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Eugene/Spring/Rose/Alb/Corv News Releases for Wed. May. 12 - 6:57 pm
Wed. 05/12/21
Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update - May 12, 2021 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 05/12/21 5:04 PM
2021-05/3986/144934/OEM_RISING_LOGO_W_SUN.png
2021-05/3986/144934/OEM_RISING_LOGO_W_SUN.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-05/3986/144934/thumb_OEM_RISING_LOGO_W_SUN.png

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update for May 12, 2021, to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. See today's Wildfire Recovery update here.

Photo Captions:

Oregon Office of Emergency Management Wildfire Recovery Logo: Oregon Rising - Stronger Together.
File: OEM RISING LOGO JPG

Screenshot of the Oregon Recreation Site Status Map. This multi-agency effort shows the status of federal and state recreation areas including trails, parks, and campgrounds. (Image courtesy of the Natural and Cultural Resources Task Force)
File: Oregon's Recreation Site Map




Attached Media Files: 2021-05/3986/144934/OEM_RISING_LOGO_W_SUN.png , 2021-05/3986/144934/Oregons_Recreation_Site_Map.png

COVID-19 weekly cases, hospitalizations decline
Oregon Health Authority - 05/12/21 4:55 PM

May 12, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

COVID-19 weekly cases, hospitalizations decline

The Oregon Health Authority’s COVID-19 Weekly Report, released today, shows a second consecutive week of declining cases and hospitalizations.

OHA reported 4,896 new daily cases of COVID-19 during the week of Monday, May 3 through Sunday, May 9. That represents a 12% decline from the previous week and marks the second consecutive week of lower weekly cases.

New COVID-19 related hospitalizations also declined from 272 to 245.

There were 31 reported COVID-19 related deaths, nearly doubling the previous week’s total.

There were 111,121 tests for COVID-19 for the week of May 2 through May 8. The percentage of positive tests was 6.1%.

People 70 years of age and older have accounted for 39% of COVID-19 related hospitalizations and 75% of COVID-19 related deaths.

Today’s COVID-19 Weekly Outbreak Report shows 42 active COVID-19 outbreaks in senior living communities and congregate living settings, with three or more confirmed cases and one or more COVID-19 related deaths.


Exhibit Opens May 14 Featuring Stories of Immigrant Women of Color, War Survivors Narratives, Objects and Portraits on
Oregon Historical Society - 05/12/21 4:31 PM

Portland, OR — On May 14, 2021, a public exhibition from The Immigrant Story, “I Am My Story: Voices of Hope,” opens at the Oregon Historical Society (OHS). It features stories by six African women who are war survivors.

The newest exhibition by The Immigrant Story is a collaboration with acclaimed Portland photographer Jim Lommasson and his storytelling project, “What We Carried.” Lommasson created photos of the objects the women brought with them while traveling from their homelands to the U.S., and asked them to write on the photos. 

The objects, portraits and narratives connect viewers with the reflections, joys and fears of these young women. They shine a light on different facets of the Black experience, including the multiple layers of adversity experienced by immigrant women of color and survivors of war.

“This is our first live exhibit since before the COVID-19 pandemic began,” said Sankar Raman, founder of The Immigrant Story. “In light of the Black Lives Matter movement, we are thrilled to once again share pertinent stories– ones that speak to the Black experience – in a country with a lasting history of racism that continues to harm its Black residents, including immigrants.”

“I Am My Story is a collaborative storytelling project with six young African women who in their own words tell their stories of survival,” said Lommason. “They have witnessed unimaginable inhumanity and fled their homelands and have become our new Oregon neighbors. I have been moved by their courage and their ability to make new lives in America. The six participants truly represent the human spirit.”

Now, more than ever, the world needs stories of hope and resilience. The Immigrant Story’s intention in sharing these stories is to inspire viewers to persevere through trying times. In “I Am My Story: Voices of Hope,” the six storytellers show that it’s possible to triumph over fear and doubt, and ultimately overcome circumstances that are beyond their control.

Here are summaries of two of the women’s stories:

Olive Bukuru

Beneath the star-studded sky of Makamba, Burundi, 6-month-old Olive Bukuru clung to her father’s hip as they fled on foot for roughly 100 miles to Tanzania. It was 1996, and they were Hutus fleeing genocide. Family members had been killed before their eyes during the violent struggle. “Lots of people wish for things to change,” Bukuru says, “but you have to get up and do something.”

Divine Irambona

One night when Divine Irambona was eleven years old, her family’s security guards warned them of robbers. “Give us all your money or the entire family will die,” the men threatened. Irambona, who was hiding, darted out between the mens’ legs, past bullets and ran to her neighbor for help. “I guess I was kind of like a hero at that moment,” she says. After resettling in the United States, Irambona, who volunteers with refugees coming to Salem, has maintained her courageous selflessness. “I believe that everyone deserves peace. Everyone deserves a home.”

See all the profiles at https://theimmigrantstory.org/category/ucc/, and learn more about the exhibit at https://theimmigrantstory.org/my-story/.

As part of The Immigrant Story’s partnership with OHS, these and other interviews are archived in OHS’ research library, and many are available on the OHS Digital Collections website.

About The Immigrant Story:

The Immigrant Story documents and archives the voices and stories of immigrants in short, visual, written and podcast formats. The organization’s vision is to provide curated and relevant content to enhance empathy and create an inclusive community. The goal is both to advance the national dialogue and to dispel myths about new Americans through strong, thoughtful, narratives.

 

About What We Carried

In What We Carried, Portland photographer Jim Lommasson asks participants to share an item they brought on their journey to the U.S. He photographs the objects and asks the owners to provide personal reflections directly on the photographs. The participants’ commentary gives voice to the universal plight of refugees throughout time. 

About the Oregon Historical Society

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state’s collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon’s history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon’s cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.

 

Following the guidance and requirements of the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) for indoor entertainment establishments, the Oregon Historical Society has implemented important safety protocols for the health of our staff and visitors. Current protocols and hours are detailed at ohs.org/reopening.


DPSST Arbitration/Certification Workgroup Agenda May 27, 2021
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 05/12/21 4:13 PM

The DPSST Arbitration/Certification Workgroup will hold a meeting on May 27, 2021 at 1:00 p.m. in the Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. For further information, please contact Linsay Hale at (503) 378-2427.

Call-In Information

Phone: 888-273-3658

Access Code: 4711910

ťWorkgroup Members:

Zach Kenney, PPB Non-Management (PPC)

Lee Eby, OSSA (CPC)

Chris Davis, PPB Management (PPC)

Tosha Vanderburg, P&P Non-Management

Taj Shivvers, DOC Non-Management (CPC)

Tim Svenson, OSSA (TPC)

John Teague, OACP (PPC/Board)

Brian Pixley, OSSA (CPC)

Alex Gardener, OSP (PPC)

Gary Ninman, DOC PDU (CPC)

Terri Davie, OSP (PPC/Board)

Mike Yoder, DOC Management (CPC)

Rebecca Interiano, OSP Tele. Mgmt (TPC)

James Ristoff, Non-Mgmt Corrections (CPC)

Anil Karia, Labor Attorney

Scott Winkels, League of Oregon Cities

Elmer Dickens, Washington County Counsel

1.  Introductions

2.  Initial Review and Identification of Workgroup Topics and Discussion Points

Presented by Linsay Hale

3.  Next Workgroup Meeting: TBD


BT FTM Workgroup Meeting Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 05/12/21 4:07 PM

For Immediate Release                                        

May 11, 2021

Contact:   Sara Stewart
                503-378-2424

                sara.stewart@state.or.us

Notice of Special Meeting

The BT FTM Workgroup, a subgroup of the Telecommunications Curriculum Committee, will hold a regular meeting on May 26, 2021 from 3:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.  The meeting will be held virtually via Zoom.  For a link, please contact Sara Stewart at the email address listed above.  A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

Agenda Items:

  1. Check in
  2. Updated FTM Format Review
  3. FTM Guidebook – Review Purpose
  4. Module Headings Exercise
  5. Core Competencies
  6. Next Steps

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Workgroup members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


9-1-1 Operators to Graduate from Oregon Public Safety Academy / DPSST
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 05/12/21 3:30 PM

9-1-1 Operators to Graduate from Oregon Public Safety Academy / DPSST

 

The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is pleased to announce the graduation of its 123rd Basic Telecommunications Class.

The three-week course includes emergency call handling techniques, stress management, civil liability, ethics, criminal law, overview of fire-rescue and law enforcement operations, and a number of other topics. Upon completion of the course, students will return to their employing agency to continue their training for a number of months with a field training officer.

The 9-1-1 training program began in 1993 when the Oregon Legislative Assembly enacted legislation which requires that individuals who receive emergency calls for assistance from the public, meet professional standards for training and certification. There are approximately 950 men and women across the state who work in this profession in city, county, tribal, regional, and state public safety communications centers.

Basic Telecommunications #BT123 Graduation will be held at 9:00 a.m. on Friday, May 14, 2021, at the Oregon Public Safety Academy, in Salem, Oregon. Telephone: 503-378-2100.  Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the need for social distancing, the graduation will be closed to the public.  However, we would like to publicly congratulate Basic Telecommunications Class #BT 123 for a successful completion of their Basic Training.
 
Members of Basic Telecommunications Class #123:

Dispatcher Jasmin Brotton

Curry County Sheriff's Office

 

Dispatcher Lauren Brown

Wasco County Sheriff's Office

 

Dispatcher Erica Cianni

W.C.C.C.A.

 

Dispatcher Sheela Deskins

Junction City Police Department

 

Dispatcher Jayson Edblom

Oregon State University DPS

 

Dispatcher Amanda Ferriss

Oregon State University DPS

 

Dispatcher Laura Frost

W.C.C.C.A.

 

Dispatcher Lucretia Gassner

Josephine County Sheriff's Office

 

Dispatcher Tatum Green

Bureau of Emergency Communications

 

Dispatcher Kyle Hernandez

Bureau of Emergency Communications

 

Dispatcher Amanda Hynum

Bureau of Emergency Communications

 

Dispatcher Dylan Jackson

W.C.C.C.A.

 

Dispatcher Victoria Johnson

W.C.C.C.A.

 

Dispatcher Taylor Kile

Bureau of Emergency Communications

 

Dispatcher Skylar King

Linn County Sheriff's Office

 

Dispatcher Montana Knox

Linn County Sheriff's Office

 

Dispatcher Heidi Loebach

Bureau of Emergency Communications

 

Dispatcher Spencer Maine

Tillamook County 911

 

Dispatcher Katelyn Melville

LaGrande Police Department

 

Dispatcher Tiarella Miles

Bureau of Emergency Communications

 

Dispatcher Courtney Pattock

Bureau of Emergency Communications

 

Dispatcher Daniel Rossetti

W.C.C.C.A.

 

Dispatcher Kendall Tompkins

Bureau of Emergency Communications

 

Dispatcher Heather Walters

Wasco County Sheriff's Office

## Background Information on the BPSST and DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement.  Jerry Granderson serves as the Director and Darren Bucich, Chief of McKenzie Fire & Rescue serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.

 


Committee meets virtually May 25 to review grant applications for recreation projects
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 05/12/21 3:30 PM

The County Opportunity Grant Program Advisory Committee will hold a public meeting to review grant applications from 8:30 a.m.–12 p.m. May 25 via Zoom.

Applicants to the County Opportunity Grant Program (COGP) will present their proposed projects for acquiring, planning, developing and rehabilitating county-run camping facilities. The committee will evaluate and score all applications and create a priority ranking list of projects to be funded. The list will be forwarded to the Oregon Parks and Recreation Commission for final review and approval.

A schedule listing applicants and their specific presentation times is posted on the County Opportunity Grant Program web page at https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/GRA/pages/GRA-cogp.aspx. A link to view the Zoom meeting will also be posted at the site.

The COGP Advisory Committee consists of seven members who represent counties, recreational vehicle owners, people with disabilities and the general public. They also represent various geographic areas of the state. 

The COGP was established in 1983 to direct a portion of revenue from recreational vehicle registration fees to counties for park and recreation sites and programs. All Oregon counties are eligible to apply. The program is administered by Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD). 

For more information about the COGP, visit oprdgrants.org.


Conference of Local Health Officials meets May 20 via Zoom
Oregon Health Authority - 05/12/21 2:53 PM

May 12, 2021

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139 PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Conference of Local Health Officials meets May 20 via Zoom

What: The monthly public meeting of the Conference of Local Health Officials (CLHO). 

Agenda: Discuss reinstatement of triennial reviews; discuss orientations for newer public health administrators and staff; hear updates from the Health Officer Caucus and the CLHO Systems and Innovation Committee; discuss local ARPA funding; hear update on Curry County transfer of public health authority; discuss public health workforce and infrastructure.

Agenda is subject to change and is posted with meeting materials on the CLHO website at http://www.oregonclho.org/ prior to meeting.

There is no public comment period during this meeting.

When: Thursday, May 20, 9:30-11 a.m.

Where: Via Zoom meeting.  Join at

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1607711675?pwd=S2pzRlErUUE0SjNyenhDTTlCcm1rQT09

Background: The Conference of Local Health Officials provides recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority on the foundational capabilities and programs and any other public health program or activity under ORS 431.147. (ORS 431.340)

Program contact: Sara Beaudrault, 971-645-5766, a.beaudrault@state.or.us">sara.beaudrault@state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Sara Beaudrault at 971-645-5766 711 TTY or a.beaudrault@state.or.us">sara.beaudrault@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board Subcommittee meetings May 12-15
Oregon Health Authority - 05/12/21 2:47 PM

May 12, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board Subcommittee meetings May 12-15

What: Public meetings of the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board, subcommittees May 12-15. There is no public comment period available at these subcommittee meetings.

What

When

Where

Agenda

Equity Subcommittee

Wednesday, May 12, 4-5 p.m.

Via Zoom Meeting:

Meeting ID: 160 1882 1728

 

Available online

Research Subcommittee

Thursday, May 13, 1-2 p.m.

Via Zoom Meeting:

Meeting ID: 160 1882 1728

 

TBD

Licensing Subcommittee

Thursday, May 13, 2-4 p.m.

Via Zoom Meeting:

Meeting ID: 160 1882 1728

 

TBD

Products Subcommittee

Friday, May 14, 3-5 p.m.

Via Zoom Meeting:

Meeting ID: 160 1882 1728

 

TBD

Training Subcommittee

Friday, May 14, 1-3 p.m.

Via Zoom Meeting:

Meeting ID: 160 1882 1728

TBD

Background: Established by Ballot Measure 109 (2020), the Oregon Psilocybin Advisory Board makes recommendations to OHA on available scientific studies and research on the safety and efficacy of psilocybin in treating mental health conditions, and makes recommendations on the requirements, specifications and guidelines for providing psilocybin services in Oregon.

The Board will also develop a long-term strategic plan for ensuring that psilocybin services will become and remain a safe, accessible and affordable therapeutic option for all persons 21 years of age and older in this state for whom psilocybin may be appropriate; and monitor and study federal laws, regulations and policies regarding psilocybin.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Nic Riley at 971-673-0404, 711 TTY, or iley@dhsoha.state.gov">nic.riley@dhsoha.state.gov, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon reports 616 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 9 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 05/12/21 2:28 PM

May 12, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 616 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 9 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are nine new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,558, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 616 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 193,014.

Oregon surpasses 2 million vaccinated

Oregon reached another milestone in the efforts to vaccinate Oregonians — more than 2 million people have received at least one dose of a safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine.

According to the latest data, 2,006,179 people in Oregon have received at least one shot. Overall, 1,509,537 Oregonians have completed their series.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Oregon vaccinators have now administered at least one shot to 49% of all Oregonians. Oregon ranks 21st in the nation in the percentage of the total population who have received at least one dose, exceeding the national average of 46%.

“Based on our current trends, Oregon is on track to meet our goal of vaccinating 70% of adults by mid- to late-June,” said OHA Director Patrick Allen. “Thanks to all of our partners for helping us stay ahead of a virus that is circulating in our communities.”

“We still have work to do but it’s encouraging to see so many local partners working to achieve parity in vaccination rates for communities of color. The more people who have access to vaccines and choose to get vaccinated, the sooner we can end this pandemic and go back to doing the things we enjoy.”

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 34,415 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 17,961 doses were administered on May 11 and 16,454 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on May 11.

The 7-day running average is now 34,869 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered a total of 1,850,101 first and second doses of Pfizer, 1,413,162 first and second doses of Moderna and 113,436 single doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 2,211,885 doses of Pfizer, 1,798,980 doses of Moderna and 253,800 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 346, which is one more than yesterday. There are 88 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is one fewer than yesterday.

The total number of COVID-19 positive patient bed-days in the most recent seven days is 2,316, which is a 2.5% increase from the previous seven days. The peak daily number of beds occupied by COVID-19 positive patients in the most recent seven days is 346.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (2), Benton (14), Clackamas (80), Clatsop (1), Columbia (7), Coos (9), Crook (11), Deschutes (63), Douglas (15), Gilliam (1), Grant (2), Hood River (2), Jackson (42), Jefferson (13), Josephine (6), Klamath (15), Lake (2), Lane (49), Lincoln (2), Linn (21), Malheur (6), Marion (53), Multnomah (105), Polk (11), Tillamook (2), Umatilla (20), Union (1), Washington (49), Wheeler (2) and Yamhill (10).

Oregon’s 2,550th COVID-19 death is a 46-year-old woman from Clackamas County who tested positive on May 1 and died on May 8 at Kaiser Permanente Sunnyside Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,551st COVID-19 death is a 25-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive on April 25 and died on May 10 at Providence Medford Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,552nd COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old woman from Crook County who tested positive on April 20 and died on May 8 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,553rd COVID-19 death is a 32-year-old man from Lane County who tested positive on April 24 and died on May 11 at Oregon Health & Science University Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,554th COVID-19 death is a 50-year-old woman from Malheur County who tested positive on April 29 and died on May 10 at St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,555th COVID-19 death is a 67-year-old woman from Linn County who tested positive on April 23 and died on May 10 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,556th COVID-19 death is a 70-year-old man from Washington County who tested positive on April 13 and died on May 8 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,557th COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old man from Jefferson county who tested positive on April 21 and died on May 10 at St. Charles Bend Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,558th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man from Jefferson County who tested positive on April 17 and died on May 10 at St. Charles Bend Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.


Beaverton Man Indicted in Streaming Service Fraud Scheme
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 05/12/21 2:16 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A federal grand jury in Portland has returned an indictment charging a Beaverton, Oregon, man for his role in a scheme to steal and resell customer account credentials for popular internet streaming services including Netflix, HBO Max, and Spotify Premium.

Samuel Joyner, 30, has been charged with conspiracy to commit computer and access device fraud, trafficking and use of unauthorized access devices, and possession of fifteen or more unauthorized access devices.

“I applaud the thorough investigative effort and international law enforcement coordination resulting in these charges and today’s arrest of Mr. Joyner. Hacking and access device fraud are serious crimes that significantly impact companies large and small. Our office will continue to prioritize these and other internet crimes,” said Scott Erik Asphaug, Acting U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

“Cyber crime shows how small of a world we live in these days. The subjects and the victims can live next door or half a world away. In this instance, FBI agents in Omaha, Nebraska, launched an investigation that would stretch all the way to Australia and back to Oregon. Without their hard work, we wouldn't have this successful arrest today,” said Kieran L. Ramsey, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon. “As for consumers - this is a good reminder to check your accounts and change passwords to unique and complex passphrases.”

“This investigation spanned across the Pacific to our shores in Australia, showing that while crimes may be borderless, our law enforcement response is united across countries. Following a referral of information from our FBI law enforcement partners, the Australian Federal Police arrested, charged and secured a conviction against a Sydney man, and we also seized more than a million dollars’ worth of cryptocurrency assets which were the proceeds of his crime,” Australian Federal Police cybercrime operations case officer Joanna Kondos said. “Cybercrime is not a victimless crime – this case uncovered stolen account details from millions of people around the world, and we work to investigate these crimes on behalf of those who have had their personal details scammed for someone else’s profit.”

According to the indictment, between February 2018 and March 2019, Joyner and an accomplice, Evan McMahon, 23, of Sydney, Australia, conspired with one another to create and operate an online service called AccountBot. AccountBot offered a paid subscription service where customers could obtain account credentials to access popular internet streaming services at a greatly reduced rate.

Joyner and McMahon illegally acquired usernames and passwords to the various streaming services through credential stuffing attacks, a computer hacking technique where individuals obtain large sets of account credentials, often made available as a result of large data breaches, and, using an automated tool, repeatedly enter credentials into a website or internet-based service to verify their authenticity. Verified credentials obtained via credential stuffing can then be used to access online user accounts without authorization.

AccountBot customers paid a fee, ranging from $1.79 to $24.99, depending on the type of service and access duration needed. These customers paid Joyner and McMahon in fiat or cryptocurrency. Joyner and McMahon were equal partners of AccountBot, but fulfilled distinct tasks. McMahon was primarily responsible for drafting computer code for the service’s website and managing customer payments. Joyner acquired the majority of stolen user credentials and was responsible for AccountBot customer service.

By March 2019, AccountBot purported to have over 52,000 different registered customers and more than 217,000 unique sets of stolen account credentials.

Joyner was arrested without incident today by the FBI and made his initial appearance in federal court before a U.S. Magistrate Judge. He was arraigned, pleaded not guilty, and released pending a five-day jury trial scheduled to begin on July 13, 2021.

Conspiracy to commit computer and access device fraud is punishable by up to five years in federal prison. Trafficking and use of unauthorized access devices and possession of fifteen or more unauthorized access devices are each punishable by up to 10 years in federal prison.

McMahon was prosecuted for similar offenses in the District Court of New South Wales in Sydney. In April 2021, he was sentenced to two years and two months to be served by way of intensive corrections order, the most serious, non-custodial sentence imposed in New South Wales.

Acting U.S. Attorney Asphaug and Special Agent in Charge Ramsey made the announcement.

This case was investigated by the FBI and Australian Federal Police. Assistant U.S. Attorney Quinn P. Harrington is prosecuting the case.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

Malicious cyber activity threatens the public’s safety and our national and economic security. The FBI is the lead federal agency for investigating cyber attacks and intrusions, collecting and sharing intelligence and engaging with victims while working to unmask those committing malicious cyber activities, wherever they are. Learn more about what you can do to protect yourself from cyber criminals, how you can report cyber crime, and the FBI’s efforts in combating the evolving cyber threat.?

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Sweet Home Fire District responds to church fire
Sweet Home Fire Dist. - 05/12/21 1:20 PM

SWEET HOME, Ore. May 12, 2021 — On Tuesday, May 11, 2021, at approximately 8:03 p.m., the Sweet Home Fire and Ambulance District and the Sweet Home Police Department responded to a reported structure fire at 1150 Elm Street, Sweet Home, Linn County, Oregon. When fire personnel arrived, they located the fellowship hall of Elm Street Baptist involved with fire. 

Sweet Home Fire District Chief Dave Barringer said, "Due to the early 9-1-1 call and the quick response of the crew, the fire was contained to the one building." 

Members of the State Fire Marshal’s Office and Oregon State Police Arson Investigation Unit responded to assist with the fire investigation.

The fire is suspicious and believed to be criminal in nature.

 

###

For Additional Information Contact:
Sweet Home Police Department
541-367-5181
shpd@sweethomeor.gov


AG Rosenblum and Public Utility Commission Partner to Protect Low Income Oregonians
Oregon Public Utility Commission - 05/12/21 10:22 AM

AG ROSENBLUM AND PUBLIC UTILITY COMMISSION PARTNER TO PROTECT LOW INCOME OREGONIANS
$1.6 million settlement announced to benefit Oregon Lifeline Program

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon Public Utility Commission (PUC) and Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum today announced a $1.6 million dollar False Claims Act settlement with a Sprint (now T-Mobile) subsidiary called Assurance Wireless, for overcharging the Oregon Lifeline program. This program, managed by the PUC, provides discounted voice and broadband service to qualifying low-income Oregonians paid for with federal and state subsidies.

In 2019, PUC staff launched an investigation of Sprint’s billing practices and discovered it had been systematically overcharging the Oregon Lifeline program for ineligible usage. PUC’s discovery eventually led to a nationwide investigation where the FCC recovered approximately $368 million for the federal Lifeline subsidy and issued a $200 million penalty. After securing an Oregon refund of $788,061 in December 2020, the PUC assisted Oregon DOJ’s civil enforcement team in securing an additional settlement payment of $859,451 under the Oregon False Claims Act, for a grand total of $1,647,512 returned back to the state.

“Sprint significantly overcharged Oregon’s program—as it did elsewhere across the country,” said Attorney General Rosenblum. “Luckily, we caught on and made them pay. Especially when it comes to services for people with low incomes, big companies like Sprint have a duty to act responsibly. I want to thank everyone at Oregon’s Department of Justice and the PUC who worked on this settlement. Together we are sending a strong signal: We will not tolerate waste and abuse of critical state subsidies.” 

 “Oregon Lifeline provides an invaluable service to low-income Oregonians by helping them stay connected and have access to local emergency services, jobs, healthcare, education, and other vital resources,” said PUC Chair Megan Decker. “The efforts of our team helped ensure the integrity of the Lifeline program not only for customers in Oregon, but across the country as well. Without these efforts, this issue may have gone undetected indefinitely.”

For additional information about the Oregon Lifeline program, visit https://www.lifeline.oregon.gov.

