially water.  Drink more water than usual, don’t wait until you are thirsty.
  • Be Smart: Try to avoid long periods on time in the direct sun, and try to get all outside activities, errands and shopping done in the morning hours when it’s not so hot.
  • Stay Cool: Try to stay cool and opt for an air-conditioned location whenever possible.
  • Dress Light: Wear light, loose fitting clothing.
  • Cool Down: If you feel like you are overheating take a cool shower or bath.
  • Eat Light: Try to avoid hot foods and heavy meals.
  • Take Breaks: If working or participating in outdoor activities, make sure to take frequent breaks out of the sun to rehydrate.
  • Checkup: Make sure to check up on relatives, neighbors, livestock and pets.
  • Stay Safe: Reminder young children and pets should never be left unattended in vehicles under any circumstances. This is especially true during warm or hot weather when car interiors can reach lethal temperatures in a matter of minutes.
  • Protect your Skin and Eyes: Use sunscreen with at least an SPF 15+ when going outside.  Think about wearing a hat to protect your head and sunglasses to protect your eyes.
  • Please, stay cool, stay hydrated and stay informed!

 

 

LOCAL CONTACTS AND CASES BEING SUPPORTED IN ISOLATION AND QUARANTINE

Currently, DPHN is supporting 126 cases in isolation, as well as another 170 contacts in quarantine in Douglas County. Isolation is recommended for confirmed and presumptive cases, quarantine is recommended for contacts of confirmed or presumptive cases.  Currently, staff is supporting a total of 296 total contacts and cases in isolation or quarantine.  This number represents a snapshot of the significant amount of work being done locally to help control the spread of COVID.

 

DOUGLAS COUNTY TIGER TEAM HOSTS FREE POP-UP COVID-19 VACCINATION CLINICS

The Douglas County Tiger Team continues to bring free COVID-19 vaccines directly to rural areas via our mobile medical vans (MMV) via their pop up vaccine clinics.  They are visiting businesses, farms, fire stations and other locations in our smaller remote communities in Douglas County. The Douglas County Board of Commissioners, who have led the charge for our Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team efforts since the beginning, have coordinated with DPHN to organize our local Tiger Team to manage our vaccine outreach efforts through ‘pop-up’ vaccine clinics.

 

The Douglas County Tiger Team will be hosting FREE POP UP COVID VACCINE CLINICS at the locations listed below.  The clinics are currently open to anyone 18 years of age and older, and preregistration is not necessary:

 

  • Wednesday, June 23, 2021: Tenmile and surrounding area. Clinic will be at the Tenmile Fire Department at 158 Reston Road in Roseburg from 1:00 am to 4:00 pm.

 

Look for the Douglas County Tiger Team at local events and festivals, like Music on the Half, which begins on Tuesday, July 6, 2021.  Our Tiger Team coordinates with Umpqua Valley Ambulance to bring a certified vaccinator and a medical assistant to each clinic.  If you are interested in having the Douglas County Tiger Team come to your business, fire department, farm or town to provide a pop-up vaccine clinic or if you have any questions about our Douglas County Tiger Teams and want a schedule of their upcoming pop-up vaccination clinics, please call (541) 670-3110 or our local COVID-19 Hotline at (541) 464-6550Click here for the calendar listing of the upcoming Tiger Team Pop Up Vaccine Clinics

 

FREE DRIVE-THROUGH COVID-19 VACCINATION EVENT SATURDAY, JUNE 26 AT THE DOUGLAS COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS

Douglas Public Health Network (DPHN), Douglas County Board of Commissioners, and Aviva Health are collaborating again to host the next mass drive-through COVID-19 vaccination event on Saturday, June 26, 2021, from 9:00 am to 1:00 pm at the Douglas County Fairgrounds.

 

We are planning to utilize the Pfizer (two dose) and the J&J (single dose) vaccines at this event.  Eligibility for this event includes:

1) ALL residents of Douglas County ages 12 years old and older.

2) Second doses of the Pfizer vaccine to those residents who received their first dose at one of our drive through COVID-19 vaccination events.

 

Residents DO NOT need to pre-register or schedule an appointment for this event.  If you have questions please contact the phone numbers provided below:

  • Call (541) 464-6500.
  • If you need help in Spanish, you can call and leave a message on our Spanish Help Line at (541) 671-1355.
  • Please do not call, contact or go to the Douglas County Fairgrounds to ask about the vaccination event.
  • For those residents that received their first dose of the Pfizer vaccine at one of our other drive-through events, you can just show up at this event.

 

Pre-registration is not required, just show up and get your vaccine.  All residents ages 12 and over are eligible! #itsyourturn; #itsfreeitseasy; #C19Vaccine.  For those ages 12 to 14, it is required that a parent or guardian accompany you and give written consent for the vaccine.

AVIVA HAS A DEDICATED FREE COVID-19 VACCINATION CLINIC SITE IN ROSEBURG 

Shared from Aviva Health.  Aviva Health opened a dedicated COVID-19 vaccination clinic site at 4221 NE Stephens Street, Suite 101 in Roseburg, just across the street from its main Roseburg Clinic location near Costco.  The new COVID-19 Vaccination Clinic opened Wednesday, May 18, 2021, and offers free COVID-19 vaccines by appointment.   The new COVID-19 vaccination clinic will be open Monday through Friday, from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm and is open for residents ages 12 and older.  To schedule an appointment during the week please call (541) 672-9596.

 

As a reminder: Parental or guardian consent is required to vaccinate residents 12 to 14 years old.  Written consent can be obtained in advance.  Under Oregon law, minors 15 years of age and older may consent to medical treatment, including vaccinations, when provided by a physician, physician assistant, naturopath, nurse practitioner, dentist or optometrist, or other professionals operating under the license of these providers; however, families are encouraged to make decisions about vaccinations together.

 

COVID-19 VACCINE ELIGIBILITY OPEN FOR EVERYONE 12 YEARS OLD AND OLDER

According to the CDC, State of Oregon and OHA, ALL residents ages 12 years old and older are eligible to get the COVID-19 Vaccine.  As of May 13, 2021, the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine has been approved for people ages 12 to 15, joining those 16 and above who are already eligible.  The good news, according to Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, our Douglas County Public Health Officer, is that we have plenty of vaccine and will be giving to anyone 12 and above who wants it. Remember, “it’s your turn!” So, locate a vaccine location near you, get signed up and show up to get your COVID-19 vaccine today!

 




  1. Attached Media Files: DCCRT
Coos Bay Man Sentenced to 30 Years in Federal Prison for Sexually Exploiting a 3-Year-Old Child
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 06/23/21 11:54 AM

EUGENE, Ore.—A Coos Bay, Oregon man was sentenced to federal prison today for producing sexually explicit images and videos of a 3-year-old child.

Keith James Atherton, 33, was sentenced to 30 years in federal prison followed by a life term of supervised release.

According to court documents, on July 13, 2018, an undercover agent from Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) viewed child sexual abuse material streamed on a video chat website. Less than 24 hours later, Atherton was identified as the perpetrator, located, and taken into federal custody. Further investigation revealed that Atherton had produced several sexually explicit images and videos involving a 3-year-old child. Investigators seized more than 10 digital devices from Atherton, containing at least 35,000 images and 8,000 videos depicting the sexual abuse of infants, toddlers, and young children.

On July 18, 2018, a federal grand jury in Eugene returned a three-count indictment charging Atherton with using or attempting to use a minor to produce a visual depiction of sexually explicit conduct and possession and distribution of child pornography. On February 24, 2021, Atherton pleaded guilty to using or attempting to use a minor to produce a visual depiction of sexually explicit conduct.

Acting U.S. Attorney Scott Erik Asphaug of the District of Oregon made the announcement.

This case was investigated by Homeland Security Investigations with assistance from the Coos Bay Police Department, the Coos County Sheriff’s Office and the Oregon State Police. Assistant U.S. Attorney Jeffrey S. Sweet prosecuted the case with assistance from the Coos County District Attorney’s Office.

Anyone who has information about the physical or online exploitation of children are encouraged to contact HSI at (866) 347-2423 or submit a tip online at www.ice.gov/tips.

Federal law defines child pornography as any visual depiction of sexually explicit conduct involving a minor. It is important to remember child sexual abuse material depicts actual crimes being committed against children. Not only do these images and videos document the victims’ exploitation and abuse, but when shared across the internet, re-victimize and re-traumatize the child victims each time their abuse is viewed. To learn more, please visit the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children at www.missingkids.org.

This case was brought as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse. For more information about Project Safe Childhood, please visit www.justice.gov/psc.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Rural Oregon's services and utilities -- water, electric, fire protection, public safety, health and more -- could lose funding, hurting already disadvantaged populations
Publix Northwest PR-PA - 06/23/21 10:47 AM

Oregon’s legislature needs to act fast to restore and protect vital services if the ARPA allocation isn’t secured and soon

For Immediate Release: June 23, 2021

CONTACT: Frank Stratton, Executive Director, Special Districts Association of Oregon, 503-881-1895; Jennifer Quisenberry, SDAO, 503.798.9245

(Salem, Ore.) – Promised funding for Oregon’s rural special districts is fast fading if the 2021 Oregon legislature – in its remaining THREE days – doesn’t commit allocations from the state’s share of federal ARPA funds. The American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) is expected to provide Oregon with approximately $2.6 billion in discretionary federal recovery funds for state needs.

Rural districts have banded together to ask for a five percent allocation of the total $2.6 billion available throughout the state, amounting to a one-time $130 million allotment.

“We have been asking for the Governor to make an equity decision, because these needed funds will go to districts serving rural and mostly disadvantaged populations,” said Frank Stratton, executive director of the Special Districts Association of Oregon. “Nearly every Oregonian relies in some degree on special districts for their critical local infrastructure and essential services related to water, sanitation, fire protection, emergency medical services, transportation, soil and water conservation, parks, libraries, and more. Which districts will we have to say ‘no’ to?”

Data from the Special Districts Association of Oregon show these special districts have forecasted $562.3 million in impact throughout this year due to the pandemic. More than half will reduce essential services and one third will reduce their frontline workforce should funding not be allocated.

Stratton adds, “These districts are especially critical in our disadvantaged rural communities, many of which rely almost entirely on special districts for their basic municipal services.  During this time, many districts have issued moratoriums on shutting off water, wastewater, sanitation and other utility services. Recreation/park districts and library districts, which operate largely on programmatic fees and rental charges, have been forced to close their doors. Soil and water conservation districts are unable to perform contract work. First responders and front-line public servants with fire protection districts, healthcare districts, and county service districts providing police protection faced increased risks with limited personal protective equipment.”

Rural service leaders anticipate impacts from the lack of allocation could create substantial inequities. Examples of impact in special districts include but are not limited to:

  • Curry County is home to 38 special districts currently set to receive $0 in ARPA funds.

  • Statewide, port districts have each averaged a 20 percent hit to their annual operating budgets.

  • The Port of Astoria has been hit especially hard by the COVID-19 pandemic, with an estimated revenue loss as of Jan 31, 2021 standing at $1.376 million, an 18 percent reduction from the previous year.

  • Oak Lodge Water Services District and the community it serves have been hit especially hard by the COVID-19 pandemic. In one year, the number of accounts that became delinquent (over 45 days past due) increased by 23.5%. The average balance for these accounts continues to increase each month, currently over $500 on average per account.

  • Nehalem Bay Fire and Rescue District estimates the current financial impact is about $300,000, more than 20 percent of its annual budget.

  • The White River Health District has been unable to fully provide the care many of its patients required. The financial losses incurred total approximately $154,000. For a significant period of time, the district has only been able to employ one doctor, one day a week.

  • Sunset Empire Recreation District, which provides childcare and other community benefit services, estimates ‘significant loss’ at $750,000, service disruptions and scores of layoffs.

 

“The distributive process in Oregon has already been developed,” says Stratton. He notes the districts can receive the allocated funds through Oregon’s State Fiscal Recovery funding, which processes through the state’s Department of Administrative Services. “We encourage the Governor to use this process.”

                                                                                          # #  #


Oregon Community Foundation Awards More Than $1 Million for Summer, Programs for Parents and Their Young Children (Birth to Age 5) (Photo)
Oregon Community Foundation - 06/23/21 9:00 AM
Impact Northwest Photo_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation
Impact Northwest Photo_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/6858/146071/thumb_Impact_Northwest_Photo_Courtesy_of_Oregon_Community_Foundation.JPG

Oregon Community Foundation Awards More Than $1 Million for Summer

Programs for Parents and Their Young Children (Birth to Age 5)

Portland, OR – Wednesday, June 23, 2021 – Oregon Community Foundation (OCF) announced today that it has approved 43 grants totaling $1.1 million to support organizations throughout Oregon offering group-based summer learning and fun, enriching activities for parents and their young children (birth to age 5), with an emphasis on programs reaching families and communities disproportionately impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

“OCF has invested in programs for young children and their families for more than two decades, knowing that experiences in the early years are critically important for children’s healthy development,” said Mary Louise McClintock, Senior Education Strategy and Policy Advisor, Oregon Community Foundation. “We’re thrilled to partner with the State of Oregon to make resources available in communities all over the state for activities and classes that bring families together after months of stress and isolation. This funding supports parents in their role as their child’s first and most important teacher, providing play and learning opportunities that build healthy young brains.”

Since late April, OCF has been administering $40 million in state-funded grants for community organizations to provide summer enrichment activities.

“Nurturely’s new Babywearing y Bailando program is a free community dance class by and for the Latinx community for parents and babies. It provides critical social support for expectant and new parents after a very isolating year” said Emily Little, PhD, Executive Director of Nurturely. “This program offers time in nature, healthy movement, and safe infant carrying practices, all evidence-based strategies to prevent postpartum depression and promote bonding with baby. We’re so grateful to Oregon Community Foundation.”

Following is a snapshot of just a few of the community-based organizations that OCF is supporting through its state-funded Early Childhood Summer Support grant program:

Greater St. Helens Aquatic District $10,000 [Photo Attached]

to support free Parent/TOT swim lessons for children ages 3 months to 3 years and their families.

“Oregon Community Foundation’s support of the Eisenschmidt Pool means we’ll be able to offer daily Parent/TOT swimming classes, throughout the summer,” said Anne Collson, Finance Manager, Greater St. Helens Aquatic District. “Staff will train and provide water safety knowledge to parents/tots in a fun, safe water environment at no cost to our community members.”

Impact NW $46,000 [Photo Attached]

to support interactive programming and group activities for children 0-5 and their families through the Healthy Families, Parent Child Development Services, and Safe & Together programs in the Portland area.

Nurturely $30,000 [Photo Attached]

to support Babywearing y Bailando, a 2-day/week outdoor parent-infant bonding program created by and for Latinx families in Lane County.

Salem Islamic Center $30,000

to support summer parent-child workshops for children K-5 and their families.

“Over the past years at Salem Islamic Center, families have struggled to find summer learning activities for their children,” said Nagia Elzaidi, Educational Director, Salem Islamic Center. “With Oregon Community Foundation’s support, we can now offer parent-child playgroups to help children birth to age 5 develop self-esteem and a positive attitude towards learning. This is an opportunity for children and families to connect, socialize and be in community once again.” 

The Family Nurturing Center $43,000

for weekly summer Parent-Baby groups for parents and their children 0-3 in Jackson and Josephine counties.

About Oregon’s Summer Learning and Child Care Package for Kids

The State of Oregon has invested in summer learning programs to support children and families over summer months, in the critical time between the end of this school year and the beginning of the next.

More information about summer academic and enrichment program grants can be found in OCF’s online Press Room.

About Oregon Community Foundation

Oregon Community Foundation puts donated money to work in Oregon — more than $100 million in grants and scholarships annually. Since 1973, OCF grantmaking, research, advocacy and community-advised solutions have helped individuals, families, businesses, and organizations create charitable funds to improve lives for all Oregonians. Impactful giving — time, talent, and resources from many generous Oregonians — creates measurable change. Throughout 2020, OCF responded quickly and urgently — distributing a record-setting $220 million in charitable dollars to more than 3,000 nonprofits throughout Oregon working to address urgent needs, stabilize communities and prepare for long-term recovery in Oregon. OCF donors responded to the magnitude of need, as reflected in a 44% increase in donor advised fund grantmaking from the previous year. For more information, please visit: oregoncf.org.

###

EDITOR NOTES:

> Please find complete list of grantees attached: By Region Early Childhood Summer Support Approved Grant List - 6.17

> Mary Louise McClintock, Senior Education Strategy and Policy Advisor, Oregon Community Foundation, is available for interview. Interested media should email: mlmcclintock@oregoncf.org and mkenney@oregoncf.org.




Attached Media Files: By Region Early Childhood Summer Support Approved Grant List - 6.17 , OCF State-Funded Early Childhood Grants_FINAL News Release_06 23 2021 , Impact Northwest Photo_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation , St. Helens Aquatic District Photo_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation , Nurturely Photo_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation

June 23, 2021 Housing Stability Council Awards Funding for Nearly 2,000 Affordable Homes
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 06/23/21 9:00 AM

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

June 23, 2021

 

CONTACT:

Connor McDonnell 

Oregon Housing and Community Services

503 986-2051  

equests@oregon.gov" target="_blank">HCS.MediaRequests@oregon.gov  

 

Housing Stability Council Awards Funding for Nearly 2,000 Affordable Homes

Record number of projects approved for affordable development across Oregon

SALEM, OR – Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS) announces a record number of funding has been awarded at the June Housing Stability Council meeting including the latest round of Local Innovation and Fast Track (LIFT) and Permanent Supportive Housing (PSH) Program funding.

“This funding could not have come at a better time,” said Oregon Housing and Community Services Director, Margaret Salazar. “As our state turns toward economic recovery from COVID and wildfires, we know that housing is a critical part of our infrastructure. Housing is a basic human need and I am grateful to Governor Kate Brown and the legislature for these resources. Going forward, thousands of Oregon families will have a safe, dry, and affordable place to call home.”

Earlier this month the Oregon Housing Stability Council, which reviews and sets policy for the development and financing of affordable housing, approved a variety of housing resources focused on communities throughout the state. These awards come at a time when OHCS has received a record amount of funding for the prevention of homelessness and housing instability in Oregon. These awards will add needed affordable housing supply across Oregon.

LIFT Rental Awards

Since the launch in 2016, the LIFT program has helped thousands of underserved Oregonians attain keys in their pockets and a roof over their heads. The program focuses on serving historically underserved Oregonians, including communities of color in both urban and rural communities. The Housing Stability Council approved all 12 recommended LIFT Rental Award applications from across the state including five from rural communities. All together, these projects will create 1,153 new affordable homes in with awards totaling $70.3 million.

Additionally, to be responsive to the serious housing shortages resulting from the 2020 Oregon wildfires, two projects received additional application points for projects in the Federal Declared Disaster Areas, including one in Jackson County.

“The destruction in Jackson County was unimaginable and the disruption to people’s lives even worse,” said Daryn Murphy, Vice President of Development at Commonwealth Development Corporation. “Being able to move this project along quickly will be a step in the right direction in getting survivors rehoused, but there is a lot of work ahead. The LIFT funding is an important tool to make projects like this happen and the state’s priority on impacted areas shows their commitment to rebuilding places like Talent and Phoenix.

 

 

Jackson County:

Renaissance Flats, City of Talent:

Marion County:

Marion Wildfire Portfolio, Mill City & City of Stayton:

27th Avenue Apartments, City of Salem:

 

Umatilla County

Moorehouse Apartments, City of Hermiston:        

Clackamas County

Marylhurst Commons, City of Lake Oswego:

Molalla Apartments, City of Molalla:

 

Washington County

Aloha Family Housing, City of Beaverton:

Multnomah County

The Montana Vistas, City of Portland:                             

Maryland Overlook Apartments, City of Portland:     

Glisan Tower, City of Portland:                                        

Bottling Blocks, City of Portland:                                   

148th Avenue Apartments, City of Portland:

 

 

?$7.56M          72 Homes

 

?$15.7M            126 Homes 

$5.1M               96 Homes

 

 

?$4.15M             60 Homes

v

$4.25M             100 Homes

$4.5M               60 Homes

 

 

$2.89M             81 Homes

 

$3.612M            75 Homes

$8.76M             171 Homes  

$4.087M          105 Homes

$4.612M          109 Homes

$5.1M               96 Homes

 

 

 

LIFT Homeownership Awards

The LIFT Homeownership program was established with the goal to create affordable homeownership opportunities for historically underserved communities across Oregon. This was the fourth round of LIFT funding dedicated to developing affordable homes for purchase. With three projects in urban areas and one in a rapidly gentrifying rural area, the four homeownership projects awarded will receive $5.5 million to create 55 new affordable homeownership opportunities in communities across the state. 

 

Washington County

Century Boulevard, City of Hillsboro:                         

Clackamas County

Clackamas CLT, City of Milwaukie:                                

Multnomah County

Taylor’s Ferry Condos, City of Portland:                      

Deschutes County

Village Meadows, City of Sisters:                              

 

$1.8M  18 Homes

 

$1.1M  11 Homes

 

$1.7M  17 Homes

 

$900K  9 Homes

 

Permanent Supportive Housing Awards

The final category for June funding consideration was 2021 Permanent Supportive Housing (PSH) award recommendations. PSH combines deeply affordable housing with wrap around services to support Oregonians, particularly those experiencing chronic homelessness. The Housing Stability Council approved funding for 5 proposals which will create a total of 143 PSH homes and 391 affordable homes overall. To be eligible for funding, projects had to be participants of the 2020 or 2021 Oregon Supportive Housing Institute. These developments cover both urban (Multnomah, Clackamas, and Marion counties) and rural communities (Lake and Malheur Counties).

 

Since July of 2019 OHCS has funded a record number of 656 PSH homes putting the agency well ahead of schedule and more than halfway towards meeting the 1000 Permanent Supportive Housing target over five years. 

 

Lake County:

Desert Horizons, City of Lakeview:

Marion County:

Sequoia Crossing, City of Salem:

Multnomah County:

Garden Park Estates, City of Portland:

Clackamas County:

Good Shepherd Village, City of Happy Valley:

Malheur County:

Ontario Affordable Housing, City of Ontario:

 

$4.2M          17 Homes

 

$5.9M         60 Homes

 

$3.75           117 Homes

 

$3.5M         142 Homes

 

6 PSH Slots  55 Homes

 

 

 

An additional 378 homes were awarded funding at the June meeting with 4%/bond transactions bringing the total to 1974. More detailed information about the awards can be found in the June Housing Stability packet.

 

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Attached Media Files: 06-23-2021-PR-Lift-Awards

06-23-21 Douglas County Public Works to Begin Chip Seal Program
Douglas Co. Government - 06/23/21 8:32 AM
DCPW
DCPW
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/6789/146074/thumb_DC_Public_Works_Logo_619.jpg

DOUGLAS COUNTY PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

June 23, 2021

 

2021 SUMMER ROAD IMPROVEMENT UPDATE

Douglas County Public Works to Begin Chip Seal Program

 

(Douglas County, Ore.) – Douglas County Public Works Department (DCPW), Operations and Maintenance Division plans to begin work on their annual chip seal program on roadways in Douglas County beginning next week.  The work is scheduled to continue throughout the summer.  Chip seal work is typically performed Monday through Friday, from 7:00 am to 5:30 pm, depending upon weather and material availability. Traffic in the work areas will be controlled by flaggers during active work hours.

 

The chip seal program is the application of a special protective wearing surface to an existing pavement.  The surface treatment combines one or more layer(s) of asphalt with one or more layer(s) of fine aggregate.  DCPW will provide updates to the chip seal maintenance schedule, if and when any changes occur. 

 

The tentative work schedule is as follows and is subject to modification:

 

June 28 – July 2                 County Rd. #16, Carnes Rd, Roseburg                       MP - ALL

                                                County Rd. #26, Happy Valley Road, Roseburg         MP - ALL

                                                County Rd. #366, Rolling Hills Road, Roseburg         MP 1.45 to 1.81

 

July 6 – July 9                         County Rd. #108, Strickland Canyon Rd, Roseburg   MP – ALL

 

July 12 – July 23                 County Rd. #38, Olalla Road, Winston                       MP 0.00 to 6.50

                                                County Rd. #125, Hoover Hill Road, Winston            MP – ALL

                                                County Rd. #140, Ireland Road, Winston                   MP – ALL

                                                County Rd. #141, Benedict Road, Winston                 MP - ALL

 

July 26 – August 3             County Rd. #48, Lower Smith Road, Reedsport         MP – ALL

                                                County Rd. #55, Scholfield Road, Reedsport              MP 0.00 – 3.38

 

August 4 – August 10        County Rd. #33, Tyee Road, Umpqua                         MP 12.00 – 22.11

 

August 11 – August 16      County Rd. #9, Fort McKay Road, Oakland               MP 0.00 – 6.43

                                                County Rd. #13, Iverson Road, Umpqua                    MP – ALL

 

August 17 – August 20      County Rd. #17, Buckhorn Road, Roseburg               MP 8.50 – 11.50

                                                County Rd. #17A, Little River Road, Glide                MP 0.00 – 1.20

                                                County Rd. #4G, Glide Loop Drive, Glide                  MP – ALL

 

August 23 – August 27      County Rd. #16, Roberts Creek Road, Roseburg        MP - ALL

                                                County Rd. #133, Melton Road, Roseburg                  MP – ALL

 

August 30 – September 3  County Rd. #90, Doerner Road, Roseburg                  MP 0.00 – 2.48

 

 

Safety is always a priority for the motoring public, as well as for our employees.  Please understand that road construction projects will impact drive times, so we are asking residents to plan accordingly. Expect up to 20-minute delays and try to seek alternate routes whenever possible.  We are asking motorists to proceed with caution, be patient and obey all posted signs, warnings and flagger instructions as they travel thru all road construction zones.  For more information, please contact DCPW at (541) 440-4208 or log onto https://douglascounty-oregon.us/376/Project-Information

 

 

###

 

Contact Tamara Howell, Douglas County Emergency Communications & Community Engagement Specialist – Public Information Officer - (541) 670-2804 cell - (541) 957-4896 office - tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us




Attached Media Files: DCPW

The Oregon State Police Joins Forces To Put the Brakes on Excessive Speeding (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 06/23/21 8:00 AM
WSTSC
WSTSC
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Drivers stayed off the roads in droves during the pandemic. Unfortunately, those who did drive were the cause of a steep rise in roadway deaths, with the excess speed at the heart of many crashes. The Western States Traffic Safety Coalition (WSTSC) members came together to show commitment and emphasis on meaningful public education about the dangers of risky driving behaviors, especially excessive speeding. The WSTSC Coalition includes the following members from Arizona Department of Public Safety, California Highway Patrol, Colorado State Patrol, Idaho State Police, Montana Highway Patrol, Nevada Highway Patrol, North Dakota Highway Patrol, South Dakota Highway Patrol, Utah Highway Patrol, Washington State Patrol, Wyoming Highway Patrol, and #YourOregonStatePolice.

Excess speed is a major factor contributing to serious injury and fatal crashes for drivers of all ages, along with speeding-related vehicle rollovers. As the nation opens up, summer vacations begin and more people hit the roads, law enforcement will be proactive in helping bring speeds and subsequent crashes down. 

Excessive speed has a devastating impact on the safety of life for those traveling on our highways. To help address this issue, the WSTSC will be conducting an Excessive Speed Enforcement Safety Campaign this June 25 – 27, 2021. Assertive traffic law enforcement activity with a targeted public safety focus is the purpose of the WSTSC partnership and this campaign. The WSTSC encourages everyone to plan ahead and allow plenty of time to arrive at your destination safely to avoid feeling the need to speed.

The WSTSC hopes you choose to join us in achieving the goal of zero deaths due to excessive speeds, especially over the #FourthofJuly holiday.