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Meth/Heroin
Douglas Interagency Narcotics Team (DINT) - 05/12/21 10:22 AM
2021-05/6255/144915/Bond.jpeg
2021-05/6255/144915/Bond.jpeg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-05/6255/144915/thumb_Bond.jpeg

In the evening hours of Tuesday, May 11th, 2021, detectives with the Douglas Interagency Narcotics Team (DINT) executed a search warrant at a residence in the 2300 block of Cannon Avenue, in Roseburg (Green District).  This residence is alarmingly close to the entrance of Sunnyslope Elementary School.  

 

DINT and the Douglas County Sheriff's Office have received multiple complaints in recent months about the obvious drug activity taking place at the residence.  Due to those complaints, as well as the proximity to the school, DINT conducted a targeted investigation and developed information indicating both methamphetamine and heroin trafficking taking place at the residence.

 

A search of the residence revealed more than a quarter pound of methamphetamine, approximately 18 grams of black tar heroin, a small amount of suspected fentanyl, a large amount of cash, a firearm, and a substantial amount of evidence of distribution.  

 

42 year old Leah Wilkins, of Roseburg, was arrested and lodged at the Douglas County jail on charges of Unlawful Possession of Heroin, and Unlawful Delivery of Heroin within 1,000 feet of a school.

 

DINT also arrested 43 year old Timothy Bond, of Roseburg, and lodged him at the Douglas County Jail on charges of Unlawful Possession of Methamphetamine, Unlawful Delivery of Methamphetamine within 1,000 feet of a school, and Felon in Possession of  a Firearm.  

 

The investigation is continuing, and more charges are likely to follow.  




Attached Media Files: 2021-05/6255/144915/Bond.jpeg , 2021-05/6255/144915/Wilkins.jpeg

Oregon Recreational Trails Advisory Council meets May 20
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 05/12/21 10:00 AM

The Oregon Recreational Trails Advisory Council (ORTAC) will meet 1 – 2:30 p.m. May 20 via web conference. The meeting includes a discussion of plans to recognize the 50th anniversary of the Oregon Recreation Trails System Act.

The meeting is open to the public. The agenda and link for the meeting is posted on the ORTAC website at https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/BWT/Documents/ORTAC-Agenda-May-2021.pdf.

The Oregon Legislature passed the Oregon Recreation Trails System Act in 1971, laying the groundwork for Oregon’s development of a high quality system of non-motorized trails that connect communities and highlight the state’s natural beauty.

The Act included establishing ORTAC to advise Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) and its partners in developing and promoting exceptional non-motorized trail systems throughout Oregon.

The council is made up of seven volunteer members representing the five congressional districts and two coastal representatives. Members are appointed by the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission.

For more information, contact Program Coordinator Jodi Bellefeuille at 503-856-6316 or ellefeuille@oregon.gov">jodi.bellefeuille@oregon.gov.


Updated: Oregon reports 660 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 16 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 05/12/21 9:07 AM

May 11, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Updated: Oregon reports 660 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 16 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 16 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,549, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 660 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 192,416.

Information from today’s media briefing

This afternoon, Gov. Kate Brown and OHA Director Patrick Allen provided an update on the state's new vaccination targets for reopening the economy, closing the vaccine equity gap at the county level and the criteria for lifting the County Risk Level framework. You can watch a recording of today’s briefing here and find a copy of the talking points here. Today’s slides are also available here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 34,415 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 17,961 doses were administered on May 10 and 16,454 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on May 10.

The seven-day running average is now 34,869 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered a total of 1,850,101 first and second doses of Pfizer, 1,413,162 first and second doses of Moderna and 113,436 single doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines. As of today, 1,490,512 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series. There are 1,994,968 people who have had at least one dose.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 2,211,885 doses of Pfizer, 1,798,980 doses of Moderna and 253,800 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 345, which is 19 more than yesterday. There are 89 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is 11 more than yesterday.

The total number of COVID-19 positive patient bed-days in the most recent seven days is 2,300, which is a 3.0% decrease from the previous seven days. The peak daily number of beds occupied by COVID-19 positive patients in the most recent seven days is 345.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (10), Clackamas (60), Clatsop (3), Columbia (2), Crook (10), Deschutes (64), Douglas (14), Grant (1), Harney (2), Hood River (1), Jackson (44), Jefferson (5), Josephine (12), Klamath (43), Lake (4), Lane (52), Linn (22), Malheur (4), Marion (57), Morrow (3), Multnomah (94), Polk (8), Tillamook (3), Umatilla (27), Union (3), Wallowa (1), Wasco (2), Washington (90), Wheeler (2) and Yamhill (17).

Oregon’s 2,534th death is a 75-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive on April 24 and died on May 9 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,535th death is an 84-year-old woman from Clackamas County who tested positive on April 5 and died on April 21 her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,536th death is an 84-year-old woman from Clackamas County who tested positive on Dec. 13, 2020 and died on April 29 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,537th death is a 79-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive on April 22 and died on May 9 at Providence Medford Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,538th death is a 61-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive on April 20 and died on May 9 at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,539th death is a 78-year-old woman from Klamath County who tested positive on April 26 and died on May 7 at Sky Lakes Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,540th death is a 69-year-old woman from Klamath County who tested positive on April 26 and died on May 8 at Sky Lakes Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,541st death is a 79-year-old man from Klamath County who tested positive on March 27 and died on April 29 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,542nd death is a 68-year-old man from Malheur County who tested positive on April 5 and died on April 25 at St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise, ID. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,543rd death is a 62-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive on April 5 and died on April 25 at Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,544th death is a 65-year-old man from Morrow County who tested positive on April 8 and died on April 22 at Oregon Health & Sciences University Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,545th death is a 67-year-old man from Multnomah County who tested positive on April 9 and died on April 22 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,546th death is an 83-year-old man from Multnomah County who tested positive on April 9 and died on April 27 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,547th death is an 83-year-old woman from Yamhill County who died on April 27 Willamette Valley Medical Center. She had underlying conditions. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,548th death is a 93-year-old man from Washington County who tested positive on April 18 and died on April 29 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,549th death is a 58-year-old man from Washington County who tested positive on March 19 and died on April 26 at Oregon Health & Sciences University Hospital. He had no underlying conditions.

Oregon updates vaccine waste disclosure1,2,3

Vaccine Type

Doses Recalled

Wasted Spoiled Expired

Grand Total

Janssen (Johnson & Johnson) COVID-19 Vaccine

 

327

327

Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine

 

1745

1,745

Pfizer COVID-19 Vaccine

 

488

488

Grand Total

0

2,560

2,560

1Updated: 05/011/21 

2Data source: ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS) 

3Data is preliminary and subject to change.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.




Attached Media Files: 2021-05/3687/144898/OHA_3699_Get_Vaccinated_Oregon_v2.pdf

Lane County to auction 9 properties, including homes and vacant lots
Lane Co. Government - 05/12/21 9:00 AM

Lane County is hosting an oral auction of real property on Wednesday, June 9, at 10:00 a.m. in Harris Hall (125 E. 8th Ave., Eugene).

 

Included in the auction are one house located in Chesire, one mobile home located in Eugene, and vacant lots located in Eugene and Florence. The properties up for auction range from a $3,000 minimum bid to a $100,000 minimum bid.

 

MEDIA OPPORTUNITY: A mobile home located in Eugene is available to film. Contact Jeff Turk to set up a time (see media section for phone number).

 

The properties have minimum bid amounts and will not be sold for less than the minimum bid. The properties will be sold on an as-is basis using a quitclaim deed, which passes any title, claim or interest in the property to the buyer without making any representations regarding other claims or liens.

 

Interested bidders must register prior to the start of bidding and are encouraged to arrive early to the auction. Attendance may be limited to conform to COVID-19 protocols.

 

Payment must be made with cash, cashier’s checks or certified back checks payable to Lane County. No personal or business checks, debit and credit cards or financing will be accepted. A 20 percent deposit of the minimum bid amount is due at the time of the auction. The remaining balance is due after the bids are accepted by the Board of County Commissioners and the quitclaim deed is ready for delivery (typically 2­–6 weeks after auction).

 

For more information including a complete list of auction terms, property descriptions and registration information, visit www.lanecounty.org/propertymanagement.

 

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Have you returned your ballot?
Lane Co. Government - 05/12/21 8:30 AM

Have you voted but not returned your ballot to Lane County Elections?

 

Lane County Elections recommends that voters mail back their voted ballots to the Elections Office no later than today, Wednesday, May 12. After that date, Lane County Clerk Cheryl Betschart suggests voters return their ballots to one of the many official ballot drop sites available. Postage is no longer required.

 

A list of available drop sites is available online and enclosed with the voting material.

 

To be counted, all voted ballots must be received at the Elections Office or in an official drop site by 8:00 p.m. on Election Day, Tuesday, May 18, 2021. Postmarks do not qualify ballots.

 

Betschart shared several important reminders for voters to follow as they get their ballots ready to return. “Please call our office if you have any questions prior to casting your vote,” she said. “We want to make sure all registered voters can have their votes counted.”

 

  • Each voter must sign the ballot return identification envelope that lists the voter’s printed name and address.
  • Sign the ballot envelope in the same manner as your most current voter registration card.

 

Due to COVID-19, the Lane County Elections Office will be open to the public only on Friday, May 14; Monday, May 17; and Tuesday, May 18, Election Day. Check our web page at www.lanecountyor.gov for additional updates concerning office hours. When open, visitors will be required to observe physical distancing guidelines; masks are required. The Elections Office has a small quantity of masks available for visitors that do not have their own.

 

On all other dates, the Lane County Elections Office is closed to walk-ins. Assistance is available over the phone at 541-682-4234 (Mon-Fri 9am-Noon and 1-4pm, Election Day 7am-8pm) and via email at elections@lanecountyor.gov. Voters with issues that cannot be resolved via phone or email will be able to make an appointment to visit the Elections Office.

 

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Lane County and Community LendingWorks to distribute $2.4 million in small business grants to businesses not funded in January
Lane Co. Government - 05/12/21 8:24 AM

Lane County and Community LendingWorks will distribute an additional $2.4 million in small business grants to Lane County businesses that applied during the last round of funding in December 2020 but did not receive funding and were waitlisted.

 

The funding was provided by the State of Oregon. Counties were notified of the additional funding at the beginning of May.

 

“Support for local businesses is critical to recovering from the effects of the pandemic in Lane County,” said Lane County Board of Commissioners Chair Joe Berney. “We decided to distribute funding to the business waitlist to do two things – get the funding in the hands of local business owners as fast as possible, and streamline the process.  Maximum resource needs to be moved directly and efficiently to local businesses now, and that’s what we’re doing.”

 

Waitlisted local businesses with fewer than 25 full-time equivalent employees, as well as sole proprietors, are eligible to receive funding. Businesses on the waitlist will need to confirm that they are still eligible before funding is disbursed.

 

Recipients will selected in two rounds of random drawings. The first drawing for 75 percent of the overall funding will be conducted among applications from businesses in the tourism, hospitality or event sectors, along with businesses closed as a result of the Governor’s ordered freezes and the recent move to extreme risk (e.g., gyms, museums, sports courts, etc.), rural businesses or majority women-, disabled-, veteran-, or minority-owned businesses.

 

The remaining 25 percent of the funds will be dispersed in the second random drawing that includes all other eligible applicants, as well as those not selected in the first drawing.

 

The need is far greater than what local resources can address; nearly 1,600 businesses in Lane County requested more than $24 million in funding when applications were opened in December. Lane County will continue to advocate for more small business support and disperse any additional funding quickly and equitably.

 

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Committee to review historic cemetery grant applications
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 05/12/21 7:52 AM

On May 26, 2021 the Oregon Historic Cemeteries Grant committee will meet to score and rank the applications for the Oregon Historic Cemeteries Grant program. The recommendations from the committee will be forwarded to the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries for final review and approval on June 4, 2021. The meeting will be held by teleconference at 9:00 a.m. interested parties may access the meeting by Zoom. The meeting agenda includes the access information.

State law established the seven-member Commission to maintain a listing of all historic cemeteries and gravesites in Oregon; promote public education on the significance of historic cemeteries; and help obtain financial and technical assistance for restoring, improving and maintaining their appearances.

Special accommodations for the meeting – including translation services – may be made by calling 503-98600690 at least 72 hours prior to the start of the meeting. For information about the grants contact Kuri Gill at 503-986-0685 or by e-mail: i.Gill@oregon.gov">Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov.


Sinaloa-based Narcotics Distributor Designated under the Kingpin Act for Trafficking Fentanyl, Heroin, and Methamphetamine in Oregon (Photo)
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 05/12/21 7:50 AM
Counterfeit Oxycodone Seized in Jackson County
Counterfeit Oxycodone Seized in Jackson County
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-05/6325/144903/thumb_Counterfeit_Oxycodone_(M-30)_Seized_in_Jackson_County.jpg

Kingpin Act Sanctions Oregon Defendant and his Construction Business

PORTLAND, Ore.—Acting U.S. Attorney Scott Erik Asphaug announced the unsealing of an indictment today against a Sinaloa-based drug trafficker for his role in trafficking fentanyl, heroin, and methamphetamine from Mexico to the Pacific Northwest.

Efrain Mendivil Figueroa, 41, of Sinaloa, Mexico, has been charged with conspiracy to distribute heroin, methamphetamine, and fentanyl and conspiracy to commit money laundering.

The announcement of charges against Figueroa follows the U.S. Department of Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) designation of Figueroa as a Specially Designated Narcotics Trafficker pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act (Kingpin Act). OFAC identified Figueroa as a fentanyl, heroin, methamphetamine, and cocaine distributor and transportation coordinator for the Jesus Gonzalez Penuelas Drug Trafficking Organization (aka “Gonzalez Penuelas DTO”). OFAC also designated the construction company City Plaza, Sociedad Anonima de Capital Variable, based in Guasave, Sinaloa for being owned or controlled by Figueroa. According to OFAC, the Gonzales Penuelas DTO is one of the largest raw opium gum and heroin sources of supply in northern Mexico, and increasingly a major distributor of fentanyl.

“Efrain Figueroa’s drug trafficking organization has deep ties in the Pacific Northwest. Our charges allege he is a long-term, active trafficker of heroin, methamphetamine, and fentanyl from Mexico to Oregon. Together, these drugs, particularly fentanyl, have caused immeasurable harm to the public safety and health of communities throughout our state,” said Acting U.S. Attorney Asphaug. “We applaud OFAC for designating Jesus Gonzalez Penuelas as a Significant Foreign Narcotics Kingpin and Figueroa as a Specially Designated Narcotics Trafficker under the Kingpin Act for the significant danger they pose to the U.S. and its citizens.”

“This bold action highlights the DEA’s ability and intention of holding accountable the dangerous Mexican Drug Trafficking Organizations who reside within our borders, but also those operating in Mexico who believe they are untouchable,” said DEA Special Agent in Charge Frank Tarentino. “DEA makes it a priority to identify and target drug traffickers who flood our city streets with poison and deny these drug trafficking organizations the profits of their illegal trade responsible for fueling the opioid epidemic. We will continue to work closely with our international partners to bring Efrain Figueroa to justice and dismantle drug cartels like Gonzales Penuelas DTO.”

“Fentanyl, particularly in the form of counterfeit prescription pills, is the region’s emerging drug threat and poses a significant danger to our communities. The increase in fentanyl supply and use over the past 2 ½ years in Oregon is reflected in the number of law enforcement trafficking investigations, drug seizures, overdose hospitalizations and, tragically, overdose deaths,” said Oregon-Idaho HIDTA Executive Director, Chris Gibson. “The Oregon-Idaho HIDTA will continue to support the cooperative efforts of our treatment, prevention and law enforcement partners with the ultimate goal of reducing the demand for and supply of the dangerous drugs that sadly wreak havoc in the lives of an increasing number of Oregonians.”

According to the indictment, beginning in at least August 2018, Figueroa and several associates are alleged to have conspired with one another to possess and distribute heroin, methamphetamine, and fentanyl in Oregon and elsewhere. As part of their drug trafficking scheme, the group maintained various locations for the purpose of storing and packaging narcotics and used vehicles to transport and distribute product. The group would also smuggle bulk quantities of U.S. currency across state and international borders to facilitate drug transactions and engaged in money laundering to conceal their trafficking proceeds.

Acting U.S. Attorney Asphaug and Special Agent in Charge Tarantino made the announcement.

This case was investigated by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) and the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) Interdiction Taskforce with assistance from the FBI and Homeland Security Investigations. It is being prosecuted by Steven T. Mygrant, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

The Oregon HIDTA program was established by the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy in June of 1999. In 2015 the program expanded into Idaho and was renamed the Oregon-Idaho HIDTA. The Oregon-Idaho HIDTA consists of 16 counties, including Oregon’s Clackamas, Deschutes, Douglas, Jackson, Josephine, Lane, Linn, Malheur, Marion, Multnomah, Umatilla and Washington counties, and Idaho’s Ada, Bannock, Canyon, and Kootenai counties.

This case was brought as part of the Justice Department’s Organized Crime and Drug Enforcement Task Force (OCDETF) program, the centerpiece of the department’s strategy for reducing the availability of drugs in the U.S. OCDETF was established in 1982 to mount a comprehensive attack on drug trafficking by disrupting and dismantling major drug trafficking and money laundering organizations. Today, OCDETF combines the resources and expertise of its member federal agencies in coordination with state and local law enforcement.

Opioid abuse affects communities across the nation. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that in 2019, its most recent data, there were 70,630 drug overdose deaths in the U.S. Opioids and synthetic opioids were alone responsible for 49,860 overdose deaths or nearly 71% of all overdoses. Drug overdose is now the leading cause of injury or death in the United States.

Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid 80 to 100 times more powerful than morphine and 30 to 50 times more powerful than heroin. A 3-milligram dose of fentanyl—a few grains of the substance—is enough to kill an average adult male.

The availability of illicit fentanyl in Oregon has presented public safety and health officials with a host of new challenges, including a dramatic increase in overdose deaths. Fentanyl-related overdose deaths in Oregon have doubled between 2016 and 2019. In 2020, most fentanyl seized in Oregon was in the form of counterfeit prescription pills, such as Oxycodone, commonly referred to as M-30s.

If you or someone you know suffers from addiction, please call the Lines for Life substance abuse helpline at 1-800-923-4357 or visit www.linesforlife.org. Phone support is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. You can also text “RecoveryNow” to 839863 between 8am and 11pm Pacific Time daily.

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Attached Media Files: Gonzalez Penuelas DTO Chart , PDF Release , Counterfeit Oxycodone Seized in Jackson County , Counterfeit Oxycodone Seized in the Portland Metro Area (2) , Counterfeit Oxycodone Seized in Portland Metro Area

Tue. 05/11/21
Correction: Oregon approved to issue more than $550 million in food assistance to 572,000 children
Oregon Department of Human Services - 05/11/21 3:48 PM

NOTE: A previous version of this media release had a typo in the number to text 211. We apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused.

To contact 211 via text: Text your zip code to 898211 (TXT211)

(Salem) – The State of Oregon received approval from the federal government to issue Pandemic EBT (P-EBT) for the 2020 - 2021 school year. This will provide more than $550 million in food assistance for approximately 572,000 children in Oregon.

P-EBT provides food benefits to families whose children do not have access to the free or reduced-price meals usually provided at school. Oregon was approved to provide retroactive food benefits to eligible students for the 2020 - 2021 school year. The P-EBT benefits are expected to be issued beginning in July.

“P-EBT benefits will significantly support the food security, health and well-being of children and families across Oregon,” said Dan Haun, director of the Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Self-Sufficiency Programs. “Still, many Oregonians are struggling meeting their basic needs. We encourage them to contact our partners at 211 and the Oregon Food Bank.”

“All children deserve access to adequate nutrition to fuel their learning. The Oregon Department of Education is happy to be partnering with ODHS and local school districts to meet the nutrition needs of Oregon's children and families who were most impacted by the pandemic.” said Cindy Hunt, Chief of Staff at Oregon Department of Education (ODE).

ODHS and ODE share responsibility in ensuring that children across Oregon receive P-EBT food benefits. ODE collaborates with school districts across Oregon to determine eligibility and ODHS issues the benefits on Electronic Benefit Transfer (EBT) cards.

Households do not need to apply for P-EBT. Benefits will be automatically issued for students who normally have access to free and reduced-price meals and are enrolled at a school in Oregon.

If your children are not currently enrolled in free or reduced meals you can apply through your school or online at the Oregon Department of Education website. Qualifying for free or reduced meals for the 2020 – 2021 school year before June 30, 2021 will ensure you receive P-EBT when the benefits are issued. P-EBT benefit eligibility and amounts will vary. Visit pebt.oregon.gov for more information.

Each student will receive their own P-EBT card. Students and households new to P-EBT and households with more than one student will receive an Oregon P-EBT card in the mail with instructions. Cards will be mailed to the address on file with the school for those students who do not receive SNAP.

Students who are already receiving Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits will receive the P-EBT benefits on the EBT card associated with their household’s SNAP case.

P-EBT does not replace any child nutrition program already offered, and families are encouraged to continue participating in grab-n-go-meals or emergency food programs at their local schools and community locations.

P-EBT is separate from SNAP benefits including emergency allotments that are also being issued due to the impact of COVID-19. P-EBT benefits are not considered in a public charge test.

Resources to help meet basic needs

  • Find a food pantry: foodfinder.oregonfoodbank.org
  • Learn about government programs and community resources for older adults and people with disabilities: Aging and Disability Resource Connection of Oregon at 1-855-673-2372 or www.adrcoforegon.org.
  • Dial 2-1-1, or text your zip code to 898211 (TXT211), www.211info.org
  • Oregon Department of Human Services Resources 

About SNAP

Administered by ODHS, SNAP is a federal program that provides food assistance to approximately 1 million eligible, low-income families and individuals in Oregon, including many older adults and people with disabilities. Oregonians in need can apply for benefits, including SNAP, child care, cash assistance and Medicaid. Learn more at https://govstatus.egov.com/or-dhs-benefits. For local resources in your area, such as food or shelter, please call 2-1-1 or reach out to the state’s Aging and Disability Resource Connection (ADRC) at 1-855-ORE-ADRC or 1-855-673-2372.

About the Oregon Department of Education

The Oregon Department of Education fosters equity and excellence for every learner through collaboration with educators, partners, and communities. ODE oversees the education of over 560,000 students in Oregon’s public K-12 education system. While ODE isn’t in the classroom directly providing services, the agency (along with the State Board) - focuses on helping districts achieve both local and statewide goals and priorities through strategies such as:

  • Developing policies and standards
  • Providing accurate and timely data to inform instruction
  • Training teachers on how to use data effectively
  • Effectively administering numerous state and federal grants
  • Sharing and helping districts implement best practices

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Lane County Public Health May 11th COVID-19 Case/Vaccination Update: Live Virtual Press Conference at 10:30
Lane Co. Government - 05/11/21 2:32 PM

Lane County Public Health (LCPH) was notified of at least 50 additional positive cases of COVID-19.This makes a total of  ?twelve thousand nine hundred and twenty one cases. 322,493 doses administered in Lane County. 

 

12,921 total cases - Note that this includes confirmed and presumptive.

 

Of our cases (confirmed and presumptive):

Hospitalized: 17

·ICU: 8 (of the 17)

Deaths: 146

Infectious: 251

 

HOSCAP COVID-positive Hospitalized Cases

·Statewide:

o   Hospitalized: 342

o   ICU: 88

  9

 

 

 

 

Total persons fully vaccinated: 143,486 (+8,288 since 5/7)
Total persons received first dose only: 43,125
Total doses administered: 322,493

Percentage of adult population receiving at least one dose: 60.36%
Percentage of adult population fully vaccinated: 46.41%
Percentage of  total population fully vaccinated: 37.87%

 

 

Data regarding Lane County testing, patient status, case ZIP codes and more is available at www.LaneCountyOR.gov/localdata

 

 

 

The State of Oregon has created a COVID-19 web page with resources at http://coronavirus.oregon.gov.

 

 

High Risk Individuals who had contact with these community members will be contacted by Lane County Public Health so they can work with their health care providers on next steps. Communicable disease investigations are underway. If a public contact exposure point is identified, that information will be shared with the public.

 

 

 

Presumptive cases are people without a positive PCR test who have COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. Though not confirmed by a positive diagnostic test, presumptive cases have a high likelihood of having COVID-19 because of the specific nature of the symptoms and known exposure.


OED Launches Federal Mixed Earner Unemployment Compensation (MEUC) Program - Program provides an additional $100 weekly benefit to 'hybrid workers'
Oregon Employment Department - 05/11/21 2:00 PM

May 11, 2011 (Salem, OR)-- Today the Oregon Employment Department launched the Mixed Earner Unemployment Compensation (MEUC) program, a temporary federal program for ‘hybrid workers,’ or people who have earned W-2 wages and self-employment income. MEUC is the sixth federal benefit program implemented by the Employment Department since March 2020.

“We are pleased to have another critical lifeline available for people who are struggling during this ongoing global health pandemic. MEUC was created in response to workers whose past income wasn’t fully being counted. Congress heard the outcry from these workers, and now that the program has launched, Oregonians who have side income will see that reflected in their weekly benefit amount,” said Acting Director David Gerstenfeld.

MEUC provides an extra $100 per week to eligible claimants. Claimants are eligible for MEUC if, in addition to W-2 wages, they earned a net income of at least $5,000 in self-employment work in the most recent taxable year before they applied for unemployment benefits. When claiming weeks of MEUC, they must have received at least one dollar in Regular UI or Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC) benefits. Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) recipients are not eligible for MEUC.

MEUC benefits are available from Dec. 27, 2020, through the week ending Sept. 4, 2021. Eligible claimants will receive benefit payments going back to the week of Dec. 27, 2020, and then for all eligible weeks they claim moving forward.

People who think they may be eligible for MEUC benefits will need to submit proof of qualifying income to the Employment Department. The quickest way to apply for MEUC is online, by visiting the Online Claim System and clicking “MEUC”.

Those unable to apply online can submit their application and required documentation by mail. Claimants without internet access can call the Employment Department’s Tax Section at 503-947-1488 for instructions on what information to send and where to send it. Eligible claimants will receive MEUC payments approximately 3 weeks after approved documents have been received.

For more information about MEUC, visit the Employment Department’s Mixed Earner Unemployment Compensation FAQ or the Applying for MEUC Step-by-Step Guide. The Employment Department is hosting a live webinar on MEUC at 1 p.m. Thursday, May 13, and a recording of the webinar will be available May 14. Webinar registration and webinar recordings can be found at unemployment.oregon.gov/webinars

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Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services




Attached Media Files: 2021-05/930/144891/MEUC_Launched_PR_FINAL.pdf

Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team -- Daily Update -- May 11, 2021
Douglas Co. Government - 05/11/21 12:18 PM
2021-05/6789/144887/DCCRT_Logo_72020.jpg
2021-05/6789/144887/DCCRT_Logo_72020.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-05/6789/144887/thumb_DCCRT_Logo_72020.jpg

Our local COVID-19 updates represent the coordinated effort of the agencies that make up the DCCRT

 

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – May 11, 2021

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - DAILY UPDATE

 

(Douglas County, Ore.) DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 TEST RESULTS: As of 12:00 pm Today, Tuesday, May 11, 2021, there are SIXTEEN (16) people with new positive test results and ONE (1) presumptive has been moved to a positive with a positive test result to report since our noon case update yesterday.  The total number of cases of people with positive test results and presumptives in Douglas County is now at 3,256. Currently, there are SIXTEEN (16) Douglas County COVID-19 patients that are being hospitalized, eight locally and eight out-of-the-area. Our Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, under the direction of the Douglas County Board of Commissioners, continue to devote all resources available to our local COVID response.

 

Douglas County, OR - COVID-19 - Case Update Chart

Date

Friday

May 7, 2021

Saturday

May 8, 2021

Sunday

May 9, 2021

Monday

May 10, 2021

Today, Tuesday,

May 11, 2021

Total COVID-19 Cases

3,223

3,225

3,229

3,240

3,256

People w/ Positive PCR or Antigen Test Results

3,065

3,067

3,071

3,081

3,098

Presumptive

158

158

158

159

158

Total Currently Hospitalized

11

11

12

12

16

Total Currently in Isolation

102

95

99

102

112

Total COVID-19 Related Deaths

70

70

70

70

70

Our daily update includes the total number of cases in Douglas County, which combines people with positive test results and presumptives, as well as a breakout of those case numbers. There will be times when a presumptive will move to a positive test result, and our total case number will not change because the case has already been counted.

 

LOCAL CONTACTS AND CASES BEING SUPPORTED IN ISOLATION AND QUARANTINE

Currently, DPHN is supporting 112 cases in isolation, as well as another 431 contacts in quarantine in Douglas County. Isolation is recommended for confirmed and presumptive cases, quarantine is recommended for contacts of confirmed or presumptive cases.  Currently, staff is supporting a total of 543 total contacts and cases in isolation or quarantine.  This number represents a snapshot of the significant amount of work being done locally to help control the spread of COVID.

 

NEXT DRIVE-THROUGH COVID-19 VACCINATION EVENT WILL BE SATURDAY, MAY 15

Douglas Public Health Network (DPHN), Douglas County Board of Commissioners, and Aviva Health have collaborated to host the next mass drive-through COVID-19 vaccination event on Saturday, May 15, 2021, at the Douglas County Fairgrounds. The event will be open to ALL residents of Douglas County 16 years old and older.  In addition to first dose vaccines, we will also be administering second doses of the Pfizer vaccine to those residents who received their first dose at one of our drive through COVID-19 vaccination events. Stay tuned for information on how you can sign up for this vaccine event later this week.  Please do not call, contact or go to the Douglas County Fairgrounds to ask about signing up for the vaccine event.

 

DPHN – IT’S YOUR TURN TO GET THE VACCINE!

Douglas Public Health Network launched their “it’s your turn” vaccine campaign, encouraging everyone to step up and take their turn to get their COVID-19 vaccine. 

Everyone over the age of 16 is now eligible to get a COVID-19 vaccine, and we want people to know they are eligible and that we have vaccine available.  Having the majority of our residents vaccinated is the surest road to getting back the sense of normalcy and freedom that we all miss and want. It’s your turn to help us get there!” stated Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, Douglas County Public Health Officer.  #itsyourturn

 

DOUGLAS COUNTY TIGER TEAM’S POP-UP VACCINATION CLINICS

The Douglas County Tiger Team is out and about in the county bringing the COVID-19 vaccines directly to rural areas via our mobile medical vans (MMV) at businesses, farms, fire stations and locations in our smaller remote communities in Douglas County. The Douglas County Board of Commissioners, who have led the charge for our Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team efforts since the beginning, have coordinated with DPHN to organize our local Tiger Team to manage our vaccine outreach efforts through ‘pop-up’ vaccine clinics. 

The Douglas County Tiger Team will be hosting FREE POP UP COVID VACCINE CLINICS at the locations listed below.  The clinics are open to anyone 18 years of age and older and preregistration is not necessary:

 

  • Wednesday, May 12, 2021: Oakland area: Oakland City Hall parking lot located at 637 NE Locust Street in Oakland from 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm
  • Thursday, May 13, 2021: Glide area: Glide Rural Fire Protection District – Glide Station located at 18910 North Umpqua Hwy in Glide from 10:00 am to 2:00 pm

 

If you are interested in having the Douglas County Tiger Team come to your business, fire department, farm or town to provide a pop-up vaccine clinic or if you have any questions about our Douglas County Tiger Teams and want a schedule of their upcoming pop-up vaccination clinics, please call (541) 670-3110 or our local COVID-19 Hotline at (541) 464-6550. 

 

UPCOMING AVIVA HEALTH COVID-19 VACCINATION CLINIC

Shared from Aviva Health.  Aviva Health, with the help of local partners (DPHN & Douglas County Commissioners) will be hosting vaccination events at various locations in rural Douglas County.  For more information, or to schedule an appointment or for a list of upcoming clinics, please call Aviva Health at (541) 672-9596. 

 

  • Wednesday, May 12, 2021:  Aviva Health’s COVID-19 Vaccine team will be at the Myrtle Creek Elks Lodge, located at 106 South Main Street in Myrtle Creek from 8:00 am to 11:30 am and 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm offering COVID-19 vaccinations to residents aged 16 years of age and older.  Walk-ins also welcomed!

 

STATE ANNOUNCES UPDATES TO COVID MANDATED RISK LEVELS

Increase in Indoor Capacity Limits for Indoor Recreation and Indoor Entertainment

Shared from OHA.  The State of Oregon announced earlier this week that they updated their state mandated risk level guidance for indoor capacity limits for Oregon counties for their Moderate and High Risk COVID Levels.  They have increased the capacity for indoor recreation, fitness and indoor entertainment venues.  As of Wednesday, May 5, 2021, indoor entertainment establishments and indoor recreation and fitness establishments in ALL Oregon counties may allow the following:

 

  • State Mandated Moderate Risk Level: Maximum 20% occupancy or 100 people total, whichever is larger
  • State Mandated High Risk Level: Maximum 10% occupancy or 50 people total, whichever is larger

 

The State Mandated Lower Risk Level and the State Mandated Extreme Risk Level capacity limits for these sectors remain the same.  To view the States updated capacity limits, please refer to the OHA State Mandated Sector Risk Level Guidance Chart.

 

COVID-19 VACCINE ELIGIBILITY OPEN FOR EVERYONE 16 YEARS OLD AND OLDER

According to the State of Oregon and OHA, ALL residents 16 years old and older are eligible to get the COVID-19 Vaccine, NOW! Remember, “it’s your turn!” So, get signed up or show up to get your COVID-19 vaccine today!

 

  1. Call and set up an appointment with your primary health care provider or ask them for a referral to another health care provider.
  2. Call and set up an appointment with a local pharmacy.
  3. Sign up for or attend one of the vaccination clinics offered in Douglas County through DPHN, Douglas County, Aviva Health or our Douglas County Tiger Team. 
  4. If you are a member of the Cow Creek Band of the Umpqua Tribe of Indians, please contact to set up an appointment at (541) 672-9405 or log onto https://www.cowcreek-nsn.gov/public-health/
  5. The Roseburg VA Health Care System is setting up appointments for veterans to receive the COVID-19 vaccine.  For more information, call the Roseburg VAMC at (541) 440-1000 or log onto https://www.va.gov/health-care/covid-19-vaccine/.

 

NO ACCESS TO THE INTERNET TO SCHEDULE YOUR VACCINE APPOINTMENT? LOCAL HELP IS AVAILABLE

Not everyone is able to use the internet, a tablet, a computer or a smart phone to schedule a COVID vaccine appointment.  If you or someone you know needs to schedule an appointment for the COVID vaccine, and do not have access to the internet, you can call one of the numbers below to get help scheduling an appointment.

 

  • Call our Douglas County COVID-19 Hotline at (541) 464-6550.
  • Coastal Residents can call the Lower Umpqua Hospital District COVID-19 Vaccine Call Center at (541) 271-2175.
  • U.S. Veterans can call the Roseburg VA Health Care Center at (541) 440-1000.
  • Members of the Cow Creek Band of the Umpqua Tribe of Indians can call (541) 672-9405.
  • Seniors can call Douglas County Senior Services at (541) 440-3677.

 

GETTING YOUR SECOND DOSE OF THE COVID-19 VACCINE IS IMPORTANT  

While we have heard a lot about second dose hesitancy, it is vitally important to for those residents who have received their first dose of the Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine, to make sure that you get and not forgo getting your second dose of the vaccine and complete their vaccination.  It will better ensure your immunity and help to protect yourself and those around you that you love. 

If you have already received your first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, here are a few answers to questions about your second dose.

  • The latest information shows that you can expect to get your second dose about 4-6 weeks after the first dose.
  • You should have received a vaccination card when you received your first dose that details the brand of vaccine, its lot number, and the date the vaccine was administered.  This card is for your records only, and is not official proof that you have received the vaccine. Proof of your vaccination rests with the State Alert System, which is accessible by medical facilities.
  • You should get your second dose from the same provider or organization from which you received your first. However, the physical address where you receive the second dose may change.
  • You will be notified by the provider or organization that gave you your first dose about where and when you will receive your second dose.
  • I got a first vaccine out of the area; can I get my second vaccine in Douglas County?  The second vaccine dose is “paired” to the first dose, and your second dose will be sent to wherever you got your first dose.  Therefore, except in rare circumstances, you will need to return to where you got your first dose.
  • If you have questions, please contact the provider or organization where you received your first dose.

 

PLEASE CONTINUE TO KEEP YOU AND YOUR FAMILY SAFE

We continue encourage everyone, for the sake of our local businesses, services and residents, to gauge your risk level, and to make the best choice in order protect yourself and those around you from contracting or spreading coronavirus.  We have provided education on the widely proven COVID-19 safety measures, and encourage you to limit your contact with others not from your household, stay home if you are sick, and wear face coverings where recommended. Click here, for a graphic on how to protect you and your family from the spread of COVID-19.  We know how important family, businesses and faith are to you, so we ask that you consider all options available in order to eliminate and minimize the spread of the COVID-19 virus in our communities to help protect the ones you love, the businesses you love and the places you love to go.

 

COVID-19 FACEBOOK LIVE WITH DR. BOB

Tune in tonight, Tuesday, May 11, 2021, at 6:00 pm for the next Facebook Live with Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, the Douglas County Public Health Officer.  For future Facebook Events with Dr. Bob, please submit your questions to: ookquestions@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org">Facebookquestions@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Dr. Bob and the DPHN team will do their best to respond to as many questions as they can during the Facebook event.  The Facebook Events are hosted by DPHN on the DPHN Facebook page.

 

STATE AND FEDERAL COVID-19 INFORMATION

It is important to understand that Federal and State Government and their Agencies are the ones setting policy and issuing the guidelines for the pandemic. Locally, we are following the recommended guidance issued by the U.S. Center for Disease Control (CDC) and the Oregon Health Authority (OHA).  If you have questions about the current guidelines or the recommendations, contact the CDC or OHA directly for more information. OHA posts their daily updates at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.  

 

Please do not call 911, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office or Douglas County Offices to report compliance issues with the State of Oregon, OHA or Governor’s orders. The Governor has directed the State offices for Oregon Occupational Safety and Health (OSHA) and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) to be the enforcement agencies responsible for ensuring restaurants, bars, and other businesses comply with the current State COVID guidelines.  If you have concerns, questions or wish to report compliance, issues contact these state agencies directly:  OSHA: (800) 922-2689 or OSHA website or OLCC (503) 872-5000 or OLCC website.

 

ACCESS TO LOCAL COVID-19 RESOURCES

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer, DPHN and the DCCRT team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020.  

 

Local Online Access to Updates

Stay up to date with accurate and local COVID-19 information in Douglas County by visiting the Douglas County Government website or DCGOV Facebook page or the DPHN website or DPHN Facebook page

 

Free Local e-Newsletter Subscription

You can also sign up for the Douglas County e-Newsletter that publishes and sends out the daily update to our subscription base free.  You can sign up for the Douglas County e-Newsletter at www.co.douglas.or.us.  Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer, DPHN and the DCCRT have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020. 

 

Douglas County COVID-19 Hotline (541) 464-6550

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners and DPHN continue to offer a local resource hotline for Douglas County residents for COVID-19. The hotline provides answer to frequently asked questions, basic information and referrals to resources and services. Our local hotline number is (541) 464-6550 and is staffed from 8:00 am to 5: pm, 7 days a week.

 

Aviva Health Offers Vaccine Frequently Asked Questions Webpage

Aviva Health has created an online FAQ page to answer questions related to COVID-19 regarding availability and scheduling.  Log onto https://aviva.health/covid-19-vaccine-faqs/

 

COVID Vaccine Call Center at Lower Umpqua Hospital District in Reedsport

Lower Umpqua Hospital District now has a COVID-19 Vaccine Call Center for COVID-19 vaccine information in the Reedsport, Douglas County Coastal area.  The LUHD COVID-19 Vaccine Call Center number is (541) 271-2175, and is available Monday through Friday from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm.

 

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Contact Tamara Howell, Public Information Officer, Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, (541) 670-2804 cell (541) 957-4896 tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us   

Contact Vanessa Becker, Public Information Officer, Douglas Public Health Network, (541) 817-6552 cell (541) 440-3571 vanessa@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org




Attached Media Files: 2021-05/6789/144887/DCCRT_Logo_72020.jpg

Committee for Family Forestlands meets May 20 via Zoom
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 05/11/21 12:07 PM

SALEM, Ore. - The Committee for Family Forestlands will meet virtually Thursday, May 20 from 9 a.m. to noon. To join the call or provide public comment at this virtual meeting please contact Susan Dominique at 503-945-7502.

The committee’s agenda includes: 

  • Committee and partner updates
  • Private Forest Division update
  • Legislative update
  • Post-fire recovery update
  • SB 1602 update
  • Chair Recommendation and July report to Board of Forestry

The meeting is open to the public to attend online via Zoom. Public comments will be accepted near the start of the meeting after approval of the minutes. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting by calling Susan Dominique at 503-945-7502.

The 13-member committee researches policies that affect family forests, natural resources and forestry benefits. Based on its findings, the committee recommends actions to the Oregon Board of Forestry and the State Forester. You can find more information at 

https://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/CFF.aspx


Lane County Public Health May 11th COVID-19 Case/Vaccination Update: Live Virtual Press Conference at 10:30
Lane Co. Government - 05/11/21 12:00 PM

Lane County Public Health (LCPH) was notified of at least 50 additional positive cases of COVID-19.This makes a total of  ?twelve thousand nine hundred and twenty one cases. 322,493 doses administered in Lane County. 

 

12,921 total cases - Note that this includes confirmed and presumptive.

 

Of our cases (confirmed and presumptive):

Hospitalized: 17

·ICU: 8 (of the 17)

Deaths: 146

Infectious: 251

 

HOSCAP COVID-positive Hospitalized Cases

·Statewide:

o   Hospitalized: 342

o   ICU: 88

  9

 

 

 

 

Total persons fully vaccinated: 143,486 (+8,288 since 5/7)
Total persons received first dose only: 43,125
Total doses administered: 322,493

Percentage of adult population receiving at least one dose: 60.36%
Percentage of adult population fully vaccinated: 46.41%
Percentage of  total population fully vaccinated: 37.87%

 

 

Data regarding Lane County testing, patient status, case ZIP codes and more is available at www.LaneCountyOR.gov/localdata

 

 

 

The State of Oregon has created a COVID-19 web page with resources at http://coronavirus.oregon.gov.

 

 

High Risk Individuals who had contact with these community members will be contacted by Lane County Public Health so they can work with their health care providers on next steps. Communicable disease investigations are underway. If a public contact exposure point is identified, that information will be shared with the public.

 

 

 

Presumptive cases are people without a positive PCR test who have COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. Though not confirmed by a positive diagnostic test, presumptive cases have a high likelihood of having COVID-19 because of the specific nature of the symptoms and known exposure.


Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs Advisory Committee to Hold Virtual Meeting in June
Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs - 05/11/21 11:14 AM

The next meeting of the Advisory Committee to the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs will be held Wednesday, June 2, 2021, via Zoom. The meeting begins at 9:30 a.m. and runs until Noon.

The committee is made up of veterans appointed by the governor to provide counsel on veteran issues and represent veteran concerns across Oregon. Its nine members serve in a vital advisory role to the director and staff of the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs.

ODVA’s Reports to the Advisory Committee are available to the public on the ODVA website: https://issuu.com/odva/stacks/38107bb40c054695831edf5634865ca4

This meeting is being held virtually due to travel and gathering size restrictions related to the coronavirus pandemic. The public is invited to attend.

To attend:

You will need to pre-register using this link: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZIucuipqzwjE9BtgOgPUUAfSn6XmOT-FWet Pre-registration is required. Once pre-registered you will receive the meeting link.

Join by Zoom via Telephone: Dial 1 (253) 215-8782. When prompted, enter the meeting ID: 863 5115 7994 # and passcode: 374884#

You will be prompted to state your name. State your first and last name.

Town Hall:

There will be a Town Hall at the end of the business meeting in which we invite you to ask questions of the committee and director. This time is set aside for individuals to bring up broader veteran community issues. Members of the community are also invited to submit written public comments to the Committee at the following email address: vaac@odva.state.or.us.

More information can be found online at www.oregon.gov/odva/Pages/advisory.aspx or to contact the Advisory Committee, please email vaac@odva.state.or.us.


Officers respond to shooting incident in northeast Salem
Salem Police Dept. - 05/11/21 10:33 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

DATE:           Tuesday, May 11, 2021

Officers respond to shooting incident in northeast Salem

Detectives working all available leads

Salem, Ore. — Just before midnight on Monday, May 10, 2021, Salem Police patrol officers responded to multiple calls of shots fired near the vicinity of Clay and Cypress Streets NE. Officers in the area also heard the shots and arrived to find a vehicle speeding away. A pursuit was initiated and ended near the 2800 block of Howell Prairie Road NE where the occupants drove into a field and fled on foot.

Salem Police received support from regional agencies, Marion County Sheriff’s Office, Keizer Police Department and Oregon State Police, as they assisted with establishing a perimeter and the search. A thorough search of the area for several hours did not result in locating the occupants of the involved vehicle.

Patrol officers working the original scene of the shooting determined several vehicles in the nearby gas station parking lot had been struck. Although the vehicles were occupied, none of the persons inside were struck by the gunfire. Unfortunately, five dogs in the back of one of the vehicles were hit by bullets. With the owner’s permission, officers took the adult dog and puppies immediately to an emergency veterinary clinic close by, but two of the dogs died.

Detectives are currently working all available leads, and no further information is available at this time. If you have any information regarding this incident, please call the Salem Police Department tips line at 588-8477.

# # #


Lane County Public Health May 11th COVID-19 Case/Vaccination Update: Live Virtual Press Conference at 10:30
Lane Co. Government - 05/11/21 10:19 AM

Lane County Public Health (LCPH) was notified of at least 50 additional positive cases of COVID-19.This makes a total of  ?twelve thousand nine hundred and twenty one cases. 322,493 doses administered in Lane County. 

 

12,921 total cases - Note that this includes confirmed and presumptive.

 

Of our cases (confirmed and presumptive):

Hospitalized: 17

·ICU: 8 (of the 17)

Deaths: 146

Infectious: 251

 

HOSCAP COVID-positive Hospitalized Cases

·Statewide:

o   Hospitalized: 342

o   ICU: 88

  9

 

 

 

 

Total persons fully vaccinated: 143,486 (+8,288 since 5/7)
Total persons received first dose only: 43,125
Total doses administered: 322,493

Percentage of adult population receiving at least one dose: 60.36%
Percentage of adult population fully vaccinated: 46.41%
Percentage of  total population fully vaccinated: 37.87%

 

 

Data regarding Lane County testing, patient status, case ZIP codes and more is available at www.LaneCountyOR.gov/localdata

 

 

 

The State of Oregon has created a COVID-19 web page with resources at http://coronavirus.oregon.gov.

 

 

High Risk Individuals who had contact with these community members will be contacted by Lane County Public Health so they can work with their health care providers on next steps. Communicable disease investigations are underway. If a public contact exposure point is identified, that information will be shared with the public.

 

 

 

Presumptive cases are people without a positive PCR test who have COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. Though not confirmed by a positive diagnostic test, presumptive cases have a high likelihood of having COVID-19 because of the specific nature of the symptoms and known exposure.


U.S. Attorney's Office Recognizes National Police Week, May 9-15, 2021
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 05/11/21 9:48 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.— In honor of National Police Week, Acting U.S. Attorney Scott Erik Asphaug recognizes the service and sacrifice of federal, state, local, and Tribal law enforcement. This year, the week is observed Sunday, May 9 through Saturday, May 15, 2021.

“This week is a time to honor our law enforcement officers who have made the ultimate sacrifice in service to our nation,” said Attorney General Garland. “I am constantly inspired by the extraordinary courage and dedication with which members of law enforcement act each day, putting their lives on the line to make our communities safer. To members of law enforcement and your families: we know that not a single day, nor a single week, is enough to recognize your service and sacrifice. On behalf of the entire Department of Justice, you have our unwavering support and eternal gratitude.”

“National Police Week is a time-honored tradition that affords all Americans the opportunity to recognize and celebrate the accomplishments of law enforcement officers across the country. It also gives us the opportunity to reflect on the tremendous personal sacrifice made by officers and their families every day to keep our communities safe,” said Acting U.S. Attorney Asphaug. “I am personally very thankful for our law enforcement officers here in Oregon for their continued partnership with our office. We could not do the work we do without your steadfast dedication and service.”

In 1962, President Kennedy issued the first proclamation for Peace Officers Memorial Day and National Police Week to remember and honor law enforcement officers for their service and sacrifices. Peace Officers Memorial Day, which every year falls on May 15, specifically honors law enforcement officers killed or disabled in the line of duty.  

Each year, during National Police Week, our nation celebrates the contributions of law enforcement from around the country, recognizing their hard work, dedication, loyalty, and commitment to keeping our communities safe. This year the COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted law enforcement officers’ courage and unwavering devotion to the communities that they have sworn to serve.

During the Roll Call of Heroes, a ceremony coordinated by the Fraternal Order of Police (FOP), more than 300 officers will be honored. Based on data submitted to and analyzed by the National Law Enforcement Officer Memorial Fund (NLEOMF), of the law enforcement officers who died nationwide in the line of duty in 2020, nearly 60 percent succumbed to COVID-19.

Additionally, according to statistics reported by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) through the Law Enforcement Officer Killed and Assaulted (LEOKA) Program, 46 law enforcement officers died as a result of felonious acts and 47 died in accidents in 2020. LEOKA statistics can be found on FBI’s Crime Data Explorer website. 

The names of the 394 fallen officers who have been added in 2020 to the wall at the National Law Enforcement Officer Memorial will be read on Thursday, May 13, 2021, during a Virtual Candlelight Vigil, which will be livestreamed to the public at 8:00 PM EDT. The Police Week in-person public events, originally scheduled for May, have been rescheduled due to ongoing COVID-19 concerns to October 13-17, 2021. An in-person Candlelight Vigil event is scheduled for October 14, 2021.

Those who wish to view the Virtual Candlelight Vigil on May 13, 2021, can watch on the NLEOMF YouTube channel found at www.youtube.com/user/TheNLEOMF. The FOP’s Roll Call of Heroes can be viewed at www.fop.net. To view the schedule of virtual Police Week events in May, please view NLEOMF’s Police Week Flyer.  