#SlowYourRoll #WSTSC #HighwaySafety

 




Attached Media Files: WSTSC

Tue. 06/22/21
Oregon National Guard Leadership visits troops conducting wildfire training (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 06/22/21 6:52 PM
2021-06/962/146070/210622-Z-CM403-198.JPG
2021-06/962/146070/210622-Z-CM403-198.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/962/146070/thumb_210622-Z-CM403-198.JPG

Photo captions:

006, 026 - Maj. Gen. Michael E. Stencel, Adjutant General, Oregon, visits with Oregon National Guard Citizen-Soldiers and Airmen who are attending the wildland firefighter training for the Oregon National Guard held at Camp Rilea, in Warrenton, Ore., June 22, 2021. The state’s coordinated and comprehensive wildfire suppression efforts include training more than 100 Oregon National Guardsmen as wildland firefighters, which will conclude later this week on June 25, following a culmination field training exercise on Thursday, June 24.  (National Guard photo by Aaron Perkins, Oregon Military Department) 

070, 080 - Chief Master Sgt. Daniel Conner, Oregon National Guard Command Senior Enlisted Leader converses with Oregon Air National Staff Sgt's Ashely Vela and Saxon Riendeau, both assigned to the 173rd Fighter Wing, and are attending the wildland firefighter training for the Oregon National Guard held at Camp Rilea, in Warrenton, Ore., June 22, 2021. The state’s coordinated and comprehensive wildfire suppression efforts include training more than 100 Oregon National Guardsmen as wildland firefighters, which will conclude later this week on June 25, following a culmination field training exercise on Thursday, June 24.  (National Guard photo by Aaron Perkins, Oregon Military Department)

084 - Maj. Gen. Michael E. Stencel, Adjutant General, Oregon, pauses for a photo with Oregon Air Guard and 142nd Wing Aircraft Maintenance Squadron member, Kory Butler, who is attending the wildland firefighter training for the Oregon National Guard held at Camp Rilea, in Warrenton, Ore., June 22, 2021. The state’s coordinated and comprehensive wildfire suppression efforts include training more than 100 Oregon National Guard Citizen-Soldiers and Citizen-Airmen as wildland firefighters, which will conclude later this week on June 25, following a culmination field training exercise on Thursday, June 24. (National Guard photo by Aaron Perkins, Oregon Military Department)

147 - Mr. Dan Cleveland, Oregon Military Department Firefighter Lead (center), gives a briefing to Maj. Gen. Michael E. Stencel, Adjutant General, Oregon, (right) and Chief Master Sgt. Daniel Conner, Oregon National Guard Command Senior Enlisted Leader (left) on the current wildland fire training being held at Camp Rilea, in Warrenton, Ore., June 22, 2021.The state’s coordinated and comprehensive wildfire suppression efforts include training more than 100 Oregon National Guard Citizen-Soldiers and Citizen-Airmen as wildland firefighters, which will conclude later this week on June 25, following a culmination field training exercise on Thursday, June 24. (National Guard photo by Aaron Perkins, Oregon Military Department)

194, 198 - Maj. Gen. Michael E. Stencel, Adjutant General, Oregon, talks with Oregon National Guard Citizen-Soldiers and Airmen attending the wildland firefighter training for the Oregon National Guard held at Camp Rilea, in Warrenton, Ore., June 22, 2021. The state’s coordinated and comprehensive wildfire suppression efforts include training more than 100 Oregon National Guardsmen as wildland firefighters, which will conclude later this week on June 25, following a culmination field training exercise on Thursday, June 24.  (National Guard photo by Aaron Perkins, Oregon Military Department)




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/962/146070/210622-Z-CM403-198.JPG , 2021-06/962/146070/210622-Z-CM403-194.JPG , 2021-06/962/146070/210622-Z-CM403-147.JPG , 2021-06/962/146070/210622-Z-CM403-084.JPG , 2021-06/962/146070/210622-Z-CM403-080.JPG , 2021-06/962/146070/210622-Z-CM403-070.JPG , 2021-06/962/146070/210622-Z-CM403-026.JPG , 2021-06/962/146070/210622-Z-CM403-006.JPG

Oregon reports 267 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death
Oregon Health Authority - 06/22/21 4:34 PM

June 22, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 267 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death

PORTLAND, Ore. — There is one new COVID-19 related death in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,757, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 267 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 207,105.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 9,296 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 4,708 doses were administered on June 21 and 4,588 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on June 21.

The seven-day running average is now 11,201 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 2,443,680 first and second doses of Pfizer,1,709,047 first and second doses of Moderna and 163,375 single doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 2,357,258 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,110,737 have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series. The number of adult Oregonians needing vaccinations to reach the 70% threshold is 41,094. A daily countdown can be found on the OHA vaccinations page.  

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 2,943,405 doses of Pfizer, 2,220,440 doses of Moderna and 299,100 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 146, which is two more than yesterday. There are 35 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is one fewer than yesterday.

The total number of COVID-19 positive patient bed-days in the most recent seven days is 1,046, which is an 11.0% decrease from the previous seven days. The peak daily number of beds occupied by COVID-19 positive patients in the most recent seven days is 162.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (12), Benton (4), Clackamas (22), Clatsop (2), Columbia (2), Coos (1), Curry (10), Deschutes (9), Douglas (12), Gilliam (1), Grant (1), Hood River (1), Jackson (14), Jefferson (1), Josephine (12), Klamath (2), Lake (1), Lane (18), Lincoln (4), Linn (10), Malheur (6), Marion (25), Morrow (1), Multnomah (25), Polk (12), Sherman (3), Umatilla (18), Union (2), Wasco (1), Washington (31) and Yamhill (4).

Oregon’s 2,757th death is a 55-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive on May 7 and died on June 10 at OHSU Health Hillsboro Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

OHA encourages providers to vaccinate at every opportunity

As more doses are reported unused due to reduced first-dose demand, OHA has encouraged providers to prioritize vaccinating Oregonians, even if it means opening a vial to use some doses while the remainder goes unused.

COVID-19 vaccine providers have done an outstanding job stewarding vaccines when they were scarce.

Now that our supply of vaccine has stabilized, it is time to look at this through a different lens.

OHA encourages providers to vaccinate at every opportunity. Given COVID-19 vaccine vials contain up to 14 doses, we expect some vaccine will go unused. And that is OK. Vaccinated people are more important than unused vaccine.

Providers with available vaccine may also use the Get Vaccinated Oregon tool to list their vaccine availability and clinic hours or connect with community-based organizations to support vaccine clinics in their area.

At this point in the pandemic, we are going to stop the spread of COVID-19 one shot at a time.

Oregon updates non-viable vaccine disclosure1,2,3

Starting this week, OHA’s weekly update on non-viable vaccines will change how it describes vaccines not being used.

Previously the term wastage was used to describe any dose of COVID-19 vaccine discarded at the end of the day from multidose vials and doses deemed non-viable for other issues related to provider use, such as broken vials.

All future weekly updates will now call such doses non-viable.

OHA will continue using the terms spoiled and expired. Expired doses are those that passed the published expiration date provided on the vial. Spoiled doses are those that occur because of a refrigeration failure or other temperature-related occurrence.

Our non-viable vaccine table has been moved to the tableau dashboard. You can find that link to the weekly tab here. OHA reports updates on vaccines not being used each Tuesday in our daily media release.

Vaccine Type

Doses Recalled

Non-Viable Spoiled Expired

Grand Total

Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine

 

4,839

4,839

Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine

 

25,981

25,981

Pfizer COVID-19 Vaccine

 

7,472

7,472

Grand Total

0

38,292

38,292

1Updated: 06/22/21 

2Data source: ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS) 

3Data is preliminary and subject to change.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.


UPDATE - Name Released - Fatal Crash on Hwy 99E - Marion County
Oregon State Police - 06/22/21 3:56 PM

The operator is being identified as Roberto Martinez (22) of Salem.

On Tuesday, June 22, 2021 at approximately 1:23 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 99E near milepost 39.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Ford Focus was southbound when it left the roadway, crashed through a fence and struck an unoccupied truck.

The operator sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.  The name will be released when appropriate.

OSP was assisted by Marion County Fire and Medics and ODOT.

 

 


Case Number Correction - Oregon State Police is Requesting Public's Assistance with Homicide Investigation - Coos County
Oregon State Police - 06/22/21 3:17 PM

On Friday, June 18, 2021 Oregon State Police assisted numerous agencies with the investigation of multiple homicides that occurred in Coos County.

The suspect, Oen Nicholson,  traveled to Hwy 126, near Noti, in Lane County where the vehicle Nicholson was driving was ditched.  It is believed that Nicholson obtained a ride from someone in the Noti area to Springfield where Laura Johnson was abducted and taken to Wisconsin.

Oregon State Police is requesting anyone with information or that might have given Nicholson a ride from Noti to Springfield to contact the Oregon State Police at 1-800-442-0776 or OSP and leave information regarding OSP Case # SP21-168713.


Deputies Arrest Manager and Bartender of Top of the Bowl Strip Club (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/22/21 3:10 PM
Jamie Hennricks
Jamie Hennricks
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/5204/146062/thumb_Hennricks.jpg

DRAIN, Ore. - The manager and bartender of the Top of the Bowl Strip Club in Drain were arrested Saturday morning. 

On Saturday, June 19, 2021, shortly before 3:30 am Deputies became aware that the business had been serving alcohol despite not holding an OLCC Liquor License.  The license had been surrendered earlier in the year after Top of the Bowl had been found in violation of regulations and the license had been suspended. Oregon law specifically outlines illegal sales of alcohol, including membership fees, without a license. 

Deputies contacted the manager, Richard Morin and the owner/bartender, Jamie Hennricks at the business. Deputies confirmed alcohol was being served and "tips/donations" were being accepted for the alcohol, however there was a "suggested" amount. Deputies seized the alcohol found on the premise. 

Morin and Hennricks were arrested and lodged at the Douglas County Jail for Mixing, Storing or Serving Liquor Without A License, an A Misdemeanor. 




Attached Media Files: Jamie Hennricks , Morin, Richard

Extreme drought declared for Lane County
Lane Co. Government - 06/22/21 2:04 PM

The Lane County Board of Commissioners voted today to declare a local emergency regarding the extreme drought conditions found throughout much of Lane County and expected to last into the summer.

 

“Extreme drought conditions exist across Oregon and Lane County is experiencing a mix of extreme drought in the Cascade Foothills and severe drought nearly everywhere else,” said Lane County Emergency Manager Patence Winningham. “This declaration will open up a host of tools and resources to water right users in Lane County such as farmers, agriculture, and businesses that may be affected by surface water rights.”

 

The local emergency declaration also requests the Oregon Office of Emergency Management to recommend adding Lane County to the State’s emergency declaration under ORS 536 and to direct the Oregon Water Resources Department to make available temporary transfers of water rights, emergency water use permits, and use of existing right options and agreements. A state drought declaration allows the Oregon Water Resources Department to offer certain tools to water rights holders in a drought-declared county. These tools have an expedited review process, reduced fee schedule, and are intended to be short-term emergency authorizations, not permanent solutions to deal with water supply challenges.

 

The Oregon Water Resources Department maintains a drought website that provides the status of current water conditions and state drought declarations, as well as information on what you can do to use water wisely.  For more information visit www.oregon.gov/OWRD/programs/climate/droughtwatch

 

The website also answers questions about emergency applications, the state declaration process, and general water supply conditions.

 

The last drought emergency in Lane County was declared in 2015.

 

 

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Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Weekday Update - June 22, 2021 (Photo)
Douglas Co. Government - 06/22/21 12:08 PM
UVA Logo
UVA Logo
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Our local COVID-19 updates represent the coordinated effort of the agencies that make up the DCCRT

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – June 22, 2021

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - WEEKDAY UPDATE

 

(Douglas County, Ore.) DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 UPDATE FOR TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 2021

As of 12:00 pm today, Tuesday, June 22, 2021, there are SEVEN (7) people with new positive test results and TWO (2) new presumptives to report since our noon update yesterday.  Also, please note that we have retracted ONE (1) positive case number from our totals from yesterday.†  After investigation, we determined that one person with a positive test result was not a Douglas County resident, and therefore the case has been moved to their respective County.  The chart below has been adjusted to reflect the retraction. The total number of cases of people with positive test results and presumptives in Douglas County is now at 3,899. Currently, there are FIFTEEN (15) Douglas County COVID-19 patients that are being hospitalized, eight locally and seven out-of-the-area. Our Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, under the direction of the Douglas County Board of Commissioners, continue to devote all resources available to our local COVID response.

 

Douglas County, OR - COVID-19 - Case Update Chart

Date

Thursday,

June 17, 2021

Friday,

June 18, 2021

Saturday/Sunday

June 19&20, 2021

Monday

June 21, 2021

Today, Tuesday,

June 22, 2021

Total COVID-19 Cases

3,853

3,867

3,883

3,890†

3,899

People w/ Positive PCR or Antigen Test Results

3,672

3,686

3,700

3,707

3,717

Presumptive

181

181

183

183

185

Total Currently Hospitalized

11

11

13

15

15

Total Currently in Isolation

155

154

152

155

155

Total COVID-19 Related Deaths

82

83

84

84

84

Our daily update includes the total number of cases in Douglas County, which combines people with positive test results and presumptives, as well as a breakout of those case numbers. There will be times when a presumptive will move to a positive test result, and our total case number will not change because the case has already been counted. Please note that we have retracted ONE (1) positive case number from our totals from yesterday. After investigation, we determined that one person with a positive test result is not a Douglas County resident and therefor, the case has been moved to their respective County. 

 

LOCAL CONTACTS AND CASES BEING SUPPORTED IN ISOLATION AND QUARANTINE

Currently, DPHN is supporting 126 cases in isolation, as well as another 195 contacts in quarantine in Douglas County. Isolation is recommended for confirmed and presumptive cases, quarantine is recommended for contacts of confirmed or presumptive cases.  Currently, staff is supporting a total of 321 total contacts and cases in isolation or quarantine.  This number represents a snapshot of the significant amount of work being done locally to help control the spread of COVID.

 

BEHIND THE SCENES: COMMUNITY PARTNERS

UMPQUA VALLEY AMBULANCE

For the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team (DCCRT) members, the Douglas County Board of Commissioners and Douglas Public Health Network (DPHN) staff, managing all the aspects of our county wide COVID response, epidemiological investigations, communications, supply logistics, testing and vaccination programs often involves bringing in expert local partners.  Having expertly trained community partners that are ready and willing to step up at a moment’s notice and stay in it for the long-haul to provide specialized services, has greatly contributed to the success of our local COVID response. 

 

Meet Umpqua Valley Ambulance:

Umpqua Valley Ambulance (UVA) is part of the Metro West Family of Companies which are owned by JD Fuiten.  In 2011, Bay Cities Ambulance started meeting transportation needs of VA patients in Roseburg.  In 2016, Douglas County Fire District #2 sold the ambulance division to Metro West, which began operating under Bay Cities Ambulance for 911 responses.  In 2019 Bay Cities Ambulance Roseburg changed their name to Umpqua Valley Ambulance to reflect their community commitment.  UVA currently employs 75 full-time employees.  They have contracts for emergency response services with both Douglas County and the State of Oregon.  Recently they contracted with the State of California through FEMA to provide COVID-19 testing and vaccines for wildland firefighters. 

 

What They Bring to the Response:

We had a chance to catch up with Tom Krokoski, Operations Manager and Rodney Blake, Clinical Manager at UVA, to talk about how they have been an integral part of our counties outreach efforts during our COVID-19 response.  Much like DPHN, UVA has been training staff for years in preparation for a major emergency, disaster or pandemic.  Their extensive and ongoing training programs include medical & emergency acuity, infectious disease, blood borne pathogens, intermuscular injections, rescue techniques, mental health and customer service.  During the pandemic they have provided a valuable service to local residents, as their wheelchair transport service is capable of transporting COVID-19 patients due to specialized equipment and training.  DPHN contracted with UVA early in the COVID-19 battle to help with and be a resource for local COVID-19 testing, particularly for local law enforcement agencies, care facilities and home-bound residents.  Since then they have expanded their relationship with DPHN to include vaccinations for those same groups.  In addition, UVA was also commissioned as a major resource in the state to administer in-home vaccines for home-bound residents through-out southern Oregon.  They have traveled to Klamath, Lane, Curry and Josephine Counties to administer vaccines to home-bound residents. 

 

The response we have received from the community for our work has been tremendous,” commented Tom Krokoski.  “We have seen people cry with relief, express unbelievable joy, and exclaim that they haven’t left their homes in a year, and that this will help them to start getting their freedom back. We are thankful for all the life changing work being done in our county, as well as the all the partnerships created with the County, Commissioner Tim Freeman, Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, DPHN (Teresa Mutschler and Mike Hansen), Aviva Health and Fire District #2 (Rob Bullock).”

 

Tiger Team Members:

In March, Douglas County Commissioner Tim Freeman came up with the idea for a local mobile medical team, to help with our rural vaccine outreach efforts.  He coordinated with Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, our Public Health Officer and the DPHN staff, to create the Douglas County Tiger Team.  They soon recognized that they would need to add a licensed vaccinator and medical assistant to the squad.  So, they once again reached out to UVA, and asked them to join the new team.  UVA gladly accepted the challenge.  Through the Tiger Team Pop Up Clinics all around Douglas County, UVA has been able to administer approximately 700 vaccines to residents. 

 

I cannot say enough about the team at UVA, and how amazing they have been as a resource for not only DPHN, but for our communities during this pandemic.  We know that we can always count on them to step up and assist when needed,” commented Teresa Mutschler, Executive Director at DPHN and the Co-Incident Commander of the DCCRT. 

 

UVA’s mantra should be, “We are here to help!”, because they are definitely more than willing, as well as capable of stepping up to any challenge presented before them.  UVA is another wonderful example of one of the amazing behind the scenes community partners that deserve more than a few accolades for their efforts over the last year (and beyond).  Thank you, Tom, Rodney and all of the staff at Umpqua Valley Ambulance for everything you do!

 

DOUGLAS COUNTY WEEKLY VACCINATION RATE

We are still making progress towards our goal.  As of Monday, June 22, 2021, 53.60% of eligible residents ages 16 and older in Douglas County have been vaccinated with the COVID-19 vaccine.  That means that a total of 50,837 residents have received at least their first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine.  486 new vaccination doses were administered since last week for residents ages 16 and older, and 43 new vaccination doses were given to those 12-15 years of age.  We wanted to let everyone know that another 109 previously administered doses were finally added to the Oregon Alert IIS System this week to account for historical data from March and April from the Cow Creek Tribe.  As a reminder, we are still adding vaccine doses given to Douglas County residents at the Roseburg VA Health Care Center and Cow Creek Band of the Umpqua Tribe of Indians Health Care Community to the state reported numbers that have yet to be added to the Oregon Alert IIS System, as the State does not include these in their total weekly percentage. 

 

As we have stated numerous times before, our percentage of eligible residents that have been vaccinated will differ from the number that the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has on their daily online vaccination report.  This is because the OHA vaccination data DOES NOT include the all the vaccines given by Federally recognized sites in our county (Roseburg VA and Cow Creek).  The OHA report located here, clearly states that their data is “Because ALERT IIS does not capture doses administered at Veterans Affairs, Department of Defense and Federal Bureau of Prisons, Oregon is measuring progress towards this statewide goal using CDC data which includes vaccinations at these federal sites. For counties, in order to be eligible to move to Lower Risk in Oregon's Risk Level Framework, 65% or more of the county population 16 and older must have received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine. This is based on ALERT 11S data as well as federal doses from Veterans Affairs, Department of Defense and Federal Bureau of Prisons. Federal doses from these entities are not shown below but are counted toward the county risk metric movement.”  Because these Federal sites receive their COVID-19 vaccines directly from the Federal Government, they are required to report their vaccination data directly to the Federal Government.  The Cow Creek Tribe is now entering data into BOTH the federal and state systems, but the data reconciliation is still not complete. The Fed’s and OHA say they have yet to find to good way to combine the state and federal vaccination data in their daily reports. So, there is an obvious discrepancy in the vaccination data.  That is why Douglas County Commissioner Tim Freeman and Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, our Douglas County Public Health Officer continue to fervently ask OHA, the State of Oregon and our State Legislators to address and correct this problem.  Douglas County needs to vaccinate about 10,900 more eligible residents in order to reach the 65% goal. 

 

DOUGLAS COUNTY TIGER TEAM HOSTS FREE POP-UP COVID-19 VACCINATION CLINICS

It’s another busy week for the Tiger Team.  The Douglas County Tiger Team continues to bring free COVID-19 vaccines directly to rural areas via our mobile medical vans (MMV) via their pop up vaccine clinics.  They are visiting businesses, farms, fire stations and other locations in our smaller remote communities in Douglas County. The Douglas County Board of Commissioners, who have led the charge for our Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team efforts since the beginning, have coordinated with DPHN to organize our local Tiger Team to manage our vaccine outreach efforts through ‘pop-up’ vaccine clinics.

 

The Douglas County Tiger Team will be hosting FREE POP UP COVID VACCINE CLINICS at the locations listed below.  The clinics are currently open to anyone 18 years of age and older, and preregistration is not necessary:

 

  • Tuesday, June 22, 2021: Melqua-Melrose and surrounding area. Clinic will be at the Coles Valley Vineyards at 10003 Melqua Road in Umpqua from 8:00 am to 4:00 pm.
  • Wednesday, June 23, 2021: Camas Valley and surrounding area. Clinic will be at the Camas Valley Fire Department at 142 Burma Road in Camas Valley from 8:00 am to 12:00 pm.
  • Wednesday, June 23, 2021: Tenmile and surrounding area. Clinic will be at the Tenmile Fire Department at 158 Reston Road in Roseburg from 1:00 am to 4:00 pm.

 

Our Tiger Team coordinates with Umpqua Valley Ambulance to bring a certified vaccinator and a medical assistant to each clinic.  If you are interested in having the Douglas County Tiger Team come to your business, fire department, farm or town to provide a pop-up vaccine clinic or if you have any questions about our Douglas County Tiger Teams and want a schedule of their upcoming pop-up vaccination clinics, please call (541) 670-3110 or our local COVID-19 Hotline at (541) 464-6550Click here for the calendar listing of the upcoming Tiger Team Pop Up Vaccine Clinics

 

FREE DRIVE-THROUGH COVID-19 VACCINATION EVENT SATURDAY, JUNE 26 AT THE DOUGLAS COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS

Douglas Public Health Network (DPHN), Douglas County Board of Commissioners, and Aviva Health are collaborating again to host the next mass drive-through COVID-19 vaccination event on Saturday, June 26, 2021, from 9:00 am to 1:00 pm at the Douglas County Fairgrounds.

 

We are planning to utilize the Pfizer (two dose) and the J&J (single dose) vaccines at this event.  Eligibility for this event includes:

1) ALL residents of Douglas County ages 12 years old and older.

2) Second doses of the Pfizer vaccine to those residents who received their first dose at one of our drive through COVID-19 vaccination events.

 

Residents DO NOT need to pre-register or schedule an appointment for this event.  If you have questions please contact the phone numbers provided below:

  • Call (541) 464-6500.
  • If you need help in Spanish, you can call and leave a message on our Spanish Help Line at (541) 671-1355.
  • Please do not call, contact or go to the Douglas County Fairgrounds to ask about the vaccination event.
  • For those residents that received their first dose of the Pfizer vaccine at one of our other drive-through events, you can just show up at this event.

 

Pre-registration is not required, just show up and get your vaccine.  All residents ages 12 and over are eligible! #itsyourturn; #itsfreeitseasy; #C19Vaccine.  For those ages 12 to 14, it is required that a parent or guardian accompany you and give written consent for the vaccine.

 

AVIVA HAS A DEDICATED FREE COVID-19 VACCINATION CLINIC SITE IN ROSEBURG 

Shared from Aviva Health.  Aviva Health opened a dedicated COVID-19 vaccination clinic site at 4221 NE Stephens Street, Suite 101 in Roseburg, just across the street from its main Roseburg Clinic location near Costco.  The new COVID-19 Vaccination Clinic opened Wednesday, May 18, 2021, and offers free COVID-19 vaccines by appointment.   The new COVID-19 vaccination clinic will be open Monday through Friday, from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm and is open for residents ages 12 and older.  To schedule an appointment during the week please call (541) 672-9596.

 

As a reminder: Parental or guardian consent is required to vaccinate residents 12 to 14 years old.  Written consent can be obtained in advance.  Under Oregon law, minors 15 years of age and older may consent to medical treatment, including vaccinations, when provided by a physician, physician assistant, naturopath, nurse practitioner, dentist or optometrist, or other professionals operating under the license of these providers; however, families are encouraged to make decisions about vaccinations together.

 

COVID-19 VACCINE ELIGIBILITY OPEN FOR EVERYONE 12 YEARS OLD AND OLDER

According to the CDC, State of Oregon and OHA, ALL residents ages 12 years old and older are eligible to get the COVID-19 Vaccine.  As of May 13, 2021, the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine has been approved for people ages 12 to 15, joining those 16 and above who are already eligible.  The good news, according to Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, our Douglas County Public Health Officer, is that we have plenty of vaccine and will be giving to anyone 12 and above who wants it. Remember, “it’s your turn!” So, locate a vaccine location near you, get signed up and show up to get your COVID-19 vaccine today!

 

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Attached Media Files: UVA Logo , DCCRT , 62121 DC Vaccine Rate

Community Disaster Resilience Planning for Heritage Resources model and guidebook wins national award
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 06/22/21 11:37 AM

SALEM, Oregon – The American Association for State and Local History (AASLH) have announced the 38 winners of the AASLH Leadership in History Awards. Oregon Heritage is pleased to announce that the Community Disaster Resilience Planning for Heritage Resources model and guidebook project is one of the recipients of this award.

The AASLH Leadership in History Awards, now in its 76th year, is the most prestigious recognition for achievement in the preservation and interpretation of state and local history.  The awards honor people, projects, exhibits, and publications that represent the best in the field and provide leadership for the future of state and local history.

Oregon Heritage, in partnership with UO School of Planning, Public Policy and Management’s Institute for Policy Research & Engagement (IPRE), the City of Cottage Grove and several local nonprofits, worked over the last year to develop a new model for heritage resource disaster planning. The initiative resulted in organizational plans for five heritage organizations, a community-wide plan for the city and a guidebook so the process can be duplicated in other communities.

“It is important to protect heritage resources from disaster, not only for their own intrinsic value, but also for the critical role they play in community healing following a disaster. This project resulted in a collective approach where heritage resources were considered alongside other critical community assets in a city’s planning efforts for future potential disasters,” comments Chrissy Curran, Director of Oregon Heritage and Deputy State Historic Preservation Officer.

“Winning this award emphasizes how important it is to identify and safeguard the irreplaceable heritage resources that make us who we are as a community, not only so they remain for the future, but for the value they bring as anchors in a disruptive time. We look forward to having other Oregon communities use this guide and process.”

Heritage resources like historic downtowns, museums, historic districts, cemeteries, genealogical libraries, etc. are valuable community assets. They are also wonderful resources to assist communities in recovery from disasters. The effort to strengthen these organizations’ resilience following a disaster is critical. According to Kuri Gill, grants and outreach coordinator with Oregon Heritage, it was time to try something new. “After working for years with heritage organizations on disaster planning and response, we discovered some challenges. Remaining focused on disaster planning and preparation when organizations are trying to keep the doors open and the lights on is tough.” It seemed that a community plan with coordinated goals would help drive the work and make it easier to access resources. The next step was to find the right team to pull off a pilot project.

Oregon Heritage coordinates the Oregon Heritage All-Star Community program, which recognizes communities that support, promote and coordinate their heritage resources. Cottage Grove is one such community, that also has an award-winning preservation plan which includes the community’s heritage resources. Since they were already coordinating heritage organizations and incorporating them into city planning, the city was an ideal pilot partner.

Oregon Heritage partnered with IPRE on this project. IPRE has produced excellent community planning projects and disaster resilience work through its Community Planning Workshop (CPW). This project is a good example of the power of university-community partnerships, explains Robert Parker, director of strategic and technical solutions, for IPRE. “Oregon Heritage has long worked to support preservation of Oregon’s heritage, the CPW provided need capacity to bring the guidebook to completion,” said Parker. “The project supported the mission of Oregon Heritage, of heritage organizations in Cottage Grove, and provided our graduate students a robust learning platform on emergency management and resiliency in the middle of a global pandemic.”

Cottage Grove heritage nonprofits that committed to the project included: Bohemia Gold Mining Museum, Cottage Grove Genealogical Society, Cottage Grove Historical Society, Cottage Grove Museum, and Downtown Cottage Grove Inc. Representatives of each organization participated in several workshops and listening sessions to develop plans for their individual organizations. They also participated in the development of the community plan. According to Amanda Ferguson, City of Cottage Grove planner, the results were worth the effort. “I am so pleased that Cottage Grove was chosen to participate in this disaster planning process. Our Heritage Partners learned so much about disaster resilience, and are now much better prepared to respond to small and large issues within their organizations and as part of a greater heritage community. This plan will give the City a path forward to help guide community resilience efforts while positioning us to better preserve our own resources.”

To access the model plans, the guidebook, supporting materials, and the workshops visit the Oregon Heritage website at www.oregonheritage.org. To see all 38 winners of the AASLH Leadership in History Awards visit www.aaslh.org. For more information about Oregon Heritage contact i.gill@oregon.gov">Kuri Gill at 503-383-6787.


Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Elder Fraud (Part 2, Money Mules) (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 06/22/21 11:36 AM
TT - Elder Fraud - Money Mules - GRAPHIC - June 22, 2021
TT - Elder Fraud - Money Mules - GRAPHIC - June 22, 2021
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June is Elder Abuse Awareness Month. For more information, go to https://www.fbi.gov/scams-and-safety/common-scams-and-crimes/elder-fraud. Our series of "Tech Tuesday" reports this month will cover a variety of scams that seniors often face.