To learn more about National Police Week in-person events scheduled for October, please visit www.policeweek.org.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Announcement

OnPoint Community Credit Union Reveals Its 2021 Prize for Excellence in Education Community Builder Winners and Educator of the Year Finalists
OnPoint Community Credit Union - 05/11/21 9:30 AM

OnPoint's 12th annual celebration of educators will award up to $100,000 to K-12 teachers and schools

PORTLAND, Ore., May 11, 2021 — As the 12th annual OnPoint Prize for Excellence in Education continues, OnPoint Community Credit Union today announced the five schools that have won this year's Community Builder awards, providing up to $5,000 for each school's special projects that enrich their communities. OnPoint also announced today the six teachers who are finalists for the Educator of the Year awards. Three winners (one K-5, one 6-8 and one 9-12) will be announced from May 24 to 26, 2021, starting with K-5. They will have their mortgage or rent paid for one full year and receive $2,500 for each of their schools. The remaining three finalists (one K-5, one 6-8 and one 9-12) will each receive $5,000 for themselves and $1,500 for their schools.

"Since the pandemic began, teachers and students have navigated unparalleled circumstances and worked hard to discover creative new ways to engage and teach students," said Rob Stuart, President and Chief Executive Officer, OnPoint Community Credit Union. “In reviewing nominations, we discovered all the innovative and inspiring ways educators have come together to support each other and engage students.”

OnPoint's annual education awards ceremony began in 2010 and celebrates local educators and schools that creatively engage students, inspire innovation in the classroom, and impact the lives of students and families. In its 11-year history, the contest has awarded more than $470,000 in prizes to 285 local educators and schools. The 2021 OnPoint Prize for Excellence in Education will award up to an additional $100,000 to deserving public and private K-12 teachers and schools.

Details on each of the 2021 Community Builder award winners and Educator of the Year finalists are listed below:

Community Builder Awards
OnPoint has recognized five schools from across the region with its Community Builder awards. Four schools will receive $2,000 from OnPoint for a special project of their choice, and one school determined by online community votes will receive $5,000.

$5,000 Community Builder Award Winner

Holy Family Catholic School's Celebration of International Diversity (Archdiocese of Portland, Portland, Ore.) was selected by community votes to receive this year's $5,000 Community Builder award. The initiative, led by the school's Racial Equity Committee, supports faculty, students, families and the greater parish in exploring prejudices, racial diversity and solutions that will foster an equitable and just community. Specifically, Holy Family Catholic School will use the grant to engage guest speakers from different cultures, provide books for the social justice book club, purchase food for cooking classes and provide art supplies.

$2,000 Community Builder Award Winners

  • Awbrey Park Elementary School's Conscious Discipline Program (Eugene School District, Eugene, Ore.), which supports teachers' and students' social and emotional needs in the classroom with an evidence-based, trauma-informed approach.
  • Cheldelin Middle School's Fire and Food Courtyard Project (Corvallis School District, Corvallis, Ore.), which creates unique learning experiences for students over a wood-fired kiln.
  • Lyle Elementary School's Recess for All (Dallas School District 2, Dallas, Ore.), which will redesign its recess so all students can engage in activities that will benefit their physical and mental health and prepare them to return to the classroom ready to learn.
  • Vern Patrick Elementary School's StoryWalk® (Redmond School District 2J, Redmond, Ore.), which will build a permanent installation along the school's track for the school and community to enjoy.

Educator of the Year Finalists

In addition to announcing its Community Builder Award winners, OnPoint also revealed its six finalists for 2021 Educator of the Year.

K-5 Finalists

  • Lionel Clegg - 1st grade, Woodlawn Elementary School, Portland Public Schools, Portland, Ore.
  • Aarti Kamalahasan - Kindergarten, Sato Elementary School, Beaverton School District, Beaverton, Ore.

6-8 Finalists

  • Beckie Plaza - 6-8th grade science, Lake Oswego Junior High School, Lake Oswego School District, Lake Oswego, Ore.
  • Travis Rooke-Ley - 8th grade math, Whitford Middle School, Beaverton School District, Beaverton, Ore.

9-12 Finalists

  • Addie Lyden - 9-12th grade history, law and AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination) teacher, Southridge High School, Beaverton School District, Beaverton, Ore.
  • Desmond Spann - 9-10th grade English, Franklin High School, Portland Public School District, Portland, Ore.

Click here to learn more about OnPoint's finalists for 2021 Educator of the Year.

"The incredible schools and teachers recognized today have raised the bar for excellence in education, inside and outside the classroom," continued Stuart. "OnPoint thanks the finalists and winners, their fellow nominees and the rest of our education community for the enduring impact they have on children and families across Oregon and Southwest Washington."

Honoring Founders' Legacy of Excellence in Education

OnPoint was founded in 1932 by 16 schoolteachers. In addition to its annual Prize for Excellence in Education campaign, OnPoint continues its founders' mission in many other ways. Click here to learn more.

ABOUT ONPOINT COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION

OnPoint Community Credit Union is the largest credit union in Oregon, serving over 437,000 members and with assets of $8.3 billion. Founded in 1932, OnPoint Community Credit Union's membership is available to anyone who lives or works in one of 28 Oregon counties (Benton, Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Coos, Crook, Curry, Deschutes, Douglas, Gilliam, Hood River, Jackson, Jefferson, Josephine, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Morrow, Multnomah, Polk, Sherman, Tillamook, Wasco, Washington, Wheeler, and Yamhill) and two Washington counties (Skamania and Clark) and their immediate family members. More information is available at www.onpointcu.com or 503-228-7077 or 800-527-3932.

 


Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against "Robo texts" (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 05/11/21 9:14 AM
TT - Robo Texts - GRAPHIC - May 11, 2021
TT - Robo Texts - GRAPHIC - May 11, 2021
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Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. Today: Building a digital defense against robo text and email scams.

Last week, we shared some information from the FCC about avoiding robocall scams. This week, we have some information from our partners at the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) about robo text and email scams.

We are not talking about messages you get from a company or agency when you signed up to receive those – things like newsletters or coupons. Subscribe and unsubscribe to those as you wish. We are talking about unsolicited messages from unknown people or groups who are either trying to download malware onto your device or trying to get you to give up personal info.

You think you're doing the right thing to stop the harassment by clicking "unsubscribe." Don’t do it! By clicking “unsubscribe” links or texting “stop” in reply, the spammers literally take that to mean “subscribe” and “please, go on.”

As these spammers blast out millions of texts or emails every day, they aren’t actually targeting you specifically—in fact, they might not know if your email or phone number is even valid. They are looking for signs of an active account. By hitting “unsubscribe” or replying in any way, you validate your contact information and risk inviting even more spam and scams.

There are various ways to mark messages as spam, depending on your type of device and service provider. You can also forward messages to the FTC directly. (More info on how to do that can be found here: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/how-recognize-and-report-spam-text-messages)

At the very least, if you get a suspicious email, mark it as spam and delete it without opening it. If you get a suspicious text, delete without replying and block that number on your phone.

According to the FTC, here’s how to avoid those spam texts and emails in the first place:

  • Avoid displaying your email address in public. Spammers scrape blog posts, chat rooms, social networking sites, and forums—so the less of you that’s out there, the better.
  • Use two email addresses—one for personal messages and one for everything else. Ideally, this second public-facing email address should be one you are willing to delete one day, if needed. 
  • Use a truly original address that’s unlikely to be created by spammers. Spammers send out millions of messages to probable name combinations hoping to find a valid address. That means common first name/last name email addresses are more likely to attract spam.

If you believe are a victim of an online scam, you should report the incident to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office.  

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Attached Media Files: TT - Robo Texts - AUDIO - May 11, 2021 , TT - Robo Texts - GRAPHIC - May 11, 2021

Thousands of people in Oregon are taking advantage of health coverage savings through the Marketplace (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 05/11/21 8:44 AM
OHIM Logo
OHIM Logo
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(Salem) – People in Oregon are enrolling in health coverage at a much higher rate than this time last year. As of April 30, 2021, more than 10,100 people in Oregon have newly enrolled in health coverage through the Marketplace, which is an increase of 31 percent over people who enrolled during this time last year and 80 percent more than enrolled during the same period in 2019.

Higher enrollment in the Marketplace from Feb. 15 through April 30 is likely due to the COVID-19 special enrollment period, which is open to anyone who needs health coverage and is eligible to shop through HealthCare.gov. This special enrollment period continues through Aug. 15, 2021.

In addition, people applying through the Marketplace are now eligible for substantially higher savings thanks to the American Rescue Plan. More than 4 in 5 people in Oregon now qualify for financial assistance in the form of premium tax credits, which reduce the cost of the monthly premium to have health coverage, and cost-sharing reductions to reduce the out-of-pocket costs associated with health care.

People already receiving premium tax credits are also receiving additional savings. Enrollees can choose to receive all of the increased tax credits with their 2021 tax return or they can update their HealthCare.gov application for 2021 coverage to reduce monthly premiums for the rest of the year. Enrollees who are already covered through the Marketplace receive additional savings of an average of $50 per person per month.

The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace offers a quick snapshot of the plans and savings to eligible Oregonians. The tool, available at OregonHealthCare.gov/WindowShop, and has been updated to correctly calculate additional savings now available to people shopping through the Marketplace. People who are currently enrolled through the Marketplace can preview extra savings and people who are not currently enrolled can prepare to enroll for the first time.

To apply, go to OregonHealthCare.gov and answer a few Oregon-specific questions to get to the right health coverage application. You can also search the “get help” directory on OregonHealthCare.gov to find an insurance agent or community partner organization to help complete the application and enroll. Insurance agents and community partners provide local, one-on-one assistance at no charge to the client. This help is available virtually and on the phone, and in person following safety protocols.

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The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace, a part of state government, helps people get health insurance when they do not have job-based coverage, and do not qualify for the Oregon Health Plan or another program. The Marketplace is the state-level partner to HealthCare.gov, and a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS). For more information, go to OregonHealthCare.gov.




Attached Media Files: OHIM Logo

Lane County Firewise Grant Program open for applications
Lane Co. Government - 05/11/21 8:30 AM

Lane County’s Firewise Grant program is accepting applications from residents outside of urban growth boundaries in Lane County through May 28.

 

Firewise grants provide rural property owners with funding to help complete projects that reduce the risk of wildfire, such as clearing vegetation, replacing wood shake roofing, low-fire-risk plants and landscaping materials, noncombustible exterior siding, chimney spark arrestors, and more.

 

“The Firewise grants are a great way for property owners to reduce the risk of wildfire to their homes,” said Lane County’s Firewise Program Manager Meia Matsuda. “The Firewise-eligible projects focus on helping people get their property lean, clean and green through improved vegetation clearing, irrigation and fire-resistant landscaping and materials.”

 

Up to $15,500 in grant funding is available for each qualifying property.

 

Learn more and apply online at www.lanecounty.org/firewise.

 

Paper applications are also available in the Lane County Public Works Customer Service Center vestibule at 3050 North Delta Highway, Eugene.

 

MEDIA OPPORTUNITY: Local media are invited to interview Firewise program staff and tour a property near Cottage Grove that has participated in the Firewise program on Thursday, May 13, between 10:30 p.m. and 12:00 p.m. See the media contact section for more details.

 

Firewise grants are funded through Title III of the Federal Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Program - Section 601 of the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008. 

 

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The Lot at Zidell Yards Announces the Start of Its Summer Live Music and Movie Lineup
The Lot at Zidell Yards - 05/11/21 7:04 AM
The Lot at Zidell Yards
The Lot at Zidell Yards
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PORTLAND, May 11, 2021—The Lot at Zidell Yards, Portland’s premier socially-distanced outdoor performance venue, is excited to announce a diverse lineup of live music, movies and events to kick off the 2021 summer season—May and June events are on sale today at 10 a.m. at thelotatzidellyards.com.

 

“The team at The Lot can’t wait to bring live shows back to our community, provide local artists with a home for the summer and give our audience the opportunity to safely come together and celebrate,” said Christina Fuller, Co-Owner and Partner, Fuller Events. ”Today’s announcement is just the beginning of a summer of great programming, which we’ll continue to roll out throughout the season.”

 

Live at The Lot:

  • Sat, May 29 - Sávila. Comprised of three Mexican-American musicians based out of Portland, Sávila melds their roots of Cumbia, Soul and Club Music to form their own style, Ancestral Club.

  • Sun, May 30 - Federale. Federale was conceived as an outlet to channel inspiration from ‘60s & ‘70s European soundtracks, particularly those from Italy made famous by the Spaghetti Western and Giallo genres.

  • Mon, May 31 - Rosé and Roses with Jacob Miller, presented by Union Wine Co. With an affinity for minimalist pop and firm roots planted in American traditional music, Jacob Miller crafts a timeless sound unique to his voice, style and abilities.

  • Thu, June 3 - Jenny Don’t and the Spurs. The Spurs are a musical force to be reckoned with—a must-see for anyone who enjoys spirited garage-infused country played with sincerity and raw conviction. 

  • Fri, June 4 & Sat, June 5 - The Dandy Warhols. Since their inception in Portland in 1994, The Dandy Warhols have sailed through, and past, shifting musical climates by keeping their art unfiltered and presenting thoughts un-mired by censorship.

  • Sat, June 12 - Cardioid + opening set by Nick Delffs. Cardioid flits between genres and tones with the sly, dexterous abandon of an artist in full control. Her music is tactile, industrial-strength dream-pop awash in fuzzed-out guitars and retro-wave synths.

  • Fri, June 18 & Sat, June 19 - Summer Brass with Members of the Oregon Symphony (tickets on sale May 18). Share an evening with brass and percussion of the Oregon Symphony in a program of festive and familiar, from Joan Tower, Piazzolla and Bizet’s Suite from Carmen.

  • Sun, June 20 - Ashleigh Flynn & The Riveters. With what PopMatters describes as "tenacious swagger," critically-acclaimed solo artist Ashleigh Flynn recently dialed up the volume and debuted an all-female rock band as a nod to the “Rosie the Riveter” archetype from WWII.

  • Wed, July 14 - Liv Warfield (tickets coming soon). While she takes cues from musical influences like Nina Simone, Etta James, Sade, Tina Turner and Mary J. Blige, Warfield has  carved out a style all her own, best described as “alternative soul with a lil bit of Rock ‘n’ Roll.”

  • Fri, July 16 - Ural Thomas & The Pain (tickets coming soon). It goes without saying that a man practically built out of rhythm would never stop playing music … Ural Thomas is, and forever will be, Portland's pillar of soul.

  • Sat, July 17 - Y La Bamba (tickets coming soon). Y La Bamba has been many things, but at the heart of it is singer-songwriter Luz Elena Mendoza’s inquisitive sense of self. Their fifth record, Mujeres, carries on their affinity for spiritual contemplation, while storytelling with a full emotional spectrum.

 

The Lot with Hollywood Theatre:

  • Fri, May 28 - E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (PG) + opening set by Portland Cello Project

  • Mon, May 31 - Love & Basketball (PG-13) + opening set by Karma Rivera

  • Tue, June 8 - Rear Window (PG) + opening set by 45th Parallel’s Pyxis Quartet, presented by Front Porch Properties PDX

  •  Fri, June 11 - Crazy Rich Asians (PG-13)

  • Tue, June 15 - Thelma & Louise (R) + opening set by Roselit Bone, presented by Rally Pizza

  • Tue, June 22 - Troop Beverly Hills (PG)

  • Sat, June 26 - Coming to America (R) + opening set by Cool Nutz and DJ Fatboy, presented by The Mirarchi Family

  • Mon, June 28 - Stand By Me (R) + opening set by The Shivas, presented by Oregon Film

  • Tue, July 20 - Labyrinth (PG), presented by Deb Counts-Tabor REALTOR® (tickets coming soon)

  • Tue, July 27 - The Muppet Movie (G), presented by Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace (tickets coming soon)

  • Wed, July 28 - Casablanca (PG) + opening set by Onry (tickets coming soon)

  • Tue, Aug 3 - WALL-E (G), presented by Portland EcoFilm Festival and Crag Law Center (tickets coming soon)

 

Pride Pics: 

  • Wed, June 16 & Thu, June 17 - In celebration of Portland Pride 2021, Pride Northwest and the directors of QDoc Film Festival will host Pride Pics: An Outdoor Film Experience.

 

Tickets are on sale today at 10 a.m. at thelotatzidellyards.com. More events will continue to be announced via The Lot's newsletter and social media channels.

 

Located at 3030 S Moody Avenue, The Lot at Zidell Yards will feature a full stage, a large format LED screen, a site-specific sound system, and an on-site food and beverage program—all for guests to enjoy with their quaran-team from the comfort of their socially-distanced seating pod. 

 

The health and safety of the community is the highest priority of The Lot at Zidell Yards. The Lot will follow state and county health guidelines to create a safe experience for all audience members, staff and performers. The Lot has the following key safety measures in place: socially-distanced seating pods, wide thoroughfares with clearly marked traffic lanes, limited seating capacity, touchless ticket scanning, mask-wearing guidelines for all attendees, staff and performers, stringent cleaning and sanitizing protocols and ample restrooms with attendants and cleaning procedures. More information on The Lot’s safety protocols can be found on the website.

 

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You can find renders of The Lot at Zidell Yards, band photos and movie posters for publication, here.

For press inquiries, please contact Lauren Merge at media@fullerevents.com or (503) 706-3271.

For more info and future updates on The Lot at Zidell Yards visit thelotatzidellyards.com.




Attached Media Files: The Lot at Zidell Yards , June 4 & 5 - The Dandy Warhols , June 3 - Jenny Don't & The Spurs , May 31 - Love & Basketball , May 31 - Jacob Miller , May 30 - Federale , May 29 - Savila , May 28 - E.T.

Mon. 05/10/21
Quick Thinking Neighbors Slow Springfield House Fire
Eugene Springfield Fire - 05/10/21 4:21 PM
2021-05/4466/144868/B9C40B93-5822-4285-818E-470E2E44B4D0.jpeg
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Springfield, OR.  Eugene Springfield Fire responded to a reported house fire in the 1800 block of F St. in Springfield Monday afternoon.  Neighbors saw the fast moving fire and grabbed a garden hose to slow the spread of the fire prior to the first arriving fire crews.  On arrival, crews found a partially extinguished fire in an attached out building that had also extended to the exterior and eves of the home.  Given the wind conditions and fire spread, had the neighbors not acted quickly, the fire could have been much worse. Crews finished extinguishing the fire and any hot spots. The Fire Marshal's Office is investigating the cause.  




Attached Media Files: 2021-05/4466/144868/B9C40B93-5822-4285-818E-470E2E44B4D0.jpeg

Oregon reports 388 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 05/10/21 1:51 PM

May 10, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 388 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are three new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,533, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 388 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 191,774.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 28,659 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 22,263 doses were administered on May 9 and 6,396 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on May 9.

The 7-day running average is now 34,030 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered a total of 1,828,744 first and second doses of Pfizer, 1,401,316 first and second doses of Moderna and 112,593 single doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines. As of today, 1,467,659 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series. There are 1,982,835 people who have had at least one dose.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 2,110,095 doses of Pfizer, 1,710,920 doses of Moderna and 246,700 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 326, which is eight more than yesterday. There are 78 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is two more than yesterday.

The total number of COVID-19 positive patient bed-days in the most recent seven days is 2,300, which is a 2.3% decrease from the previous seven days. The peak daily number of beds occupied by COVID-19 positive patients in the most recent seven days is 345.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

OHA updates population data

Today, the Oregon Health Authority updated its COVID-19 case rates (cases per 100,000 residents) using 2020 population data from Portland State University’s (PSU) Population Research Center and 2019 housing and demographic data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey (ACS).

OHA also updated its vaccination rates (people vaccinated per 100 residents) with 2020 population data from PSU and the 2019 Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS) from the ACS. These changes affected the weekly data report, all COVID-19 Tableau Dashboards and the county risk metrics.

OHA had previously been using 2019 population data from PSU and 2018 data from the ACS to calculate COVID-19 case rates and 2019 population data from PSU and 2019 PUMS data from the ACS to calculate vaccination rates.

In the past year, specific populations have changed, and this update will ensure that OHA is displaying and sharing the most up-to-date and accurate information available for case and vaccination rates in specific populations. Case rates and vaccination rates may shift slightly because of this change.

The following case rates will be affected:

  • Sex
  • Age Group
  • Race
  • Ethnicity
  • County

The following vaccination rates will be affected:

  • Sex
  • Age Group
  • Race & Ethnicity
  • County

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (1), Benton (21), Clackamas (76), Clatsop (4), Columbia (12), Coos (1), Crook (3), Deschutes (56), Douglas (6), Harney (3), Hood River (2), Jackson (8), Jefferson (4), Josephine (7), Lane (24), Linn (23), Marion (45), Multnomah (76), Polk (3), Tillamook (2), Wasco (1), Washington (4) and Yamhill (6).

Oregon’s 2,531st COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive on April 25 and died on April 27 at Salem Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,532nd COVID-19 death is a 70-year-old man from Lane County who tested positive on April 18 and died on May 6 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,533rd COVID-19 death is a 63-year-old man from Josephine County who tested positive on March 8 and died on May 2 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.


Wildfire awareness month: Run-away debris burning leads human-caused wildfires
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 05/10/21 1:11 PM

SALEM, Ore. – Fire departments and prevention groups urge everyone to dispose of yard debris, rather than burn it. This year’s warm and dry conditions have already caused fires to burn many acres quickly. Rather than burning yard debris, you can help prevent wildfires by chipping or recycling it.

The Oregon Department of Forestry has declared fire season for parts of the state. This year about 180 fires have already burned about 1,900 acres. April’s dry, warm conditions prompted some county-wide burn bans.

May is Wildfire Awareness Month. This is a great time to trim trees and tidy up bushes and plants around your home that could easily catch fire. This is especially true after this winter’s ice storm. Because of the dry weather, as you begin spring clean-up, the Oregon Department of Forestry and Keep Oregon Green urge you to consider alternatives to burning.

“The time to safely burn yard debris has passed,” said Keep Oregon Green President Kristin Babbs. “Waiting until next fall or winter after heavy rains prevents piles burned this spring from re-starting during the heat of the summer. Burn piles can hold heat for several weeks and start again under warm, windy conditions.” Babbs said delaying your burn plans will give the debris more time to cure. You can cover a part of the pile with plastic to keep it dry until it’s safe to burn.

If burning now is the only option to dispose of yard debris, fire prevention specialists ask people to follow safe burning practices. The following tips can help stop run-away burn piles:

  • Call before you burn - Burning regulations vary by location depending on the weather and fuel conditions. If you are planning to burn, check with your local Oregon Department of Forestry district, fire protective association, or air protection authority to learn about current burning restrictions or regulations, and if you need a permit.
  • Know the weather - Never burn on dry or windy days, because fires can spread out of control more easily.
  • Clear a 10-foot buffer - Make sure there are no tree branches or power lines above or fuels around your pile.
  • Keep burn piles small - Large burn piles can cast hot embers long distances. Use small piles, maximum of four feet by four feet. Add only a little debris as the pile burns, to keep it small.
  • Always have water and fire tools nearby - When burning, have a water hose on and ready or a bucket of water, and shovel and dirt to put out the fire. Drown the pile with water, stir the coals, and drown again, repeating until the fire is out cold.
  • Stay with the fire until it is out cold – State laws requires monitoring of debris burn from start to finish until it is out cold. This law is intended to ensure sparks or embers that jump from the fire can be put out quickly. Recheck burn piles. They can retain heat for several weeks and restart when the weather warms up and winds blow.
  • Never use gasoline or other flammable or combustible liquids to start or speed up your fire. Every year, about 60 percent of the Oregon Burn Center cases are from yard debris burning.
  • Only burn yard debris - State laws prohibit burning materials in the open that create dense smoke or noxious odors.
  • Costs of run-away debris burns– State law requires the proper clearing, building, attending and extinguishing of open fires all year. Citations can cost $2,000. If your debris burn spreads out of control, you will have to pay for putting the fire out, and likely the damage to your neighbors’ properties. This can be extremely expensive.

More tips on wildfire prevention, including campfire safety, motorized equipment use, and fire-resistant landscaping can be found on the Keep Oregon Green site, www.keeporegongreen.org/. Find public use restrictions for Oregon Department of Forestry protected lands here: https://gisapps.odf.oregon.gov/firerestrictions/PFR.html.

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Western Oregon University aims for pack immunity through immunization requirement for Wolves
Western Oregon University - 05/10/21 12:34 PM

MONMOUTH, Ore. – Western Oregon University (WOU) announced today that in preparation for a predominantly in-person fall 2021, COVID-19 vaccinations will be required for students and employees who study or work in person at either the Monmouth or Salem campuses.

 

The vaccine requirement, among other efforts, was announced earlier today to current students in a virtual information session focused on COVID-19 planning for the 2021-22 academic year.

 

“We know our students and employees miss the vibrance of in-person campus life, and we want to return to that while also supporting the overall safety of our communities. Vaccination is an important step toward pack immunity so our Wolves can be together again,” said WOU President Rex Fuller. “In the meantime, we’ve been doing everything we can during spring term to make vaccines accessible to members of our campus community.”

 

In the virtual session, Fuller emphasized that the details of the vaccination requirement plan would be further refined through engagement with many campus stakeholders, including WOU’s Reopening Committee, Faculty Senate, Staff Senate, the Associated Students of Western Oregon University (ASWOU), and the university’s two unions: SEIU and the Western Oregon University Federation of Teachers (WOUFT). Because WOU is one of Oregon’s most ethnically diverse university campuses, Fuller also pledged to engage the campus’s University Diversity and Inclusion Advisory Committee (UDIAC) for advice and suggestions as the plan is finalized.

 

“The details of the plan require the input of our faculty, staff, and students, through the lens of science, data and public health expertise.  It would be short-sighted to rush the details of a vaccination requirement without hearing from the WOU community,” Fuller said.

 

In order to incentivize students to get vaccinated sooner rather than later, the university also announced a program in conjunction with the WOU Wolfstore that gives students $25 to be used on textbooks, supplies, gear or whatever they choose.

 

“My hope is that this incentive program encourages WOU students to get their vaccination and rewards those who already have. It’s important we do our part to support pack immunity in our Wolf community,” said Associated Students of Western Oregon University President N.J. Johnson. “We encourage students to get their first vaccination as soon as possible so they will have their second dose completed before the conclusion of spring term.”

 

Free vaccinations are available in the Pacific Room of WOU’s Werner University Center on Monday, Wednesday and Friday each week. Walk-ins are welcome from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Or, appointments can be made with Salem Health. WOU has hosted the Polk County clinic for Salem Health since February 2021.

 

 

# # #

 

About Western Oregon University

Western Oregon University, founded in 1856 in Monmouth, is the state’s oldest public university. Serving about 5,000 students, WOU is a mid-sized, NCAA Division II institution with about 70% of the student population being from Oregon. A significant portion of attendees are members of under-represented groups, veterans or non-traditional students. WOU is Oregon’s campus of choice for those seeking a transformative education in a supportive, student-centered learning community where classes are taught by faculty. Together we succeed.


Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team -- Daily Update -- May 10, 2021
Douglas Co. Government - 05/10/21 12:14 PM
2021-05/6789/144854/DCCRT_Logo_72020.jpg
2021-05/6789/144854/DCCRT_Logo_72020.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-05/6789/144854/thumb_DCCRT_Logo_72020.jpg

Our local COVID-19 updates represent the coordinated effort of the agencies that make up the DCCRT

 

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – May 10, 2021

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - DAILY UPDATE

 

(Douglas County, Ore.) DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 TEST RESULTS: As of 12:00 pm Today, Monday, May 10, 2021, there are TEN (10) people with new positive test results and ONE (1) new presumptive to report since our noon case update yesterday.  The total number of cases of people with positive test results and presumptives in Douglas County is now at 3,240. Currently, there are TWELVE (12) Douglas County COVID-19 patients that are being hospitalized, five locally and seven out-of-the-area. Our Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, under the direction of the Douglas County Board of Commissioners, continue to devote all resources available to our local COVID response.  

 

Douglas County, OR - COVID-19 - Case Update Chart

Date

Thursday

May 6, 2021

Friday

May 7, 2021

Saturday

May 8, 2021

Sunday

May 9, 2021

Today, Monday,

May 10, 2021

Total COVID-19 Cases

3,211

3,223

3,223

3,229

3,240

People w/ Positive PCR or Antigen Test Results

3,056

3,065

3,065

3,071

3,081

Presumptive

155

158

158

158

159

Total Currently Hospitalized

11

11

11

12

12

Total Currently in Isolation

101

102

102

99

102

Total COVID-19 Related Deaths

70

70

70

70

70

Our daily update includes the total number of cases in Douglas County, which combines people with positive test results and presumptives, as well as a breakout of those case numbers. There will be times when a presumptive will move to a positive test result, and our total case number will not change because the case has already been counted.

 

LOCAL CONTACTS AND CASES BEING SUPPORTED IN ISOLATION AND QUARANTINE

Currently, DPHN is supporting 102 cases in isolation, as well as another 530 contacts in quarantine in Douglas County. Isolation is recommended for confirmed and presumptive cases, quarantine is recommended for contacts of confirmed or presumptive cases.  Currently, staff is supporting a total of 632 total contacts and cases in isolation or quarantine.  This number represents a snapshot of the significant amount of work being done locally to help control the spread of COVID.

 

NEXT DRIVE-THROUGH COVID-19 VACCINATION EVENT WILL BE SATURDAY, MAY 15

Douglas Public Health Network (DPHN), Douglas County Board of Commissioners, and Aviva Health have collaborated to host the next mass drive-through COVID-19 vaccination event on Saturday, May 15, 2021, at the Douglas County Fairgrounds. The event will be open to ALL residents of Douglas County 16 years old and older.  In addition to first dose vaccines, we will also be administering second doses of the Pfizer vaccine to those residents who received their first dose at one of our drive through COVID-19 vaccination events. Stay tuned for information on how you can sign up for this vaccine event later this week.  Please do not call, contact or go to the Douglas County Fairgrounds to ask about signing up for the vaccine event.

 

DPHN – IT’S YOUR TURN TO GET THE VACCINE!

Douglas Public Health Network launched their “it’s your turn” vaccine campaign, encouraging everyone to step up and take their turn to get their COVID-19 vaccine. 

Everyone over the age of 16 is now eligible to get a COVID-19 vaccine, and we want people to know they are eligible and that we have vaccine available.  Having the majority of our residents vaccinated is the surest road to getting back the sense of normalcy and freedom that we all miss and want. It’s your turn to help us get there!” stated Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, Douglas County Public Health Officer.  #itsyourturn

 

DOUGLAS COUNTY TIGER TEAM’S POP-UP VACCINATION CLINICS

The Douglas County Tiger Team is out and about in the county bringing the COVID-19 vaccines directly to rural areas via our mobile medical vans (MMV) at businesses, farms, fire stations and locations in our smaller remote communities in Douglas County. The Douglas County Board of Commissioners, who have led the charge for our Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team efforts since the beginning, have coordinated with DPHN to organize our local Tiger Team to manage our vaccine outreach efforts through ‘pop-up’ vaccine clinics. 

 

The Douglas County Tiger Team will be hosting FREE POP UP COVID VACCINE CLINICS at the locations listed below.  The clinics are open to anyone 18 years of age and older and preregistration is not necessary:

 

  • Wednesday, May 12, 2021: Oakland area: Oakland City Hall parking lot located at 637 NE Locust Street in Oakland from 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm
  • Thursday, May 13, 2021: Glide area: Glide Rural Fire Protection District – Glide Station located at 18910 North Umpqua Hwy in Glide from 10:00 am to 2:00 pm

 

If you are interested in having the Douglas County Tiger Team come to your business, fire department, farm or town to provide a pop-up vaccine clinic or if you have any questions about our Douglas County Tiger Teams and want a schedule of their upcoming pop-up vaccination clinics, please call (541) 670-3110 or our local COVID-19 Hotline at (541) 464-6550. 

 

UPCOMING AVIVA HEALTH COVID-19 VACCINATION CLINIC

Shared from Aviva Health.  Aviva Health, with the help of local partners (DPHN & Douglas County Commissioners) will be hosting vaccination events at various locations in rural Douglas County.  For more information, or to schedule an appointment or for a list of upcoming clinics, please call Aviva Health at (541) 672-9596. 

 

  • Wednesday, May 12, 2021:  Aviva Health’s COVID-19 Vaccine team will be at the Myrtle Creek Elks Lodge, located at 106 South Main Street in Myrtle Creek from 8:00 am to 11:30 am and 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm offering COVID-19 vaccinations to residents aged 16 years of age and older.  Walk-ins also welcomed!

 

STATE ANNOUNCES UPDATES TO COVID MANDATED RISK LEVELS

Increase in Indoor Capacity Limits for Indoor Recreation and Indoor Entertainment

Shared from OHA.  The State of Oregon announced earlier this week that they updated their state mandated risk level guidance for indoor capacity limits for Oregon counties for their Moderate and High Risk COVID Levels.  They have increased the capacity for indoor recreation, fitness and indoor entertainment venues.  As of Wednesday, May 5, 2021, indoor entertainment establishments and indoor recreation and fitness establishments in ALL Oregon counties may allow the following:

 

  • State Mandated Moderate Risk Level: Maximum 20% occupancy or 100 people total, whichever is larger
  • State Mandated High Risk Level: Maximum 10% occupancy or 50 people total, whichever is larger

 

The State Mandated Lower Risk Level and the State Mandated Extreme Risk Level capacity limits for these sectors remain the same.  To view the States updated capacity limits, please refer to the OHA State Mandated Sector Risk Level Guidance Chart.

 

COVID-19 VACCINE ELIGIBILITY OPEN FOR EVERYONE 16 YEARS OLD AND OLDER

According to the State of Oregon and OHA, ALL residents 16 years old and older are eligible to get the COVID-19 Vaccine, NOW! Remember, “it’s your turn!” So, get signed up or show up to get your COVID-19 vaccine today!

 

  1. Call and set up an appointment with your primary health care provider or ask them for a referral to another health care provider.
  2. Call and set up an appointment with a local pharmacy.
  3. Sign up for or attend one of the vaccination clinics offered in Douglas County through DPHN, Douglas County, Aviva Health or our Douglas County Tiger Team. 
  4. If you are a member of the Cow Creek Band of the Umpqua Tribe of Indians, please contact to set up an appointment at (541) 672-9405 or log onto https://www.cowcreek-nsn.gov/public-health/
  5. The Roseburg VA Health Care System is setting up appointments for veterans to receive the COVID-19 vaccine.  For more information, call the Roseburg VAMC at (541) 440-1000 or log onto https://www.va.gov/health-care/covid-19-vaccine/.

 

NO ACCESS TO THE INTERNET TO SCHEDULE YOUR VACCINE APPOINTMENT? LOCAL HELP IS AVAILABLE

Not everyone is able to use the internet, a tablet, a computer or a smart phone to schedule a COVID vaccine appointment.  If you or someone you know needs to schedule an appointment for the COVID vaccine, and do not have access to the internet, you can call one of the numbers below to get help scheduling an appointment.

 

  • Call our Douglas County COVID-19 Hotline at (541) 464-6550.
  • Coastal Residents can call the Lower Umpqua Hospital District COVID-19 Vaccine Call Center at (541) 271-2175.
  • U.S. Veterans can call the Roseburg VA Health Care Center at (541) 440-1000.
  • Members of the Cow Creek Band of the Umpqua Tribe of Indians can call (541) 672-9405.
  • Seniors can call Douglas County Senior Services at (541) 440-3677.

 

GETTING YOUR SECOND DOSE OF THE COVID-19 VACCINE IS IMPORTANT  

While we have heard a lot about second dose hesitancy, it is vitally important to for those residents who have received their first dose of the Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine, to make sure that you get and not forgo getting your second dose of the vaccine and complete their vaccination.  It will better ensure your immunity and help to protect yourself and those around you that you love. 

 

If you have already received your first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, here are a few answers to questions about your second dose.

  • The latest information shows that you can expect to get your second dose about 4-6 weeks after the first dose.
  • You should have received a vaccination card when you received your first dose that details the brand of vaccine, its lot number, and the date the vaccine was administered.  This card is for your records only, and is not official proof that you have received the vaccine. Proof of your vaccination rests with the State Alert System, which is accessible by medical facilities.
  • You should get your second dose from the same provider or organization from which you received your first. However, the physical address where you receive the second dose may change.
  • You will be notified by the provider or organization that gave you your first dose about where and when you will receive your second dose.
  • I got a first vaccine out of the area; can I get my second vaccine in Douglas County?  The second vaccine dose is “paired” to the first dose, and your second dose will be sent to wherever you got your first dose.  Therefore, except in rare circumstances, you will need to return to where you got your first dose.
  • If you have questions, please contact the provider or organization where you received your first dose.

 

PLEASE CONTINUE TO KEEP YOU AND YOUR FAMILY SAFE

We continue encourage everyone, for the sake of our local businesses, services and residents, to gauge your risk level, and to make the best choice in order protect yourself and those around you from contracting or spreading coronavirus.  We have provided education on the widely proven COVID-19 safety measures, and encourage you to limit your contact with others not from your household, stay home if you are sick, and wear face coverings where recommended. Click here, for a graphic on how to protect you and your family from the spread of COVID-19.  We know how important family, businesses and faith are to you, so we ask that you consider all options available in order to eliminate and minimize the spread of the COVID-19 virus in our communities to help protect the ones you love, the businesses you love and the places you love to go.

 

COVID-19 FACEBOOK LIVE WITH DR. BOB

Tune in on Tuesday, May 11, 2021 at 6:00 pm for the next Facebook Live with Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, the Douglas County Public Health Officer.  For future Facebook Events with Dr. Bob, please submit your questions to: ookquestions@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org">Facebookquestions@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Dr. Bob and the DPHN team will do their best to respond to as many questions as they can during the Facebook event.  The Facebook Events are hosted by DPHN on the DPHN Facebook page.

 

STATE AND FEDERAL COVID-19 INFORMATION

It is important to understand that Federal and State Government and their Agencies are the ones setting policy and issuing the guidelines for the pandemic. Locally, we are following the recommended guidance issued by the U.S. Center for Disease Control (CDC) and the Oregon Health Authority (OHA).  If you have questions about the current guidelines or the recommendations, contact the CDC or OHA directly for more information. OHA posts their daily updates at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.  

 

Please do not call 911, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office or Douglas County Offices to report compliance issues with the State of Oregon, OHA or Governor’s orders. The Governor has directed the State offices for Oregon Occupational Safety and Health (OSHA) and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) to be the enforcement agencies responsible for ensuring restaurants, bars, and other businesses comply with the current State COVID guidelines.  If you have concerns, questions or wish to report compliance, issues contact these state agencies directly:  OSHA: (800) 922-2689 or OSHA website or OLCC (503) 872-5000 or OLCC website.

 

ACCESS TO LOCAL COVID-19 RESOURCES

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer, DPHN and the DCCRT team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020.  

 

Local Online Access to Updates

Stay up to date with accurate and local COVID-19 information in Douglas County by visiting the Douglas County Government website or DCGOV Facebook page or the DPHN website or DPHN Facebook page

 

Free Local e-Newsletter Subscription

You can also sign up for the Douglas County e-Newsletter that publishes and sends out the daily update to our subscription base free.  You can sign up for the Douglas County e-Newsletter at www.co.douglas.or.us.  Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer, DPHN and the DCCRT have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020. 

 

Douglas County COVID-19 Hotline (541) 464-6550

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners and DPHN continue to offer a local resource hotline for Douglas County residents for COVID-19. The hotline provides answer to frequently asked questions, basic information and referrals to resources and services. Our local hotline number is (541) 464-6550 and is staffed from 8:00 am to 5: pm, 7 days a week.

 

Aviva Health Offers Vaccine Frequently Asked Questions Webpage

Aviva Health has created an online FAQ page to answer questions related to COVID-19 regarding availability and scheduling.  Log onto https://aviva.health/covid-19-vaccine-faqs/

 

COVID Vaccine Call Center at Lower Umpqua Hospital District in Reedsport

Lower Umpqua Hospital District now has a COVID-19 Vaccine Call Center for COVID-19 vaccine information in the Reedsport, Douglas County Coastal area.  The LUHD COVID-19 Vaccine Call Center number is (541) 271-2175, and is available Monday through Friday from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm.

 

###

 

Contact Tamara Howell, Public Information Officer, Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, (541) 670-2804 cell (541) 957-4896 tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us   

Contact Vanessa Becker, Public Information Officer, Douglas Public Health Network, (541) 817-6552 cell (541) 440-3571 vanessa@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org




Attached Media Files: 2021-05/6789/144854/DCCRT_Logo_72020.jpg

First-Ever Virtual Oregon Women Veterans Conference Announces Guest Speakers
Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs - 05/10/21 10:07 AM
Major General Tammy Smith.
Major General Tammy Smith.
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The Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs (ODVA) is excited to announce the outstanding trio of women veteran leaders who will headline the first-ever virtual Oregon Women Veterans Conference on Saturday, May 22.

This free biennial conference, organized by ODVA for more than 22 years, celebrates the contributions, diversity and strength of Oregon’s women veteran community, and is the largest gathering of women-identifying veterans in the state.

The lineup includes Maj. Gen. Tammy Smith, Brig. Gen. Donna Prigmore, and Dr. Betty Moseley Brown.

Maj. Gen. Smith, who is retiring after an extraordinary 35-year career with the United States Armed Forces, most recently served as Deputy Commanding General - Sustainment for the Eighth United States Army in South Korea. As such, she was the first female general officer to serve in an Eighth Army headquarters-level position.

Brig. Gen. Prigmore’s military career began as an enlisted member of the United States Air Force in 1982 before joining the Air National Guard, where she acquired more than 14 years of command and deputy/vice command experience at the flight, squadron, group and wing levels. She currently serves as Commander of the Oregon Air National Guard and was the first female in the Oregon National Guard to be promoted to a general officer.

Dr. Moseley Brown’s passion for veterans began as a member of the United States Marine Corps from 1978 to 1992. She continued her distinguished career in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), including serving as the first Outreach Coordinator for the Veterans Benefits Administration and the Associate Director of the Center for Women Veterans. Dr. Moseley Brown is currently the Designated Federal Officer for the Veterans’ Family, Caregiver and Survivor Federal Advisory Committee.

This year’s Oregon Women Veterans Conference will also feature a vibrant series of workshops exploring new, and important topics on VA health care for women, along with valuable resources ad connections with employment, education and other earned federal veterans’ benefits. Attendees will also be able to connect with event sponsors and vendors.

The day’s agenda also includes a listening session for Oregon women veterans, hosted by ODVA Director Kelly Fitzpatrick and ODVA’s new Women Veterans Coordinator, Jessica Bradley.

“We could not be more excited about this conference, from the outstanding guest speakers who will be sharing stories from their remarkable lives, to the benefit experts who will be answering questions and offering critical information to the Oregon women veteran community,” Fitzpatrick said. “We look forward to connecting with Oregon women veterans during this unique event.”

Women veterans who have served in every era and branch of military service are invited to join in this inspiring event. Attendance is free, but registration is required. Please visit wvc.oregondva.com for more information or to register today.

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Attached Media Files: Major General Tammy Smith. , Dr. Betty Moseley Brown. , Brigadier General Donna Prigmore.

Minimum and Maximum Weekly Benefit Amounts to Increase Nearly 9% for New UI and PUA Claims
Oregon Employment Department - 05/10/21 10:04 AM

May 10, 2021 (Salem, OR)-- Today the Oregon Employment Department announced the annual change to the minimum and maximum weekly benefit amounts (WBAs) for regular unemployment insurance (UI). For new regular UI claims filed in Oregon on or after July 4, 2021, minimum and maximum WBAs each will increase by approximately 9%.

The increase will also apply to new PUA claims effective on or after July 4, 2021. This increase will be a significant income boost for new claimants who receive the minimum or maximum WBA. During the most recent quarter, 16% of regular UI recipients received the minimum WBA, and 24% received the maximum WBA.

The 9% increase is the result of growth in Oregon’s average weekly wage during 2020. Starting July 4, the minimum WBA for new regular UI claims will increase by $14, from $157 to $171 per week. The maximum WBA for new regular UI claims and new PUA claims will increase by $60, from $673 to $733 per week. The minimum WBA for new PUA claims will not be affected because it is set by the US Department of Labor

Individuals who file new regular UI or PUA claims prior to July 4, 2021 will continue receiving the same WBA they had been receiving. Federal rules prohibit the benefit increase for Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC) and Extended Benefits (EB).

Under Oregon law (ORS657.150(4)), the Oregon Employment Department recalculates the minimum and maximum WBAs for regular UI benefits annually. The amounts are set as percentages of the average weekly wage earned by Oregonians. The minimum WBA is 15% of the average weekly wage and the maximum WBA is 64%. Both dollar amounts are rounded down to the nearest dollar, as required by law.

For more information, visit OED’s regular UI benefits calculator or the PUA benefits calculator.

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Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: 2021-05/930/144816/Min_and_Max_WBAs_Increase_pr_FINAL.pdf

Los montos mínimos y máximos de beneficios semanales aumentarán casi el 9% para reclamos de desempleo y PUA nuevos
Oregon Employment Department - 05/10/21 10:04 AM

10 de mayo de 2021 (Salem, OR)-- Hoy, el Departamento de Empleo de Oregon anunció el cambio anual a los montos mínimos y máximos de beneficios semanales (WBA) para el desempleo regular. Para los nuevos reclamos regulares de desempleo presentados en Oregon a partir del 4 de julio de 2021, los montos semanales mínimos y máximos aumentarán cada uno en aproximadamente un 9%.

El aumento también se aplicará a los nuevos reclamos del PUA vigentes a partir del 4 de julio de 2021. Este aumento será un aumento significativo de ingresos para los nuevos solicitantes que reciban el monto semanal mínimo o máximo. Durante el trimestre más reciente, el 16% de los beneficiarios regulares de desempleo recibieron el monto semanal mínimo y el 24% recibió el monto semanal máximo.

El aumento del 9% es el resultado del crecimiento en el salario semanal promedio de Oregon durante 2020. A partir del 4 de julio, el monto semanal mínimo para los nuevos reclamos regulares de desempleo aumentará en $14, de $157 a $171 por semana. El monto semanal máximo para los nuevos reclamos regulares de desempleo y nuevos reclamos del PUA aumentará en $60, de $673 a $733 por semana. El monto semanal mínimo para nuevos reclamos del PUA no se verá afectado porque lo establece el Departamento de Trabajo de EE. UU.

Las personas que presenten nuevos reclamos regulares de desempleo o del PUA antes del 4 de julio de 2021 continuarán recibiendo el mismo monto semanal que habían estado recibiendo. Las reglas federales prohíben el aumento de beneficios para la Compensación de Desempleo de Emergencia por la Pandemia (PEUC) y los Beneficios Extendidos (EB).

Según la ley de Oregon (ORS657.150 (4)), el Departamento de Empleo de Oregon calcula los montos semanales mínimos y máximos para los beneficios regulares del desempleo anualmente. Las cantidades se establecen como porcentajes del salario semanal promedio ganado por los residentes de Oregon. El monto semanal mínimo es el 15% del salario semanal promedio y el monto semanal máximo es el 64%. Ambos montos en dólares se redondean al dólar más cercano, según lo exige la ley.

Para obtener más información, visite la calculadora de beneficios de desempleo habitual del Depto. de Empleo o la calculadora de beneficios del PUA.

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Programa de igualdad de oportunidades: ayudas y servicios auxiliares disponibles a pedido para personas con discapacidades. Contacto: (503) 947-1794. Para las personas sordas o con problemas de audición, llame al 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: 2021-05/930/144815/Min_and_Max_WBAs_Increase_SP.pdf , 2021-05/930/144815/Min_and_Max_WBAs_Increase_SP_85.pdf

All4Oregon Update: Get First Doses Now - OCC Mass Vaccination Site Projects Wrap-up Date
Kaiser Permanente Northwest - 05/10/21 9:39 AM

All4Oregon Update: Get First Doses Now - OCC Mass Vaccination Site Projects Wrap-up Date

Since opening the All4Oregon Mass Vaccination Site at the Oregon Convention Center on Jan. 20, we’ve had the honor of playing an instrumental role in vaccinating our community. As of Friday, we’d administered nearly 465,000 vaccinations.

From the start, All4Oregon has been committed to keeping our doors open as long as the community needs us. Last week, we took steps to make the vaccination process even easier by moving to self-scheduling and inviting walk-ins. Based on the volume of walk-ins and appointments scheduled the last several days, it’s clear demand is waning as the vaccine becomes more readily available, more Oregonians become vaccinated, and health systems and partners refocus on taking the vaccine into smaller, neighborhood- and community-based settings. 

Therefore, we’ve made the following decisions about the All4Oregon Mass Vaccination Site schedule:

  • We will offer 1st (prime) doses until May 27.
  • In June, we will offer 2nd doses only.
  • We expect to close the All4Oregon site on Saturday, June 19.

Until then we will continue to offer both scheduled appointments and walk-ins and strongly encourage people who haven’t yet been vaccinated to take advantage of the convenient, efficient OCC experience.

We are also making preparations to vaccinate the 12-15 year old age group when the Pfizer vaccine is approved for use in that group and they are determined by health authorities to be eligible.

A reminder that the OCC is currently administering the Pfizer vaccine only. People who received their first dose of Pfizer elsewhere can get their 2nd dose at the OCC, if they bring their vaccination card or other documentation showing which vaccine they received for the 1st dose, and when.

Please check the All4Oregon.org site to schedule an appointment or to see the dates and hours of operation until June 19. Note that we will be closed Sunday, May 30th and Monday, May 31st for the Memorial Day Holiday.

While walk-ins are welcome, we encourage people to visit All4Oregon to make appointments.


Eugene Springfield Fire Crews Battle Train Trestle Fire
Eugene Springfield Fire - 05/10/21 2:13 AM
2021-05/4466/144842/30EFBA41-C004-4C82-BE91-88F8591B3652.jpeg
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-05/4466/144842/thumb_30EFBA41-C004-4C82-BE91-88F8591B3652.jpeg

Springfield, OR. Eugene Springfield Fire crews are currently working to extinguish a large fire involving the Union Pacofic Rail Road trestle at South 2nd Street in Springfield.  The fire was threatening Hexion Chemical and crews were able to stop the spread of fire toward the plant.  Rail traffic is stopped and the cause of the fire is under investigation.  




Attached Media Files: 2021-05/4466/144842/30EFBA41-C004-4C82-BE91-88F8591B3652.jpeg , 2021-05/4466/144842/F1CD9586-FFC3-4CD0-BF78-C13EA9497A99.jpeg

Sun. 05/09/21
Cougar Sighting in Woodburn Area
Marion Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/09/21 4:00 PM

The Marion County Sheriff's Office received information of a cougar sighting in the area around Butteville and Ten Oaks Lane in Woodburn. It is reported to be a large cougar that is not afraid of humans or dogs. Be careful and do not approach if located. Please call the Sheriff’s Office non-emergency line at 503- 588-5032 if you see the animal. If seen within the city of Woodburn, please call The Woodburn Police Department non-emergency line at 503-982-2340.