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: building a digital?defense against money mule frauds targeting senior citizens.? 

When a criminal wants to add layers of protection between a victim and himself, he will use a money mule.?The?money mule is a person who?acts as a?middle-man?-?either knowingly or unknowingly transferring?illegally-acquired?money on behalf of or at the direction of another.?The mule makes it easier for the criminal to?mask his identity,?move money out of the U.S., and evade scrutiny by banks.?The scam can work a couple different ways:? 

In one variation, a scam artist targets a senior with any one of a thousand frauds. When the victim sends the money, he?actually sends?it to the money mule?who?then transfers the funds?to the criminal. The victim?definitely loses?money in this scenario.? 

In another variation, the victim?is?the money mule.?In most cases, seniors targeted in this way don’t know that they are involved in a larger criminal scheme. In this scenario, other victims?send?the senior citizen funds, which he then transfers to?someone he thinks is a?love interest or business partner. In this case, the mule himself may or may not lose money.? 

Seniors are particularly vulnerable to money mule scams because they tend to be more trusting; may be lonely or spend a great deal of time alone; or have diminished physical or mental capacity.?? 

Here’s how you?can protect yourself and family members:? 

  • Don’t agree to set up a bank account for someone you don’t know and trust.? 

  • Don’t?give out?your own?bank account information or?use your own?account to transfer money for other people. No legitimate business will ask you to do this.? 

  • Don’t respond to unsolicited emails, texts, calls or social media messages offering easy money.? 

  • Be wary of an employer or love interest?who?asks you to transfer money and offers you the opportunity to keep a portion for yourself.? 

  • Be suspicious of any online romance in which your new love asks for money or asks for help moving money.? 

?If you have been victimized by an online scam, report your suspicious contacts to the FBI. You can file an online report at the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at?www.ic3.gov?or call your FBI local office.? 

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Attached Media Files: TT - Elder Fraud - Money Mules - AUDIO - June 22, 2021 , TT - Elder Fraud - Money Mules - GRAPHIC - June 22, 2021

UPDATE - Shooting Investigation - Marion County
Oregon State Police - 06/22/21 11:10 AM

The victim of the gunshot is being identified as Jerry Regis (28) of Salem. 

OSP is requesting anyone with any information regarding yesterday's shooting to contact the Oregon State Police at 1-800-442-0776 or OSP and leave information for Detective Yoder.

On Monday, June 21, 2021 at approximately 2:45P.M., Oregon State Police, Salem Police Department and emergency personnel responded to a person with a gunshot near the northbound Interstate 5 off-ramp.

The victim has been transported to the hospital.

The suspect is described as a Hispanic male adult approximately 5’5 with a shaved or almost shaved head, mustache, wearing khaki pants and khaki shirt.  Last seen headed south armed with a firearm.  If you see anyone matching this description please call 911.

Investigation is continuing – Law Enforcement is still active please avoid the area.


4 ways to keep workplaces safe this summer
SAIF - 06/22/21 10:10 AM

How to keep employees safe during warm weather and wildfire season.

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Oregon kicked off the start of summer with temperatures spiking in the 90s and 100s in many parts of the state this week. Wildfires are cropping up as well, as firefighters prepare for another busy fire season.

There are many ways to get your workplace ready for the warmer weather ahead. Here’s a guide to keeping workers cool and preventing summer-related injuries and illnesses.

  • Heat stress prevention: Water, shade, and rest are key. Use a buddy system to monitor workers for signs of heat exhaustion and heat stroke.
  • Protect your skin: Oregon’s cloudy skies won’t prevent skin cancer. Workers should break out the sunscreen (at least SPF 30) every two hours and wear protective clothing and eyewear.
  • Hydration is your body’s best defense: Educate workers and supervisors on the importance of hydration. Provide clean water, and consider providing water bottles, occasional drinks with electrolytes, or even adding a cooler room with portable fogger fans.
  • Don’t put off wildfire prep: Learn what your business can do to be better prepared before, during, and after wildfire events by downloading this checklist. It includes making evacuation plans, stocking masks and filters, and monitoring air quality.

SAIF has experts available for interviews on how to beat the heat and prepare for wildfire season. Find more tips and specific resources at saif.com.

About SAIF

SAIF is Oregon's not-for-profit workers' compensation insurance company. Since 1914, we've been taking care of injured workers, helping people get back to work, and striving to make Oregon the safest and healthiest place to work. For more information, visit the About SAIF page on saif.com.


6-22-21 Douglas County Museum Receives Grant for Summer Youth Program (Photo)
Douglas Co. Government - 06/22/21 9:03 AM
OCF Logo
OCF Logo
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DOUGLAS COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

June 22, 2021

 

Douglas County Museum Receives Grant for Summer Youth Program

 

            (Douglas County, Ore.) The Douglas County Board of Commissioners are pleased to announce that the Douglas County Museum has received a grant from the K-12 Summer Learning Fund of The Oregon Community Foundation (OCF).  The grant in the amount of $86,920 was approved by the OCF’s Board of Directors on June 9, 2021 and awarded to the Douglas County Museum, who will utilize the grant to facilitate the Museum’s 2021 Camp Umpqua - Junior Youth Summer Program for students ages 10-13. 

 

The OCF puts donated money to work in Oregon by dispersing more than $100 million in grants and scholarships annually. For nearly 45 years, OCF grantmaking, research, advocacy and community-advised solutions have helped individuals, families, businesses and organizations create charitable funds to help improve the lives of Oregonians.  The impactful giving of time, talent and resources from many generous Oregonians helps to create these grant opportunities.  The OCF makes grants available through an application process that involves local citizens in the review and evaluation process.  Grant application materials, as well as individuals or businesses interested in establishing a fund can visit www.oregoncf.org for more information.

 

            “As I have said many times before, our Douglas County Museums are truly local gems.  This grant will provide an amazing opportunity for youth in Douglas County, both here and at the coast, to discover and experience nature, science, history and art while helping to cultivate their imaginations.  We are proud of our dedicated museum staff, as well as our volunteers and foundation members who work hard to create an engaging and unique museum experience, not only for our citizens, but for children and visitors alike,” commented Commissioner Tom Kress.

 

The Douglas County Museum’s 2021 Camp Umpqua - Junior Youth Summer Program will feature two camps this year.  One camp will be at the Douglas County Museum in Roseburg and the other at the Umpqua Lighthouse Museum in Winchester Bay.  The first day of camp is Monday, July 5 and the last day of camp is Tuesday, August 24, 2021.  Camp Umpqua applications can be found online at http://umpquavalleymuseums.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/Camp-Umpqua-Application.pdf or you may stop in at Douglas County Museum and pick one up in person. All camp applications must be completed and turned in no later than Wednesday, June 30, 2021.  The camp is free and is limited to twelve (12) campers at each site, so apply soon. This exciting camp adventure is for kids ages 10-13 and includes day activities at both museums, as well as some joint overnight activities. Campers will be

challenged to find resources from their everyday world, devise an original concept, and create something cool. They will use the elements of art and tools of design to unleash their inner artist, capture the energy of new-found passions exploring a variety of art techniques and learn a little art history along the way.  Campers will also be introduced to camp traditions their parents likely enjoyed, while blending in a more modern take on “roughing it” with survivor games, building self-confidence.   Camp Umpqua is a time for kids to develop their imaginations, a time for growth, and a time to form new friendships. The camp goal is for campers to share their camp experiences with others and perhaps apply them to their everyday lives for many years to come.

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Contact Tamara Howell, Douglas County Emergency Communications & Community Engagement Specialist – Public Information Officer

(541) 670-2804 cell - (541) 957-4896 office - tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us

 

Camp Umpqua Flier Attached




Attached Media Files: 2021 Camp Umpqua Flier , OCF Logo , DC Museum Logo , 2021 Camp Umpqua Flier2

Marine Board Denies Petition, Approves Cycle One Grants
Oregon Marine Board - 06/22/21 9:00 AM

The Oregon State Marine Board denied a petition to repeal rules for the Lower Willamette River and approved 16, Cycle One Boating Facility grant applications during their quarterly Board meeting held virtually, on June 14.  

The Board considered a petition to repeal recent regulatory changes that went into effect May 1, on the Lower Willamette River from Willamette Falls downstream to the Hawthorne Bridge. After a brief deliberation, the Board voted to deny the petition, reinforcing their commitment to the rules that were adopted in January 2021. Marine Board staff will update the Board on the implementation of the new rules and associated changes in boating activities in late 2022.

The Cycle One boating facility grant round was extremely competitive. The agency allocates seventy percent of available grant funds each biennium to larger projects that may require the entire two years to complete. Twenty-five grant applications were submitted, identifying $8.6 million in project needs and over $5 million from the agency’s 2021-23 funding with $3.5 million available. Sixteen grant projects were awarded funding. Ninety-five written public comments were received, largely in support of grant requests; a 30 percent increase in comments from the last grant cycle. Additionally, OSMB staff consult with Oregon’s nine federally recognized Tribal Governments on grant applications.

The Marine Board approved the following grants projects:

Northwest Region

  • Port of Columbia County, Scappoose Bay Marina. The grant will pay for consultant services for design, engineering and permitting. [BJO1] The Board approved $87,500.00 in Boating Facility Grant funds and $87,500.00 Waterway Access Grant funds combined with $175,000.00 of applicant match. The total project cost is $350,000.00.

Southern Region

  • City of Coos Bay, Eastside and Empire Facilities. The grant will pay for replacing the 20-year-old boarding docks. The Board approved $67,750.00 in Boating Facility Grant funds combined with $203,250.00 federal Sport Fish Restoration funds from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. The city provided $149,774.08 of applicant match. The total project cost is $420,774.08.
  • Douglas County, Amacher Park. The grant will pay for replacing and expanding the asphalt parking area, replacing the upper portion of the boat ramp and expanding a nonmotorized boat staging area. The Board approved $71,625.00 in Boating Facility Grant funds and $71,625.00 Waterway Access Grant funds combined with $428,250.00 federal Sport Fish Restoration funds from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. The County provided $190,500 of applicant match. The total project cost is $762,000.00.
  • City of Grants Pass, Baker Park. The grant will pay for an overlay to the existing asphalt parking area, striping and curbing, add ADA curb cuts and stormwater system. The Board approved $75,000.00 Boating Facility Grant funds and $75,000.00 Waterway Access Grant funds combined with $53,970.00 of applicant match. The total project cost is $203,970.00.
  • Jackson County, Upper Rogue Regional Park -Shady Cove. The grant pays for consultation services for an archaeological survey and hydrologic analysis to replace the boat ramp, expand the parking area, and add a much desired nonmotorized boat staging and launch area. The Board approved $40,000.00 in Boating Facility Grant funds and $40,000.00 in Waterway Access Grant funds combined with $22,500.00 in applicant match. The total project cost is $102,500.00.

Eastern Region

  • Deschutes National Forest, Wyeth Park. The grant pays for replacing the boat ramp, repairing the gravel road and parking area. The Board approved $22,640.04 Boating Facility Grant funds and $52,827.96 Waterway Access Grant funds combined with $75,468.00 of applicant match. The total project cost is $150,936.00.
  • Boardman Parks and Recreation, Boardman Marina. The grant pays for consultant services for permitting to reconfigure and replace the short-term tie-up docks and gangway. The Board approved $45,500.00 Boating Facility Grant funds and $10,500.00 in federal Boating Infrastructure Grant funds combined with $21,000.00 of applicant match. The total project cost is $77,000.00.
  • City of La Grande, Morgan Lake. The grant pays for a new vault toilet. The Board approved $9,250.00 Waterway Access Grant funds combined with $47,192.00 of applicant match. The total project cost is $56,442.00.
  • Port of Hood River, Port boat launch. The grant pays for replacing the boarding docks and abutments. The Board approved $132,300.00 Boating Facility Grant funds combined with $161,592.00 of applicant match. The total project cost is $293,892.00.

Valley Region

  • Polk County, Buena Vista Boat Ramp. The grant pays for a long-awaited boat ramp replacement, boarding docks, and expands the asphalt parking area. The grant will also add a vault toilet and a nonmotorized boat staging area. The Board approved $350,000.00 in Boating Facility Grant funds, $50,000.00 in Waterway Access Grant funds combined with $1,200,000.00 in federal Sport Fish Restoration funds from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.  The County is providing $91,434.00 for a total project cost of $1,691,434.00.
  • Lane County, Howard Buford Recreation Area. The grant pays for consultant services for design, engineering and permitting services for a new nonmotorized boating access site. The Board approved $66,000.00 Waterway Access Grant funds combined with $29,548.00 of applicant match. The total project cost is $95,548.00.
  • Marion County, Butteville Landing. The grant pays for a nonmotorized boat dock, piling and gangway to the dock. The Board approved $24,000.00 Waterway Access Grant funds combined with $101,171.00 of applicant match. The total project cost is $125,171.00.
  • State Parks, Luckiamute State Natura Area. The grant pays for consultant services for design, engineering and permitting services for new nonmotorized boating access. The Board approved $56,250.00 Waterway Access Grant funds combined with $23,750.00 of applicant match. The total project cost is $80,000.00.

Portland/Metro

  • City of Tigard, Cook Park. The grant pays for consultant services for design, engineering and permitting to replace boarding docks and to add nonmotorized, low freeboard boat launching docks. The Board approved $3,900.00 Boating Facility Grant funds and $74,100.00 Waterway Access Grant funds combined with $72,000.00 of applicant match. The total project cost is $150,000.00.
  • Tualatin Riverkeepers, Tualatin River outreach[BJO2] . The grant pays for community, grass-roots level engagement and diversity (equitable access) for a holistic approach to recreational nonmotorized boating access on the Tualatin River. This effort will provide information and support to existing and future boating facility providers around the importance of access, connection to the river trail and expand opportunities to the Hispanic and LatinX community. The Board approved $40,000.00 of Waterway Access Grant funds combined with $33,000.00 of applicant match. The total project cost is $73,000.00.
  • State Parks, Sandy Beach-Schwitter Landing. The grant pays for repair to the short-term tie-up dock and debris boom from prior storm damage. The Board approved $2,500.00 Boating Facility Grant funds and $82,500.00 federal Boating Infrastructure Grant funds combined with $27,560.00 of applicant match. The total project cost is $112,560.00.

Learn more about the agency’s boating facilities program and opportunities to engage with the Marine Board at boat.oregon.gov.

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The Marine Board is directly funded by boaters in the form of registration, title, and permit fees, as well as through marine fuel taxes. No lottery, general fund tax dollars or local facility parking fees support the agency or its programs. Boater-paid fees support the boating public through boating safety services (on-the-water law enforcement, training, and equipment), boating safety education, grants for the construction and maintenance of boating access facilities, and environmental protection programs. For more information about the Marine Board and its programs, visit boat.oregon.gov.

 


Oregon Community Foundation Grants $3.9 Million to Providence and $4.2 Million to MWVCAA to Purchase Area Motels for Use as Transitional Housing, All Project Turnkey Funds Now Awarded, representing 17 projects statewide and a total of 800 units of housing
Oregon Community Foundation - 06/22/21 9:00 AM
ProjectTurnkey-McMinnville Photo (4 of 4)__Courtesy of Providence and Oregon Community Foundation
ProjectTurnkey-McMinnville Photo (4 of 4)__Courtesy of Providence and Oregon Community Foundation
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Project Turnkey-McMinnVille Media Contacts:

Maureen Kenney, Public Relations Manager, Oregon Community Foundation

mkenney@oregoncf.org

Mike Antrim, Senior Communications Manager, Providence Health & Services

im@providence.org">mike.antrim@providence.org | (503) 537-8248

Laverne Pitts, Development Director, Yamhill Community Action Partnership (YCAP)
nep@yamhillcap.org">lavernep@yamhillcap.org | (503) 687-1488 | x1488

Jimmy Jones, Executive Director, Mid-Willamette Valley Community Action Agency (MWVCAA)

jimmy.jones@mwvcaa.org | (503) 399-9080

Oregon Community Foundation Grants $3.9 Million to Providence and $4.2 Million to MWVCAA to Purchase Area Motels for Use as Transitional Housing

All Project Turnkey Funds Now Awarded, representing 17 projects statewide and a total of 800 units of housing/shelter

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Drone Footage of Project Turnkey-McMinnville Sitehttps://youtu.be/776ArTsBqFsCourtesy of Providence Health & Services and Oregon Community Foundation

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McMinnville and Salem, Ore. – June 22, 2021 – Oregon Community Foundation announced today that it has selected Providence Health & Services (Providence) to receive a $3.9 million Project Turnkey grant and Mid-Willamette Valley Community Action Agency (MWVCAA) to receive a $4.2 million Project Turnkey grant to purchase and convert area motels into transitional housing for community members in need. These latest grants complete the allocation of the $65 million fund; all Project Turnkey funds are fully deployed, representing a total of 17 projects in 13 counties statewide and 800 new units of housing/non-congregate shelter.

Project Turnkey-McMinnville | Providence and YCAP

A $3.9 million Project Turnkey grant will help Providence support people experiencing homelessness in Yamhill County. The McMinnville-based shelter will be operated in collaboration with Yamhill Community Action Partnership (YCAP), which will provide supportive services to guests.

“We are excited to partner with YCAP and Oregon Community Foundation on addressing homelessness in our area as our Mission calls for us to care for the poor and vulnerable,” said Father Chris Fabre, Chief Mission Officer, Providence Newberg Medical Center. “Addressing homelessness is a key priority for our ministry and this is one step in supporting that initiative.” 

The Project Turnkey-McMinnville grant funds will be pooled with funds from Oregon Housing and Community Services and other funds sought through prospective intergovernmental partners. “YCAP’s motel sheltering project has been phenomenally successful at keeping people safe and moving them on to permanent, stable housing,” said Commissioner Casey Kulla, Yamhill County Board of Commissioners. “The purchase of a motel through Project Turnkey is our community’s opportunity to make this good work permanent, as we work towards a county where homelessness is brief and rare. Our most vulnerable residents will be safer and healthier because of this investment.”

The McMinnville project was selected, in part, for the broad outreach and community support. “Oregon Community Foundation is thrilled to partner with Providence and YCAP on this innovative Project Turnkey effort to benefit the residents of Yamhill County,” said Jenn Columbus, Regional Director (Northern Willamette Valley), Oregon Community Foundation “The community engagement strategy, enthusiasm to identify an appropriate facility, and key partners to secure additional funding demonstrate a clear commitment to finding supportive solutions here.”

Key benefits of Project-Turnkey-McMinnville – to be operated by Providence and YCAP – include:

  • Safe accommodation and support for Yamhill County community members in need
  • Provision of essentials such as food boxes, clothing, showers, hygiene items, etc.
  • Help to move people experiencing homelessness from crisis to stability.
  • Culturally specific, supportive services including:
    • On-site case management
    • Health care, including mental health services
    • Resource navigation
    • Linkages to permanent housing solutions.

“It is an honor to be on the front end of Project Turnkey, spearheading critical work with Providence, OCF and our supportive community partners,” said Alexandra Hendgen, Executive Director, YCAP. “This effort changes the landscape around homelessness in our community in a meaningful way, enacting resources that will make a difference in lives in this moment. Project Turnkey empowers the continuation of the YCAP non-congregate sheltering that has provided a strong path for Yamhill individuals and families to step into stable, positive housing solutions.”

Project Turnkey-Mid-Willamette Valley | MWVCAA and the ARCHES

The Project Turnkey grant will help MWVCAA support fire survivors from the Santiam Canyon. The shelter will be operated by a MWVCAA program called The Arches Project, which will provide connections to many supportive services throughout the broader community.

“We are really excited about expanding our ability to serve our broader community with much needed transitional housing,” says Jimmy Jones, Executive Director, Mid-Willamette Valley Community Action Agency. “MWVCAA will renovate this local motel to provide appropriate support for Santiam Canyon fire survivors.” Jones went on to express his appreciation for the work of Oregon Community Foundation and the Oregon Legislature to make this possible.

The Project Turnkey funds will be pooled with other funds sought through prospective intergovernmental partners. “We can solve complex problems together when community and government collaborate,” said Megan Loeb, Program Officer, Oregon Community Foundation.

“The Project Turnkey-Mid-Willamette Valley Grant completes the allocation of funds from the Project Turnkey Wildfire Fund, bringing the grand total to 400 units of housing throughout Oregon’s fire-affected counties.”

Key benefits of Project-Turnkey-Mid-Willamette Valley – to be operated by the ARCHES (a program of MWVCAA) – include:

  • Safe accommodation and support for fire survivors from the Santiam Canyon.
  • Provision of essentials such as food boxes, clothing, showers, hygiene items, etc.
  • Help to move fire survivors from crisis to stability.
  • Inclusive, supportive services including:
    • On-site case management
    • Health care, including mental health services
    • Resource navigation
    • Linkages to permanent housing solutions.

“Our world changed after the wildfires struck Santiam Canyon. We experienced the loss of housing and community as well as a sense of belonging and security,” said Ashley Hamilton, Program Director, the ARCHES, a project of MWVCAA. “Thanks to Project Turnkey, we can rebuild. We offer a safe place for people, access services for daily living and achieve long term housing and stability.”

Oregon Community Foundation offers support for Oregons housing needs along a continuum—from shelter to supportive housing to affordable housing to equitable home ownership—through a variety of tools, including research, grants, advocacy, and low-interest loans. OCFs administration of Project Turnkey is one example of the innovative, collaborative approaches underway to help more Oregonians find stable, affordable housing.

For a complete list of Project Turnkey grant awardees, please visit Project Turnkey online.

About Project Turnkey

The Oregon Legislature allocated a total of $65 million for Project Turnkey for the purpose of acquiring motels/hotels for use as non-congregate shelter for people experiencing homelessness or at-risk of homelessness. Two discrete funds were provided by the state: one totaling $30 million to be awarded in counties and tribal communities impacted by the 2020 wildfires; and one totaling $35 million for the remaining 28 counties in the state. Oregon Community Foundation is administering both funds through an application and selection process, with guidance from an Advisory Committee of state, local, and community stakeholders. For more information, please visit Project Turnkey online.

Providence Health & Services/Oregon
Providence Health & Services in Oregon offers a comprehensive array of health and education services through its eight hospitals, medical clinics, health plans, long-term care facilities and home health services. With more than 20,000 employees, Providence is the state’s largest private employer. Visit www.providence.org/oregon.

About Yamhill Community Action Partnership (YCAP)

YCAP assists residents of Yamhill County, through Client Services and Housing, Energy Services, a regional Food Bank, and Youth Services. To learn more, please visit: yamhillcap.org.

About Mid-Willamette Valley Community Action Agency

MWVCAA is the leading social services provider for Marion and Polk counties. To learn more, please visit: mwvcaa.org

About Oregon Community Foundation

Oregon Community Foundation puts donated money to work in Oregon – more than $100 million in grants and scholarships annually. Since 1973, OCF grantmaking, research, advocacy and community-advised solutions have helped individuals, families, businesses, and organizations create charitable funds to improve lives for all Oregonians. Impactful giving–time, talent, and resources from many generous Oregonians–creates measurable change. Throughout 2020, OCF responded quickly and urgently - distributing a record-setting $220 million in charitable dollars to more than 3,000 nonprofits throughout Oregon working to address urgent needs, stabilize communities and prepare for long-term recovery in Oregon. OCF donors responded to the magnitude of need, as reflected in a 44% increase in donor advised fund grantmaking from the previous year. For more information, please visit: oregoncf.org.

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Drone Footage of Project Turnkey-McMinnville Sitehttps://youtu.be/776ArTsBqFs

Courtesy of Providence Health & Services and Oregon Community Foundation




Attached Media Files: PT-McMinnville_PT-Mid-Willamette Valley_FINAL News Release_06 22 2021 , ProjectTurnkey-McMinnville Photo (4 of 4)__Courtesy of Providence and Oregon Community Foundation , ProjectTurnkey-McMinnville Photo (3 of 4)__Courtesy of Providence and Oregon Community Foundation , ProjectTurnkey-McMinnville Photo (2 of 4)__Courtesy of Providence and Oregon Community Foundation , ProjectTurnkey-McMinnville Photo (1 of 4)__Courtesy of Providence and Oregon Community Foundation , Project Turnkey Number Graphic_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation , Project Turnkey Oregon Map as of June 22, 2021 Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation

Fire danger leads to call for extreme caution celebrating the Fourth of July
Lane Co. Government - 06/22/21 9:00 AM

Lane County Parks, Lane Fire Authority and the Lane County Sheriff’s Office are urging caution when celebrating the Fourth of July this year, especially if your plans include parks along Fern Ridge Reservoir.

 

“Orchard Point and Richardson parks traditionally attract large crowds of people to celebrate the Fourth of July,” said Lane County Parks Manager Brett Henry. “Even though our community partners are not hosting a fireworks show over the reservoir this year, it’s important for park visitors to remember that fireworks are not allowed in any Lane County parks.”

 

To help park visitors enjoy the holiday safely, Lane County Park Rangers and volunteers from the Lane County Sheriff’s Mounted Posse will be on-hand at Orchard Point and Richardson parks.

 

“We enjoy getting to volunteer at community events,” said Posse volunteer Alan Murphy. “It allows us to serve our community by helping people be safe – and everyone really enjoys seeing and interacting with the volunteers and their horses.”

 

Drought conditions and an early start to fire season in the Willamette Valley require residents to exercise extreme caution with any flammable items Fourth of July, whether celebrating at a local park or at home.

 

“If you plan to use fireworks at home you should also have a plan to minimize the risk of injury and wildfire,” said Lane Fire Authority’s Lieutenant Tressa Miller. “Even sparklers burn at about 2,000 degrees and we want everyone to celebrate safely.”

 

Fireworks safety tips:

  • Never try to re-light or pick up fireworks that have not ignited fully.
  • Never point or throw fireworks at another person.
  • Keep a bucket of water or a garden hose handy in case of fire.
  • Never shoot fireworks off in metal or glass containers.
  • Submerge the spent device in a bucket of water for several minutes to prevent a trash fire.

 

Remember: fireworks are not allowed in any Lane County-owned or maintained park, including Armitage Park, Harbor Vista Campground, Orchard Point Park and Richardson Park. People found to be using fireworks in Lane County Parks may be removed. Park gates will close at 9:00 p.m. for day use areas.

 

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Applications open to serve on Lane County's redistricting committee
Lane Co. Government - 06/22/21 8:30 AM

Lane County’s Home Rule Charter requires that boundaries for Lane County commissioner districts be evaluated and updated at least once every ten years. The last redistricting effort was completed in 2011. The current redistricting process will be led by a committee of Lane County community members.

 

The Independent Redistricting Committee (IRC) will be composed of fifteen (15) members. Each commissioner will select one member and those five (5) will select the remaining ten (10) members. The IRC will be responsible for presenting between two (2) and four (4) redistricting options to the Board of County Commissioners before the end of October 2021.

 

The Home Rule Charter states: “In accordance with Federal, State, or County census figures, the boundaries of the five districts shall be drawn by the board of commissioners so as not to deny any person equal protection of the law.”

 

The Board of County Commissioners determined that the IRC will include people of color, different ethnicity, low income, urban and rural, a variety of ages, genders and gender identification, political affiliation and nonaffiliated voters, registered voters and non-registered voters.

 

Applications are available at www.LaneCountyOR.gov/IRC. Committee members must be residents of Lane County.

 

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Deer Creek Village Affordable Housing: First Residents Move-In (Photo)
Neighborworks Umpqua - 06/22/21 8:00 AM
Deer Creek Village outside
Deer Creek Village outside
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/6854/146024/thumb_20210617_151017.jpg

ROSEBURG, Ore., June 22, 2021 – The first residents have moved into NeighborWorks Umpqua's new 68-unit apartment complex, Deer Creek Village, located at 2843 NE Douglas Avenue. Hundreds of applications were carefully considered, and Deer Creek Village is a place that Veterans now call home.

The first resident to move into Deer Creek Village was a senior and disabled Veteran who recently moved from out of state to assist a family member who is also a Veteran. Other move-ins included Veterans with temporary living situations such as 2-year limited transitional housing and even a friend's couch.

  "I have watched Deer Creek being built from the framework over the last year. I have a bedroom, bathroom, and livingroom -- that is perfect for me. I take the elevator to the third floor but will probably start taking the stairs for exercise. I like everything about the apartment, including the fridge, stove, heat, and air-conditioning," says one of the residents.

Another resident, Rachel, who served in the Navy says, "I love this place -- I will be here forever. All of my utilities will be paid for." She also describes that the bus across the street is very convenient for easy access to town, and she can walk from Deer Creek to the bowling alley for recreation.