Oregon reports 610 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, two new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 05/09/21 1:33 PM

May 9, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 610 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, two new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are two new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,530 the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 610 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 191,405.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 37,726 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 13,606 doses were administered on May 8 and 24,120 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on May 8.

As of today, there are 1,968,933 people who have had at least one dose of a vaccine. A total of 1,340,794 have received a second dose of Pfizer or Moderna vaccines.

The seven-day running average is now 33,133 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered a total of 3,315,448 million vaccine doses, which includes: 1,812,149 first and second doses of Pfizer, 1,393,975 first and second doses of Moderna and 107,870 single doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines (1,454 doses were administered but did not specify product information).

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 318, which is 11 fewer than yesterday. There are 76 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is eight fewer than yesterday.

The total number of COVID-19 positive patient bed-days in the most recent seven days is 2,325, which is a 0.1% increase from the previous seven days. The peak daily number of beds occupied by COVID-19 positive patients in the most recent seven days is 351.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (13), Clackamas (78), Columbia (10), Coos (3), Crook (8), Curry (1), Deschutes (35), Douglas (5), Harney (1), Hood River (2), Jackson (16), Jefferson (3), Josephine (6), KIamath (22), Lane (40), Lincoln (1), Linn (31), Malheur (6), Marion (76), Morrow (1), Multnomah (144), Polk (10), Tillamook (4), Washington (81) and Yamhill (13).

Oregon’s 2,529th death is a 80-year-old woman from Deschutes county who tested positive on April 24 and died on May 3 at St Charles Bend Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2530th death is a 83-year-old woman from Multnomah county who tested positive on April 27 and died on May 7 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

County

Total Cases1

Total deaths2

Baker

946

14

Benton

3,039

19

Clackamas

17,186

209

Clatsop

972

8

Columbia

1,715

26

Coos

2,049

33

Crook

1,073

20

Curry

645

9

Deschutes

8,703

74

Douglas

3,225

70

Gilliam

62

1

Grant

506

5

Harney

338

8

Hood River

1,181

30

Jackson

10,733

135

Jefferson

2,170

34

Josephine

3,308

68

Klamath

4,330

61

Lake

444

7

Lane

12,838

145

Lincoln

1,371

20

Linn

4,828

67

Malheur

3,504

61

Marion

21,814

306

Morrow

1,101

15

Multnomah

37,970

584

Polk

3,710

52

Sherman

58

1

Tillamook

640

3

Umatilla

8,140

84

Union

1,444

23

Wallowa

182

5

Wasco

1,370

28

Washington

25,360

229

Wheeler

28

1

Yamhill

4,422

75

Statewide

191,405

2,530

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases

ELRs received 05/08/2021

County

Negative ELRs

Positive ELRs

Total ELRs

Percent Positivity

Baker

19

0

19

0.0%

Benton

299

13

312

4.2%

Clackamas

1,198

105

1,303

8.1%

Clatsop

134

6

140

4.3%

Columbia

120

14

134

10.4%

Coos

101

3

104

2.9%

Crook

70

8

78

10.3%

Curry

17

0

17

0.0%

Deschutes

490

67

557

12.0%

Douglas

103

3

106

2.8%

Gilliam

1

0

1

0.0%

Grant

16

0

16

0.0%

Harney

9

3

12

25.0%

Hood River

61

5

66

7.6%

Jackson

374

20

394

5.1%

Jefferson

51

3

54

5.6%

Josephine

224

8

232

3.4%

Klamath

72

12

84

14.3%

Lake

4

1

5

20.0%

Lane

1,190

43

1,233

3.5%

Lincoln

68

1

69

1.4%

Linn

455

34

489

7.0%

Malheur

77

0

77

0.0%

Marion

722

73

795

9.2%

Morrow

19

0

19

0.0%

Multnomah

2,401

135

2,536

5.3%

Polk

197

11

208

5.3%

Sherman

3

0

3

0.0%

Tillamook

43

4

47

8.5%

Umatilla

85

4

89

4.5%

Union

13

0

13

0.0%

Wallowa

3

0

3

0.0%

Wasco

133

0

133

0.0%

Washington

1,488

72

1,560

4.6%

Wheeler

1

0

1

0.0%

Yamhill

377

21

398

5.3%

Statewide

10,638

669

11,307

5.9%

Cumulative ELRs

County

Negative ELRs

Positive ELRs

Total ELRs

Percent Positivity

 

Baker

11,722

1,861

13,583

13.7%

Benton

142,679

4,658

147,337

3.2%

Clackamas

445,223

26,196

471,419

5.6%

Clatsop

34,638

1,691

36,329

4.7%

Columbia

42,759

2,333

45,092

5.2%

Coos

47,201

2,512

49,713

5.1%

Crook

18,873

1,397

20,270

6.9%

Curry

11,442

542

11,984

4.5%

Deschutes

193,270

10,887

204,157

5.3%

Douglas

82,690

3,664

86,354

4.2%

Gilliam

1,238

44

1,282

3.4%

Grant

6,369

427

6,796

6.3%

Harney

4,221

387

4,608

8.4%

Hood River

32,377

1,687

34,064

5.0%

Jackson

219,264

16,210

235,474

6.9%

Jefferson

19,850

1,994

21,844

9.1%

Josephine

73,802

3,823

77,625

4.9%

Klamath

50,291

4,894

55,185

8.9%

Lake

5,315

422

5,737

7.4%

Lane

491,656

15,372

507,028

3.0%

Lincoln

43,532

2,701

46,233

5.8%

Linn

141,641

8,878

150,519

5.9%

Malheur

26,347

5,129

31,476

16.3%

Marion

351,112

32,531

383,643

8.5%

Morrow

7,494

1,319

8,813

15.0%

Multnomah

1,049,859

56,547

1,106,406

5.1%

Polk

71,701

4,858

76,559

6.3%

Sherman

1,403

68

1,471

4.6%

Tillamook

15,096

640

15,736

4.1%

Umatilla

66,487

9,105

75,592

12.0%

Union

21,473

1,814

23,287

7.8%

Wallowa

3,245

182

3,427

5.3%

Wasco

35,055

1,714

36,769

4.7%

Washington

646,497

41,593

688,090

6.0%

Wheeler

713

31

744

4.2%

Yamhill

137,558

7,213

144,771

5.0%

Statewide

4,554,093

275,324

4,829,417

5.7%

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.


Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team -- Daily Update -- May 9, 2021
Douglas Co. Government - 05/09/21 12:51 PM
2021-05/6789/144838/DCCRT_Logo_72020.jpg
2021-05/6789/144838/DCCRT_Logo_72020.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-05/6789/144838/thumb_DCCRT_Logo_72020.jpg

Our local COVID-19 updates represent the coordinated effort of the agencies that make up the DCCRT

 

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – May 9, 2021

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - DAILY UPDATE

 

(Douglas County, Ore.) DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 TEST RESULTS: As of 12:00 pm Today, Sunday, May 9, 2021, there are FOUR (4) people with new positive test results to report since our noon case update yesterday.  The total number of cases of people with positive test results and presumptives in Douglas County is now at 3,229. Currently, there are TWELVE (12) Douglas County COVID-19 patients that are being hospitalized, six locally and six out-of-the-area. Our Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, under the direction of the Douglas County Board of Commissioners, continue to devote all resources available to our local COVID response.

 

Douglas County, OR - COVID-19 - Case Update Chart

Date

Wednesday

May 5, 2021

Thursday

May 6, 2021

Friday

May 7, 2021

Saturday

May 8, 2021

Today, Sunday,

May 9, 2021

Total COVID-19 Cases

3,197

3,211

3,223

3,223

3,229

People w/ Positive PCR or Antigen Test Results

3,042

3,056

3,065

3,065

3,071

Presumptive

155

155

158

158

158

Total Currently Hospitalized

12

11

11

11

12

Total Currently in Isolation

105

101

102

102

99

Total COVID-19 Related Deaths

70

70

70

70

70

Our daily update includes the total number of cases in Douglas County, which combines people with positive test results and presumptives, as well as a breakout of those case numbers. There will be times when a presumptive will move to a positive test result, and our total case number will not change because the case has already been counted.

 

LOCAL CONTACTS AND CASES BEING SUPPORTED IN ISOLATION AND QUARANTINE

Currently, DPHN is supporting 99 cases in isolation, as well as another 551 contacts in quarantine in Douglas County. Isolation is recommended for confirmed and presumptive cases, quarantine is recommended for contacts of confirmed or presumptive cases.  Currently, staff is supporting a total of 650 total contacts and cases in isolation or quarantine.  This number represents a snapshot of the significant amount of work being done locally to help control the spread of COVID.

 

CELEBRATING MOM’S TODAY AND EVERY DAY

Happy Mother’s Day!  The modern observance of Mother's Day was first celebrated in 1908 when Anna Jarvis held a memorial for her mother at St. Andrew's Methodist Church in Grafton, West Virginia.  Did you know that more phone calls are made on Mother’s Day than any other day of the year? These Mom Day chats often cause phone traffic to spike by as much as 37%, but the love they send makes hearts swell well over 150%.  We know that with the pandemic Moms have taken on a number of extra roles over the past year…like work-at-home-mom trying to balance work, kids and chores from a corner of the kitchen table; to playing stand-in school, art and music teacher from the living room couch; to becoming an expert on searching Google for at-home entertainment ideas for the kids on the daily; to inventing fun stay-cations in the back yard; to helping out with day-care so you can go to work and to getting a smart phone and learning how to use video chat.  Let’s face it, Moms are amazing.  So, it's time to give Mom some love for being a supermom, not just today, but every day!  There are so many ways you can celebrate your Mom today, so give her a call, mail a card, invite her over for a special dinner, send her flowers, make her a special gift, go visit her or offer to help with chores or tasks around the house. Thank you, Mom!

 

DPHN – IT’S YOUR TURN TO GET THE VACCINE!

Douglas Public Health Network launched their “it’s your turn” vaccine campaign, encouraging everyone to step up and take their turn to get their COVID-19 vaccine. 

Everyone over the age of 16 is now eligible to get a COVID-19 vaccine, and we want people to know they are eligible and that we have vaccine available.  Having the majority of our residents vaccinated is the surest road to getting back the sense of normalcy and freedom that we all miss and want. It’s your turn to help us get there!” stated Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, Douglas County Public Health Officer.  #itsyourturn

 

DOUGLAS COUNTY TIGER TEAM’S POP-UP VACCINATION CLINICS

The Douglas County Tiger Team is out and about in the county bringing the COVID-19 vaccines directly to rural areas via our mobile medical vans (MMV) at businesses, farms, fire stations and locations in our smaller remote communities in Douglas County. The Douglas County Board of Commissioners, who have led the charge for our Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team efforts since the beginning, have coordinated with DPHN to organize our local Tiger Team to manage our vaccine outreach efforts through ‘pop-up’ vaccine clinics. 

 

The Douglas County Tiger Team will be hosting FREE POP UP COVID VACCINE CLINICS at the locations listed below.  The clinics are open to anyone 18 years of age and older and preregistration is not necessary:

 

  • Wednesday, May 12, 2021: Oakland area: Oakland City Hall parking lot located at 637 NE Locust Street in Oakland from 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm
  • Thursday, May 13, 2021: Glide area: Glide Rural Fire Protection District – Glide Station located at 18910 North Umpqua Hwy in Glide from 10:00 am to 2:00 pm

 

If you are interested in having the Douglas County Tiger Team come to your business, fire department, farm or town to provide a pop-up vaccine clinic or if you have any questions about our Douglas County Tiger Teams and want a schedule of their upcoming pop-up vaccination clinics, please call (541) 670-3110 or our local COVID-19 Hotline at (541) 464-6550. 

 

UPCOMING AVIVA HEALTH COVID-19 VACCINATION CLINIC

Shared from Aviva Health.  Aviva Health, with the help of local partners (DPHN & Douglas County Commissioners) will be hosting vaccination events at various locations in rural Douglas County.  For more information, or to schedule an appointment or for a list of upcoming clinics, please call Aviva Health at (541) 672-9596. 

 

  • Wednesday, May 12, 2021:  Aviva Health’s COVID-19 Vaccine team will be at the Myrtle Creek Elks Lodge, located at 106 South Main Street in Myrtle Creek from 8:00 am to 11:30 am and 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm offering COVID-19 vaccinations to residents aged 16 years of age and older.  Walk-ins also welcomed!

 

STATE ANNOUNCES UPDATES TO COVID MANDATED RISK LEVELS

Increase in Indoor Capacity Limits for Indoor Recreation and Indoor Entertainment

Shared from OHA.  The State of Oregon announced earlier this week that they updated their state mandated risk level guidance for indoor capacity limits for Oregon counties for their Moderate and High Risk COVID Levels.  They have increased the capacity for indoor recreation, fitness and indoor entertainment venues.  As of Wednesday, May 5, 2021, indoor entertainment establishments and indoor recreation and fitness establishments in ALL Oregon counties may allow the following:

 

  • State Mandated Moderate Risk Level: Maximum 20% occupancy or 100 people total, whichever is larger
  • State Mandated High Risk Level: Maximum 10% occupancy or 50 people total, whichever is larger

 

The State Mandated Lower Risk Level and the State Mandated Extreme Risk Level capacity limits for these sectors remain the same.  To view the States updated capacity limits, please refer to the OHA State Mandated Sector Risk Level Guidance Chart.

 

COVID-19 VACCINE ELIGIBILITY OPEN FOR EVERYONE 16 YEARS OLD AND OLDER

According to the State of Oregon and OHA, ALL residents 16 years old and older are eligible to get the COVID-19 Vaccine, NOW! Remember, “it’s your turn!” So, get signed up or show up to get your COVID-19 vaccine today!

 

  1. Call and set up an appointment with your primary health care provider or ask them for a referral to another health care provider.
  2. Call and set up an appointment with a local pharmacy.
  3. Sign up for or attend one of the vaccination clinics offered in Douglas County through DPHN, Douglas County, Aviva Health or our Douglas County Tiger Team. 
  4. If you are a member of the Cow Creek Band of the Umpqua Tribe of Indians, please contact to set up an appointment at (541) 672-9405 or log onto https://www.cowcreek-nsn.gov/public-health/
  5. The Roseburg VA Health Care System is setting up appointments for veterans to receive the COVID-19 vaccine.  For more information, call the Roseburg VAMC at (541) 440-1000 or log onto https://www.va.gov/health-care/covid-19-vaccine/.

 

NO ACCESS TO THE INTERNET TO SCHEDULE YOUR VACCINE APPOINTMENT? LOCAL HELP IS AVAILABLE

Not everyone is able to use the internet, a tablet, a computer or a smart phone to schedule a COVID vaccine appointment.  If you or someone you know needs to schedule an appointment for the COVID vaccine, and do not have access to the internet, you can call one of the numbers below to get help scheduling an appointment.

 

  • Call our Douglas County COVID-19 Hotline at (541) 464-6550.
  • Coastal Residents can call the Lower Umpqua Hospital District COVID-19 Vaccine Call Center at (541) 271-2175.
  • U.S. Veterans can call the Roseburg VA Health Care Center at (541) 440-1000.
  • Members of the Cow Creek Band of the Umpqua Tribe of Indians can call (541) 672-9405.
  • Seniors can call Douglas County Senior Services at (541) 440-3677.

 

GETTING YOUR SECOND DOSE OF THE COVID-19 VACCINE IS IMPORTANT  

While we have heard a lot about second dose hesitancy, it is vitally important to for those residents who have received their first dose of the Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine, to make sure that you get and not forgo getting your second dose of the vaccine and complete their vaccination.  It will better ensure your immunity and help to protect yourself and those around you that you love. 

 

If you have already received your first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, here are a few answers to questions about your second dose.

  • The latest information shows that you can expect to get your second dose about 4-6 weeks after the first dose.
  • You should have received a vaccination card when you received your first dose that details the brand of vaccine, its lot number, and the date the vaccine was administered.  This card is for your records only, and is not official proof that you have received the vaccine. Proof of your vaccination rests with the State Alert System, which is accessible by medical facilities.
  • You should get your second dose from the same provider or organization from which you received your first. However, the physical address where you receive the second dose may change.
  • You will be notified by the provider or organization that gave you your first dose about where and when you will receive your second dose.
  • I got a first vaccine out of the area; can I get my second vaccine in Douglas County?  The second vaccine dose is “paired” to the first dose, and your second dose will be sent to wherever you got your first dose.  Therefore, except in rare circumstances, you will need to return to where you got your first dose.
  • If you have questions, please contact the provider or organization where you received your first dose.

 

PLEASE CONTINUE TO KEEP YOU AND YOUR FAMILY SAFE

We continue encourage everyone, for the sake of our local businesses, services and residents, to gauge your risk level, and to make the best choice in order protect yourself and those around you from contracting or spreading coronavirus.  We have provided education on the widely proven COVID-19 safety measures, and encourage you to limit your contact with others not from your household, stay home if you are sick, and wear face coverings where recommended. Click here, for a graphic on how to protect you and your family from the spread of COVID-19.  We know how important family, businesses and faith are to you, so we ask that you consider all options available in order to eliminate and minimize the spread of the COVID-19 virus in our communities to help protect the ones you love, the businesses you love and the places you love to go.

 

COVID-19 FACEBOOK LIVE WITH DR. BOB

Tune in on Tuesday, May 11, 2021 at 6:00 pm for the next Facebook Live with Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, the Douglas County Public Health Officer.  For future Facebook Events with Dr. Bob, please submit your questions to: ookquestions@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org">Facebookquestions@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Dr. Bob and the DPHN team will do their best to respond to as many questions as they can during the Facebook event.  The Facebook Events are hosted by DPHN on the DPHN Facebook page.

 

STATE AND FEDERAL COVID-19 INFORMATION

It is important to understand that Federal and State Government and their Agencies are the ones setting policy and issuing the guidelines for the pandemic. Locally, we are following the recommended guidance issued by the U.S. Center for Disease Control (CDC) and the Oregon Health Authority (OHA).  If you have questions about the current guidelines or the recommendations, contact the CDC or OHA directly for more information. OHA posts their daily updates at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.  

 

Please do not call 911, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office or Douglas County Offices to report compliance issues with the State of Oregon, OHA or Governor’s orders. The Governor has directed the State offices for Oregon Occupational Safety and Health (OSHA) and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) to be the enforcement agencies responsible for ensuring restaurants, bars, and other businesses comply with the current State COVID guidelines.  If you have concerns, questions or wish to report compliance, issues contact these state agencies directly:  OSHA: (800) 922-2689 or OSHA website or OLCC (503) 872-5000 or OLCC website.

 

ACCESS TO LOCAL COVID-19 RESOURCES

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer, DPHN and the DCCRT team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020.  

 

Local Online Access to Updates

Stay up to date with accurate and local COVID-19 information in Douglas County by visiting the Douglas County Government website or DCGOV Facebook page or the DPHN website or DPHN Facebook page

 

Free Local e-Newsletter Subscription

You can also sign up for the Douglas County e-Newsletter that publishes and sends out the daily update to our subscription base free.  You can sign up for the Douglas County e-Newsletter at www.co.douglas.or.us.  Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer, DPHN and the DCCRT have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020. 

 

Douglas County COVID-19 Hotline (541) 464-6550

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners and DPHN continue to offer a local resource hotline for Douglas County residents for COVID-19. The hotline provides answer to frequently asked questions, basic information and referrals to resources and services. Our local hotline number is (541) 464-6550 and is staffed from 8:00 am to 5: pm, 7 days a week.

 

Aviva Health Offers Vaccine Frequently Asked Questions Webpage

Aviva Health has created an online FAQ page to answer questions related to COVID-19 regarding availability and scheduling.  Log onto https://aviva.health/covid-19-vaccine-faqs/

 

COVID Vaccine Call Center at Lower Umpqua Hospital District in Reedsport

Lower Umpqua Hospital District now has a COVID-19 Vaccine Call Center for COVID-19 vaccine information in the Reedsport, Douglas County Coastal area.  The LUHD COVID-19 Vaccine Call Center number is (541) 271-2175, and is available Monday through Friday from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm.

 

###

 

Contact Tamara Howell, Public Information Officer, Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, (541) 670-2804 cell (541) 957-4896 tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us   

Contact Vanessa Becker, Public Information Officer, Douglas Public Health Network, (541) 817-6552 cell (541) 440-3571 vanessa@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org




Attached Media Files: 2021-05/6789/144838/DCCRT_Logo_72020.jpg

Fatal Crash on Interstate 5 - Marion County
Oregon State Police - 05/09/21 12:13 PM

On Saturday, May 8, 2021 at approximately 11:25 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a vehicle crash on Interstate 5 southbound near milepost 263.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Kia Sportage was stopped with the operator, Ahmed Shadad (41) of Salem, outside of the vehicle when he and the Kia were struck by a Dodge Ram van operated by Travis Tgrudzinski (26) of Salem.

Shadad sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Tgrudzinski was not injured.

OSP was assisted by the Marion County Sheriff's Office, Marion County Fire/EMS, and ODOT.


Fatal Crash on Hwy 101 - Curry County
Oregon State Police - 05/09/21 11:43 AM

On Saturday, May 8, 2021 at approximately 8:50 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 101 near milepost 342.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Ford Flex, operated by Robert Pope III (53) from Brookings, was northbound and crossed into the southbound lane and collided with a Ford F250 operated by Robie Sell (56) of Coos Bay.

Pope III sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Sell and his passenger, Robin Sell (62) of Coos Bay, received minor injuries and were not transported.

OSP was assisted by Curry County Sheriff's Office, Gold Beach Fire Department, and ODOT.


Search Underway for Missing Roseburg Man Near Twin Lakes
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/09/21 9:47 AM
Harry Burleigh
Harry Burleigh
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-05/5204/144833/thumb_Burleigh_H.jpg

IDLEYLD PARK, Ore. - The Douglas County Sheriff's Office is continuing search efforts in the Twin Lakes area for a missing Roseburg man. 

69 year-old Harry Burleigh was reported missing at 10:15 pm on Friday, May 7, 2021 after he failed to return home from a camping trip in the Toketee area. Burleigh was originally due to arrive home on Thursday, May 6, 2021, but failed to do so. 

Douglas County Sheriff's Office Search and Rescue was dispatched to begin searching for Burleigh. On the morning of Saturday, May 8, 2021, Burleigh's vehicle was located at the lower trailhead to Forest Service trail 1500, which leads into Twin Lakes. Burleigh, a fisherman, is believed to have attempted to walk into the lakes to fish before going home. 

Search efforts continue today, Sunday, May 9, 2021, with additional search and rescue resources from other counties assisting. 

Burleigh is described as a white male adult, 6'2'' tall, weighing at 175lbs with dark brown graying hair and blue eyes. His clothing description is unknown, but he may be carrying a day pack and collapsible fishing pole.  

Anyone who believes they may have information which may assist in the search is asked to contact the Douglas County Sheriff's Office at (541) 440-4471 referencing case number 21-2033.




Attached Media Files: Harry Burleigh

Sat. 05/08/21
Two Rivers Correctional Institution reports in-custody death
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 05/08/21 12:42 PM
Rickie S. Sibbitt
Rickie S. Sibbitt
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-05/1070/144829/thumb_Sibbitt_R.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Rickie S. Sibbitt, died May 7, 2021. Sibbitt was incarcerated at Two Rivers Correctional Institution (TRCI) in Umatilla and passed away while on hospice care. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified.

Sibbitt entered DOC custody on September 4, 2001, from Marion County. His earliest release date was January 3, 2022. He was 62 years old.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 13,200 individuals who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state. While crime information is public record, DOC elects to disclose only upon request out of respect for any family or victims.

TRCI is a multi-custody prison in Umatilla that houses approximately 1,800 adults in custody. TRCI participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including institution and industrial laundry, mattress manufacturing, and sewing. Other institution work programs include reparation and cleaning of irrigation ditches, maintenance of local baseball fields, and work with local cities and the Hermiston School District. The facility provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, religious services, and behavioral health services. TRCI opened in 2000.

####

 

 

 




Attached Media Files: Rickie S. Sibbitt

Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team -- Daily Update -- May 8, 2021
Douglas Co. Government - 05/08/21 12:15 PM
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Our local COVID-19 updates represent the coordinated effort of the agencies that make up the DCCRT

 

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – May 8, 2021

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - DAILY UPDATE

 

(Douglas County, Ore.) DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 TEST RESULTS: As of 12:00 pm Today, Saturday, May 8, 2021, there are TWO (2) people with new positive test results to report since our noon case update yesterday.  The total number of cases of people with positive test results and presumptives in Douglas County is now at 3,225. Currently, there are ELEVEN (11) Douglas County COVID-19 patients that are being hospitalized, five locally and six out-of-the-area. Our Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, under the direction of the Douglas County Board of Commissioners, continue to devote all resources available to our local COVID response.  

 

Douglas County, OR - COVID-19 - Case Update Chart

Date

Tuesday

May 4, 2021

Wednesday

May 5, 2021

Thursday

May 6, 2021

Friday

May 7, 2021

Today, Saturday,

May 8, 2021

Total COVID-19 Cases

3,187

3,197

3,211

3,223

3,225

People w/ Positive PCR or Antigen Test Results

3,032

3,042

3,056

3,065

3,067

Presumptive

155

155

155

158

158

Total Currently Hospitalized

14

12

11

11

11

Total Currently in Isolation

105

105

101

102

95

Total COVID-19 Related Deaths

70

70

70

70

70

Our daily update includes the total number of cases in Douglas County, which combines people with positive test results and presumptives, as well as a breakout of those case numbers. There will be times when a presumptive will move to a positive test result, and our total case number will not change because the case has already been counted.

 

LOCAL CONTACTS AND CASES BEING SUPPORTED IN ISOLATION AND QUARANTINE

Currently, DPHN is supporting 95 cases in isolation, as well as another 514 contacts in quarantine in Douglas County. Isolation is recommended for confirmed and presumptive cases, quarantine is recommended for contacts of confirmed or presumptive cases.  Currently, staff is supporting a total of 609 total contacts and cases in isolation or quarantine.  This number represents a snapshot of the significant amount of work being done locally to help control the spread of COVID.

 

DPHN – IT’S YOUR TURN TO GET THE VACCINE!

Douglas Public Health Network launched their “it’s your turn” vaccine campaign, encouraging everyone to step up and take their turn to get their COVID-19 vaccine. 

Everyone over the age of 16 is now eligible to get a COVID-19 vaccine, and we want people to know they are eligible and that we have vaccine available.  Having the majority of our residents vaccinated is the surest road to getting back the sense of normalcy and freedom that we all miss and want. It’s your turn to help us get there!” stated Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, Douglas County Public Health Officer.  #itsyourturn

 

DOUGLAS COUNTY TIGER TEAM’S POP-UP VACCINATION CLINICS

The Douglas County Tiger Team is out and about in the county bringing the COVID-19 vaccines directly to rural areas via our mobile medical vans (MMV) at businesses, farms, fire stations and locations in our smaller remote communities in Douglas County. The Douglas County Board of Commissioners, who have led the charge for our Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team efforts since the beginning, have coordinated with DPHN to organize our local Tiger Team to manage our vaccine outreach efforts through ‘pop-up’ vaccine clinics. 

The Douglas County Tiger Team will be hosting FREE POP UP COVID VACCINE CLINICS at the locations listed below.  The clinics are open to anyone 18 years of age and older and preregistration is not necessary:

 

  • Wednesday, May 12, 2021: Oakland area: Oakland City Hall parking lot located at 637 NE Locust Street in Oakland from 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm
  • Thursday, May 13, 2021: Glide area: Glide Rural Fire Protection District – Glide Station located at 18910 North Umpqua Hwy in Glide from 10:00 am to 2:00 pm

 

If you are interested in having the Douglas County Tiger Team come to your business, fire department, farm or town to provide a pop-up vaccine clinic or if you have any questions about our Douglas County Tiger Teams and want a schedule of their upcoming pop-up vaccination clinics, please call (541) 670-3110 or our local COVID-19 Hotline at (541) 464-6550. 

 

UPCOMING AVIVA HEALTH COVID-19 VACCINATION CLINIC

Shared from Aviva Health.  Aviva Health, with the help of local partners (DPHN & Douglas County Commissioners) will be hosting vaccination events at various locations in rural Douglas County.  For more information, or to schedule an appointment or for a list of upcoming clinics, please call Aviva Health at (541) 672-9596. 

 

  • Wednesday, May 12, 2021:  Aviva Health’s COVID-19 Vaccine team will be at the Myrtle Creek Elks Lodge, located at 106 South Main Street in Myrtle Creek from 8:00 am to 11:30 am and 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm offering COVID-19 vaccinations to residents aged 16 years of age and older.  Walk-ins also welcomed!

 

STATE ANNOUNCES UPDATES TO COVID MANDATED RISK LEVELS

Increase in Indoor Capacity Limits for Indoor Recreation and Indoor Entertainment

Shared from OHA.  The State of Oregon announced earlier this week that they updated their state mandated risk level guidance for indoor capacity limits for Oregon counties for their Moderate and High Risk COVID Levels.  They have increased the capacity for indoor recreation, fitness and indoor entertainment venues.  As of Wednesday, May 5, 2021, indoor entertainment establishments and indoor recreation and fitness establishments in ALL Oregon counties may allow the following:

 

  • State Mandated Moderate Risk Level: Maximum 20% occupancy or 100 people total, whichever is larger
  • State Mandated High Risk Level: Maximum 10% occupancy or 50 people total, whichever is larger

 

The State Mandated Lower Risk Level and the State Mandated Extreme Risk Level capacity limits for these sectors remain the same.  To view the States updated capacity limits, please refer to the OHA State Mandated Sector Risk Level Guidance Chart.

 

COVID-19 VACCINE ELIGIBILITY OPEN FOR EVERYONE 16 YEARS OLD AND OLDER

According to the State of Oregon and OHA, ALL residents 16 years old and older are eligible to get the COVID-19 Vaccine, NOW! Remember, “it’s your turn!” So, get signed up or show up to get your COVID-19 vaccine today!

 

  1. Call and set up an appointment with your primary health care provider or ask them for a referral to another health care provider.
  2. Call and set up an appointment with a local pharmacy.
  3. Sign up for or attend one of the vaccination clinics offered in Douglas County through DPHN, Douglas County, Aviva Health or our Douglas County Tiger Team. 
  4. If you are a member of the Cow Creek Band of the Umpqua Tribe of Indians, please contact to set up an appointment at (541) 672-9405 or log onto https://www.cowcreek-nsn.gov/public-health/
  5. The Roseburg VA Health Care System is setting up appointments for veterans to receive the COVID-19 vaccine.  For more information, call the Roseburg VAMC at (541) 440-1000 or log onto https://www.va.gov/health-care/covid-19-vaccine/.

 

NO ACCESS TO THE INTERNET TO SCHEDULE YOUR VACCINE APPOINTMENT? LOCAL HELP IS AVAILABLE

Not everyone is able to use the internet, a tablet, a computer or a smart phone to schedule a COVID vaccine appointment.  If you or someone you know needs to schedule an appointment for the COVID vaccine, and do not have access to the internet, you can call one of the numbers below to get help scheduling an appointment.

 

  • Call our Douglas County COVID-19 Hotline at (541) 464-6550.
  • Coastal Residents can call the Lower Umpqua Hospital District COVID-19 Vaccine Call Center at (541) 271-2175.
  • U.S. Veterans can call the Roseburg VA Health Care Center at (541) 440-1000.
  • Members of the Cow Creek Band of the Umpqua Tribe of Indians can call (541) 672-9405.
  • Seniors can call Douglas County Senior Services at (541) 440-3677.

 

GETTING YOUR SECOND DOSE OF THE COVID-19 VACCINE IS IMPORTANT  

While we have heard a lot about second dose hesitancy, it is vitally important to for those residents who have received their first dose of the Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine, to make sure that you get and not forgo getting your second dose of the vaccine and complete their vaccination.  It will better ensure your immunity and help to protect yourself and those around you that you love. 

 

If you have already received your first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, here are a few answers to questions about your second dose.

  • The latest information shows that you can expect to get your second dose about 4-6 weeks after the first dose.
  • You should have received a vaccination card when you received your first dose that details the brand of vaccine, its lot number, and the date the vaccine was administered.  This card is for your records only, and is not official proof that you have received the vaccine. Proof of your vaccination rests with the State Alert System, which is accessible by medical facilities.
  • You should get your second dose from the same provider or organization from which you received your first. However, the physical address where you receive the second dose may change.
  • You will be notified by the provider or organization that gave you your first dose about where and when you will receive your second dose.
  • I got a first vaccine out of the area; can I get my second vaccine in Douglas County?  The second vaccine dose is “paired” to the first dose, and your second dose will be sent to wherever you got your first dose.  Therefore, except in rare circumstances, you will need to return to where you got your first dose.
  • If you have questions, please contact the provider or organization where you received your first dose.

 

PLEASE CONTINUE TO KEEP YOU AND YOUR FAMILY SAFE

We continue encourage everyone, for the sake of our local businesses, services and residents, to gauge your risk level, and to make the best choice in order protect yourself and those around you from contracting or spreading coronavirus.  We have provided education on the widely proven COVID-19 safety measures, and encourage you to limit your contact with others not from your household, stay home if you are sick, and wear face coverings where recommended. Click here, for a graphic on how to protect you and your family from the spread of COVID-19.  We know how important family, businesses and faith are to you, so we ask that you consider all options available in order to eliminate and minimize the spread of the COVID-19 virus in our communities to help protect the ones you love, the businesses you love and the places you love to go.

 

COVID-19 FACEBOOK LIVE WITH DR. BOB

Tune in on Tuesday, May 11, 2021 at 6:00 pm for the next Facebook Live with Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, the Douglas County Public Health Officer.  For future Facebook Events with Dr. Bob, please submit your questions to: ookquestions@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org">Facebookquestions@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Dr. Bob and the DPHN team will do their best to respond to as many questions as they can during the Facebook event.  The Facebook Events are hosted by DPHN on the DPHN Facebook page.

 

STATE AND FEDERAL COVID-19 INFORMATION

It is important to understand that Federal and State Government and their Agencies are the ones setting policy and issuing the guidelines for the pandemic. Locally, we are following the recommended guidance issued by the U.S. Center for Disease Control (CDC) and the Oregon Health Authority (OHA).  If you have questions about the current guidelines or the recommendations, contact the CDC or OHA directly for more information. OHA posts their daily updates at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.  

 

Please do not call 911, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office or Douglas County Offices to report compliance issues with the State of Oregon, OHA or Governor’s orders. The Governor has directed the State offices for Oregon Occupational Safety and Health (OSHA) and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) to be the enforcement agencies responsible for ensuring restaurants, bars, and other businesses comply with the current State COVID guidelines.  If you have concerns, questions or wish to report compliance, issues contact these state agencies directly:  OSHA: (800) 922-2689 or OSHA website or OLCC (503) 872-5000 or OLCC website.

 

ACCESS TO LOCAL COVID-19 RESOURCES

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer, DPHN and the DCCRT team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020.  

 

Local Online Access to Updates

Stay up to date with accurate and local COVID-19 information in Douglas County by visiting the Douglas County Government website or DCGOV Facebook page or the DPHN website or DPHN Facebook page

 

Free Local e-Newsletter Subscription

You can also sign up for the Douglas County e-Newsletter that publishes and sends out the daily update to our subscription base free.  You can sign up for the Douglas County e-Newsletter at www.co.douglas.or.us.  Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer, DPHN and the DCCRT have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020. 

 

Douglas County COVID-19 Hotline (541) 464-6550

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners and DPHN continue to offer a local resource hotline for Douglas County residents for COVID-19. The hotline provides answer to frequently asked questions, basic information and referrals to resources and services. Our local hotline number is (541) 464-6550 and is staffed from 8:00 am to 5: pm, 7 days a week.

 

Aviva Health Offers Vaccine Frequently Asked Questions Webpage

Aviva Health has created an online FAQ page to answer questions related to COVID-19 regarding availability and scheduling.  Log onto https://aviva.health/covid-19-vaccine-faqs/

 

COVID Vaccine Call Center at Lower Umpqua Hospital District in Reedsport

Lower Umpqua Hospital District now has a COVID-19 Vaccine Call Center for COVID-19 vaccine information in the Reedsport, Douglas County Coastal area.  The LUHD COVID-19 Vaccine Call Center number is (541) 271-2175, and is available Monday through Friday from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm.

 

###

 

Contact Tamara Howell, Public Information Officer, Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, (541) 670-2804 cell (541) 957-4896 tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us   

Contact Vanessa Becker, Public Information Officer, Douglas Public Health Network, (541) 817-6552 cell (541) 440-3571 vanessa@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org




Attached Media Files: 2021-05/6789/144828/DCCRT_Logo_72020.jpg

Oregon reports 833 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 7 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 05/08/21 12:07 PM

May 8, 2021

Oregon reports 833 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 7 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. There are seven new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,528, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 833 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 190,804.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 63,868 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 27,835 doses were administered on May 7 and 36,033 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on May 7.

The seven-day running average is now 33,318  doses per day.

Oregon has now administered a total of 1,788,239 first and second doses of Pfizer, 1,382,574 first and second doses of Moderna and 105,458 single doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 2,082,015 doses of Pfizer, 1,706,980 doses of Moderna and 246,100 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 329, which is five more than yesterday. There are 84 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is six fewer from yesterday.

The total number of COVID-19 positive patient bed-days in the most recent seven days is 2,352, which is a 3.7% increase from the previous seven days. The peak daily number of beds occupied by COVID-19 positive patients in the most recent seven days is 351.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (7), Benton (11), Clackamas (92), Clatsop (4), Columbia (10), Crook (8), Curry (5), Deschutes (115), Douglas (4), Gilliam (4), Harney (1), Hood River (2), Jackson (35), Jefferson (5), Josephine (6), KIamath (49), Lane (55), Lincoln (3), Linn (26), Malheur (7), Marion (75), Morrow (1), Multnomah (156), Polk (8), Tillamook (4), Umatilla (9), Union (2), Wallowa (2), Wasco (4), Washington (94) and Yamhill (29).

Note: Oregon’s 2,409th and 2,509th COVID-19 deaths, reported on April 6 and May 5, are the same person. Because of this error we are renumbering our reported deaths starting with 2,522 today.

Oregon’s 2,522nd death is an 87-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive on May 2 and died on May 7 at Asante Ashland Community Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,523rd death is a 90-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive on April 26 and died on May 7 at Asante Ashland Community Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,524th death is a 62-year-old woman from Marion County who tested positive on April 18 and died on May 7 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,525th death is a 65-year-old man from Lane County who tested positive on April 16 and died on May 7 at McKenzie-Willamette Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,526th death is a 69-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive on May 2 and died on May 4 at Adventist Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,527th death is a 68-year-old man from Multnomah County who tested positive on April 30 and died on May 7 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,528th death is a 68-year-old man from Multnomah County who tested positive on April 23 and died on May 2 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

 

County

Total Cases1

Total deaths2

Baker

946

14

Benton

3,026

19

Clackamas

17,107

209

Clatsop

973

8

Columbia

1,705

26

Coos

2,046

33

Crook

1,065

20

Curry

645

9

Deschutes

8,669

73

Douglas

3,220

70

Gilliam

62

1

Grant

506

5

Harney

337

8

Hood River

1,179

30

Jackson

10,716

135

Jefferson

2,167

34

Josephine

3,302

68

Klamath

4,308

61

Lake

444

7

Lane

12,799

145

Lincoln

1,370

20

Linn

4,798

67

Malheur

3,498

61

Marion

21,739

306

Morrow

1,100

15

Multnomah

37,830

583

Polk

3,699

52

Sherman

58

1

Tillamook

636

3

Umatilla

8,140

84

Union

1,444

23

Wallowa

182

5

Wasco

1,370

28

Washington

25,279

229

Wheeler

28

1

Yamhill

4,411

75

Statewide

190,804

2,528

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases.

Electronic Laboratory Reporting Received 05/07/21

County

Negative ELRs

Positive ELRs

Total ELRs

Percent Positivity

Baker

34

7

41

17.1%

Benton

1,143

18

1,161

1.6%

Clackamas

1,423

147

1,570

9.4%

Clatsop

64

3

67

4.5%

Columbia

146

11

157

7.0%

Coos

188

3

191

1.6%

Crook

106

7

113

6.2%

Curry

75

9

84

10.7%

Deschutes

818

88

906

9.7%

Douglas

250

9

259

3.5%

Gilliam

1

0

1

0.0%

Grant

81

1

82

1.2%

Harney

4

1

5

20.0%

Hood River

143

3

146

2.1%

Jackson

684

53

737

7.2%

Jefferson

58

4

62

6.5%

Josephine

399

9

408

2.2%

Klamath

168

45

213

21.1%

Lake

19

0

19

0.0%

Lane

2,419

106

2,525

4.2%

Lincoln

123

3

126

2.4%

Linn

700

53

753

7.0%

Malheur

46

0

46

0.0%

Marion

1,320

96

1,416

6.8%

Morrow

30

1

31

3.2%

Multnomah

4,257

215

4,472

4.8%

Polk

235

7

242

2.9%

Sherman

4

0

4

0.0%

Tillamook

41

4

45

8.9%

Umatilla

162

12

174

6.9%

Union

83

0

83

0.0%

Wallowa

13

2

15

13.3%

Wasco

377

6

383

1.6%

Washington

2,150

137

2,287

6.0%

Wheeler

2

0

2

0.0%

Yamhill

500

37

537

6.9%

Statewide

18,266

1,097

19,363

5.7%

 

Cumulative ELRs

County

Negative ELRs

Positive ELRs

Total ELRs

Percent Positivity

Baker

11,703

1,861

13,564

13.7%

Benton

142,380

4,645

147,025

3.2%

Clackamas

444,025

26,091

470,116

5.5%

Clatsop

34,504

1,685

36,189

4.7%

Columbia

42,639

2,319

44,958

5.2%

Coos

47,100

2,509

49,609

5.1%

Crook

18,803

1,389

20,192

6.9%

Curry

11,425

542

11,967

4.5%

Deschutes

192,780

10,820

203,600

5.3%

Douglas

82,587

3,661

86,248

4.2%

Gilliam

1,237

44

1,281

3.4%

Grant

6,353

427

6,780

6.3%

Harney

4,212

384

4,596

8.4%

Hood River

32,316

1,682

33,998

4.9%

Jackson

218,890

16,190

235,080

6.9%

Jefferson

19,799

1,991

21,790

9.1%

Josephine

73,578

3,815

77,393

4.9%

Klamath

50,219

4,882

55,101

8.9%

Lake

5,311

421

5,732

7.3%

Lane

490,466

15,329

505,795

3.0%

Lincoln

43,464

2,700

46,164

5.8%

Linn

141,186

8,844

150,030

5.9%

Malheur

26,270

5,129

31,399

16.3%

Marion

350,390

32,458

382,848

8.5%

Morrow

7,475

1,319

8,794

15.0%

Multnomah

1,047,458

56,412

1,103,870

5.1%

Polk

71,504

4,847

76,351

6.3%

Sherman

1,400

68

1,468

4.6%

Tillamook

15,053

636

15,689

4.1%

Umatilla

66,402

9,101

75,503

12.1%

Union

21,460

1,814

23,274

7.8%

Wallowa

3,242

182

3,424

5.3%

Wasco

34,922

1,714

36,636

4.7%

Washington

645,009

41,521

686,530

6.0%

Wheeler

712

31

743

4.2%

Yamhill

137,181

7,192

144,373

5.0%

Statewide

4,543,455

274,655

4,818,110

5.7%

 

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.


Fri. 05/07/21
Oregon Connections Extends Branded Nepris Platform to Virtually Connect Employers with Classrooms & Students
Future School Lab - 05/07/21 6:38 PM

The agreement enables Oregon Connections to expand their work of connecting STEM Hubs and K-12 schools across the state with professionals from every industry - locally and globally

Portland, OR - May 7, 2021 - Oregon Connections, the online platform powered by Nepris that has been used for the past five years to bridge the gap between local education and industry, has extended their partnership with Nepris to continue to virtually connect Oregon students with employers and industry experts, both locally and across the globe, for another three years.

Just in time for Oregon’s STEM Week happening May 8-16, Oregon Connections has renewed an agreement with Nepris’ national platform to give educators across Oregon access to  professionals from every industry. Used by regional STEM Hubs across the state, Oregon Connections has seen a tripling of teacher and district use over the last year, and more than four times the number of industry sessions offered. During STEM Week alone, Oregon Connections is host to 32 sessions hosted by Oregon industry professionalsThis Oregon Connections platform is sponsored in part by Portland General Electric (PGE), Pacific Power, First Tech Federal Credit Union, and The Lemelson Foundation.

Live sessions with professionals on real-world applications of whatever content they are learning helped make virtual learning fun, engaging, and thought-provoking during the pandemic. This is a trend that may be here to stay. 

“Inspiration and access to career pathways is no longer an accident of zip code,” said Melissa Dubois, Executive Director of the South Metro-Salem STEM Partnership hosted by Oregon Tech in Wilsonville.  “Oregon Connections has allowed us to broaden the horizons of kids from Multnomah to Malheur counties.”

The STEM Hubs are able to collaborate in the design of and participation in events that are 100% virtual, like Oregon Engineers Week and Oregon STEM Week, scaling the reach and impact of both the education system and Oregon employers. These events are geared toward Oregon students and presented by Oregon employers, but open to classrooms across the country.

“Kids can’t be what they can’t see.  Oregon Connections has been pivotal in helping us bridge that inspiration gap for kids who just don’t know what’s out there after graduation,” said Dubois. “Oregon Connections became a critical connection to inspiration and relevance during distance learning. We are so excited to build on that in the coming years.”  

Oregon Connections operates on the Nepris virtual learning platform, used by over 125,000 educators across the country, bringing real-world relevance and career exposure to students through live, virtual connections with industry experts. Many of these virtual sessions are about STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math), but there are also authors, artists, designers, actors, athletes, entertainers, and more available. 

The professionals talk about their jobs and bring relevance and application to students’ everyday learning. The live sessions let students ask questions to gain insights from working professionals, take site tours of otherwise inaccessible workspaces, participate in mock interviews, and even present their own projects for feedback. Most importantly, these connections enable students to envision themselves in a variety of careers, regardless of their location or economic status.

“Our work with Oregon Connections began 5 years ago, and we’re thrilled with the growth of that partnership over that time,” explains Sabari Raja, Nepris co-founder and CEO. “This renewed agreement is a testament to not only the efficacy of this model, but also to Oregon’s foresight and dedication to always improving education. By introducing students to the many career paths available early and often, Oregon students of today have a stronger foundation on which to build their own future”.

Through this agreement, Oregon Connections educators will be able to leverage the full power of the platform for live connections - to request virtual industry guests and participate in Industry Chats - interactive talks with guest speakers which take place virtually throughout the day. They will also have unlimited access to the Video Library of 10,000+ archived videos of past sessions. These educational sessions include everything from high-level career introductions and resume reviews, to virtual tours of workplaces, and real-world science and tech activities for students. 

Oregon STEM Hubs, school districts, employers, and organizations interested in learning more about Oregon Connections can reach out to Penny Jahraus (support@oregonconnections.org) for additional details and next steps. 

About Oregon Connections
Oregon Connections is the next generation, web-based tool that makes it easy for industry professionals to connect with K-20 educators. Professionals can share their skills and expertise to bring real-world, authentic learning opportunities to all our students helping to create the next generation of innovators. Through virtual sessions, professionals can help students and teachers connect their classroom to the world of work. Together we can make a difference. Oregon Connections is a project of the STEM Oregon regional STEM hub network in collaboration with regional Career Technical Education partners, and has been a growing presence in Oregon since 2016.

About Nepris
Austin-based Nepris provides a cloud-based platform connecting industry professionals with K-16 classrooms so that students see the relevance of what they are learning in school. Students are exposed to diverse role models and career paths in STEM, the Arts, retail, manufacturing, and countless other careers. Nepris makes it easy for teachers to leverage industry connections while offering a scalable platform for companies and regional intermediaries to easily and effectively engage the current workforce with the future workforce, virtually. Nearly a half-million students have participated in a Nepris virtual session or have viewed one of the 10,000 hours of videos in its library. See Nepris in action at Nepris.com@NeprisApp


Prineville Man Arrested for Attempting to Have Sex With and Provide Methamphetamine to a Minor Online
Central Oregon Drug Enforcement (CODE) - 05/07/21 5:15 PM
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Released by: Sergeant Kent Vander Kamp, Central Oregon Drug Enforcement

Date: May 7, 2021

Location: 500 block of NW Wall St, Bend

Arrested: Patrick James ADAMS, Age 35, of Prineville, Oregon

Charges:                 ORS 167.057  Luring a Minor

                                ORS 163.433  Online Corruption of a Child I

                                ORS 475.906  Attempted Delivery of a Controlled Substance to a Minor

                                ORS 475.890  Unlawful Delivery of Methamphetamine

                                ORS 163.479  Attempted Unlawful Contact with a Child

                                Pending Parole Violation hold

Today, Detectives with the Central Oregon Drug Enforcement Team concluded a weeklong child luring investigation with the arrest of Patrick James Adams of Prineville, Oregon. At the beginning of the month, a CODE Detective was randomly contacted by Adams via social media while conducting an unrelated investigation. CODE Detectives identified Adams as a Registered Sex Offender and is prohibited from contacting minors.  

During the last week, Adams pursued the Detective believing he was a fourteen-year-old girl, and began sending sexualized photographs and messages via social media. While Detectives attempted to confirm Adams’ whereabouts, he continued to solicit the online Detective, asking to meet for sex, and offered “her” methamphetamine.

CODE Detectives accepted and arranged to meet Adams in Bend today. On May 7th, 2021, at approximately 12:15 PM, CODE Detectives, with the assistance of Bend Police Officers and Detectives, contacted Adams in downtown Bend at the corner of Wall St and Franklin Ave. He was taken into custody without incident or injury. Adams was found to be in possession of methamphetamine and other relevant evidence in this case.

CODE Detectives believe Adams may have been in contact with other juveniles in the central Oregon area via social media platforms. We ask parents and young people to report any contact with Adams on social media to your local law enforcement agency, school resource officer, or online with the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children at www.cybertip.org

Adams was lodged in the Deschutes County Adult Jail with the above-listed charges. With the assistance of the US Department of Homeland Security Investigations, this case will be referred to the United States Attorney’s Office in Eugene for charging consideration.  