Designed by Studio C Architecture, Deer Creek Village is organized around a central courtyard and sets a new standard of affordable living with its energy-efficient features and modern amenities. The apartments are adjacent to serene wetlands and include a bicycle storage room, laundry facilities, an outdoor play area, and a community room with a kitchen. Upon move-in, and through a generous grant award from the Oregon Department of Veteran's Affairs and delivery by Servpro, Veterans will receive an apartment starter package. This kit contains almost everything they need except furniture: cookware, utensils, cleaning supplies, towels, bedding, and toiletries.

Deer Creek Village was made possible by both private and public funding. The project started with the generous donation of the land in 2015 by Rose and Robert Rothstein. Development began in 2019 as an $18M investment to address Roseburg's housing needs and is the first significant affordable housing development in Roseburg since 2013. U.S. Bank, Oregon Housing and Community Services, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Oregon Community Foundation, Enterprise Community Partners, and Roseburg Urban Renewal Agency enabled the development.

Veterans, individuals, homeless, those experiencing disabilities, and small families making less than 60% of the Area Median Income, or about $33,000 per year, can apply to live at Deer Creek Village. If Veterans apply today, they are moved to the top of the interest list.

For more information on Deer Creek Village, visit the NeighborWorks Umpqua website: http://www.nwumpqua.org/deer-creek/




Attached Media Files: Deer Creek Village outside , One of the first Veteran residents inside Deer Creek Village

Another Traffic Stop Leads to Drugs Off the Streets- Klamath County
Oregon State Police - 06/22/21 7:12 AM
Drugs Klamath
Drugs Klamath
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On June 19, 2021, at approximately 7:16 P.M. an OSP Trooper from the Klamath Falls Area Command stopped a vehicle for failure to drive within its lane on U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 264.  During the traffic stop, the Trooper noticed signs of criminal activity, and a consent search was conducted.  The search of the vehicle revealed approximately 55.1 pounds of methamphetamine, approximately 2.2 pounds of cocaine, and approximately 1,027 grams of suspected fentanyl pills concealed in the vehicle.

The driver was identified as Daniel Ponce Gonzalez (36) from Yakima, Washington, and the passenger was identified as Benjamin Madrigal Birrueta (20) from Madera, California.  Mr. Ponce Gonzalez and Mr. Madrigal Birrueta were lodged at the Klamath County Jail for Unlawful Possession and Delivery of Methamphetamine, Unlawful Possession and Delivery of Cocaine, Unlawful Possession and Delivery of a Schedule II Controlled Substance, and Possession of a Forged Instrument. 

The Oregon State Police was assisted by Agents from the Medford Offices of the Department of Homeland Security Investigations and the Drug Enforcement Administration.

 




Attached Media Files: Drugs Klamath

Mon. 06/21/21
UPDATED: SUBJECT FOUND - Deputies Searching for Missing 24 year-old Elkton Man With Down Syndrome (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/21/21 7:46 PM
Brett Beckley
Brett Beckley
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/5204/146029/thumb_Beckley_Brett.jpg

UPDATE 06/21/2021 7:40 PM

Deputies have located Brett, who is safe and un-injured. The Sheriff's Office would like to thank the public for their assistance. 

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ORIGINAL RELEASE 06/21/2021 5:00 PM

ELKTON, Ore. - Deputies are actively searching for 24 year-old Brett Beckley who went missing from his residence in the 1000-block of Shad Road Monday morning. 

On Monday, June 21, 2021 shortly before 4:15 pm, 9-1-1 dispatchers took a report that Brett had left his residence at approximately 2:00 am Monday morning in a light blue Yamaha golf cart with an aluminum diamond plated tool box in the back. He is described as 5'5'' 140lbs with brown hair and brown eyes. He was last known to be wearing a dark blue Patagonia fleece jacket, tie dye shirt, jeans and black Adidas shoes. Brett has down syndrome and is non-verbal. 

Anyone with who has seen Brett or knows of his whereabouts is asked to call the Sheriff's Office at (541) 440-4471.




Attached Media Files: Brett Beckley

Fatal Crash on Interstate 84 - Hood River County
Oregon State Police - 06/21/21 5:29 PM

On Sunday, June 20, 2021 at approximately 11:47 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Interstate 84 near mile post 67.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Subaru Impreza, operated by Enrique Sosa (21) from Mosier,  was westbound when it crashed through a guardrail, went down an embankment and stopped in the Columbia River.

Sosa and the juvenile passenger sustained fatal injuries and were pronounced deceased.

OSP was assisted by the Hood River County Sheriff's Office, Hood River Fire and Rescue, Skamania County Dive Team, and ODOT.


OSFM staging firefighting resources in Central Oregon ahead of forecast thunderstorms
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 06/21/21 5:22 PM

SALEM, Ore. – With lightning in the forecast and several parts of the state under a Red Flag Warning or a Fire Weather Watch, the Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal is staging firefighting resources in Central Oregon. 

This is a proactive move for the region to be better prepared and bolster any initial fire attack. These firefighters are not being assigned to a specific incident but will be an added resource and increase the state’s readiness if there is a fire.  

Two firefighting task forces, one from Marion County and one from Washington County, will be stationed in Central Oregon, ready to respond and help local resources in the event a wildfire erupts and threatens structures. These teams will be prepositioned for 72-hours but may stay longer if they are needed. 

“We know the conditions across the state are dry, and with thunderstorms in the forecast, even the smallest spark could trigger a wildfire, that is why we are prepositioning these resources,” Oregon State Fire Marshal Mariana Ruiz-Temple said. “We can’t control the weather, but we can plan for what we can control, and that is strategically placing resources ahead of this weather event.”

At this time, the OSFM is not deploying any of its Incident Management Teams, but they are ready in the event they need to be activated and deployed.

The OSFM encourages all Oregonians to be aware of the dry conditions and take the necessary precautions to avoid sparking a fire.

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Oregon reports 78 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 06/21/21 4:25 PM

June 21, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 78 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are two new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,756 the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 78 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 206,850.

Note: Today’s daily case count is unusually low.  Although a low case count is welcome news, OHA is interpreting this with caution. Reported case counts on Mondays are typically the lowest of the week, and some of the Local Public Health Authorities did not process laboratory reports Sunday. The reported number of new cases will be higher tomorrow.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 3,077 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 2,044 doses were administered on June 20 and 1,033 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on June 20.

The seven-day running average is now 11,820 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 2,439,167 first and second doses of Pfizer,1,705,394 first and second doses of Moderna and 162,789 single doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 2,353,753 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,104,707 have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series. The number of adult Oregonians needing vaccinations to reach the 70% threshold is 44,606. A daily countdown can be found on the OHA vaccinations page.  

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 2,937,825 doses of Pfizer, 2,219,460 doses of Moderna and 299,100 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 144, which is five fewer than yesterday. There are 36 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is one more than yesterday.

The total number of COVID-19 positive patient bed-days in the most recent seven days is 1,072, which is an 8.8% decrease from the previous seven days. The peak daily number of beds occupied by COVID-19 positive patients in the most recent seven days is 172.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (7), Clatsop (3), Columbia (2), Curry (2), Deschutes (3), Douglas (5), Jefferson (1), Josephine (8), Lane (13), Linn (8), Morrow (1), Multnomah (18), Union (1), Wasco (1), Yamhill (4).

Oregon’s 2,755th COVID-19 death is a 49-year-old woman from Linn county who tested positive on June 6 and died on June 19 at Samaritan Lebanon Community Hospital. She had no underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2756th COVID-19 death is a 54-year-old woman from Douglas county who tested positive on June 11 and died on June 20 at Mercy Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

 

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OHA hosting virtual town hall Tuesday to discuss Curry County transfer of public health services
Oregon Health Authority - 06/21/21 4:17 PM

June 21, 2021

Media contacts:     Jonathan Modie, Oregon Health Authority, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

OHA hosting virtual town hall Tuesday to discuss Curry County transfer of public health services

PORTLAND, Ore.—Oregon Health Authority is hosting a virtual town hall on Tuesday, June 22, from 5:30-6:30 p.m. to share information and answer questions about the transfer of Curry County’s public health services to OHA.

A panel of OHA representatives will do brief presentations and then take residents’ questions. The meeting can be accessed via Zoom at https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1605987595?pwd=ZjViYmszK1VEcHdOd2I3enlNSFg3QT09. Residents can ask questions via the Zoom chat feature; those unable to use the chat feature can submit questions to COVID19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orCOVID19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us.

Curry County is expected to complete the transfer of its public health services to OHA on July 1. The county Board of Commissioners approved a resolution in April to begin the transfer process.

As of May 2, OHA began providing a subset of statutorily required services, and beginning July 1, the remainder of those services will be provided directly by OHA, including:

  • Monitoring communicable diseases and controlling outbreaks, including the COVID-19 pandemic response.
  • Ensuring access to safe drinking water.
  • Ensuring access to WIC services.
  • Licensing and inspecting food, pool and lodging facilities.

For more information, visit https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/PROVIDERPARTNERRESOURCES/LOCALHEALTHDEPARTMENTRESOURCES/Pages/curry-County.aspx.

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Everyone has a right to know about and use OHA programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Cara Biddlecom: at 971-673-2284, 711 TTY, or a.m.biddlecom@state.or.us">cara.m.biddlecom@state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Fatal Crash on Hwy 140W - Klamath County
Oregon State Police - 06/21/21 4:06 PM

On June 20, 2021 at approximately 7:35 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 140W near milepost 43.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Harley Davidson motorcycle, operated by David Erickson (70) of Klamath Falls, was eastbound when it went off the roadway and crashed.

Erickson was transported by air ambulance to the hospital where they were pronounced deceased.

OSP was assisted by the Klamath County Sheriff's Office, Rocky Point Fire & Medical, and the USFS


State Fire Marshal Asks Oregonians to Keep Fireworks Use Legal and Safe
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 06/21/21 1:51 PM
OSFM Firework Safety
OSFM Firework Safety
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SALEM, Ore. - The Office of State Fire Marshal, the Oregon Fire Service, natural resource agencies, and Oregon licensed fireworks wholesalers ask Oregonians to “keep it legal and keep it safe” when using all fireworks. The 2021 Oregon fireworks retail sales season opens June 23rd and runs through July 6th. The OSFM and its partners want everyone to know what fireworks are legal to use in Oregon without a permit, where residents can use them, and how to use fireworks safely.

In 2020, the U.S. saw a record-setting year when it comes to the consumption of fireworks. American’s consumed 385.8 million pounds of fireworks, a 55 percent increase from the previous year. According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, nationwide, children 0 to 4 years old are injured by fireworks and treated at an emergency department more than any other age group. (5.3 injuries per 100,000 people). Older teens, 15 to 19 years old, have the second-highest injury rate (4.4 injuries per 100,000 people). Males represent 66 percent of all firework-related injuries.

In Oregon, between 2016 and 2020, Multnomah, Washington, Clackamas, and Lane Counties have had the highest rates of firework-related injuries.

With an arid spring, much of Oregon experiencing some form of drought, and concerns over an active wildfire season, the Office of the Oregon State Fire Marshal is asking people to be aware of the dry conditions. Always have a bucket of water on hand to drown spent or used fireworks, have a charged hose nearby, and never light fireworks near dry grass or areas that could catch fire easily.

“We ask that those using fireworks be responsible when using them,” Assistant Chief Deputy with the Office of the Oregon State Marshal Mark Johnston said. “Every year across the state, we see fires sparked because of improper use or use of illegal fireworks. Our message is to keep it legal and keep it safe as people celebrate the holiday.”

In Oregon, residents and visitors can only purchase consumer legal fireworks from permitted fireworks retailers and stands. State regulations limit where those fireworks may be used. Fireworks can also start structural fires that threaten lives and property, as we have seen in past years. People who plan to visit public lands and parks for the July 4 holiday are asked to leave all fireworks at home. The use of fireworks is prohibited in national parks and forests, on Bureau of Land Management lands, on U.S. Fish and Wildlife properties, on state beaches, in state parks, and in state campgrounds.

For residents who purchase legal fireworks, the OSFM encourages everyone to practice the four Bs of safe fireworks use:

  • Be prepared before lighting fireworks: keep water available by using a garden hose or bucket.
  • Be safe when lighting fireworks: keep children and pets away from fireworks.
  • Be responsible after lighting fireworks: never relight a dud. Please wait for 15 to 20 minutes, then soak it in a bucket of water before disposal.
  • Be aware: use only legal fireworks and use them only in legal places.

Oregon law prohibits the possession, use, or sale of any firework that flies into the air, explodes, or travels more than 12 feet horizontally on the ground without a permit issued by the OSFM. Fireworks, commonly called bottle rockets, Roman candles, and firecrackers, are illegal in Oregon without a permit. Officials may seize illegal fireworks and charge offenders with a class B misdemeanor, which could result in a fine of up to $2,500 per. Those who misuse fireworks or allow fireworks to cause damage are liable and may be required to pay fire suppression costs or other damage. Parents are also liable for fireworks damage caused by their children.

The OSFM has published FAQs for commonly answered questions about the sale and legal use of consumer fireworks, permits for the retail sale of fireworks, and state rules for their use and enforcement activities. OSFM’s fireworks education materials for sharing on social media also can be found on its website.

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Attached Media Files: OSFM Firework Safety

Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Weekday Update - June 21, 2021
Douglas Co. Government - 06/21/21 12:03 PM
DCCRT
DCCRT
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/6789/146012/thumb_DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_WEB_Logo_72320.jpg

Our local COVID-19 updates represent the coordinated effort of the agencies that make up the DCCRT

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – June 21, 2021

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - WEEKDAY UPDATE

 

(Douglas County, Ore.)  DOUGLAS COUNTY WEEKEND RECAP: JUNE 19 & 20, 2021

On Saturday, June 19, 2021 we had ELEVEN (11) people with new positive test results, TWO (2) new presumptives, 156 cases in isolation, 265 cases in quarantine (Total in isolation and quarantine 421) and TWELVE (12) Douglas County COVID-19 patients being hospitalized, six locally and six out-of-the-area.

 

On Sunday, June 20, 2021 we had THREE (3) people with new positive test results, 152 cases in isolation, 240 cases in quarantine (Total in isolation and quarantine 392), THIRTEEN (13) Douglas County COVID-19 patients being hospitalized, seven locally and six out-of-the-area and ONE (1) death.  Our combined weekend total was: THIRTEEN (13) new people with positive test results and TWO (2) new presumptives, bringing our weekend total of cases of people with positive test results and new presumptives in Douglas County to 3,880.

 

COVID-19 RELATED DEATH OF A DOUGLAS COUNTY RESIDENT

Our Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer, has confirmed the death of a Douglas County resident related to the COVID-19 virus. Our eighty-fourth COVID-19 related death is a 54-year-old woman who was diagnosed with COVID-19 on Friday, June 11, 2021 and passed away on Sunday, June 20, 2021.  In the interest of privacy for the loved ones of this resident, no additional information will be released. Each death related to COVID-19 is painful for all Douglas County residents, and a sad reminder of the terrible impact COVID-19 has had in our local communities. The Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Dr. Dannenhoffer, DPHN and the DCCRT team extend our heartfelt condolences and sympathies to all family members, friends, relatives, co-workers and community members of those who have passed after contracting this deadly virus.

 

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 UPDATE FOR MONDAY, JUNE 21, 2021

As of 12:00 pm today, Monday, June 21, 2021, there are EIGHT (8) people with new positive test results to report following our Saturday, June 19 and Sunday, June 20, 2021 recap presented above.  The total number of cases of people with positive test results and presumptives in Douglas County is now at 3,891. Currently, there are FIFTEEN (15) Douglas County COVID-19 patients that are being hospitalized, eight locally and seven out-of-the-area. Our Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, under the direction of the Douglas County Board of Commissioners, continue to devote all resources available to our local COVID response.

 

Douglas County, OR - COVID-19 - Case Update Chart

Date

Wednesday,

June 16, 2021

Thursday,

June 17, 2021

Friday,

June 18, 2021

Saturday/Sunday

June 19&20, 2021

Today, Monday,

June 21, 2021

Total COVID-19 Cases

3,831

3,853

3,867

3,883

3,891

People w/ Positive PCR or Antigen Test Results

3,650

3,672

3,686

3,700

3,708

Presumptive

181

181

181

183

183

Total Currently Hospitalized

12

11

11

13

15

Total Currently in Isolation

157

155

154

152

155

Total COVID-19 Related Deaths

82

82

83

84

84

Our daily update includes the total number of cases in Douglas County, which combines people with positive test results and presumptives, as well as a breakout of those case numbers. There will be times when a presumptive will move to a positive test result, and our total case number will not change because the case has already been counted.

 

LOCAL CONTACTS AND CASES BEING SUPPORTED IN ISOLATION AND QUARANTINE

Currently, DPHN is supporting 155 cases in isolation, as well as another 251 contacts in quarantine in Douglas County. Isolation is recommended for confirmed and presumptive cases, quarantine is recommended for contacts of confirmed or presumptive cases.  Currently, staff is supporting a total of 406 total contacts and cases in isolation or quarantine.  This number represents a snapshot of the significant amount of work being done locally to help control the spread of COVID.

 

DOUGLAS COUNTY TIGER TEAM HOSTS FREE POP-UP COVID-19 VACCINATION CLINICS

It’s another busy week for the Tiger Team.  The Douglas County Tiger Team continues to bring free COVID-19 vaccines directly to rural areas via our mobile medical vans (MMV) via their pop up vaccine clinics.  They are visiting businesses, farms, fire stations and other locations in our smaller remote communities in Douglas County. The Douglas County Board of Commissioners, who have led the charge for our Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team efforts since the beginning, have coordinated with DPHN to organize our local Tiger Team to manage our vaccine outreach efforts through ‘pop-up’ vaccine clinics.

 

The Douglas County Tiger Team will be hosting FREE POP UP COVID VACCINE CLINICS at the locations listed below.  The clinics are currently open to anyone 18 years of age and older, and preregistration is not necessary:

 

  • Tuesday, June 22, 2021: Melqua-Melrose and surrounding area. Clinic will be at the Coles Valley Vineyards at 10003 Melqua Road in Umpqua from 8:00 am to 4:00 pm.
  • Wednesday, June 23, 2021: Camas Valley and surrounding area. Clinic will be at the Camas Valley Fire Department at 142 Burma Road in Camas Valley from 8:00 am to 12:00 pm.
  • Wednesday, June 23, 2021: Tenmile and surrounding area. Clinic will be at the Tenmile Fire Department at 158 Reston Road in Roseburg from 1:00 am to 4:00 pm.

 

Our Tiger Team coordinates with Umpqua Valley Ambulance to bring a certified vaccinator and a medical assistant to each clinic.  If you are interested in having the Douglas County Tiger Team come to your business, fire department, farm or town to provide a pop-up vaccine clinic or if you have any questions about our Douglas County Tiger Teams and want a schedule of their upcoming pop-up vaccination clinics, please call (541) 670-3110 or our local COVID-19 Hotline at (541) 464-6550Click here for the calendar listing of the upcoming Tiger Team Pop Up Vaccine Clinics

 

FREE DRIVE-THROUGH COVID-19 VACCINATION EVENT SATURDAY, JUNE 26 AT THE DOUGLAS COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS

Douglas Public Health Network (DPHN), Douglas County Board of Commissioners, and Aviva Health are collaborating again to host the next mass drive-through COVID-19 vaccination event on Saturday, June 26, 2021, from 9:00 am to 1:00 pm at the Douglas County Fairgrounds.

 

We are planning to utilize the Pfizer (two dose) and the J&J (single dose) vaccines at this event.  Eligibility for this event includes:

1) ALL residents of Douglas County ages 12 years old and older.

2) Second doses of the Pfizer vaccine to those residents who received their first dose at one of our drive through COVID-19 vaccination events. 

 

Residents DO NOT need to pre-register or schedule an appointment for this event.  If you have questions please contact the phone numbers provided below:

  • Call (541) 464-6500.
  • If you need help in Spanish, you can call and leave a message on our Spanish Help Line at (541) 671-1355.
  • Please do not call, contact or go to the Douglas County Fairgrounds to ask about the vaccination event.
  • For those residents that received their first dose of the Pfizer vaccine at one of our other drive-through events, you can just show up at this event.

 

Pre-registration is not required, just show up and get your vaccine.  All residents ages 12 and over are eligible! #itsyourturn; #itsfreeitseasy; #C19Vaccine.  For those ages 12 to 14, it is required that a parent or guardian accompany you and give written consent for the vaccine.

 

AVIVA HAS A DEDICATED FREE COVID-19 VACCINATION CLINIC SITE IN ROSEBURG 

Shared from Aviva Health.  Aviva Health opened a dedicated COVID-19 vaccination clinic site at 4221 NE Stephens Street, Suite 101 in Roseburg, just across the street from its main Roseburg Clinic location near Costco.  The new COVID-19 Vaccination Clinic opened Wednesday, May 18, 2021, and offers free COVID-19 vaccines by appointment.   The new COVID-19 vaccination clinic will be open Monday through Friday, from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm and is open for residents ages 12 and older.  To schedule an appointment during the week please call (541) 672-9596.

 

As a reminder: Parental or guardian consent is required to vaccinate residents 12 to 14 years old.  Written consent can be obtained in advance.  Under Oregon law, minors 15 years of age and older may consent to medical treatment, including vaccinations, when provided by a physician, physician assistant, naturopath, nurse practitioner, dentist or optometrist, or other professionals operating under the license of these providers; however, families are encouraged to make decisions about vaccinations together.

 

COVID-19 VACCINE ELIGIBILITY OPEN FOR EVERYONE 12 YEARS OLD AND OLDER

According to the CDC, State of Oregon and OHA, ALL residents ages 12 years old and older are eligible to get the COVID-19 Vaccine.  As of May 13, 2021, the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine has been approved for people ages 12 to 15, joining those 16 and above who are already eligible.  The good news, according to Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, our Douglas County Public Health Officer, is that we have plenty of vaccine and will be giving to anyone 12 and above who wants it. Remember, “it’s your turn!” So, locate a vaccine location near you, get signed up and show up to get your COVID-19 vaccine today!

 




  1. Attached Media Files: DCCRT
PacificSource Welcomes Erin Fair Taylor as Vice President of Medicaid Programs
PacificSource Health Plans - 06/21/21 11:20 AM
PacificSource's Erin Fair Taylor
PacificSource's Erin Fair Taylor
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/2392/146009/thumb_DSC_4479-Edit_1200px.jpg

(Springfield, Ore.) June 21, 2021— PacificSource welcomes Erin Fair Taylor as its new vice president of Medicaid programs. In this role, Fair Taylor will lead and guide the continued growth and development of PacificSource’s Medicaid line of business, known as PacificSource Community Solutions, which currently serves more than 297,000 Medicaid members throughout the state of Oregon.

Fair Taylor comes to PacificSource from CareOregon, where she most recently served as their chief strategy officer. She also served as their chief legal officer and in several additional key roles during her twelve years with the organization. During her time with CareOregon, she also served as the interim director of government relations for Health Share of Oregon. Prior to that, she served as chief of staff for the office of State Senator Dr. Alan Bates with the Oregon Legislature.

“The regions where we provide Medicaid services have expanded dramatically over the past few years, and so it was critical that we find someone with extensive experience in this space, and the thoughtful leadership needed to support the local communities where we do business. Erin fits that bill perfectly and we are confident she will take good care of our valued members,” said Ken Provencher, president and CEO of PacificSource.

Fair Taylor received her juris doctor degree from the University of Oregon Law School, a Master of Public Health degree from Tulane University School of Public Health & Tropical Medicine, and a bachelor’s degree in anthropology from the University of Florida. Outside of the office she enjoys hiking and playing outdoors with her spouse, three kids, and dog.

About PacificSource Health Plans:

PacificSource Health Plans is an independent, not-for-profit community health plan serving the Northwest. Founded in 1933, PacificSource has local offices throughout Oregon, Idaho, Montana and Washington. The PacificSource family of companies employs more than 1,500 people and serves over 523,700 individuals throughout the Greater Northwest. For more information, visit PacificSource.com.

 

About PacificSource Community Solutions

PacificSource Community Solutions is part of the PacificSource family of companies that provides Medicaid services to Central Oregon, the Columbia Gorge, Lane, Marion, and Polk Counties.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PacificSource's Erin Fair Taylor

Sam's Valley Plane Crash Kills Pilot - UPDATE (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/21/21 10:58 AM
2021-06/6186/146008/plane_crash_3.jpg
2021-06/6186/146008/plane_crash_3.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/6186/146008/thumb_plane_crash_3.jpg

Case 21-3201

WHITE CITY, Ore. – A single-engine aircraft crashed this weekend in Sam’s Valley, Ore., killing the sole occupant. Jackson County Sheriff’s Office (JCSO) deputies and personnel from Fire District #3 were called to the scene of a small, single-engine Piper Tri-Pacer aircraft crash Sunday afternoon at the Beagle Sky Ranch Airport in White City, Ore. The aircraft went down while attempting to land at approx. 2:55 p.m., killing the aircraft’s pilot, Henry Levin, 80, of Medford, Ore. Levin’s next of kin has been notified.

The aircraft crashed in the backyard of a residence in the 15000 block of Jones Road in White City, Ore., clipping the top of several trees nearby. The crash ignited a small grass fire, which was quickly extinguished by citizens and Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) personnel.

Federal authorities will investigate the crash circumstances. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) have been advised of the incident.

Federal authorities may release further information at a later time.




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/6186/146008/plane_crash_3.jpg , 2021-06/6186/146008/plane_crash_2.jpg , 2021-06/6186/146008/plane_crash_1.jpg , 2021-06/6186/146008/40A7E557-5C58-491A-A028-0D53B92BE22B.jpeg

OHA long-term care facility report shows 84% of residents, 62% of staff vaccinated against COVID-19
Oregon Health Authority - 06/21/21 9:38 AM

EDITORS: A media availability with Dr. Becca Pierce of the Heathcare-Associated Infections Program at OHA is scheduled for 10 a.m. TODAY. Zoom link: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1610679707?pwd=aXJkVEpmZ0sybkdYb0s3MSt2R3M2Zz09.

June 21, 2021

Media contacts:     OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA long-term care facility report shows 84% of residents, 62% of staff vaccinated against COVID-19

Vaccination percentages lower in southern, eastern Oregon

PORTLAND, Ore.—A new Oregon Health Authority report shows that the state’s push to vaccinate at least 75% of all long-term care facility residents and employees—through vaccine clinics and ongoing vaccination maintenance efforts—is paying off.

The Oregon Health Authority Interim Long-Term Care Facility (LTCF) COVID-19 Vaccination Report shows that the percentage of vaccinated residents among reporting long-term care facilities exceeds the state’s 75% target for COVID-19 vaccination. It summarizes vaccination data voluntarily reported by 62% of Oregon’s licensed nursing, residential care and assisted living facilities that serve older adults and people with disabilities.

As of May 9, 2021, 84% of residents at long-term care facilities that reported data have been completely vaccinated against COVID-19, and 62% of long-term care staff have been completely vaccinated, according to the report. A completely vaccinated person is an individual who has received both doses of a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine or one dose of a single-dose vaccine.

Residents and staff at long-term care facilities are ever changing. The goal is to have vaccine maintenance plans in place to eventually maintain a 75% rate of vaccination among residents and staff at any point in time.

Geographical variations also were observed in the long-term care facility vaccination report’s findings, including that vaccination percentages were lower in southern and eastern Oregon. Percentages also differed between facility types: Vaccination percentages were higher among long-term care residents in residential care and assisted living facilities than in nursing facilities.

“This data collection is a natural extension of our program’s work to track vaccination and provide infection control support in these settings,” said Rebecca Pierce, Ph.D., manager of the Healthcare-Associated Infections Program at the OHA Public Health Division.

“Nursing, assisted-living, and residential care facilities continue to be at risk for spread of the virus that causes COVID-19 given their size and congregate nature. Residents in these settings are at elevated risk for serious health consequences from the virus. Vaccination remains our No. 1 tool to prevent spread and serious illness from COVID-19 in these settings.”

Reporting of vaccination data for residents and staff was voluntary for long-term care facilities. The Oregon Department of Human Services and the federal Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) have since required long-term care facilities they regulate to report vaccination data, effective June 1 and June 14, respectively.

The key to bolstering vaccinations among long-term care staff, Pierce explained, is ready access to vaccines and good information. “Long-term care facility staff should be able to get vaccinated quickly and conveniently, and staff and residents should be able to access reliable information from trusted sources about COVID-19 vaccines.”

###


Oregon's 9-1-1 Program First in Nation to Securely Deliver Lifesaving Location Information into Statewide Network
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 06/21/21 9:14 AM
Lumen Logo
Lumen Logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/3986/146004/thumb_Lumen_Logo.png

SALEM, Ore. -- June 21, 2021 -- Oregon’s 9-1-1 Program and RapidSOS, an emergency response data platform, announced today a partnership to deliver lifesaving enhanced location data to each of the state’s 43 9-1-1 centers. Oregon is the first in the nation to securely deploy RapidSOS into an existing, secure statewide foundational Emergency Services IP Network (ESInet), powered by Lumen. 

“The existing 9-1-1 system used to locate cell phone calls is over 20 years old, designed long before smartphones or GPS,” explained Oregon State 9-1-1 Program Manager Frank Kuchta. “When a person calls 9-1-1 from a cell phone, the dispatcher can’t see the caller’s exact location; instead, they have to rely on the caller’s wireless carrier for the information. This data comes from a cell tower that could put the caller miles away from where they physically are depending on several variables, including proximity to the cell tower, topography and the connecting technology.”

The RapidSOS Platform securely delivers real-time data from smartphones and sensors to 9-1-1 centers, helping 9-1-1 personnel quickly verify emergencies and providing critical location and additional data to effectively dispatch first responders.

Oregon’s foundational ESInet provides secure transport of 9-1-1 location data and other services for delivery across the state. The flexible network enables Oregon 9-1-1 centers to increase situational awareness by integrating innovative platforms such as RapidSOS.

“Of the 2 million 9-1-1 emergency calls received across the state each year, 80% are made using a wireless device,” said Kuchta. “RapidSOS provides an extra level of value by increasing location accuracy so Oregonians can be better located in an emergency when time matters most.”

According to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), more than 10,000 lives could annually be saved nationwide if 9-1-1 could locate wireless callers faster, allowing first responders to assist callers sooner.

Oregon’s 9-1-1 Program, Lumen and RapidSOS implemented the solution in early May 2021, and the state’s 9-1-1 centers currently using RapidSOS have already noticed improved location accuracy resulting in a more timely response in real-world scenarios. They are also seeing a cost benefit; the data allows 9-1-1 centers to eliminate added expenses associated with purchasing costly and redundant distributed networks, security devices, end-user licenses and the ongoing maintenance costs associated with acquiring supplemental caller location information.

Jessica Reed, Vice President of Strategy and Global Partners at RapidSOS, added, “We’re united in our commitment to empower safer, stronger communities with intelligent, data-driven emergency response worldwide. Together with the state of Oregon, we’re providing people with an added layer of safety and security and supporting our heroic first responders in saving millions of lives annually.”

Lifesaving emergency data available via the RapidSOS Platform is securely transmitted over Oregon’s foundational ESInet utilizing Transport Layer Security (TLS), a fundamental security function that encrypts the data and employs a trusted certificate exchange. 

About Oregon 9-1-1 Program

Established in 1981 by the Oregon Legislature, the State 9-1-1 Program provides immediate access from all telephones to critical public and private safety services within Oregon. The state is home to 43 9-1-1 centers that cover its 36 counties. The State 9-1-1 Program is part of the Oregon Office of Emergency Management; learn more at Oregon.gov/oem/911.

About RapidSOS

In partnership with public safety, RapidSOS has created the world’s first emergency response data platform that securely links life-saving data from over 350M connected devices directly to emergency services and first responders. Through its platform, RapidSOS provides intelligent data that supports over 4,800 Emergency Communications Centers worldwide, across 150 million emergency calls annually. Together with our RapidSOS Ready emergency community, RapidSOS is supporting first responders in saving millions of lives annually. To learn more about our technology that’s creating life-saving connections, visit www.rapidsos.com.

About Lumen

Lumen is guided by our belief that humanity is at its best when technology advances the way we live and work. With approximately 450,000 route fiber miles and serving customers in more than 60 countries, we deliver the fastest, most secure platform for applications and data to help businesses, government and communities deliver amazing experiences. Learn more about the Lumen network, edge cloud, security, communication and collaboration solutions and our purpose to further human progress through technology at news.lumen.com/home, LinkedIn: /lumentechnologies, Twitter: @lumentechco, Facebook: /lumentechnologies, Instagram: @lumentechnologies and YouTube: /lumentechnologies. Learn more about Lumen public sector capabilities on Twitter at @lumengov and on LinkedIn at @lumenpublicsector.

# # #

You can get this document in other languages, large print, braille, or a format you prefer. For assistance, call 971-719-1183 or email language@oem.or.us. We accept all relay calls, or you can dial 711.




Attached Media Files: Lumen Logo , RapidSOS Logo , Oregon's 9-1-1 Program Now Provides Lifesaving Technology , OEM Logo

London Road Safety Corridor goes into effect July 4
Lane Co. Government - 06/21/21 8:30 AM

To reduce DUII, speeding, and the number of people killed and injured, Lane County has designated London Road as a Safety Corridor which doubles traffic fines. The designation includes the first seven miles of London Road, from Latham Road to Cottage Grove Reservoir Road. The doubling of fees will be effective July 4, 2021 through July 5, 2023.

 

In recent years, multiple people have been killed and seriously injured in traffic crashes on London Road. All of those crashes involved driving under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol (DUII) and most involved excessive speeds. The most recent speed data, collected in February 2021, identified 36 percent of drivers exceeding the 55 mph speed limit with the greatest recorded speed at 90 mph.

 

In partnership with the Association of Oregon Counties, Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT), and South Lane Fire and Rescue, Lane County will be guiding safety actions on the London Road Safety Corridor. Safety actions include:

 

  • Engineering:  To reduce head-on collisions, centerline rumble strips were installed in 2019.  To increase visibility of the travel lanes, the pavement markings will be upgraded in summer 2021. To reduce roadway departure crashes, guardrails and curve warning signs will be installed in summer 2023.

 

  • Enforcement:  The Lane County Sheriff’s Office will provide additional traffic safety patrols thanks to grant funding from Oregon Impact. Increased fines are intended to deter people from violating traffic laws.

 

Violation

Includes

Presumptive Fine

Enhanced Fine

Class A

30 mph over speed limit

$440

$875

Class B

21-30 mph over limit

$265

$525

Class C

11-20 mph over limit

$165

$325

Class D

1-10 mph over limit

$115

$225

 

  • Education:  Public service announcements, press releases, and other public education campaigns will be created throughout the two-year program.

 

Lane County is also asking the community to weigh in on how residents can help prevent driving under the influence of intoxicants. An online survey is available at www.lanecountyor.gov/LRSC.

 

Postcards promoting the survey and providing more information about the London Road Safety Corridor were mailed to Cottage Grove households in June as part of a safety grant from Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT).

 

###


Sun. 06/20/21
Oregon reports 200 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death
Oregon Health Authority - 06/20/21 11:17 AM

June 20, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 200 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death

PORTLAND, Ore. — There is one new COVID-19-related death in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,754, Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

OHA reported 200 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 206,774.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 10,006 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 5,675 doses were administered on June 19 and 4,331 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on June 19.

The seven-day running average is now 12,724 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered a total of 2,437,234 first and second doses of Pfizer, 1,704,526 first and second doses of Moderna and 162,520 single doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines. As of today, 2,102,735 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series. There are 2,352,425 people who have had at least one dose.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 2,921,715 doses of Pfizer, 2,216,660 doses of Moderna and 299,100 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 149, which is five more than yesterday. There are 35 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is four more than yesterday.

The total number of COVID-19 positive patient bed-days in the most recent seven days is 1,102, which is an 8.7% decrease from the previous seven days. The peak daily number of beds occupied by COVID-19 positive patients in the most recent seven days is 174.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (1), Benton (5), Clackamas (19), Clatsop (5), Columbia (5), Crook (1), Curry (3), Deschutes (13), Douglas (6), Harney (2), Jackson (6), Jefferson (1), Josephine (10), Klamath (1), Lane (19), Linn (9), Marion (21), Multnomah (42), Polk (4), Union (3), Washington (21), Yamhill (3).

Oregon’s 2,754th death is a 74-year-old woman from Lane County who tested positive May 22 and died June 18 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at RiverBend. She had underlying conditions.

County

Total Cases1

Total deaths2

Baker

1,011

15

Benton

3,264

22

Clackamas

18,925

235

Clatsop

1,055

9

Columbia

1,919

29

Coos

2,166

37

Crook

1,292

23

Curry

708

11

Deschutes

10,015

82

Douglas

3,879

82

Gilliam

80

1

Grant

550

7

Harney

433

9

Hood River

1,216

33

Jackson

11,535

146

Jefferson

2,368

39

Josephine

3,598

72

Klamath

4,776

78

Lake

467

8

Lane

13,896

164

Lincoln

1,430

21

Linn

5,603

80

Malheur

3,614

63

Marion

23,425

323

Morrow

1,153

16

Multnomah

40,354

614

Polk

3,993

56

Sherman

67

1

Tillamook

660

4

Umatilla

8,593

87

Union

1,498

24

Wallowa

194

5

Wasco

1,443

30

Washington

26,781

248

Wheeler

35

1

Yamhill

4,778

79

Grand Total

206,774

2,754

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases

ELRs received 6/19

County

Negative ELRs

Positive ELRs

Total ELRs

Percent Positivity

Baker

7

2

9

22.2%

Benton

121

5

126

4.0%

Clackamas

910

29

939

3.1%

Clatsop

96

8

104

7.7%

Columbia

87

4

91

4.4%

Coos

62

2

64

3.1%

Crook

69

1

70

1.4%

Curry

24

3

27

11.1%

Deschutes

391

14

405

3.5%

Douglas

107

9

116

7.8%

Grant

4

1

5

20.0%

Harney

11

1

12

8.3%

Hood River

73

0

73

0.0%

Jackson

366

10

376

2.7%

Jefferson

39

2

41

4.9%

Josephine

221

18

239

7.5%

Klamath

34

1

35

2.9%

Lake

4

2

6

33.3%

Lane

570

17

587

2.9%

Lincoln

58

3

61

4.9%

Linn

344

12

356

3.4%

Malheur

39

1

40

2.5%

Marion

446

21

467

4.5%

Morrow

8

0

8

0.0%

Multnomah

1,925

64

1,989

3.2%

Polk

110

14

124

11.3%

Sherman

2

0

2

0.0%

Tillamook

31

0

31

0.0%

Umatilla

110

8

118

6.8%

Union

16

1

17

5.9%

Wallowa

9

0

9

0.0%

Wasco

49

0

49

0.0%

Washington

1,312

47

1,359

3.5%

Wheeler

1

0

1

0.0%

Yamhill

223

3

226

1.3%

Statewide

7,879

303

8,182

3.7%

Cumulative ELRs

County

Negative ELRs

Positive ELRs

Total ELRs

Percent Positivity

Baker

12,891

1,908

14,799

12.9%

Benton

154,799

4,950

159,749

3.1%

Clackamas

497,158

29,747

526,905

5.6%

Clatsop

37,753

1,812

39,565

4.6%

Columbia

47,699

2,612

50,311

5.2%

Coos

51,855

2,638

54,493

4.8%

Crook

22,191

1,638

23,829

6.9%

Curry

12,479

607

13,086

4.6%

Deschutes

214,503

12,582

227,085

5.5%

Douglas

91,747

4,366

96,113

4.5%

gilliam

1,371

63

1,434

4.4%

Grant

7,256

483

7,739

6.2%

Harney

4,749

470

5,219

9.0%

Hood River

34,689

1,761

36,450

4.8%

Jackson

239,420

17,449

256,869

6.8%

Jefferson

22,060

2,226

24,286

9.2%

Josephine

84,408

4,222

88,630

4.8%

Klamath

55,555

5,470

61,025

9.0%

Lake

6,363

468

6,831

6.9%

Lane

543,303

16,779

560,082

3.0%

Lincoln

47,054

2,779

49,833

5.6%

Linn

159,709

10,004

169,713

5.9%

Malheur

28,480

5,299

33,779

15.7%

Marion

384,797

35,015

419,812

8.3%

Morrow

8,263

1,387

9,650

14.4%

Multnomah

1,155,879

61,285

1,217,164

5.0%

Polk

79,587

5,297

84,884

6.2%

Sherman

1,567

76

1,643

4.6%

Tillamook

16,962

669

17,631

3.8%

Umatilla

73,541

9,594

83,135

11.5%

Union

23,703

1,898

25,601

7.4%

Wallowa

3,573

198

3,771

5.3%

Wasco

37,503

1,804

39,307

4.6%

Washington

715,871

44,323

760,194

5.8%

Wheeler

783

34

817

4.2%

Yamhill

150,825

7,831

158,656

4.9%

Statewide

5,030,346

299,744

5,330,090

5.6%

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.


Sat. 06/19/21
Oregon reports 289 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 06/19/21 2:12 PM

June 19, 2021

Media Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 289 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are three new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,753, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 289 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 206,578.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 13,670 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 7,469 doses were administered on June 18 and 6,201 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on June 18.

The 7-day running average is now 13,855 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered a total of 2,430,864 first and second doses of Pfizer, 1,701,683 first and second doses of Moderna and 161,732 single doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines. As of today, 2,095,450 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series. There are 2,349,356 people who have had at least one dose.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 2,921,715 doses of Pfizer, 2,216,660 doses of Moderna and 299,100 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 144, which is six fewer than yesterday. There are 31 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is six fewer than yesterday.

The total number of COVID-19 positive patient bed-days in the most recent seven days is 1,116, which is a 10.1% decrease from the previous seven days. The peak daily number of beds occupied by COVID-19 positive patients in the most recent seven days is 174.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (1), Benton (5), Clackamas (32), Clatsop (6), Columbia (7), Crook (2), Curry (5), Deschutes (16), Douglas (15), Gilliam (4), Grant (2), Harney (1), Jackson (15), Jefferson (4), Josephine (13), Klamath (1), Lane (15), Lincoln (3), Linn (22), Malheur (4), Marion (34), Multnomah (36), Polk (12), Umatilla (4), Union (3), Wasco (5), Washington (20) and Yamhill (2).

Oregon’s 2,751st death is a 96-year-old woman from Lane County who tested positive on June 14 and died on June 18 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,752nd death is a 73-year-old woman from Douglas County who tested positive on June 13 and died on June 17 at Mercy Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,753rd death is an 80-year-old man from Polk County who tested positive on June 14 and died on June 18 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

County

Total Cases1

Total deaths2

Baker

1,010

15

Benton

3,259

22

Clackamas

18,905

235

Clatsop

1,050

9

Columbia

1,915

29

Coos

2,166

37

Crook

1,291

23

Curry

705

11

Deschutes

10,002

82

Douglas

3,873

82

Gilliam

80

1

Grant

550

7

Harney

431

9

Hood River

1,216

33

Jackson

11,529

146

Jefferson

2,367

39

Josephine

3,588

72

Klamath

4,775

78

Lake

467

8

Lane

13,877

163

Lincoln

1,430

21

Linn

5,594

80

Malheur

3,614

63

Marion

23,404

323

Morrow

1,153

16

Multnomah

40,316

614

Polk

3,989

56

Sherman

67

1

Tillamook

660

4

Umatilla

8,593

87

Union

1,495

24

Wallowa

194

5

Wasco

1,443

30

Washington

26,760

248

Wheeler

35

1

Yamhill

4,775

79

Grand Total

206,578

2,753

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases

ELRs received 6/18

County

Negative ELRs

Positive ELRs

Total ELRs

Percent Positivity

Baker

37

2

39

5.1%

Benton

141

7

148

4.7%

Clackamas

1,002

39

1,041

3.7%

Clatsop

42

6

48

12.5%

Columbia

101

13

114

11.4%

Coos

126

0

126

0.0%

Crook

72

1

73

1.4%

Curry

53

9

62

14.5%

Deschutes

556

18

574

3.1%

Douglas

193

16

209

7.7%

Gilliam

3

2

5

40.0%

Grant

4

0

4

0.0%

Harney

16

1

17

5.9%

Hood River

83

1

84

1.2%

Jackson

472

25

497

5.0%

Jefferson

45

2

47

4.3%

Josephine

201

12

213

5.6%

Klamath

67

2

69

2.9%

Lake

12

0

12

0.0%

Lane

721

21

742

2.8%

Lincoln

81

4

85

4.7%

Linn

377

16

393

4.1%

Malheur

46

7

53

13.2%

Marion

700

38

738

5.1%

Morrow

21

0

21

0.0%

Multnomah

2,184

70

2,254

3.1%

Polk

175

11

186

5.9%

Sherman

5

0

5

0.0%

Tillamook

72

0

72

0.0%

Umatilla

174

5

179

2.8%

Union

80

6

86

7.0%

Wallowa

3

0

3

0.0%

Wasco

39

5

44

11.4%

Washington

1,581

32

1,613

2.0%

Wheeler

1

0

1

0.0%

Yamhill

224

5

229

2.2%

Statewide

9,710

376

10,086

3.7%

Cumulative ELRs

County

Negative ELRs

Positive ELRs

Total ELRs

Percent Positivity

Baker

12,884

1,906

14,790

12.9%

Benton

154,678

4,945

159,623

3.1%

Clackamas

496,248

29,718

525,966

5.7%

Clatsop

37,657

1,804

39,461

4.6%

Columbia

47,612

2,608

50,220

5.2%

Coos

51,793

2,636

54,429

4.8%

Crook

22,122

1,637

23,759

6.9%

Curry

12,455

604

13,059

4.6%

Deschutes

214,112

12,568

226,680

5.5%

Douglas

91,640

4,357

95,997

4.5%

Gilliam

1,371

63

1,434

4.4%

Grant

7,252

482

7,734

6.2%

Harney

4,738

469

5,207

9.0%

Hood River

34,616

1,761

36,377

4.8%

Jackson

239,054

17,439

256,493

6.8%

Jefferson

22,021

2,224

24,245

9.2%

Josephine

84,187

4,204

88,391

4.8%

Klamath

55,521

5,469

60,990

9.0%

Lake

6,359

466

6,825

6.8%

Lane

542,733

16,762

559,495

3.0%

Lincoln

46,996

2,776

49,772

5.6%

Linn

159,365

9,992

169,357

5.9%

Malheur

28,441

5,298

33,739

15.7%

Marion

384,351

34,994

419,345

8.3%

Morrow

8,255

1,387

9,642

14.4%

Multnomah

1,153,954

61,221

1,215,175

5.0%

Polk

79,477

5,283

84,760

6.2%

Sherman

1,565

76

1,641

4.6%

Tillamook

16,931

669

17,600

3.8%

Umatilla

73,431

9,586

83,017

11.5%

Union

23,687

1,897

25,584

7.4%

Wallowa

3,564

198

3,762

5.3%

Wasco

37,454

1,804

39,258

4.6%

Washington

714,559

44,276

758,835

5.8%

Wheeler

782

34

816

4.2%

Yamhill

150,602

7,828

158,430

4.9%

Statewide

5,022,467

299,441

5,321,908

5.6%

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

 


Fatal Crash on Hwy 140W - Klamath County
Oregon State Police - 06/19/21 8:29 AM

On Friday, June 18, 2021 at approximately 11:00 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 140W near milepost 60.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Subaru Legacy, operated by Donna Palmer (65) of Klamath Falls, was eastbound when it went off the roadway and rolled down an embankment.

Palmer was transported by air ambulance to Rogue Regional Medical Center where they were pronounced deceased.

Passenger, Gerald Berton (66) of Klamath Falls, was transported to Sky Lakes Medical Center. 

OSP was assisted by Klamath Fire District 1 and ODOT.


Fri. 06/18/21
Linn County Sheriff's Office Responds to Rescue East of Sweet Home
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 06/18/21 10:20 PM

Linn County Sheriff Jim Yon reports on Thursday June 17, at 12:12 p.m., his Deputies responded to a rescue off Sheep Creek Road off Highway 20, east of Sweet Home. Linn County Sheriff’s Office Dispatch received a 9-1-1 call of a male falling 40-feet down a cliff. 

The injuries of the male were unknown at the time and appeared urgent. During the immediate response, Deputies contacted Linn County Search & Rescue, Corvallis Mountain Rescue, Lebanon Fire Department Rope Techs and Life Flight. This area is remote, difficult to access due to steep banks, cliffs and miles of gravel roads. 

Upon arrival, Deputies could see Lloyd Barton, 76, of Eugene, unresponsive at the bottom of the cliff. Rescue teams worked to descend to Barton. As time progressed, it was clear Barton was deceased. Rescue teams worked to recover Barton and he was transported to the Sweet Home Funeral Chapel for additional assessment by a Medical Examiner. 

A witness described Barton attempting to access the area to fish. While attempting to descend the steep terrain and cliffs to the river, Barton lost his footing and began tumbling down hundreds of feet before falling off a 40-foot cliff. The witness walked out of the area, contacting a logging crew who arranged to contact 9-1-1.   

The Linn County Sheriff’s Office was assisted by Corvallis Mountain Rescue, Lebanon Fire Department, Oregon Department of Forestry, Sweet Home Fire Department, Life Flight and Eugene Police Department. 

 


Authorities searching for armed subject at large in Noti (Photo)
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/18/21 5:34 PM
2021-06/6111/145981/Unnamed.jpg
2021-06/6111/145981/Unnamed.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/6111/145981/thumb_Unnamed.jpg

Update

As of 5:20pm authorities are re-opening Hwy. 126 near milepost 39.  The suspect’s whereabouts are currently unknown and it is possible that he has already fled the area.  Residents are asked to remain vigilant and to report any suspicious activity to police immediately.  A heavy police presence is still on scene actively searching for the suspect.   

-

Update - The previous release stated the suspect was believed to be wearing a light shirt.  The suspect was last spotted in a dark colored shirt.

-

On 06/18/21 shortly after 12:00pm, the Oregon State Police and Lane County Sheriff’s Office responded to the report of a vehicle crash on Hwy. 126 near milepost 39 in Noti.  The driver of the involved vehicle, a white Dodge 243LWL, was no longer on scene when authorities arrived.  This vehicle is believed to be linked to the homicides that occurred in the North Bend area earlier today.

The suspect in this case is described as a white male adult standing approximately 6’02” and weighing approximately 200lbs.  He was further described as having short hair and wearing a light colored t-shirt and blue jeans.  He is to be considered armed and dangerous.  Residents in the area are asked to shelter in place and to immediately report any suspicious activity to authorities.

Anyone who saw the involved vehicle during or following the crash or anyone matching the suspect description is asked to contact the Lane County Sheriff’s Office at 541-682-4150 opt. 1.  We are additionally hoping to contact the driver of a small white sedan that may have stopped at the crash scene.

Attached is a photo of the suspect taken earlier today.  Updates will be provided as they become available.




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/6111/145981/Unnamed.jpg

Oregon reports 315 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 5 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 06/18/21 5:09 PM

June 18, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 315 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 5 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are five new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,750, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 315 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 206,299.

Vaccine provider dashboard updated

OHA has updated its vaccine dashboard that shows OHA-enrolled provider locations that administer COVID-19 vaccines. The updated dashboard now includes details on provider locations, including business names and addresses.

The dashboard allows users to find COVID-19 vaccine locations near them, and links to resources for scheduling including vaccines.govGet Vaccinated Oregon and egov.com. The dashboard is not a tool for scheduling appointments. Scheduling for vaccinations should be done separately with each vaccine provider.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 13,063 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 6,124 doses were administered on June 17 and 6,934 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on June 17.

The seven-day running average is now 14,716 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 2,422,839 first and second doses of Pfizer,1,696,938 first and second doses of Moderna and 160,990 single doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 2,344,714 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,086,483 have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series. The number of adult Oregonians needing vaccinations to reach the 70% threshold is 51,616.

A daily countdown can be found on the OHA vaccinations page.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 2,921,715 doses of Pfizer, 2,216,660 doses of Moderna and 299,100 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 150, which is one fewer than yesterday. There are 37 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is unchanged from yesterday.

The total number of COVID-19 positive patient bed-days in the most recent seven days is 1,132, which is an 11.4% decrease from the previous seven days. The peak daily number of beds occupied by COVID-19 positive patients in the most recent seven days is 174.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (2), Benton (2), Clackamas (33), Clatsop (2), Columbia (5), Coos (2), Crook (4), Curry (5), Deschutes (12), Douglas (17), Hood River (1), Jackson (19), Jefferson (2), Josephine (8), Klamath (6), Lane (17), Lincoln (2), Linn (19), Malheur (4), Marion (25), Morrow (1), Multnomah (52), Polk (12), Sherman (1), Umatilla (28), Wasco (1), Washington (26) and Yamhill (7).

Oregon’s 2,746th COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old man from Jefferson County who tested positive on May 8 and died on June 17 at St. Charles Bend Hospital. He had no underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,747th COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old man from Deschutes County who tested positive on June 2 and died on June 6 at St. Charles Bend Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,748th COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old woman from Clatsop County who tested positive on April 11 and died on June 1 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,749th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive on April 20 and died on April 25 at Oregon Health & Science University Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,750th COVID-19 death is a 45-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive on June 6 and died on June 16 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

# # #


Rescue on Santiam River
Albany Fire Dept. - 06/18/21 5:06 PM
AFD and LCSO Rescue floaters from Santiam River
AFD and LCSO Rescue floaters from Santiam River
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/1216/145984/thumb_DJI_0039.JPG

Albany Fire Department made its second rescue of the season on the Santiam River today near Jefferson.  Two women entered the river at Green Bridge on inflatable tubes, but did not take note of the current warning signs for hazardous trees and snags.  Both women became stuck on a large tree.  One of the victims was then pinned under the log but was able to hold on.  The woman was luckily able to access a life vest she had brought along, but was not wearing.  The second victim was able to make her way to the top of the log.  The Albany Fire Drone flew a life vest over the river and delivered  it to the second victim while she waited for first responders.    

Due to the size and amount of river debris,  Jefferson Fire District’s rescue boat could not get to the victims.  AFD and Linn County Sheriff’s Rescue Water Crafts, which are smaller and more easily maneuverable, were able to access the women and get them to shore.  Jefferson Fire District medics evaluated the victims for injuries.  No one was transferred to hospital.  This rescue was successful because of our ongoing law enforcement and fire service partnerships.

We want to remind everyone to: 1) Know your route before you go 2) Wear a life vest and 3) Tell someone your plans for the day.




Attached Media Files: AFD and LCSO Rescue floaters from Santiam River , AFD and LCSO Rescue floaters from Santiam River

Sex Offender Notification (Photo)
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/18/21 4:22 PM
2021-06/1294/145983/Cortez_Edward_Evelardo_Jr.jpg
2021-06/1294/145983/Cortez_Edward_Evelardo_Jr.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/1294/145983/thumb_Cortez_Edward_Evelardo_Jr.jpg

Marion County Sheriff’s Office is releasing the following information pursuant to ORS163A.215, which authorizes Community Corrections to inform the public when the release of information will enhance public safety and protection.

The individual who appears on this notification has been convicted of a sex offense that requires registration with the Sheriff’s Office. Additionally, this person’s criminal history places them in a classification level which reflects the potential to re-offend. This notification is not intended to increase fear; rather, it is our belief that an informed public is a safer public.

 

NAME: Cortez, Edward Garcia

SID#: 8114137

DOB: 7/07/1971

CURRENT AGE: 49

 

RACE: H                     SEX: M

HEIGHT: 5' 07''           WEIGHT: 200lbs

HAIR: BLK                  EYES: BRO

 

RESIDENCE: 650 LOCUST ST NE, SALEM, OR 97301

Edward Garcia Cortez is on Post-Prison Supervision for the crimes of Kidnapping II and Delivery of Methamphetamine.

This person was granted supervision on: 12/13/2019

Supervision expiration date is: 01/29/2024

 

Special restrictions include:    

[X] No romantic or sexual relationships without prior PO permission

[X] No contact with minors

[X] No alcohol

Other: Mr. Cortez’ victim pool includes adult and juvenile females both known and unknown to him.




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/1294/145983/Cortez_Edward_Evelardo_Jr.jpg

Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Weekday Update - June 18, 2021
Douglas Co. Government - 06/18/21 12:41 PM
DCCRT
DCCRT
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/6789/145975/thumb_DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_WEB_Logo_72320.jpg

Our local COVID-19 updates represent the coordinated effort of the agencies that make up the DCCRT

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – June 18, 2021

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - WEEKDAY UPDATE

 

(Douglas County, Ore.)  DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 UPDATE FOR FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 2021

As of 12:00 pm today, Friday, June 18, 2021, there are FOURTEEN (14) people with new positive test results to report since our noon update yesterday.  The total number of cases of people with positive test results and presumptives in Douglas County is now at 3,867. Currently, there are ELEVEN (11) Douglas County COVID-19 patients that are being hospitalized, five locally and six out-of-the-area. Our Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, under the direction of the Douglas County Board of Commissioners, continue to devote all resources available to our local COVID response.

 

COVID-19 RELATED DEATH OF A DOUGLAS COUNTY RESIDENT

Our Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer, has confirmed the death of a Douglas County resident related to the COVID-19 virus. Our eighty-third COVID-19 related death is a 73-year-old woman who was diagnosed with COVID-19 on Sunday, June 13, 2021 and passed away on Thursday, June 17, 2021. In the interest of privacy for the loved ones of this resident, no additional information will be released. Each death related to COVID-19 is painful for all Douglas County residents, and a sad reminder of the terrible impact COVID-19 has had in our local communities. The Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Dr. Dannenhoffer, DPHN and the DCCRT team extend our heartfelt condolences and sympathies to all family members, friends, relatives, co-workers and community members of those who have passed after contracting this deadly virus.

 

Douglas County, OR - COVID-19 - Case Update Chart

Date

Monday,

June 14, 2021

Tuesday,

June 15, 2021

Wednesday,

June 16, 2021

Thursday,

June 17, 2021

Today, Friday,

June 18, 2021

Total COVID-19 Cases

3,803

3,816

3,831

3,853

3,867

People w/ Positive PCR or Antigen Test Results

3,623

3,635

3,650

3,672

3,686

Presumptive

180

181

181

181

181

Total Currently Hospitalized

10

12

12

11

11

Total Currently in Isolation

185

176

157

155

154

Total COVID-19 Related Deaths

80

80

82

82

83

Our daily update includes the total number of cases in Douglas County, which combines people with positive test results and presumptives, as well as a breakout of those case numbers. There will be times when a presumptive will move to a positive test result, and our total case number will not change because the case has already been counted.

 

LOCAL CONTACTS AND CASES BEING SUPPORTED IN ISOLATION AND QUARANTINE

Currently, DPHN is supporting 154 cases in isolation, as well as another 331 contacts in quarantine in Douglas County. Isolation is recommended for confirmed and presumptive cases, quarantine is recommended for contacts of confirmed or presumptive cases.  Currently, staff is supporting a total of 485 total contacts and cases in isolation or quarantine.  This number represents a snapshot of the significant amount of work being done locally to help control the spread of COVID.

 

DOUGLAS COUNTY TIGER TEAM HOSTING POP-UP COVID-19 VACCINE CLINIC AT THE REEDSPORT CHAINSAW CARVING CHAMPIONSHIPS

Our Douglas County Tiger Team is excited to be on Douglas County’s slice of the Oregon Coast today and tomorrow at the Reedsport Chainsaw Carving Championships!  Our team is set up and ready to administer free, no appointment necessary drive-up COVID-19 vaccines via our pop-up vaccine clinic. The clinic is open to anyone 18 years of age and older, and preregistration is not necessary.  The Moderna-two dose and J&J-single dose will be available. They are located in Rainbow Plaza at 250 Water Ave in Reedsport.

 

DOUGLAS COUNTY TIGER TEAM HOSTS FREE POP-UP COVID-19 VACCINATION CLINICS

It’s a busy week for the Tiger Team.  The Douglas County Tiger Team continues to bring free COVID-19 vaccines directly to rural areas via our mobile medical vans (MMV) via their pop up vaccine clinics.  They are visiting businesses, farms, fire stations and other locations in our smaller remote communities in Douglas County. The Douglas County Board of Commissioners, who have led the charge for our Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team efforts since the beginning, have coordinated with DPHN to organize our local Tiger Team to manage our vaccine outreach efforts through ‘pop-up’ vaccine clinics.

 

The Douglas County Tiger Team will be hosting FREE POP UP COVID VACCINE CLINICS at the locations listed below.  The clinics are currently open to anyone 18 years of age and older, and preregistration is not necessary:

 

  • Friday, June 18, 2021: Reedsport and surrounding area. Clinic will be held at the Oregon Divisional Chainsaw Carving Championship located at Rainbow Plaza, 250 Water Avenue in Reedsport from 8:00 am to 7:00 pm.
  • Saturday, June 19, 2021: Reedsport and surrounding area. Clinic will be held at the Oregon Divisional Chainsaw Carving Championship located at Rainbow Plaza, 250 Water Avenue in Reedsport from 8:00 am to 7:00 pm.
  • Tuesday, June 22, 2021: Melqua-Melrose and surrounding area. Clinic will be at the Coles Valley Vineyards at 10003 Melqua Road in Umpqua from 8:00 am to 4:00 pm.
  • Wednesday, June 23, 2021: Camas Valley and surrounding area. Clinic will be at the Camas Valley Fire Department at 142 Burma Road in Camas Valley from 8:00 am to 12:00 pm.
  • Wednesday, June 23, 2021: Tenmile and surrounding area. Clinic will be at the Tenmile Fire Department at 158 Reston Road in Roseburg from 1:00 am to 4:00 pm.

 

Our Tiger Team coordinates with Umpqua Valley Ambulance to bring a certified vaccinator and a medical assistant to each clinic.  If you are interested in having the Douglas County Tiger Team come to your business, fire department, farm or town to provide a pop-up vaccine clinic or if you have any questions about our Douglas County Tiger Teams and want a schedule of their upcoming pop-up vaccination clinics, please call (541) 670-3110 or our local COVID-19 Hotline at (541) 464-6550Click here for the calendar listing of the upcoming Tiger Team Pop Up Vaccine Clinics

 

FREE DRIVE-THROUGH COVID-19 VACCINATION EVENT SATURDAY, JUNE 26 AT THE DOUGLAS COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS

Douglas Public Health Network (DPHN), Douglas County Board of Commissioners, and Aviva Health are collaborating again to host the next mass drive-through COVID-19 vaccination event on Saturday, June 26, 2021, from 9:00 am to 1:00 pm at the Douglas County Fairgrounds.

 

We are planning to utilize the Pfizer (two dose) and the J&J (single dose) vaccines at this event.  Eligibility for this event includes:

1) ALL residents of Douglas County ages 12 years old and older.

2) Second doses of the Pfizer vaccine to those residents who received their first dose at one of our drive through COVID-19 vaccination events.

 

Residents DO NOT need to pre-register or schedule an appointment for this event. 

 

If you have questions please contact the phone numbers provided below:

  • Call (541) 464-6500.
  • If you need help in Spanish, you can call and leave a message on our Spanish Help Line at (541) 671-1355.
  • Please do not call, contact or go to the Douglas County Fairgrounds to ask about the vaccination event.
  • For those residents that received their first dose of the Pfizer vaccine at one of our other drive-through events, you can just show up at this event.

 

No pre-registration is required, just show up and get your vaccine and a delicious treat! All residents ages 12 and over are eligible! #itsyourturn; #itsfreeitseasy; #C19Vaccine.  For those ages 12 to 14, it is required that a parent or guardian accompany you and give written consent for the vaccine.

 

AVIVA HAS A DEDICATED FREE COVID-19 VACCINATION CLINIC SITE IN ROSEBURG 

Shared from Aviva Health.  Aviva Health opened a dedicated COVID-19 vaccination clinic site at 4221 NE Stephens Street, Suite 101 in Roseburg, just across the street from its main Roseburg Clinic location near Costco.  The new COVID-19 Vaccination Clinic opened Wednesday, May 18, 2021, and offers free COVID-19 vaccines by appointment.   The new COVID-19 vaccination clinic will be open Monday through Friday, from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm and is open for residents ages 12 and older.  To schedule an appointment during the week please call (541) 672-9596.

 

As a reminder: Parental or guardian consent is required to vaccinate residents 12 to 14 years old.  Written consent can be obtained in advance.  Under Oregon law, minors 15 years of age and older may consent to medical treatment, including vaccinations, when provided by a physician, physician assistant, naturopath, nurse practitioner, dentist or optometrist, or other professionals operating under the license of these providers; however, families are encouraged to make decisions about vaccinations together.

 

COVID-19 VACCINE ELIGIBILITY OPEN FOR EVERYONE 12 YEARS OLD AND OLDER

According to the CDC, State of Oregon and OHA, ALL residents ages 12 years old and older are eligible to get the COVID-19 Vaccine.  As of May 13, 2021, the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine has been approved for people ages 12 to 15, joining those 16 and above who are already eligible.  The good news, according to Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, our Douglas County Public Health Officer, is that we have plenty of vaccine and will be giving to anyone 12 and above who wants it. Remember, “it’s your turn!” So, get signed up or show up to get your COVID-19 vaccine today!

 

  1. Call and set up an appointment with your primary health care provider or ask them for a referral to another health care provider.
  2. Call and set up an appointment with a local pharmacy.
  3. Sign up for or attend one of the vaccination clinics offered in Douglas County through DPHN, Douglas County, Aviva Health or our Douglas County Tiger Team. 
  4. If you are a member of the Cow Creek Band of the Umpqua Tribe of Indians, please contact to set up an appointment at (541) 672-9405 or log onto https://www.cowcreek-nsn.gov/public-health/
  5. The Roseburg VA Health Care System is setting up appointments for veterans to receive the COVID-19 vaccine.  For more information, call the Roseburg VAMC at (541) 440-1000 or log onto https://www.va.gov/health-care/covid-19-vaccine/.

 

Please note that for residents that are ages 12 to 14, this will require a parent or guardian to accompany them and give written consent for the vaccine.  Under Oregon law, minors 15 years of age and older may consent to medical treatment, including vaccinations, when provided by a physician, physician assistant, naturopath, nurse practitioner, dentist or optometrist, or other professionals operating under the license of these providers; however, families are encouraged to make decisions about vaccinations together.

 

#ITSYOURTURN DOUGLAS COUNTY - DPHN COVID-19 VACCINATION CAMPAIGN

Free COVID-19 vaccines are available to everyone in Douglas County ages 12 and older. Douglas Public Health Network created the #itsyourturn COVID-19 vaccine campaign to encourage everyone to step up and take their turn to get their COVID-19 vaccine to help our communities fight the battle against the spread of the COVID-19 virus.  For more information on how you can take your turn and get your COVID-19 vaccine, contact your primary health care provider, call any local pharmacy, talk to your employer or visit DougCoVaccine.com. Check out the latest videos on the DPHN Facebook Page or the DPHN YouTube Channel, that feature local vaccine voices who hope to inspire our friends, family and neighbors to get the COVID-19 vaccine, so we can move forward to normal lives, activities and celebrations sooner rather than later.  #itsyourturn

 

LOCATE A VACCINE LOCATION NEAR YOU:




Attached Media Files: DCCRT , Vaccine Clinic 6-26-21 , Tiger Chainsaw Event Flyer , Reedsport Chainsaw Tiger Team

La Corte Suprema confirma la ACA; los Oregonianos siguen teniendo acceso a la cobertura del seguro médico y a los ahorros
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 06/18/21 12:36 PM
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(Salem) – La Corte Suprema de los Estados Unidos confirmó ayer la Ley de Cuidado de Salud Asequible (ACA, por sus siglas en inglés) en su decisión en el caso de California contra Texas, No. 19-840.

El caso se centró en la validez de la ACA. Dieciocho estados, dirigido por Texas, intentaron anular toda la ACA. Otros 21 estados, dirigido por California y acompañados por Oregón, defendieron la ACA.

La decisión marca la tercera decisión de este tipo desde el inicio de la Ley de Cuidado de Salud Asequible, incluyendo el caso de 2012 de la Federación Nacional de Empresas Independientes contra Sebelius (567 U.S. 519) y el caso de 2015 de King contra Burwell (576 U.S. 473). La tercera decisión de la Corte Suprema marca una enorme victoria para la ACA, permitiendo a las personas en todo de los Estados Unidos el acceso a la cobertura médica y a la asistencia financiera a través del Mercado.

"Esta decisión de la Corte Suprema de hoy es una gran victoria para los más de 500.000 habitantes de Oregón que obtuvieron cobertura a través de la ACA, independientemente de su historial de salud o estado médico", dijo la gobernadora Kate Brown. "La decisión de hoy también protege a todos los habitantes de Oregón con cobertura médica, manteniendo las protecciones para las condiciones preexistentes, previniendo los límites de por vida y los límites anuales en la cobertura de salud, y permitiendo que los adultos jóvenes permanezcan cubiertos por el plan de sus padres. Todavía tenemos mucho trabajo que hacer para garantizar a todos el acceso a cobertura de calidad y asequible, pero este es un paso importante."

La Ley de Cuidado de Salud Asequible, aprobada en marzo de 2010, prohíbe a las compañías de seguros médicos denegar la cobertura a los afiliados que tengan problemas de salud preexistentes. La ley establece parámetros sobre cómo las compañías de seguros médicos calculan las primas. Además, a los inscritos que cumplen los requisitos, la ACA permite recibir la ayuda financiera tanto para las primas mensuales como para los gastos de bolsillo, que hace la cobertura médica más asequible para millones de estadounidenses. Más de ocho de cada diez habitantes de Oregón habrían perdido la ayuda financiera si la ACA se considerara inválida, y miles habrían perdido la cobertura por completo.

"Oregón ha abrazado la Ley de Cuidado de Salud Asequible desde el principio, y seguirá esforzándose para que todos los Oregonianos tengan una cobertura médica de calidad", dijo el Comisionado de Seguros de Oregón, Andrew Stolfi. "La ACA ayuda a poner ese objetivo al alcance de miles de Oregonianos con una cobertura de calidad".

Los habitantes de Oregón tienen acceso a más asistencia financiera gracias a la ACA y al Plan de Rescate Americano, y pueden inscribirse en la cobertura de salud hasta el 15 de agosto debido a la pandemia de COVID-19. Puede averiguar qué cobertura y ahorros están disponibles para usted visitando OregonHealthCare.gov/WindowShop. Hay ayuda local gratuita de expertos en cobertura en todo Oregón. Puede encontrar ayuda local en CuidadoDeSalud.Oregon.gov.

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El Mercado de Seguros Médicos de Oregon, una parte del gobierno estatal, ayuda a las personas a conseguir seguro médico cuando no tienen cobertura a través de su trabajo, y no califican para el Plan de Salud de Oregon u otro programa. El Mercado es el socio al nivel estatal a CuidadoDeSalud.gov, y una división del Departamento de Servicios para Consumidores y Negocios (DCBS, por sus siglas en inglés). Para obtener más información, visite CuidadoDeSalud.Oregon.gov.




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/1073/145974/OHIM_logo-center_text.png

Smoke Management Advisory Committee meets June 24
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/18/21 12:30 PM

SALEM, Ore. — Oregon’s Smoke Management Advisory Committee will meet virtually Thursday June 24, 2021, from 9 a.m. to 2:45 p.m. To provide public comment at this virtual meeting, please contact Shauna Morris at 503-945-7529.

The committee’s agenda includes:

  • Protection Division report
  • Department of Environmental Quality report
  • A fund balance update
  • Burning, intrusion, and incident summary
  • Metrics discussion
  • Annual report review
  • Data system update
  • Next program review

The meeting is open to the public to attend online via Zoom. There will be a period for public comment in the morning. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting by contacting Shauna Morris at 503-945-7529. 

View the agenda and livestream option on the SMAC webpage.

Created by the Legislature in 1989, the five-member committee assists and advises the Oregon Department of Forestry in carrying out its Smoke Management Program. Members are appointed by the State Forester to serve a two-year term, which is renewable.


Umpqua Bank Charitable Foundation Awards Community Grants to 120 Nonprofits
Umpqua Bank - 06/18/21 10:53 AM
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Umpqua Bank, a subsidiary of Umpqua Holdings Corporation (NASDAQ: UMPQ) announced today that the Umpqua Bank Charitable Foundation has awarded 120 community grants to local nonprofits across its five-state footprint totaling $423.5K. The grants represent the first of three funding cycles in 2021.

Nonprofits were selected from hundreds of applicants who demonstrated a strong commitment to serving their communities, particularly those focused on reaching low-to-moderate income or under-resourced populations in one of the following eight categories: family engagement and resiliency; financial competency; housing stability and home ownership; college, career or technical readiness; entrepreneurship and business expansion; vibrant and equitable neighborhoods; technical and digital connectivity; and small business support and financial guidance.

“With local community-focused nonprofits, we are able to work together for better,” shared Randy Choy, vice president of community giving & nonprofit partnerships and managing director of the Umpqua Bank Charitable Foundation. “Their grassroots efforts are key to post-pandemic recovery, and we’re honored to support their work.”

Umpqua Bank, through the Umpqua Bank Charitable Foundation, continues to evolve its community giving strategy and community grants program to reflect a deeper commitment to improving economic prosperity, especially for under-resourced individuals, families, and small businesses. The foundation invests in nonprofit organizations, communities, and leaders to support direct-service programming that incorporates a diversity, equity, and inclusion focus.

The community grants are part of an overall foundation and corporate giving program that has invested more than $12 million since the foundation was formed in 2014. The next deadline for community grant applications is Friday, Sept. 3, 2021. Learn more at www.UmpquaBank.com/Community.

For a full list of the nonprofit grant recipients by state, visit https://www.umpquabank.com/blog/umpqua-bank-charitable-foundation-awards-community-grants-to-120-nonprofits/.




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/6798/145968/Medium-umpqua_primary-vertical-logo_CMYK_BLACK.jpg

DOGAMI Governing Board to meet June 25
Oregon Dept. of Geology and Mineral Industries - 06/18/21 10:26 AM

PORTLAND, Ore. - The Governing Board of the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) will meet on Friday, June 25 at 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. To adhere to the state’s social distancing requirements and to slow the spread of COVID-19, this public meeting will be conducted as a virtual meeting.

The meeting agenda is available at https://www.oregongeology.org.

The DOGAMI Governing Board sets policy and oversees general operations, and adopts a strategic plan every six years. The Board meets at least quarterly. As active members of their communities, Board members provide an important connection between Oregonians and DOGAMI's mission of providing earth science information and regulation to make Oregon safe and prosperous.

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U.S. 26 paving project to cause delays starting Sunday evening
ODOT: Valley, No. Coast - 06/18/21 10:10 AM

A paving project on U.S. 26 between OR 53 (Necanicum Junction) and the Nehalem River Bridge that is beginning this Sunday evening (June 20) at 7 p.m. will cause delays for travelers between the Coast and the Willamette Valley, including the Portland Metro Area. 

There will be single lane night time closures between 7 p.m. and 8 a.m. from Sunday through Thursday evenings each week.  In the four-lane sections of U.S. 26 work may occur during either daytime or nightime hours while maintaining one travel lane in each direction.

The project is a roadway surface preservation project that will remove the old asphalt and replace it with a new, much smoother surface.  In addition, new guardrail and signs will be installed throughout the project.  ADA ramps will also be installed at the end of the bridges.

Travelers should be prepared for delays and add travel time during the evening construction.  Also, use TripCheck.com for the very latest on the construction and any delays. 


Joint Statement on Portland Police Bureau's Rapid Response Team
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 06/18/21 8:00 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.—Scott Erik Asphaug, Acting U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon, and Kieran L. Ramsey, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon, have the issued the following joint statement following the resignation of members of the Portland Police Bureau’s Rapid Response Team.

“Communities across the nation have endured many challenges over the past year as they attempt to address racial inequities in the wake of the murder of George Floyd. In Portland, those challenges included large and sometimes violent demonstrations that strained our local resources and repeatedly placed officers in the difficult position of policing large and sometimes hostile crowds. As law enforcement officials, we recognize that community members and law enforcement officers alike are responsible for their conduct and that our judicial system is designed to address wrongdoing equally, whether by community members or law enforcement officers.

Like all Portlanders, we are proud of our community’s long history of peaceful civic activism and free speech. We are also proud of the federal, state, and local law enforcement officers who continue to respond to Portland demonstrations to ensure all community members can exercise their First Amendment rights safely and without the threat of violence. We urge community members to join law enforcement in helping to ensure all future demonstrations remain peaceful and inclusive.”

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Attached Media Files: PDF Statement

Adaptive Resource Fair Shares Accessible Options for Cycling with Parkinson's (Photo)
Parkinson's Resources of Oregon - 06/18/21 8:00 AM
Carol Recumbent Trike
Carol Recumbent Trike
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[Portland, Ore., June 18, 2021] – Parkinson’s Resources of Oregon (PRO), Adaptive BIKETOWN, Portland Bureau of Transporation, and Kerr Bikes will partner on their first annual Adaptive Cycling Resource Fair to offer alternative cycling options to people with Parkinson’s disease or other movement disorders.  The June 26th event will be hosted at Kerr Bikes and will include bike and Parkinson’s friendly exhibitors, short education sessions by local experts, and an opportunity to test ride Adaptive BIKETOWN and Kerr Bike’s adaptive cycling fleet. 

 

The Adaptive Cycling Resource Fair is part of an ongoing free cycling program brought to Oregon and SW Washington residents by Parkinson’s Resources of Oregon (PRO), called PeDal Support.  The year-round program encourages cycling as a beneficial form of exercise with Parkinson’s disease through a series of educational virtual sessions, small group and mentored cycling experiences, and accessible in-person events. 

 

Led by a volunteer committee of people diagnosed with Parkinson’s and others affected by the disease, the PeDal Support committee also invites the general public to the first Father’s Day Weekend Ride event, spreading awareness about Parkinson’s disease while raising funds for PeDal Support and other PROgrams. The public is encouraged to ride with a special dad, or in honor of a special dad, during Father’s Day weekend (June 19th & 20th).  To start a Facebook fundraiser, or find out how to participate, go to: www.pedalsupport.org

 

The media is invited to attend the Adaptive Cycling Resource Fair at: 

Kerr Bikes/Adaptive Biketown - 1945 SE Water Ave B, Portland, OR 97214 (next door to OMSI) 

June 26th - 10am – 3pm 

Registration is free but required at: www.pro.eventbrite.com or call 800.426.6806 

 

The PeDal Support program is sponsored by annual partners Supernus Pharmaceuticals, Providence Brain & Spine Institute, AbbVie, Boston Scientific and Amneal. 

 

This is a mask-required event with socially-distanced protocols in place for the safety of onsite volunteers and attendees with Parkinson’s disease. 

 

About Parkinson’s Resources: 

Parkinson’s Resources of Oregon (PRO) is a donor supported non-profit with the sole mission of advancing the quality of life for people with Parkinson’s, their families and caregivers. With three locations (Bend, Eugene, Beaverton), PRO provides direct care and support to thousands of families. Working to address issues faced by Parkinson’s patients and their families, we can significantly improve the quality of life for all touched by this disease. 

Find out more about PRO’s services or support PRO’s programs at: www.parkinsonsresources.org or call 800.426.6806. 

 

About Parkinson’s Disease: 

Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disease that affects the level of dopamine produced by the brain, affecting executive functioning and movement. Every nine minutes someone is diagnosed with Parkinson’s in the U.S. About 1 million people are currently living with Parkinson’s disease in the U.S. Doctors diagnose about 60,000 cases a year, mostly in people over age 60.  

Research consistently shows that Parkinson's is a disease that has to be actively managed, not just by taking medications, but by exercising and maintaining social connection.  

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Attached Media Files: Carol Recumbent Trike , Adaptive Cycling Resource Fair Web Graphic

Suspect Arrested After Attempting to Elude Police (photos) (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/18/21 7:03 AM
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Case 21-3118

Suspect Arrested After Attempting a High-Speed Elude through Medford Area

MEDFORD, Ore. – A suspect attempted to elude the Pacific Northwest Violent Offender Task Force (PNVOTF) by motorcycle Wednesday afternoon. The Task Force, including personnel from the United States Marshals Service, Jackson County Sheriff’s Office (JCSO), and Medford Police Department (MPD) arrested Christopher Lee Ridders, 34, at approx. 1515 Wednesday.

JCSO deputies initiated a traffic stop in White City, Ore. at approx. 1451. The suspect fled on his black, Harley Davidson motorcycle, driving recklessly and at high speeds while running red lights and splitting traffic. The pursuit was terminated with regards to public safety, but Law Enforcement was able to track him by JCSO, MPD and Phoenix Police Department relaying his position. Ridders then attempted a U-turn on the Phoenix, Ore. Interstate 5 exit 24 offramp towards oncoming traffic. At that point Ridders struck a police vehicle, crashing his motorcycle and was taken into custody without incident.

Ridders was wanted on multiple warrants out of Washington County, Ore. including a parole violation, second-degree robbery, second and third-degree assault, first-degree theft, and assault on an officer. While attempting to escape police, Ridders added a felony attempting to elude by vehicle, reckless driving, and reckless endangering.

Ridders is now lodged at the Jackson County jail awaiting return to Washington County, Ore.

PNVOTF specializes in locating and arresting fugitives wanted for offenses including, but not limited to, murder, assault, sex crimes, failure to register as a sex offender, firearm violations, and probation violations.

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Thu. 06/17/21
UPDATE - Fatal Crash on Interstate 5 - Marion County
Oregon State Police - 06/17/21 7:14 PM

Further investigation reveals that Jeri Sherrod was likely hit by one or more vehicles that did not stop.  Cagle stopped at the scene and cooperated.

OSP is requesting anyone with information regarding this crash or that may have hit something in the road to contact the Oregon State Police Northern Command at 1-800-442-0776 refer to SP 21-164706 – Trooper Justin Lane.  

On Thursday, June 17, 2021 at approximately 1:06 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a vehicle that struck a pedestrian on Interstate 5 near milepost 267.  

Preliminary investigating revealed a pedestrian, Jeri Sherrod (63) of Salem, was in the northbound lanes of Interstate 5 when they were struck by a Peterbilt semi-truck operated by Donald Cagle (57) of Lebanon. 

Dispatch centers had received numerous calls from motorists regarding a person in the northbound lanes before the collision. 

Sherrod sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

OSP was assisted by Marion County Fire Department and ODOT. 

I-5 northbound was shutdown for approximately five hours.  


Oregon Office of Emergency Management Assures Oregonians that Tap Water throughout the State is Clean and Safe to Drink
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 06/17/21 6:31 PM

SALEM, Ore. –  The Oregon Office of Emergency Management (OEM) emphasized that tap water throughout the state remains clean and safe despite a chlorine supply chain interruption affecting regional drinking water and wastewater treatment utilities along the West Coast.

“There are no immediate impacts, and we continue to track for potential changes or needs,” said OEM Deputy Director Matt Marheine. “The public can continue to use water for drinking, cooking and bathing, but may consider limiting outdoor use to extend the state’s current chlorine supply. We appreciate the public’s careful water usage and want to reassure there is no need to start amassing additional volumes of water.”

The chlorine shortage is the result of a major electrical failure recently suffered at Westlake Chemical, based in Longview, Washington. Westlake supplies chlorine to water and sewer utilities in Oregon, Washington, Idaho and Northern California.

The chlorine shortage does not impact all Oregon water and sewer utilities, as some entities have their own on-site chlorine generators or have enough supplies on hand to last through the next several weeks. Based on the most updated information available, this timeframe is projected to be sufficient for chlorine supplies to resume.

Utilities that may be impacted are aware of the situation and are working directly with the Governor’s Office, Oregon Health Authority (OHA), Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), OEM, and utilizing Oregon Water/Wastewater Agency Response Network (ORWARN) and federal authorities to get the chlorine supply they need.

Additionally, Westlake is working to bring the Longview plant back online quickly and evaluating options to help supply chlorine through its other plants and help alleviate the current supply shortage.

“We?are?drawing on?our?strong partnerships with Governor Brown’s Office and our local, state and regional?partners to proactively and efficiently respond to this evolving situation. Oregon utilities are collectively working together to inventory needs across the state and preparing to share the remaining chlorine supply through mutual aid until production resumes,” stated Marheine. “We are relying on our fellow Oregonians to be responsible and considerate with their water supplies and use.”

How Oregonians Can Use Water Wisely to Extend the Current Chlorine Supply

  • Use water only for drinking, cooking and bathing
  • Limit outdoor use such as filling pools, washing cars or watering lawns
  • Be considerate of fellow Oregonians when purchasing additional water supplies

The electrical failure at Westlake follows a fire that destroyed BioLab in Lake Charles, Louisiana, in August 2020, rendering that plant inoperable. That facility was responsible for a significant portion of chlorine tablets produced for the U.S. market, causing a nationwide chlorine shortage.

For additional updates and information, visit https://www.oregon.gov/oem/emops/Pages/2021-Chlorine-Shortage.aspx.

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You can get this document in other languages, large print, braille, or a format you prefer. For assistance, call 971-719-1183 or email language@oem.or.us. We accept all relay calls, or you can dial 711. 


Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council meets June 23, 2021
Oregon Health Authority - 06/17/21 3:15 PM

June 17, 2021

Media contact: Aria Seligmann, 503-535-9134, i.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us">ari.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council meets June 23, 2021

What: A public meeting of the Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council.

When: Wednesday, June 23, 2021, 1:30 – 3:30 p.m.

Where: Virtual. YouTube link with live captions (English and Spanish). https://youtu.be/yW7n1GnpCf4

Agenda: TBD

Purpose: The Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council oversees the establishment of Addiction Recovery Centers throughout Oregon. The OAC will hold regular meetings to accomplish the necessary steps to fund and set up the centers.

Read more about the OAC. Read more about Measure 110.

Questions? Contact e110@dhsoha.state.or.us">OHA.Measure110@dhsoha.state.or.us

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Brandy L. Hemsley at 971-239-2942 711 TTY or RANDY.L.HEMSLEY@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">brandy.l.hemsley@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Jury Convicts Portland Man for Role in Drug Robbery and Shooting
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 06/17/21 3:15 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A federal jury in Portland found a local man guilty today for shooting and robbing two marijuana sellers in August 2017.

Ernest Franklin Evans, 39, a Portland resident, was found guilty of Hobbs Act robbery and using, carrying, and discharging a firearm in furtherance of a crime of violence and drug trafficking crime.

According to court documents and trial testimony, on August 3, 2017, an associate of Evans set up a ruse to purchase of 10 pounds of marijuana from two local marijuana sellers. After arriving at an agreed upon location, the two marijuana sellers wheeled out a large black tote full of marijuana. Shortly thereafter, two masked men—Evans and a second associate—came out from behind the corner of a building with guns drawn. Evans had a sawed-off shotgun and his associate had a pistol. Evans shot both marijuana sellers with a sawed-off shotgun and took their marijuana.

Evans was arrested on November 19, 2018, following the execution of a federal search warrant on his Portland residence.

On May 11, 2021, a federal grand jury in Portland returned a two-count superseding indictment charging Evans with robbery and using, carrying, and discharging a firearm during a crime of violence and drug trafficking crime.

Evans faces a maximum sentence of life in prison, a $250,000 fine, and five years’ supervised release.

Acting U.S. Attorney Scott Erik Asphaug of the District of Oregon made the announcement.

This case was investigated by Homeland Security Investigations with assistance from the Portland Police Bureau; the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives; and the FBI. It was prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorneys Peter D. Sax and Jeffrey S. Sweet.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Oregon reports 300 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death
Oregon Health Authority - 06/17/21 3:03 PM

June 17, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 300 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death

PORTLAND, Ore. — There is one new COVID-19 related death in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,745, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 300 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 205,988.

Oregon Health Authority launches new version of vaccination metrics dashboard

Today, OHA launched a new version of its vaccination metrics dashboard. Changes include race and ethnicity vaccination rates released at the regional level and age groups for 60 years and older reported as 10-year groups. New graphs now include people remaining to reach 65% vaccinated in each population, by age group and county as well as by race and ethnicity and region. You can also view data over time by date of first dose to understand vaccination uptake, or by date of last dose to understand when the vaccination series was completed.

Check out this new version here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 16,106 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 8,643 doses were administered on June 16 and 7,463 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on June 16.

The seven-day running average is now 15,444 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 2,415,419 first and second doses of Pfizer,1,692,352 first and second doses of Moderna and 160,253 single doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 2,340,646 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,077,399 have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series. The number of adult Oregonians needing vaccinations to reach the 70% threshold is 55,697.

A daily countdown can be found on the OHA vaccinations page

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 2,910,285 doses of Pfizer, 2,205,820 doses of Moderna and 299,000 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 151, which is 11 fewer than yesterday. There are 37 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is no change from yesterday.

The total number of COVID-19 positive patient bed-days in the most recent seven days is 1,151, which is a 13.3% decrease from the previous seven days. The peak daily number of beds occupied by COVID-19 positive patients in the most recent seven days is 174.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Down to the docks: crew gets vaccinated onboard merchant freighter

Michael Burton, Public Health Emergency Preparedness Assistant at Coos Health & Wellness took part in an unusual vaccine clinic earlier this month.

“We were approached by a stevedoring company who said that they’d have a ship in, and could we vaccinate some of the crew.”

He took three volunteers from the Coos County Medical Reserve Corp—two to administer shots and one to do the paperwork -- down to the docks.

“When we got to the dock, we learned we’d be going aboard.”

Read the rest of this story on the Oregon Vaccine News blog.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (6), Benton (5), Clackamas (22), Clatsop (6), Columbia (8), Coos (2), Crook (2), Curry (7), Deschutes (11), Douglas (15), Harney (5), Hood River (1), Jackson (14), Jefferson (3), Josephine (15), Klamath (5), Lane (26), Lincoln (7), Linn (18), Malheur (5), Marion (27), Morrow (2), Multnomah (35), Polk (10), Umatilla (20), Union (1), Wasco (2), Washington (17) and Yamhill (3).

Oregon’s 2,745th death is a 76-year-old man from Lane County who tested positive on June 9 and died on June 15 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend. He had underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.# # #


Oregon Community Foundation Invests Substantially in Diverse Communities Through State-Funded Program to Addresses Learning Inequities in State, OCF Has Deployed Over $28 Million for Summer Youth Programs to Date (Photo)
Oregon Community Foundation - 06/17/21 2:57 PM
Centro LatinoAmericano_via Oregon Community Foundation
Centro LatinoAmericano_via Oregon Community Foundation
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/6858/145942/thumb_Centro_LatinoAmericano_via_Oregon_Community_Foundation.jpg

Oregon Community Foundation Invests Substantially in Diverse Communities Through State-Funded Program Addressing Learning Inequities in State

OCF Has Deployed Over $28 Million for Summer Youth Programs to Date

Portland, Ore. – Thursday, June 17, 2021 – Oregon Community Foundation (OCF) announced today that it has surpassed the $28 million mark in state-funded grants for summer academic and enrichment programs throughout Oregon. In latest funding rounds, OCF has focused on diverse communities that have been disproportionally impacted by COVID-19.

“Black, Indigenous and other communities of color have been disproportionally impacted by the current crises and these communities already experienced significant educational disparities,” said Belle Cantor, Senior Program Officer for Education, OCF. “Through these grants, it is critical that we prioritize reaching programs that serve youth of color to help mitigate educational disparities.”

In late April, OCF announced the foundation’s role in administering $40 million in state-funded grants for community organizations to provide summer enrichment activities.

“CAIRO is ready to provide culturally responsive efforts to uplift the academic, socio-emotional and mental wellbeing of our students and families who have had to deal with trauma that is directly or indirectly associated with the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Abdikadir Bashir, Executive Director, Center for African Immigrants and Refugees Organization. “We will employ culturally competent student support specialists with strengths-based perspective and believe in the effective collaborative ability of African immigrant students and families in education.”

Following is a snapshot of just a few Black-led, Black-serving organizations that OCF is supporting through state-funded summer program funding:

Portland Opportunities Industrialization Center $700,000 Summer Learning Grant In 2020, Portland saw nearly 900 shootings—more than double the number recorded in 2019—and 41 shooting related deaths. About half of those killed were people of color. POIC will provide summer programming that offers positive engagement with police officers, recreation during high-risk out-of-school hours, youth grief/loss support groups, and decision-making skill-building opportunities.

Juneteenth Oregon $75,000 Summer Learning Grant Juneteenth OR will provide mentoring and host workshops focused on supporting black and brown children gain skills, manage and reduce stress, develop resilience, set goals, complete college applications, explore careers and manage finances.

Center for African Immigrants and Refugees Organization (CAIRO) $60,878 Summer Learning Grant CAIRO will provide culturally competent summer learning opportunities for children from communities of color and low-income families. Programming will include literacy, mentoring, sports and recreation and summer school.

OCF has also selected several Latina/o/x and Tribal community organizations to support including:

Burns Paiute Tribe $125,000 Summer Learning Grant will provide class preparedness, field trips, summer school, tutoring and intergenerational learning.

CAPACES Leadership Institute $187,800 Summer Learning Grant CAPACES Summer Learning program will serve Latino/a/x, farmworker, immigrant and indigenous children and will focus on art and culture, youth workforce development, and hands-on activities.

Centro Latino Americano $84,060 Summer Learning Grant CLCLA summer enhancement program will provide opportunities for Latina/o/x youth, including academic support, intergenerational learning, internships and leadership training.

Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs $50,000 Summer Learning Grant The Language and Culture Department will provide classes and camps, Native language and cultural experiences for youth.

The K-12 Summer Learning Grants program supports community-based programs that serve youth and families that have been disproportionately impacted by COVID-19 and related crises.

There have been more than 400 submitted applications. Organizations are encouraged to apply throughout the spring and early summer in the rolling application process. OCF is responding quickly, with weekly application reviews and approvals. Find the K-12 Summer Learning Grant application form at:

https://oregoncf.org/grants-and-scholarships/grants/k-12-summer-learning-grant-program

OCF will also soon announce state-funded Early Childhood Summer Support Grant awards to support enrichment programs for learning. Information will be posted the OCF Press Room.

About Oregon’s Summer Learning and Child Care Package for Kids

The State of Oregon has invested in summer learning programs to support children and families over summer months, in the critical time between the end of this school year and the beginning of the next.

More information about summer academic and enrichment program grants can be found in OCF’s online Press Room.

About Oregon Community Foundation

Oregon Community Foundation puts donated money to work in Oregon — more than $100 million in grants and scholarships annually. Since 1973, OCF grantmaking, research, advocacy and community-advised solutions have helped individuals, families, businesses, and organizations create charitable funds to improve lives for all Oregonians. Impactful giving — time, talent, and resources from many generous Oregonians — creates measurable change. Throughout 2020, OCF responded quickly and urgently — distributing a record-setting $220 million in charitable dollars to more than 3,000 nonprofits throughout Oregon working to address urgent needs, stabilize communities and prepare for long-term recovery in Oregon. OCF donors responded to the magnitude of need, as reflected in a 44% increase in donor advised fund grantmaking from the previous year. For more information, please visit: oregoncf.org.

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Attached Media Files: K-12 State Funded Summer Programming Surpasses 28 Million_FINAL News Release_06 17 21 , Centro LatinoAmericano_via Oregon Community Foundation , CAIRO Academy _Courtesy of CAIRO via Oregon Community Foundation , Burns Paiute Tribe_Powwow_via Oregon Community Foundation

PeaceHealth infection prevention leader earns national recognition (Photo)
PeaceHealth - 06/17/21 2:23 PM
2021-06/5173/145887/Catherine_Kroll.jpg
2021-06/5173/145887/Catherine_Kroll.jpg
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PeaceHealth Director of Infection Prevention Catherine Kroll has been named a national recipient of the Catholic Health Association’s Tomorrow’s Leaders award for 2021.

The national award honors dedicated, high-performing individuals who have demonstrated a strong commitment to advancing the mission of Catholic healthcare. Catherine was recognized during CHA’s virtual Catholic Health Assembly in June.

In a year when infection prevention has never been more important, Catherine has been invaluable in leading practices across PeaceHealth ensuring the safety of patients, caregivers and communities, with an unwavering dedication to community collaboration and safeguarding the most vulnerable.

In her more than seven years at PeaceHealth, she has been a highly impactful leader driving successful initiatives across the health system to prevent healthcare-associated infections. She consistently goes above and beyond to uphold PeaceHealth’s mission as a collaborative, always positive, servant leader with the natural ability to forge partnerships inside and outside the organization.

Prior to joining PeaceHealth, Catherine served in various public health roles at the local, state and national levels. She is passionate about community service and is actively involved in the Southwest Washington community. She was also recently honored with the 2020 Senior Heroes Award for her dedication to patient safety for seniors in Clark County, as well and Boy Scouts of America Cascade Pacific Council’s Distinguished Citizen Award.

For more information about the CHA, visit www.chausa.org.

About PeaceHealth: PeaceHealth, based in Vancouver, Wash., is a not-for-profit Catholic health system offering care to communities in Washington, Oregon and Alaska. PeaceHealth has approximately 16,000 caregivers, a group practice with more than 1,200 providers and 10 medical centers serving both urban and rural communities throughout the Northwest. In 1890, the Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace founded what has become PeaceHealth. The Sisters shared expertise and transferred wisdom from one medical center to another, always finding the best way to serve the unmet need for healthcare in their communities. Today, PeaceHealth is the legacy of the founding Sisters and continues with a spirit of respect, stewardship, collaboration and social justice in fulfilling its Mission. Visit us online at peacehealth.org.




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/5173/145887/Catherine_Kroll.jpg

Oregon Office of Emergency Management to Hold Press Availability
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 06/17/21 1:46 PM

Salem, Ore.— The Office of Emergency Management (OEM) will hold a press availability today, June 17, at 4:30 p.m. to discuss a chlorine shortage from a major supplier that could potentially impact local water/sewer utilities and their customers. OEM will be joined by subject matter experts from the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) and the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ).

Members of the media must RSVP by 3:45 p.m., June 17, by emailing OEM at lic.Info@state.or.us">Public.Info@state.or.us. OEM is using a Zoom-based platform for the press conference, and log-in information will be provided to reporters who RSVP. Members of the media are asked to log in a few minutes early.


Supreme Court upholds ACA; Oregonians still have access to health insurance coverage and savings
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 06/17/21 12:53 PM

(Salem) – The United States Supreme Court upheld the Affordable Care Act (ACA) today in its decision in the case of California v. Texas, No. 19-840.

The case centered on the validity of the ACA. Eighteen states, led by Texas, sought to have the entire ACA struck down. Another 21 states, led by California and joined by Oregon, defended the ACA.  

The decision marks the third such decision since the inception of the Affordable Care Act, including the 2012 case of National Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius (567 U.S. 519) and the 2015 case of King v. Burwell (576 U.S. 473). The third Supreme Court decision marks a huge victory for the ACA, allowing people throughout the United States access to health coverage and financial assistance through the Marketplace.

"This Supreme Court decision today is a huge victory for the more than 500,000 Oregonians who gained coverage through the ACA, regardless of health history or medical status,” said Gov. Kate Brown. “Today's decision also protects all Oregonians with health care coverage, maintaining protections for pre-existing conditions, preventing lifetime caps and annual limits on health coverage, and allowing young adults to stay covered by their parents' plan. We still have a lot of work to do to ensure everyone access to quality, affordable health care, but this is an important step."

The Affordable Care Act, passed in March 2010, prohibits health insurance companies from denying coverage to enrollees who have pre-existing health conditions. The law sets parameters on how health insurance companies calculate premiums. In addition, the ACA allows eligible enrollees to tap into financial assistance for both monthly premiums and out-of-pocket costs, making health coverage more affordable for millions of Americans. More than eight in 10 Oregonians would have lost financial assistance if the ACA was deemed invalid, and thousands would have lost coverage altogether.

“Oregon has embraced the Affordable Care Act since the beginning, and will continue to strive to get all Oregonians covered in quality health coverage,” said Oregon Insurance Commissioner Andrew Stolfi. “The ACA helps put that goal within reach by providing quality coverage to thousands of Oregonians.”

Oregonians have access to expanded financial assistance thanks to the ACA and the American Rescue Plan, and are able to enroll in health coverage through Aug. 15 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. You can find out what coverage and savings are available to you by visiting OregonHealthCare.gov/WindowShop. Free local help is available from coverage experts throughout Oregon. You can find local help at OregonHealthCare.gov.

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The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace, a part of state government, helps people get health insurance when they do not have job-based coverage, and do not qualify for the Oregon Health Plan or another program. The Marketplace is the state-level partner to HealthCare.gov, and a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS). For more information, go to OregonHealthCare.gov.


Curry County to complete transfer of public health services to OHA July 1
Oregon Health Authority - 06/17/21 12:40 PM

June 17, 2021

Media contacts:     Erica Heartquist, Oregon Health Authority, 503-871-8843, ica.J.Heartquist@dhsoha.state.or.us">Erica.J.Heartquist@dhsoha.state.or.us

Commissioner Court Boice, Curry County, 541-247-3229, oicec@co.curry.or.us">boicec@co.curry.or.us

Curry County to complete transfer of public health services to OHA July 1

OHA has provided some services since May 2 following county resolution

PORTLAND, Ore.—Curry County is expected to complete the transfer of its public health services to Oregon Health Authority on July 1, following approval of a resolution by the county Board of Commissioners in April to begin the process.

OHA will host a virtual town hall on Tuesday, June 22, from 5:30-6:30 p.m. so Curry County residents can get more information about the transfer and ask questions of a panel of OHA representatives. The meeting can be accessed at https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1605987595?pwd=ZjViYmszK1VEcHdOd2I3enlNSFg3QT09.

Since the county’s April decision to hand over its public health authority to OHA and terminate its public health provision agreements with the state, OHA began providing some services to county residents. As of May 2, OHA began providing a subset of statutorily required services, and beginning July 1, the remainder of those services will be provided directly by OHA. Those services will include:

  • Monitoring communicable diseases and controlling outbreaks, including the COVID-19 pandemic response.
  • Ensuring access to safe drinking water.
  • Ensuring access to WIC services.
  • Licensing and inspecting food, pool and lodging facilities.

In response to the county’s decision, the Public Health Division convened staff representatives from across the division to plan for and communicate about the transition, including sharing information with local partners, clients and the public.

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Colorado Man Pleads Guilty to Federal Hate Crime After Unprovoked Stabbing of Black Man
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 06/17/21 12:30 PM

EUGENE, Ore.—A Colorado man pleaded guilty today to a federal hate crime for stabbing a Black man from Ontario, Oregon while the man was sitting in a fast-food restaurant.

Nolan Levi Strauss, 27, pleaded guilty to a hate crime involving an attempt to kill.

According to court documents, on the morning of Dec. 21, 2019, a man walked into an Arby’s Restaurant and adjoining Pilot Travel Center in Ontario where he planned to provide documentation for a pending job application. The man sat in a booth by himself, waiting to meet with the restaurant manager, when Strauss entered the building and approached the man from behind.

Suddenly, unprovoked and without warning, Strauss stabbed the man twice in the neck. The man tried to grab Strauss’s hands and take the knife, and, in the process, managed to prevent Strauss from stabbing him again. A maintenance worker approached Strauss and directed him to drop the knife several times. Finally, the stabbing victim broke free from Strauss’s grip and ran to the other side of the restaurant before collapsing on the floor. Meanwhile, the maintenance worker used a belt to secure Strauss’s hands behind his back and waited for police to arrive.

While they waited, the worker asked Strauss why he stabbed the man. Strauss replied, “Because he was Black, and I don’t like Black people.” Strauss was arrested at the scene. He later admitted he was trying to kill the man because was he was Black.

As a result of Strauss’s attack, the stabbing victim suffered two lacerations to his neck. He was evaluated in Ontario and subsequently life-flighted to a hospital in Boise, Idaho for emergency surgery.

“The defendant is being held accountable for his vicious, racially-motivated attack on a Black man who was targeted because of the color of his skin,” said Assistant Attorney General Kristen Clarke for the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division. “Racially motivated acts of violence must not be tolerated in our country today. The Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice will continue to work with our federal, state and local partners to ensure that individuals who commit bias motivated crimes are brought to justice for their actions.” 

 “This crime serves as a horrifying reminder that racism and bigotry still exist and threaten the safety of communities of color. Hate crimes not only hurt victims, but spread fear across entire communities,” said Acting U.S. Attorney Scott Erik Asphaug for the District of Oregon. “This conviction should send a strong message that federal law enforcement will not tolerate hate-motivated acts of violence and will move swiftly to hold those responsible accountable.”

“Everyone deserves to go to work without fearing they will be a victim of violence because of how they look or how they live. Racist attacks like this one—powered by hate and grounded in ignorance—strike at the heart of our community,” said Kieran L. Ramsey, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon. “We should all draw strength from our diversity and work together to protect our neighbors.”

On Sept. 17, 2020, a federal grand jury in Eugene returned a single-count indictment charging Strauss with a hate crime involving an attempt to kill.

Strauss faces a maximum sentence of life in prison. He will be sentenced on September 9, 2021 before U.S. District Court Judge Michael J. McShane.

Assistant Attorney General Kristen Clarke and Acting U.S. Attorney Scott Erik Asphaug of the District of Oregon made the announcement.

This case was investigated by the FBI with assistance from the Ontario Police Department, Oregon State Police, and the Malheur County District Attorney’s Office. It is being prosecuted by Gavin W. Bruce, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon, and Cameron A. Bell, Trial Attorney for the Civil Rights Division.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Weekday Update - June 17, 2021
Douglas Co. Government - 06/17/21 12:04 PM
DCCRT
DCCRT
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/6789/145931/thumb_DC_COVID_19_Response_Team_WEB_Logo_72320.jpg

Our local COVID-19 updates represent the coordinated effort of the agencies that make up the DCCRT

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – June 17, 2021

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - WEEKDAY UPDATE

 

(Douglas County, Ore.)  DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 UPDATE FOR THURSDAY, JUNE 17, 2021

As of 12:00 pm today, Thursday, June 17, 2021, there are TWENTY-TWO (22) people with new positive test results to report since our noon update yesterday.  The total number of cases of people with positive test results and presumptives in Douglas County is now at 3,853. Currently, there are ELEVEN (11) Douglas County COVID-19 patients that are being hospitalized, seven locally and four out-of-the-area. Our Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, under the direction of the Douglas County Board of Commissioners, continue to devote all resources available to our local COVID response.

 

Douglas County, OR - COVID-19 - Case Update Chart

Date

Saturday/Sunday

June 12 & 13, 2021

Monday,

June 14, 2021

Tuesday,

June 15, 2021

Wednesday,

June 16, 2021

Today, Thursday,

June 17, 2021

Total COVID-19 Cases

3,798

3,803

3,816

3,831

3,853

People w/ Positive PCR or Antigen Test Results

3,618

3,623

3,635

3,650

3,672

Presumptive

180

180

181

181

181

Total Currently Hospitalized

8

10

12

12

11

Total Currently in Isolation

187

185

176

157

155

Total COVID-19 Related Deaths

80

80

80

82

82

Our daily update includes the total number of cases in Douglas County, which combines people with positive test results and presumptives, as well as a breakout of those case numbers. There will be times when a presumptive will move to a positive test result, and our total case number will not change because the case has already been counted.

 

LOCAL CONTACTS AND CASES BEING SUPPORTED IN ISOLATION AND QUARANTINE

Currently, DPHN is supporting 155 cases in isolation, as well as another 435 contacts in quarantine in Douglas County. Isolation is recommended for confirmed and presumptive cases, quarantine is recommended for contacts of confirmed or presumptive cases.  Currently, staff is supporting a total of 590 total contacts and cases in isolation or quarantine.  This number represents a snapshot of the significant amount of work being done locally to help control the spread of COVID.

 

DOUGLAS COUNTY TIGER TEAM FREE POP-UP COVID-19 VACCINATION CLINICS

It’s a busy week for the Tiger Team.  The Douglas County Tiger Team continues to bring free COVID-19 vaccines directly to rural areas via our mobile medical vans (MMV) via their pop up vaccine clinics.  They are visiting businesses, farms, fire stations and other locations in our smaller remote communities in Douglas County. The Douglas County Board of Commissioners, who have led the charge for our Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team efforts since the beginning, have coordinated with DPHN to organize our local Tiger Team to manage our vaccine outreach efforts through ‘pop-up’ vaccine clinics.

 

The Douglas County Tiger Team will be hosting FREE POP UP COVID VACCINE CLINICS at the locations listed below.  The clinics are currently open to anyone 18 years of age and older, and preregistration is not necessary:

 

  • Thursday, June 17, 2021: Toketee-Diamond Lake and surrounding area.  Clinic will be held at the US Forest Service - Diamond Lake Ranger District – Ranger Station located at 2020 Toketee-Rigdon Road in Idleyld Park from 8:00 am to 4:00 pm.

 

  • Friday, June 18, 2021: Reedsport and surrounding area. Clinic will be held at the Oregon Divisional Chainsaw Carving Championship located at Rainbow Plaza, 250 Water Avenue in Reedsport from 8:00 am to 7:00 pm.

 

  • Saturday, June 19, 2021: Reedsport and surrounding area. Clinic will be held at the Oregon Divisional Chainsaw Carving Championship located at Rainbow Plaza, 250 Water Avenue in Reedsport from 8:00 am to 7:00 pm.

 

Our Tiger Team coordinates with Umpqua Valley Ambulance to bring a certified vaccinator and a medical assistant to each clinic.  If you are interested in having the Douglas County Tiger Team come to your business, fire department, farm or town to provide a pop-up vaccine clinic or if you have any questions about our Douglas County Tiger Teams and want a schedule of their upcoming pop-up vaccination clinics, please call (541) 670-3110 or our local COVID-19 Hotline at (541) 464-6550Click here for the calendar listing of the upcoming Tiger Team Pop Up Vaccine Clinics

 

AVIVA HAS A DEDICATED FREE COVID-19 VACCINATION CLINIC SITE IN ROSEBURG 

Shared from Aviva Health.  Aviva Health opened a dedicated COVID-19 vaccination clinic site at 4221 NE Stephens Street, Suite 101 in Roseburg, just across the street from its main Roseburg Clinic location near Costco.  The new COVID-19 Vaccination Clinic opened Wednesday, May 18, 2021, and offers free COVID-19 vaccines by appointment.   The new COVID-19 vaccination clinic will be open Monday through Friday, from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm and is open for residents ages 12 and older.  To schedule an appointment during the week please call (541) 672-9596.

 

As a reminder: Parental or guardian consent is required to vaccinate residents 12 to 14 years old.  Written consent can be obtained in advance.  Under Oregon law, minors 15 years of age and older may consent to medical treatment, including vaccinations, when provided by a physician, physician assistant, naturopath, nurse practitioner, dentist or optometrist, or other professionals operating under the license of these providers; however, families are encouraged to make decisions about vaccinations together.

 

COVID-19 VACCINE ELIGIBILITY OPEN FOR EVERYONE 12 YEARS OLD AND OLDER

According to the CDC, State of Oregon and OHA, ALL residents ages 12 years old and older are eligible to get the COVID-19 Vaccine.  As of May 13, 2021, the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine has been approved for people ages 12 to 15, joining those 16 and above who are already eligible.  The good news, according to Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, our Douglas County Public Health Officer, is that we have plenty of vaccine and will be giving to anyone 12 and above who wants it. Remember, “it’s your turn!” So, get signed up or show up to get your COVID-19 vaccine today!

 

  1. Call and set up an appointment with your primary health care provider or ask them for a referral to another health care provider.
  2. Call and set up an appointment with a local pharmacy.
  3. Sign up for or attend one of the vaccination clinics offered in Douglas County through DPHN, Douglas County, Aviva Health or our Douglas County Tiger Team. 
  4. If you are a member of the Cow Creek Band of the Umpqua Tribe of Indians, please contact to set up an appointment at (541) 672-9405 or log onto https://www.cowcreek-nsn.gov/public-health/
  5. The Roseburg VA Health Care System is setting up appointments for veterans to receive the COVID-19 vaccine.  For more information, call the Roseburg VAMC at (541) 440-1000 or log onto https://www.va.gov/health-care/covid-19-vaccine/.

 

Please note that for residents that are ages 12 to 14, this will require a parent or guardian to accompany them and give written consent for the vaccine.  Under Oregon law, minors 15 years of age and older may consent to medical treatment, including vaccinations, when provided by a physician, physician assistant, naturopath, nurse practitioner, dentist or optometrist, or other professionals operating under the license of these providers; however, families are encouraged to make decisions about vaccinations together.

 

#ITSYOURTURN DOUGLAS COUNTY - DPHN COVID-19 VACCINATION CAMPAIGN

Free COVID-19 vaccines are available to everyone in Douglas County ages 12 and older. Douglas Public Health Network created the #itsyourturn COVID-19 vaccine campaign to encourage everyone to step up and take their turn to get their COVID-19 vaccine to help our communities fight the battle against the spread of the COVID-19 virus.  For more information on how you can take your turn and get your COVID-19 vaccine, contact your primary health care provider, call any local pharmacy, talk to your employer or visit DougCoVaccine.com. Check out the latest videos on the DPHN Facebook Page or the DPHN YouTube Channel, that feature local vaccine voices who hope to inspire our friends, family and neighbors to get the COVID-19 vaccine, so we can move forward to normal lives, activities and celebrations sooner rather than later.  #itsyourturn

 

LOCATE A VACCINE LOCATION NEAR YOU:




Attached Media Files: DCCRT , Tiger Chainsaw

Media Advisory: Virtual Press Event on Public Safety and Burned Area Fire Closures from the 2020 Fire Season
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 06/17/21 11:59 AM

Portland, Ore. – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will have burned area fire closures this summer due to the 2020 fire season because of public safety concerns. As more people continue to get outside, the BLM wants the public to be aware of the current closures and the safety reasons behind these closures.

Media are invited to participate in a virtual press event with BLM OR/WA recreation and safety specialists who will provide information about the remaining burned area fire closures and the effects on recreation.

What:              Public Safety and Burned Area Fire Closures from the 2020 Fire Season

Where:            Virtual via Zoom      

Date:               June 23, 2021                      

Time:              9 AM to 10 AM PST            

Who:               Maya Fuller, BLM OR/WA Recreation Specialist and Randall Rishe, BLM OR/WA Safety Specialist

RSVP REQUIRED: Please RSVP by close of business on MONDAY, JUNE 21. Please provide your name and affiliated media organization to Morgan Rubanow, BLM Public Affairs Specialist: ubanow@blm.gov">mrubanow@blm.gov. A link to the event and additional details will be provided.

 

-BLM-

 

This year, we invite everyone to reimagine your public lands as we celebrate 75 years of the BLM’s stewardship and service to the American people.?The BLM manages approximately 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations.


Oregon Man Pleads Guilty After Pocketing Millions in COVID-Relief Funds
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 06/17/21 11:40 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.—An Oregon man pleaded guilty today after fraudulently converting to personal use loans intended to help small businesses during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Andrew Aaron Lloyd, 51, of Lebanon, Oregon, pleaded guilty to bank fraud, money laundering, and aggravated identity theft.

Lloyd took advantage of economic relief programs administered by the Small Business Administration (SBA), including Economic Injury Disaster Loans (EIDL) and the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP). These programs were authorized by the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, signed into law on March 27, 2020. The CARES Act provided emergency financial assistance to millions of Americans and small businesses suffering from the economic effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“CARES Act relief programs were designed to help American small businesses weather a historically difficult time in our nation’s economic history. Andrew Lloyd saw an opportunity to profit off the COVID-19 pandemic and did so at the expense of hardworking Americans. Our office will continue to investigate and prosecute anyone who seeks to unfairly enrich themselves from public funds set aside to help those in need,” said Scott Erik Asphaug, Acting U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.  

“While Americans suffered with the economic collapse that COVID-19 brought to our communities, Lloyd decided to cash in on the catastrophe. As hard working, honest people were forced onto unemployment and into food lines, Lloyd was pouring millions of stolen dollars into brokerage accounts and real estate deals. Thanks to our investigative partnerships, he will now face years in prison,” said Kieran L. Ramsey, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon.

“As our country continues to recover from the destructive effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, there are individuals like Andrew Lloyd who opt to do further harm to our country by exploiting the suffering of fellow Americans,” said Corinne Kalve, Acting Special Agent in Charge of IRS Criminal Investigation (IRS:CI). “IRS:CI will continue to pursue those who choose to abuse our financial system and who choose to steal pandemic recovery funds for their own illicit gain.”

“Lying to gain access to economic stimulus funds will be met with justice,” said Weston King, SBA Office of Inspector General Western Region Special Agent in Charge. “SBA OIG will aggressively pursue evidence of fraud against SBA’s programs aimed at assisting the nation’s small businesses struggling with pandemic challenges.  I want to thank the U.S. Attorney’s Office and our law enforcement partners for their dedication and pursuit of justice.”

According to court documents, in October 2020, federal agents initiated an investigation into Lloyd based on information suggesting he had fraudulently applied for PPP loans and EIDL at multiple financial institutions. Beginning in April 2020, Lloyd began submitting loan applications using numerous business names and personally identifiable information of relatives and business associates without their consent.

Lloyd submitted false documentation to justify the loan amounts requested, including an IRS Form 944 listing the 2019 wages purportedly paid by entities controlled by Lloyd. Total wages allegedly paid by these entities ranged from $3 million to more than $4.7 million. Lloyd’s loan applications also included lists of between 56 and 64 employees and the total wages paid to each. The loan application packages included some of the same information across the different business entities, including the businesses’ physical locations and the names of several dozen employees.

In total, Lloyd submitted nine PPP loan applications, six of which were accepted, resulting in a payout of more than $3.4 million. Lloyd also applied for numerous EIDLs, of which one was accepted, resulting in an additional $160,000 in payments to Lloyd. Upon receipt of the funds, Lloyd purchased real estate and invested in securities. Lloyd transferred more than $1.8 million of the above-described PPP loan funds to his ETRADE Securities brokerage account. Securities Lloyd purchased using the fraudulently acquired funds substantially increased in value.

In January 2021, agents seized Lloyd’s brokerage account, which included 15,740 shares of Tesla, Inc. purchased with proceeds of his fraud. In March 2021, agents seized another account containing more than $660,000 in securities and cash. The securities and cash seized from Lloyd’s accounts are presently valued at more than $11 million.

On January 5, 2021, Lloyd was charged by criminal complaint with wire fraud, bank fraud, and money laundering. He was arrested and made his first appearance in federal court on January 7, 2021. On June 6, 2021, he was charged by superseding criminal information with bank fraud, money laundering, and aggravated identity theft.

With his continued acceptance of responsibility, the U.S. Attorney’s Office will join Lloyd in jointly recommending a sentence of 61 months in federal prison. He will be sentenced on September 9, 2021 before U.S. District Court Judge Michael J. McShane.

As part of his plea agreement, Lloyd has agreed to pay more than $3.6 million in restitution to the U.S. Treasury. Lloyd also agreed to forfeit more than $11 million in cash and securities and 23 properties that were purchased with PPP funds.

An accomplice of Lloyd’s, Russell Anthony Schort, 39, of Myrtle Creek, Oregon, was charged alongside Lloyd for similar conduct. Schort is scheduled to plead guilty on July 1, 2021.

Acting U.S. Attorney Scott Erik Asphaug of the District of Oregon made the announcement.

This case was investigated by the FBI with assistance from the SBA Office of Inspector General and IRS Criminal Investigation. It is being prosecuted by Gavin W. Bruce, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

Anyone with information about allegations of attempted fraud involving COVID-19 can report it by calling the Department of Justice’s National Center for Disaster Fraud (NCDF) Hotline at 866-720-5721 or via the NCDF Web Complaint Form at: https://www.justice.gov/disaster-fraud/ncdf-disaster-complaint-form.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Coffee Creek Correctional Facility Employee Assaulted by Incarcerated Male
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 06/17/21 10:05 AM

On June 12, 2021, at approximately 2:30 p.m., a Coffee Creek Correctional Facility (CCCF) Correctional Officer was assaulted with a knife-like weapon by an incarcerated male at the Intake Center. As a result of the assault, the staff member was transported to a local hospital for evaluation and treatment of cuts to the face and head. Security staff responded to the assault and gave first aid to the employee. The adult in custody (AIC) was transported to a segregation unit at another DOC institution. 

To protect the employee’s privacy, the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) will not release the employee’s name. He has been released from the hospital and is recovering at home. Critical Incident Stress Management Team has been established at CCCF to aid employees involved in the incident. 

DOC is not releasing the name of the AIC because he is incarcerated from another state. In these cases, the names and locations of incarcerated people are not disclosed. Releasing confidential information may hinder our ability to use the exchange program and could jeopardize the safety and security of the individual.

Speaking on the incident, CCCF Superintendent Nichole Brown shared, “Our thoughts and prayers are with the Correctional Officer, his family, all of our first responders, and all those impacted by this terrible incident. The staff at CCCF come to work each day as corrections professionals dedicated to our mission to maintain the safety, security, and rehabilitation of our adults in custody. Especially at the Intake Center, employees walk into an environment that can be unpredictable. Much of the time, we focus on the great programs and opportunities at DOC—and our agency has made great strides in improving employee wellness—but the unavoidable reality of this work is that it can be high risk and high stress. This is a challenging time for our team and we stand together in support of one another.”

DOC is cooperating with the Oregon State Police on the criminal investigation. 

CCCF is a multi-custody prison in Wilsonville accommodating all of Oregon’s female AICs (approximately 1,260). The prison has cell and dormitory housing, work programs, skills training, treatment programs, health services, religious services, physical plant, a central records unit, and administrative areas. CCCF participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises, including a contact center, textiles, and document scanning. In addition, CCCF houses the state’s Intake Center, which provides intake and evaluation of all AICs committed to state custody by the courts. The Intake Center houses approximately 400 male inmates. CCCF’s minimum facility opened in 2001, and the medium facility opened in 2002.
 


Linn County Sheriff's Office Arrest Male from Tree
Linn County Sheriff's Office - 06/17/21 9:49 AM

Linn County Sheriff Jim Yon reports on Tuesday, June 15, at 2:18 p.m., his deputies performed a traffic stop on Rock Hill Road, south of Lebanon, when the operator stopped and ran through a field and into a grove of trees attempting to evade deputies.

Deputies handled a call earlier in the day where Nicholas Ames, 31, caused a disturbance near Sweet Home. He was reported to have left the area in a green mustang.  Throughout the day deputies watched for Ames during their regular patrols, eventually locating him south of Lebanon.  During the traffic stop, Ames stopped the vehicle and quickly ran through a farm field and into a grove of trees. Multiple agencies responded to assist in searching for Ames.  After three hours, Ames was located high in a tree.  At first, Ames refused to come down but a deputy on scene who is trained in crisis negotiations was able to talk Ames into cooperating and he was taken into custody.

Deputies have responded to multiple calls within the last few days where Ames was a suspect in assaulting people, violating restraining orders, and causing other disturbances.  He was transported to the Linn County Jail where he was lodged on multiple charges for Violating a Restraining Order, Reckless Driving, Elude on Foot, Elude in Vehicle and Violations of his Release Agreements from prior arrests.

Ames was involved in a similar incident in March when he attempted to evade deputies by driving through a farm field after suspected of theft.  At that time, Ames was uncooperative and ignored instructions as he acted like he had a firearm.  He was ultimately taken into custody after a lengthy negotiation.

Linn County Deputies were assisted by Benton County Sheriff’s Office, Oregon State Police, Albany Police Department, Lebanon Police Department and the Lebanon Fire Department.

 


OnPoint Community Credit Union to Open New Branches in the Tigard, Tualatin, Orchards and Johnson Creek Fred Meyer Stores
OnPoint Community Credit Union - 06/17/21 9:30 AM

Four new in-store branches will open in late June and July 2021

PORTLAND, Ore., June 17, 2021 – OnPoint Community Credit Union announced today it will open new branches in Fred Meyer’s Tigard, Tualatin, Johnson Creek and Orchards stores in late June and July 2021. These four new branches include the Tigard Branch, located at 11565 SW Pacific Hwy., Tigard, OR 97223, Tualatin Branch, located at 19200 SW Martinazzi Ave., Tualatin, OR 97062, Orchards Branch, located at 7411 NE 117th Ave., Vancouver, WA 98662 and Johnson Creek Branch, located at 8955 SE 82nd Ave., Portland, OR 97266. OnPoint is also slated to open four more branches within Fred Meyer locations in the coming months. With the opening of the final four branches, OnPoint will operate a total of 55 branches across Oregon and Southwest Washington by the end of 2021.

“Access to financial expertise and resources remains critical as our community continues to face economic challenges like rising home prices, fluctuating interest rates and a backlogged supply chain,” said Rob Stuart, President and Chief Executive Officer, OnPoint Community Credit Union. “Serving our members directly within Fred Meyer stores allows us to meet them where they are and provide direct support on their journey toward financial wellness. We look forward to growing alongside the Tigard, Tualatin, Orchards and Johnson Creek communities by building financial growth and well-being, one person at a time.”

These four new branches are part of the largest branch expansion in the credit union’s history. In celebration of these latest openings, OnPoint will donate $10,000 to local organizations serving Washington County, Clark County and Southeast Portland.

Each new OnPoint in-store branch will provide members with a complete suite of financial services, including membership enrollment, consumer and commercial lending, mortgages, financial planning, ATM and notarization. OnPoint’s new branches will also offer existing and new members special grand opening offers through the end of the year, including a $200 bonus for new members.

With the opening of these four branches, OnPoint will create 31 new jobs across these local economies. Visit the Careers section of its website to learn more about becoming part of the OnPoint team.

Orchards Branch, 7411 NE 117th Ave., Vancouver, WA 98662

Opening June 29, 2021

Ruvim Kruzhkov will serve as Branch Manager of OnPoint’s new Orchards location. Kruzhkov has served in the financial services industry for 14 years as a Teller, Personal Banker, Assistant Manager, Branch Manager and Multiple Site Branch Manager. He is originally from Krasnodar, Russia, and moved to the United States in 1990. Kruzhkov, his wife, and three children enjoy camping and spending time outdoors, especially at the Oregon coast’s dunes.

OnPoint will donate $2,500 to F.I.S.H. of Orchards, Inc, an emergency food and clothing bank located in East Clark County Washington. Founded in 1977, F.I.S.H of Orchards, Inc provides food and clothing to families and individuals in need every week at no charge. With a team of all volunteers, it serves over 5000 residents monthly.

Johnson Creek Branch, 8955 SE 82nd Ave., Portland, OR 97266

Opening June 30, 2021

Katie Koval will serve as Branch Manager of OnPoint’s new Johnson Creek location. Koval has 15 years of experience in the financial services industry, and has worked at OnPoint since 2011. She previously served as a Float Teller, Member Services Representative, Member Relationship Officer, Teller Coordinator, Branch Operations Supervisor and Senior Assistant Branch Manager. Koval and her husband live in Milwaukie and she enjoys traveling in her spare time.

OnPoint will donate $2,500 to Northwest Family Services (NWFS), a Portland-based organization that supports family stability, child well-being and victims of crime by focusing on the social influences of health. Since 1983, NWFS has worked to reduce poverty through health, education, employment and social justice services. NWFS offers many programs and services, including health and social service navigation, job readiness and placement, youth prevention and intervention programs, and more.

Tualatin Branch, 19200 SW Martinazzi Ave., Tualatin, OR 97062

Opening July 9, 2021

Nicole Harmon-Clark will serve as Branch Manager of OnPoint’s new Tualatin location. Harmon-Clark has served in the financial services industry for 12 years and has worked at OnPoint since 2012. She previously served as a Teller Coordinator, Member Relationship Officer, Small Business Specialist, and Senior Assistant Branch Manager. Harmon-Clark lives in Washington County with her wife, cat and chocolate Labrador puppy. In her spare time, she loves to hike, spend time outdoors, visit local breweries and wineries, and listen to music.

OnPoint will donate $2,500 to Chelsea’s Closet, a rolling dress-up closet that provides monthly dress-up parties for seriously ill children at children’s hospitals. The Chelsea Hicks Foundation introduced the Chelsea’s Closet dress?up program to OHSU Doernbecher Children’s Hospital in March 2010. Today, Chelsea’s Closet visits OHSU Doernbecher and Randall Children’s Hospitals monthly, with a permanent “closet” at Randall in the oncology department. Chelsea’s Closet aims to provide hope, healing and smiles to seriously ill children from all Oregon counties, reaching more than 2,300 children and their families each year.

Tigard Branch, 11565 SW Pacific Hwy., Tigard, OR 97223

Opening July 13, 2021

Marina Mijares will serve as Branch Manager of OnPoint’s new Tigard location. Mijares has 13 years of experience in the financial services industry and has worked at OnPoint since 2011. She previously served as a Teller, Member Service Representative, Teller Coordinator, Member Relationship Officer, Business Member Specialist and Assistant Branch Manager. She lives in Washington County with her husband, three children and cat. In her spare time, Mijares reads, studies, enjoys spending time with her family, attending rock concerts, traveling, visiting breweries and wineries.

OnPoint will donate $2,500 to Community Warehouse, a local furniture bank focused on connecting furnishings to Portland-area residents in need. For 20 years, Community Warehouse has collected donated home goods and worked with community organizations and social service agencies to get items into the homes of those that need it the most. In response to COVID-19, Community Warehouse delivered more than 450 Home2Go kits, dressers filled with home goods such as pots and pans, dishes and sheets. Community Warehouse is dedicated to creating more thriving communities through stronger home foundations and has served 7,800 residents since 2012.

ABOUT ONPOINT COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION

OnPoint Community Credit Union is the largest credit union in Oregon, serving over 440,000 members and with assets of $8.4 billion. Founded in 1932, OnPoint Community Credit Union’s membership is available to anyone who lives or works in one of 28 Oregon counties (Benton, Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Coos, Crook, Curry, Deschutes, Douglas, Gilliam, Hood River, Jackson, Jefferson, Josephine, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Morrow, Multnomah, Polk, Sherman, Tillamook, Wasco, Washington, Wheeler, and Yamhill) and two Washington counties (Skamania and Clark) and their immediate family members. More information is available at www.onpointcu.com or 503-228-7077 or 800-527-3932.

To qualify, individuals must open a new membership with a personal checking account and receive direct deposit of at least $500 to that account within 60 days of the open date. A bonus of $200 will be credited to their checking account approximately 60 days after new account is opened. Accounts must be open and in good standing at time of payout to receive bonus. As of 2/1/21, APY (annual percentage yield) for Interest Checking is 0.05%. APY is subject to change. $500 minimum balance for Interest Checking; no minimum balance for OnPoint Checking. When Interest Checking average monthly balance falls below $500, a $7 monthly service fee applies. Fees may reduce earnings. Bonus will be included on a 1099-INT for tax purposes. Cannot be combined with other offers for opening a new membership, such as OnPoint Savers or Refer a Friend. Offer only available at OnPoint Fred Meyer Branches. Offer valid through 12/31/21 and subject to change. Business bonus: To qualify, a new membership must be opened with a business checking account and receive $500 in deposits to that account within 60 days of the open date. A bonus of $200 will be credited to their business checking account approximately 60 days after new account is opened. Accounts must be open and in good standing at time of payout to receive bonus. Bonus will be included on a 1099-Int for tax purposes. Cannot be combined with other offers for opening a new membership, such as OnPoint Savers or Refer a Friend. Offer only available at OnPoint Fred Meyer Branches. Offer valid through 12/31/21 and subject to change.

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A Father's Day Financial Checklist for New Dads
Northwest Credit Union Assn. - 06/17/21 9:13 AM

SeaTac, Washington (June 17, 2021) — You’ve dreamed of being a dad and now the day is here.

Although you’re sleep deprived and navigating the new world of parenting, you’re probably also thinking about money and how to plan for the short- and long-term milestones of raising a child.

The Northwest Credit Union Association has eight tips to keep your finances on track:

  1. Revise your household budget.

In 2017, the USDA updated its Expenditures on Children by Families report and found that the cost of raising a child from birth to age 18 is $233,610 for a middle-income family (married with two kids) — around $12,980 per year. Adjusting for inflation and cost of living adjustments, that figure now hovers around $284,750. Broken down, it’s about $1,300 per month. Take a deep breath and realize that planning ahead with a revised budget will help you afford new expenses, such as diapers, baby food, childcare, clothing, and medical care.
 

  1. Reduce expenses.

Chances are you spent money on things you won’t have time for once you become a parent. Cancel unused magazine subscriptions and cut down on unnecessary TV or streaming services. Analyze your grocery lists and pump-up meal planning to avoid food waste. Shop thrift stores for baby clothing and other necessities — often you’ll find new items with the price tags still attached.
 

  1. Invest in good insurance.

Now that you have a dependent, good insurance is a must: health, life, and disability. Depending on the policy, life insurance can allow you to save for long-term events, such as tuition, paying off the mortgage or a wedding. Disability insurance can help if one or both parents become disabled due to illness or injury. Your employer may offer disability insurance, so be sure to check that it will be enough to pay for essential expenses, such as mortgage, childcare, household expenses, and other debt for a reasonable time period.
 

  1. Build up your emergency fund.

As everyone learned during the COVID-19 crisis, it pays to have a financial cushion. Try to have six to 12 months of living expenses saved up in case you change jobs or lose income. This safety net provides security while you’re job-hunting or if the family has to live on one parent’s salary.
 

 

 

  1. Start saving for college now.

The old saying goes, there’s no time like the present, and it’s especially true when saving for long-term expenses like college. Secure your child’s academic future by opening a College Savings 529 account with your credit union. Money invested in a 529 account can be invested and grow tax-free and each parent (or grandparent) can contribute up to $15,000 per year. You also don’t have to pay taxes on withdrawals if used for education purposes.
 

  1. Automate your monthly bills.
    Your mind is awhirl with all the details of having an infant, plus you’re just plain tired. Setting up automatic loan and bill payments can take the pressure off one household duty and ensure everything is paid on time, saving you a hassle in potential missed payments and credit card interest rate increases. 
     
  2. Ask financial experts for advice.
    Take advantage of the financial planning services offered by your credit union. You can schedule meetings to learn more about home buying, credit scores, retirement savings, and more. There are also online tools and calculators for home budget analyses, debt consolidation, equity loans, savings goals, and mortgage qualifiers.
     
  3. Update your will and estate planning documents.
    It’s no fun to think about writing a will, but you want to make sure your child is provided for, no matter what. A will allows you to choose a guardian for your child in case of an untimely death of both parents. Update your beneficiary designations to include your child as a second beneficiary of your investments and life insurance policies.

Congratulations to all the first-time parents. Contact your credit union to learn more about budgeting tools, financial education opportunities, savings programs, and affordable credit options.

 

 

 

 

 




Attached Media Files: Infographic , News Release

"If You See Something, Say Something(R)" Campaign Running in Eugene with U.S. Olympic Team Trials -- Track and Field  (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 06/17/21 9:00 AM
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SALEM, Ore. -- The U.S. Olympic Team Trials – Track and Field are coming to the newly renovated Hayward Field in Eugene June 18-27. With crowds anticipated at the event, the Oregon Office of Emergency Management (OEM) and U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS)—in partnership with TrackTown USA, University of Oregon, The Oregon Fusion Center, Lane County and the City of Eugene—are reminding the public that everyone plays a role in keeping communities safe.

“If You See Something, Say Something®” is the hallmark slogan of a nationwide campaign launched by DHS in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Justice's Nationwide Suspicious Activity Reporting Initiative, which serves as an example of how residents working together with law enforcement can make a difference to protect their communities.

Citizens are encouraged to be watchful during the U.S. Olympic Track and Field Trials, and report suspicious activity to local law enforcement or by calling 9-1-1. Suspicious activity might be a vehicle parked in an odd location, an unattended backpack, or unusual attention to facilities or buildings beyond a casual or professional interest.

“Public safety and security are everyone's responsibility,” said Oregon Office of Emergency Management Director Andrew Phelps. “If you see something concerning, trust your instincts and say something. Some of these activities could be innocent, but it's up to law enforcement to determine whether the behavior warrants investigation.”

The "If You See Something, Say Something®" campaign respects citizens' privacy, civil rights, and civil liberties by emphasizing behavior, rather than appearance, in identifying suspicious activity.

Factors such as race, ethnicity, and/or religious affiliation are not suspicious. The public should only report suspicious behavior and situations. Only reports that document behavior that is reasonably indicative of criminal activity related to terrorism will be shared with federal partners. When reporting suspicious activity to local authorities, or in the case of an emergency by calling 9-1-1, it is important to describe specifics, including:

  • Who or what you saw.
  • When you saw it.
  • Where it occurred.
  • Why it is suspicious.

Visit https://www.dhs.gov/see-something-say-something to learn more about the indicators and reporting for suspicious activity.

Promoting the importance of the ““If You See Something, Say Something®” campaign is one of the many ways that DHS’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) has worked with private sector partners, local first responders, and state and federal partners to ensure public safety at the event. Over the past four years, CISA has supported emergency response and recovery operations preparation at the U.S. Olympic Track and Field Trials by conducting several large-scale exercises and workshops focused on soft target crowded places resilience, and training on bombing prevention and response.

“Coordinating and working with our state, local, tribal, and territorial government and the private sector partners is critical to the success of this campaign,” said CISA Protective Security Advisor Chass Jones, who covers Oregon for CISA Region 10, which includes Oregon, Washington, Idaho and Alaska. “CISA looks forward to continuing to work with our partners throughout the region to do our part to ensure the Trials and accompanying events are safe and secure.”

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You can get this document in other languages, large print, braille, or a format you prefer. For assistance, call 971-719-1183 or email language@oem.or.us. We accept all relay calls, or you can dial 711.

 




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/3986/145886/Track__and__Field_Trials.jpeg , 2021-06/3986/145886/Tw_Trials.jpeg , 2021-06/3986/145886/SeeSay_Eugene-3_9x27-SPA.jpg , 2021-06/3986/145886/SeeSay_Eugene-3_9x27-ENG.jpg

Fatal Crash on Hwy 20E - Deschutes County
Oregon State Police - 06/17/21 8:59 AM

On Wednesday, June 16, 2021 at approximately 9:30 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a vehicle crash on Hwy 20E near mile post 57.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Dodge Durango, operated by Adolfo Ramirez (30) of Ontario, was westbound and crossed into the eastbound lane and collided with a Kenworth semi-truck operated by Kyle Knudtson (43) of Reardon, WA.

Ramirez sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Knudtson received minor injuries and was not transported.

OSP was assisted by Deschutes County Sheriff's Office, Deschutes County Fire Department, and ODOT.


2021 Commercial Halibut Season Is Set to Open
NOAA Fisheries - 06/17/21 6:47 AM
Crew sorts halibut catch.
Crew sorts halibut catch.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-06/6149/145911/thumb_sorting_halibut.jpg

The first 3-day commercial halibut fishing season of 2021 in federal waters off the West Coast begins next week. It starts on Tuesday, June 22 at 8 a.m. and ends on Thursday, June 24 at 6 p.m. NOAA’s Office of Law Enforcement will be conducting patrols throughout the season along with our partners. 

Patrols will focus on ensuring compliance with the rules and regulations governing commercial halibut fishing. These include:

  • Proper marking of fishing gear
  • Permitting and vessel documentation
  • Minimum size and possession restrictions

All setline or skate marker buoys carried on board or used by any U.S. vessel for halibut fishing must be marked with either the vessel’s state license number or registration number. The markings must be in legible characters at least 4 inches high and one-half inch wide in a contrasting color visible above the water.

Learn more about commercial halibut fishing regulations

Our partners in these patrols include:

  • U.S. Coast Guard
  • Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Police
  • Oregon State Police
  • California Department of Fish and Wildlife

Protecting Seabirds

In addition to the rules and regulations above, groundfish long-line vessels are now required to deploy seabird avoidance gear when fishing for Pacific halibut. This regulation only applies to vessels landing groundfish along with halibut. Streamer lines are the most common form of seabird avoidance gear and are used to prevent bird attacks on baited hooks.

Learn more about seabird regulations

Properly Releasing Halibut

Halibut that are not retained must be released outboard of the roller and returned to the water with a minimum of injury using one of these three methods:

  • Straightening the hook 
  • Cutting the gangion near the hook
  • Removing the hook with a gaff by carefully twisting it from the halibut

These safe release measures promote the survival of released halibut and help to support a sustainable fishery.

 




Attached Media Files: Crew sorts halibut catch.

Tip of The Week for June 21, 2021 - Move Over. It's The Law
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/17/21 6:16 AM
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  TIP OF THE WEEK

Date:          June 17, 2021         FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:     Sheriff Curtis Landers

                   541-265-0654

                   lcsheriff@co.lincoln.or.us

 

MOVE OVER. IT'S THE LAW.

Every day, law enforcement officers and emergency workers put their lives on the line to save ours. Even a routine traffic stop has become risky business. The following information comes from the Oregon Department of Transportation: www.oregon.gov/ODOT.

In the last 10 years, more than 700 officers have been killed in traffic incidents. In many of those cases, the officers were pulled over on the side of the road when inattentive drivers crashed into them at high speeds. That’s why there’s a strict law in Oregon designed to protect the people we depend on to protect us.

The Move Over Law (ORS 811.147) states that if you are approaching any type of emergency vehicle, tow truck or roadside assistance vehicle which is stopped on the roadside with emergency lights activated, you must:

  • MOVE OVER into another available lane.
  • If you can’t safely change lanes, SLOW DOWN to a speed that is at least 5 mph below the posted or designated speed of the roadway.
  • In all cases, the driver must try to provide as much room as possible for the emergency vehicle, tow truck or roadside assistance vehicle.

The Move Over Law is in place to help protect law enforcement officers, emergency workers, tow operators and those who routinely provide assistance to motorists along the highways. This group of dedicated professionals face a deadly threat on a daily basis: speeding and inattentive drivers. But the law also exists to protect you. The flashing lights are your cue to move over and slow down.

If you are approaching the scene of a crash, carefully watch for emergency workers directing traffic and follow all of their instructions. 

For more information and tips, visit our website at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and Like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.




Attached Media Files: 2021-06/5490/145910/061721_Move_Over._Its_The_Law.pdf , 2021-06/5490/145910/MOVE_OVER._ITS_THE_LAW.PNG

Fatal Traffic Crash in Melrose Tuesday Morning
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/17/21 6:13 AM

ROSEBURG, Ore. - A 30 year-old Roseburg man died in a single-vehicle traffic crash early Tuesday morning.

On Tuesday, June 15, 2021, shortly before 1:00 am, 9-1-1 dispatchers received a report of a single vehicle traffic crash in the 1000-block of Melrose Road. The caller reported the vehicle had crashed head-on into a tree and a male occupant who was unresponsive. 

The Sheriff's Office, along with fire and EMS agencies responded to the incident and found a tan in color 1999 Chevy Suburban which had been traveling east left the roadway for unknown reasons. The 30 year-old male driver, whose name is being withheld pending next of kin notification, was pronounced dead at the scene. The Medical Examiner's Office continues to exhaust efforts in locating family of the driver.