The Central Oregon Drug Enforcement (CODE) team is a multi-jurisdictional narcotics task force supported by the Oregon-Idaho High-Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) program and the following Central Oregon law enforcement agencies:  Bend Police Department, Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, Redmond Police Department,  Prineville Police Department, Crook County Sheriff’s Office, Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office, Madras Police Department, Oregon State Police, Sunriver Police Department, Black Butte Police Department, United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Warm Springs Tribal Police Department, Deschutes, Crook, and Jefferson County District Attorney’s, and the Oregon National Guard.

The Oregon-Idaho HIDTA program is an Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) sponsored counterdrug grant program that coordinates and provides funding resources to multi-agency drug enforcement task forces to disrupt or dismantle local, multi-state and international drug trafficking organizations.




Attached Media Files: Mug Shot

Fatal Crash on Hwy 223 - Polk County
Oregon State Police - 05/07/21 4:14 PM

On Friday, May 7, 2021 at approximately 8:15 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle collision on Hwy 223 near Fir Villa Rd.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Ford F-350 pickup, operated by Landon Pegg (32) of Dallas, was eastbound when a Honda Civic, operated by Bonnie Muhly (80) of Dallas, pulled out of a parking lot in the path of the Ford.

Muhly sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. 

Pegg was not injured and cooperated in the investigation.

OSP was assisted by the Polk County Sheriff's Office, Dallas Fire Department, and ODOT.  


Oregon's Potable Water Resources Task Force Requests Community Input to Understand Impacts of the 2020 September Wildfires on Private Drinking Water Systems
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 05/07/21 2:06 PM

 

SALEM, Ore. – The September 2020 wildfires damaged many public and private water systems across Oregon. The Potable Water Resources Task Force, part of Oregon’s state-led wildfire recovery efforts, has launched a survey to learn how the 2020 wildfires have impacted private drinking water wells and systems that divert surface water from streams or reservoirs. This information will be used to help the state better support impacted Oregonians while also helping to inform statewide recovery efforts.

“Offering assistance to individuals impacted by the September wildfires to properly restore private water supply systems will help to provide clean drinking water and protect them from potential public health and safety hazards,” said Bryn Hudson, water policy analyst for the Oregon Water Resources Department (OWRD).

If you rely on a private well or surface water system for your drinking water, please take five minutes to complete the survey. Your answers will help us understand and assess damages caused by or related to the 2020 wildfires. Access the survey online at https://wildfire.oregon.gov/Pages/Drinking-Water-Supply.aspx.

Domestic Water Well and Surface Water Resources

OWRD has developed resources for maintaining private wells after wildfire as well as post-wildfire water right considerations. Visit the Department’s wildfire recovery web page for more information regarding post-fire water rights, well maintenance and potential funding assistance. If a water system requiring a water right needs to be rebuilt, coordination with OWRD in advance is recommended.

Free private well testing for well users in wildfire-impacted communities

Well users whose properties were affected by wildfires can receive a voucher for free well water testing. Learn more and apply for a voucher by visiting healthoregon.org/wells. Well users will find guidance about how to first assess damage, then take actions to protect their wells, and finally test their well water to confirm it is safe to drink.

The Oregon Health Authority will continue to provide testing vouchers to well owners through May 15, 2021. Well owners can select from a list of approved environmental laboratories in Oregon that will honor the vouchers for testing services. The tests will look for presence of bacteria, nitrates, arsenic, lead and chemicals that are hazardous byproducts of fire.

For general information and resources for drinking water supply recovery, visit Oregon’s Wildfire Response webpage. For information, questions, or concerns contact the Potable Water Resources Task Force at e.info@state.or.us">fire.info@state.or.us.

# # #

You can get this document in other languages, large print, braille, or a format you prefer. For assistance, call 971-719-1183 or email language@oem.or.us. We accept all relay calls, or you can dial 711.




Attached Media Files: Oregon Potable Water Survey PDF

Oregon reports 844 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 8 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 05/07/21 1:12 PM

May 7, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 844 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 8 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are eight new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,522, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 844 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 189,986.

Dr. Sidelinger highlights COVID-19 trends  

Today, Dr. Dean Sidelinger, State Health Officer and State Epidemiologist, recorded a brief video segment updating the COVID-19 situation in Oregon. Confronted with new and highly transmissible variants, he is calling on all eligible Oregonians to get vaccinated. You can watch the full recording here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 54,747 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 31,750 doses were administered on May 6 and 22,987 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on May 6.

The seven-day running average is now 32,741 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered a total of 1,744,936 first and second doses of Pfizer, 1,363,623 first and second doses of Moderna and 103,960 single doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines. As of today, 1,385,116 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series. There are 1,927,021 who have had at least one dose.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 2,082,015 doses of Pfizer, 1,706,980 doses of Moderna and 246,100 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 324, which is four fewer than yesterday. There are 90 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is unchanged from yesterday.

The total number of COVID-19 positive patient bed-days in the most recent seven days is 2,354, which is a 5.5% increase from the previous seven days. The peak daily number of beds occupied by COVID-19 positive patients in the most recent seven days is 351.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (2), Benton (16), Clackamas (104), Clatsop (3), Columbia (10), Coos (4), Crook (12), Deschutes (87), Douglas (11), Gilliam (1), Grant (5), Harney (3), Hood River (4), Jackson (36), Jefferson (12), Josephine (7), KIamath (42), Lake (1), Lane (71), Lincoln (2), Linn (44), Malheur (1), Marion (80), Morrow (1), Multnomah (146), Polk (12), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (10), Union (4), Wasco (2), Washington (94), Wheeler (2) and Yamhill (14).

Oregon’s 2,515th death is a 74-year-old man from Coos County who tested positive on April 11 and died on May 6. Location of death is unknown. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,516th death is an 89-year-old man from Grant County who tested positive on April 12 and died on May 5 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,517th death is a 60-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive on April 10 and died on May 5 at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,518th death is a 57-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive on April 18 and died on May 2 at Oregon Health & Science University Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,519th death is an 84-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive on April 19 and died on April 26 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,520th death is an 87-year-old man from Multnomah County who tested positive on April 19 and died on April 21 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,521st death is a 100-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive on April 30 and died on May 6 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,522nd death is a 57-year-old man from Jefferson County who tested positive on April 9 and died on May 6 at St. Charles Madras Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.


Umpqua Bank Ranked #1 in Northwest for Customer Satisfaction by J.D. Power
Umpqua Bank - 05/07/21 12:14 PM

Umpqua’s human digital banking approach met customers’ need for personal, accessible banking during period of financial disruption

PORTLAND, Ore., (May 7, 2021)—Umpqua Bank, a subsidiary of Umpqua Holdings Corporation (NASDAQ: UMPQ), has been named the top bank in the Northwest region for customer satisfaction in the J.D. Power 2021 U.S. Retail Banking Satisfaction StudySM. The bank was among 13 U.S. financial institutions to earn a top regional ranking in the study, which highlights banks’ efforts to support customers during the pandemic.

According to Umpqua CEO Cort O’Haver, Umpqua’s human digital banking strategy uniquely prepared the bank to help customers stay personally connected to their money and their banker, particularly at the height of the pandemic’s economic and financial disruption.

“Our number one ambition at Umpqua is to be there for our customers in good times and bad. So being ranked as the top bank in our region in customer satisfaction means a lot, particularly after the extraordinary disruption of the past year,” said O’Haver. “This recognition is above all a credit to our retail associates who’ve gone the extra mile for customers. It also reflects the value of our human digital approach, which is focused on providing customers access to smart, personalized service from a financial partner they know and trust.”

In 2018, the bank launched Umpqua Go-ToTM, the industry’s first human digital banking platform, which leverages technology to empower and scale deeper customer relationships. Go-To enables every customer – at no cost and regardless of account size – the ability to choose their own personal banker devoted to their financial needs. Through a secure chat platform, customers can connect with their personal banker in real time to resolve issues, ask questions directly, and get financial counsel. Go-To enrollment and use spiked more than 30 percent following the onset of the pandemic when customers needed urgent financial support.

Earning J.D. Power’s top ranking is the latest accolade Umpqua has received and reflects the value of its human digital strategy. In 2019, Umpqua earned a Celent Model Bank of the Year Award for customer engagement. The bank was also named the Best Community Bank, USA 2020 by Capital Finance International for its support of more than 17,000 businesses during the first round of the federal Paycheck Protection Program.

About Umpqua Bank
Umpqua Bank, headquartered in Roseburg, Ore., is a subsidiary of Umpqua Holdings Corporation, and has locations across Idaho, Washington, Oregon, California and Nevada. Umpqua Bank has been recognized for its innovative customer experience and banking strategy by national publications including The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, BusinessWeek, Fast Company and CNBC. The company has been recognized for eight years in a row on FORTUNE magazine's list of the country's "100 Best Companies to Work For," and was recently named by The Portland Business Journal the Most Admired Financial Services Company in Oregon for the sixteenth consecutive year. In addition to its retail banking presence, Umpqua Bank also owns Financial Pacific Leasing, Inc., a nationally recognized commercial finance company that provides equipment leases to businesses.

ABOUT J.D. POWER
J.D. Power is a global leader in consumer insights, advisory services and data and analytics. A pioneer in the use of big data, artificial intelligence (AI) and algorithmic modeling capabilities to understand consumer behavior, J.D. Power has been delivering incisive industry intelligence on customer interactions with brands and products for more than 50 years. The world's leading businesses across major industries rely on J.D. Power to guide their customer-facing strategies.

J.D. Power is headquartered in Troy, Mich., and has offices in North America, Europe and Asia Pacific. To learn more about the company’s business offerings, visit JDPower.com/business. The J.D. Power auto shopping tool can be found at JDPower.com.


Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team -- Daily Update -- May 7, 2021
Douglas Co. Government - 05/07/21 12:10 PM
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JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – May 7, 2021

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - DAILY UPDATE

 

(Douglas County, Ore.) DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 TEST RESULTS: As of 12:00 pm Today, Friday, May 7, 2021, there are NINE (9) people with new positive test results and THREE (3) new presumptives to report since our noon case update yesterday.  The total number of cases of people with positive test results and presumptives in Douglas County is now at 3,223. Currently, there are ELEVEN (11) Douglas County COVID-19 patients that are being hospitalized, four locally and seven out-of-the-area. Our Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, under the direction of the Douglas County Board of Commissioners, continue to devote all resources available to our local COVID response.

 

Douglas County, OR - COVID-19 - Case Update Chart

Date

Monday

May 3, 2021

Tuesday

May 4, 2021

Wednesday

May 5, 2021

Thursday

May 6, 2021

Today, Friday,

May 7, 2021

Total COVID-19 Cases

3,177

3,187

3,197

3,211

3,223

People w/ Positive PCR or Antigen Test Results

3,022

3,032

3,042

3,056

3,065

Presumptive

155

155

155

155

158

Total Currently Hospitalized

13

14

12

11

11

Total Currently in Isolation

102

105

105

101

102

Total COVID-19 Related Deaths

70

70

70

70

70

Our daily update includes the total number of cases in Douglas County, which combines people with positive test results and presumptives, as well as a breakout of those case numbers. There will be times when a presumptive will move to a positive test result, and our total case number will not change because the case has already been counted.

 

LOCAL CONTACTS AND CASES BEING SUPPORTED IN ISOLATION AND QUARANTINE

Currently, DPHN is supporting 102 cases in isolation, as well as another 472 contacts in quarantine in Douglas County. Isolation is recommended for confirmed and presumptive cases, quarantine is recommended for contacts of confirmed or presumptive cases.  Currently, staff is supporting a total of 574 total contacts and cases in isolation or quarantine.  This number represents a snapshot of the significant amount of work being done locally to help control the spread of COVID.

 

NEW SERIES: COVID-19 VACCINE FACTS VS MYTHS

PART THREE: WE DO NOT KNOW WHAT THE LONG TERM SIDE EFFECTS WILL BE 

Over the past two days we have talked about reasons why residents that have not gotten the COVID-19 vaccine should seriously consider getting it.  Now let’s take a look at the most common myths and popular arguments that people are using to not get vaccinated, and why medical professionals want to set the record straight. 

 

COVID-19 Vaccine Myth #1: We don't know what the long-term side effects are?

Medical Professionals Response:  While we may not know everything about long-term side effects from the COVID-19 vaccines, what we do know from historical data is that most adverse side effects from vaccines have almost always shown up within the first two weeks, and certainly by the first two months after a vaccine has been administered, according to Dr. Ashish Jha, Dean of the Brown University School of Public Health.  That's why he and many other health professionals asked the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to wait at least two months after trial participants had been inoculated before considering whether to give emergency authorization to COVID-19 vaccines.  As with most medicines and vaccines, some side effects are expected.  It’s also important to note that if you do have a few minor side effects from the COVID-19 vaccine, that it probably means the vaccine is working and that is a good sign that your body is building up immunity to the COVID virus. 

 

It’s also important to note that the most serious vaccine side effects in history have all been caught within six weeks, stated Dr. Paul Offit, Director of the Vaccine Education Center at the Children's Hospital in Philadelphia and a member of the FDA's Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee.  "I would say, please tell me what vaccine has ever been shown to cause a long-term side effect that was not picked up in the first two months," said Offit, a co-creator of the rotavirus vaccine who has studied vaccinology for more than four decades. "The smallpox vaccine could cause inflammation of the heart muscle. The oral polio vaccine was a rare cause of polio -- it occurred in roughly 1 in 2.4 million doses. ... The yellow fever vaccine is a rare cause of ... yellow fever. All those occurred within six weeks of getting a dose," he said.  There may be very rare side effects that aren't immediately found in clinical trials. But that's due to the extreme rarity of those side effects -- "not because it's a long-term problem," Offit said.  "Sometimes you're not going to pick it up initially because it's extremely rare, so you aren't going to pick up a one-in-a-million risk in a trial of 44,000 people," he said.  Pfizer/BioNTech and Johnson & Johnson vaccines had about 44,000 participants in each of their trials. The Moderna vaccine trial had about 30,000 participants.  In their professional opinion, Dr. Offit and Dr. Jha agree that because coronavirus is highly contagious -- killing more than half a million Americans and leaving many survivors with long-term complications -- you're much better off getting the vaccine.

 

As with any issue, it is important to make sure you are getting your information from a reputable and qualified source on the topic.  Check your sources and their qualifications.  Just like you would not have open heart surgery performed by a high school baseball coach, you shouldn’t always believe everything you read on the internet…especially when it’s written by a non-medical professional.  We encourage you to talk to a medical professional or call our COVID-19 Hotline if you have questions or concerns.  Providing answers in response to all the misinformation and myths is important.  But, getting everyone that can be vaccinated, vaccinated is the most absolutely critical thing we need to do to end this pandemic before the virus mutates into variants that we can't control with our current vaccines.  #itsyourturn (Information shared in part from Health Journals)

 

DPHN – IT’S YOUR TURN TO GET THE VACCINE!

Douglas Public Health Network launched their “it’s your turn” vaccine campaign, encouraging everyone to step up and take their turn to get their COVID-19 vaccine. 

Everyone over the age of 16 is now eligible to get a COVID-19 vaccine, and we want people to know they are eligible and that we have vaccine available.  Having the majority of our residents vaccinated is the surest road to getting back the sense of normalcy and freedom that we all miss and want. It’s your turn to help us get there!” stated Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, Douglas County Public Health Officer.  #itsyourturn

 

DOUGLAS COUNTY TIGER TEAM’S POP-UP VACCINATION CLINICS

The Douglas County Tiger Team is out and about in the county bringing the COVID-19 vaccines directly to rural areas via our mobile medical vans (MMV) at businesses, farms, fire stations and locations in our smaller remote communities in Douglas County. The Douglas County Board of Commissioners, who have led the charge for our Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team efforts since the beginning, have coordinated with DPHN to organize our local Tiger Team to manage our vaccine outreach efforts through ‘pop-up’ vaccine clinics. 

 

The Douglas County Tiger Team will be hosting FREE POP UP COVID VACCINE CLINICS at the locations listed below.  The clinics are open to anyone 18 years of age and older and preregistration is not necessary:

 

  • Wednesday, May 12, 2021: Oakland area: Oakland City Hall parking lot located at 637 NE Locust Street in Oakland from 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm
  • Thursday, May 13, 2021: Glide area: Glide Rural Fire Protection District – Glide Station located at 18910 North Umpqua Hwy in Glide from 10:00 am to 2:00 pm

 

If you are interested in having the Douglas County Tiger Team come to your business, fire department, farm or town to provide a pop-up vaccine clinic or if you have any questions about our Douglas County Tiger Teams and want a schedule of their upcoming pop-up vaccination clinics, please call (541) 670-3110 or our local COVID-19 Hotline at (541) 464-6550. 

 

UPCOMING AVIVA HEALTH COVID-19 VACCINATION CLINIC

Shared from Aviva Health.  Aviva Health, with the help of local partners (DPHN & Douglas County Commissioners) will be hosting vaccination events at various locations in rural Douglas County.  For more information, or to schedule an appointment or for a list of upcoming clinics, please call Aviva Health at (541) 672-9596.  Next week they will be back in Sutherlin for another COVID-19 Vaccine Clinic. 

 

  • Wednesday, May 12, 2021:  Aviva Health’s COVID-19 Vaccine team will be at the Myrtle Creek Elks Lodge, located at 106 South Main Street in Myrtle Creek from 8:00 am to 11:30 am and 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm offering COVID-19 vaccinations to residents aged 16 years of age and older.  Walk-ins also welcomed!

 

STATE ANNOUNCES UPDATES TO COVID MANDATED RISK LEVELS

Increase in Indoor Capacity Limits for Indoor Recreation and Indoor Entertainment

Shared from OHA.  The State of Oregon announced this week that they updated their state mandated risk level guidance for indoor capacity limits for Oregon counties for their Moderate and High Risk COVID Levels.  They have increased the capacity for indoor recreation, fitness and indoor entertainment venues.  As of Wednesday, May 5, 2021 indoor entertainment establishments and indoor recreation and fitness establishments in ALL Oregon counties may allow the following:

 

 

  • State Mandated Moderate Risk Level: Maximum 20% occupancy or 100 people total, whichever is larger
  • State Mandated High Risk Level: Maximum 10% occupancy or 50 people total, whichever is larger

 

The State Mandated Lower Risk Level and the State Mandated Extreme Risk Level capacity limits for these sectors remain the same.  To view the States updated capacity limits, please refer to the OHA State Mandated Sector Risk Level Guidance Chart.

 

COVID-19 VACCINE ELIGIBILITY OPEN FOR EVERYONE 16 YEARS OLD AND OLDER

According to the State of Oregon and OHA, ALL residents 16 years old and older are eligible to get the COVID-19 Vaccine, NOW! Remember, “it’s your turn!” So, get signed up or show up to get your COVID-19 vaccine today!

 

  1. Call and set up an appointment with your primary health care provider or ask them for a referral to another health care provider.
  2. Call and set up an appointment with a local pharmacy.
  3. Sign up for or attend one of the vaccination clinics offered in Douglas County through DPHN, Douglas County, Aviva Health or our Douglas County Tiger Team. 
  4. If you are a member of the Cow Creek Band of the Umpqua Tribe of Indians, please contact to set up an appointment at (541) 672-9405 or log onto https://www.cowcreek-nsn.gov/public-health/
  5. The Roseburg VA Health Care System is setting up appointments for veterans to receive the COVID-19 vaccine.  For more information, call the Roseburg VAMC at (541) 440-1000 or log onto https://www.va.gov/health-care/covid-19-vaccine/.

 

NO ACCESS TO THE INTERNET TO SCHEDULE YOUR VACCINE APPOINTMENT? LOCAL HELP IS AVAILABLE

Not everyone is able to use the internet, a tablet, a computer or a smart phone to schedule a COVID vaccine appointment.  If you or someone you know needs to schedule an appointment for the COVID vaccine, and do not have access to the internet, you can call one of the numbers below to get help scheduling an appointment.

 

  • Call our Douglas County COVID-19 Hotline at (541) 464-6550.
  • Coastal Residents can call the Lower Umpqua Hospital District COVID-19 Vaccine Call Center at (541) 271-2175.
  • U.S. Veterans can call the Roseburg VA Health Care Center at (541) 440-1000.
  • Members of the Cow Creek Band of the Umpqua Tribe of Indians can call (541) 672-9405.
  • Seniors can call Douglas County Senior Services at (541) 440-3677.

 

GETTING YOUR SECOND DOSE OF THE COVID-19 VACCINE IS IMPORTANT  

While we have heard a lot about second dose hesitancy, it is vitally important to for those residents who have received their first dose of the Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine, to make sure that you get and not forgo getting your second dose of the vaccine and complete their vaccination.  It will better ensure your immunity and help to protect yourself and those around you that you love. 

 

If you have already received your first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, here are a few answers to questions about your second dose.

 

  • The latest information shows that you can expect to get your second dose about 4-6 weeks after the first dose.
  • You should have received a vaccination card when you received your first dose that details the brand of vaccine, its lot number, and the date the vaccine was administered.  This card is for your records only, and is not official proof that you have received the vaccine. Proof of your vaccination rests with the State Alert System, which is accessible by medical facilities.
  • You should get your second dose from the same provider or organization from which you received your first. However, the physical address where you receive the second dose may change.
  • You will be notified by the provider or organization that gave you your first dose about where and when you will receive your second dose.
  • I got a first vaccine out of the area; can I get my second vaccine in Douglas County?  The second vaccine dose is “paired” to the first dose, and your second dose will be sent to wherever you got your first dose.  Therefore, except in rare circumstances, you will need to return to where you got your first dose.
  • If you have questions, please contact the provider or organization where you received your first dose.

 

PLEASE CONTINUE TO KEEP YOU AND YOUR FAMILY SAFE

We continue encourage everyone, for the sake of our local businesses, services and residents, to gauge your risk level, and to make the best choice in order protect yourself and those around you from contracting or spreading coronavirus.  We have provided education on the widely proven COVID-19 safety measures, and encourage you to limit your contact with others not from your household, stay home if you are sick, and wear face coverings where recommended. Click here, for a graphic on how to protect you and your family from the spread of COVID-19.  We know how important family, businesses and faith are to you, so we ask that you consider all options available in order to eliminate and minimize the spread of the COVID-19 virus in our communities to help protect the ones you love, the businesses you love and the places you love to go.

 

COVID-19 FACEBOOK LIVE WITH DR. BOB

Tune in on Friday, May 7, 2021 at 4:00 pm for the next Facebook Live with Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, the Douglas County Public Health Officer.  For future Facebook Events with Dr. Bob, please submit your questions to: ookquestions@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org">Facebookquestions@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Dr. Bob and the DPHN team will do their best to respond to as many questions as they can during the Facebook event.  The Facebook Events are hosted by DPHN on the DPHN Facebook page.

 

STATE AND FEDERAL COVID-19 INFORMATION

It is important to understand that Federal and State Government and their Agencies are the ones setting policy and issuing the guidelines for the pandemic. Locally, we are following the recommended guidance issued by the U.S. Center for Disease Control (CDC) and the Oregon Health Authority (OHA).  If you have questions about the current guidelines or the recommendations, contact the CDC or OHA directly for more information. OHA posts their daily updates at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.  

 

Please do not call 911, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office or Douglas County Offices to report compliance issues with the State of Oregon, OHA or Governor’s orders. The Governor has directed the State offices for Oregon Occupational Safety and Health (OSHA) and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) to be the enforcement agencies responsible for ensuring restaurants, bars, and other businesses comply with the current State COVID guidelines.  If you have concerns, questions or wish to report compliance, issues contact these state agencies directly:  OSHA: (800) 922-2689 or OSHA website or OLCC (503) 872-5000 or OLCC website.

 

ACCESS TO LOCAL COVID-19 RESOURCES

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer, DPHN and the DCCRT team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020.  

 

Local Online Access to Updates

Stay up to date with accurate and local COVID-19 information in Douglas County by visiting the Douglas County Government website or DCGOV Facebook page or the DPHN website or DPHN Facebook page

 

Free Local e-Newsletter Subscription

You can also sign up for the Douglas County e-Newsletter that publishes and sends out the daily update to our subscription base free.  You can sign up for the Douglas County e-Newsletter at www.co.douglas.or.us.  Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer, DPHN and the DCCRT have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020. 

 

Douglas County COVID-19 Hotline (541) 464-6550

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners and DPHN continue to offer a local resource hotline for Douglas County residents for COVID-19. The hotline provides answer to frequently asked questions, basic information and referrals to resources and services. Our local hotline number is (541) 464-6550 and is staffed from 8:00 am to 5: pm, 7 days a week.

 

Aviva Health Offers Vaccine Frequently Asked Questions Webpage

Aviva Health has created an online FAQ page to answer questions related to COVID-19 regarding availability and scheduling.  Log onto https://aviva.health/covid-19-vaccine-faqs/

 

COVID Vaccine Call Center at Lower Umpqua Hospital District in Reedsport

Lower Umpqua Hospital District now has a COVID-19 Vaccine Call Center for COVID-19 vaccine information in the Reedsport, Douglas County Coastal area.  The LUHD COVID-19 Vaccine Call Center number is (541) 271-2175, and is available Monday through Friday from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm.

 

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Contact Tamara Howell, Public Information Officer, Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, (541) 670-2804 cell (541) 957-4896 tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us   

Contact Vanessa Becker, Public Information Officer, Douglas Public Health Network, (541) 817-6552 cell (541) 440-3571 vanessa@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org




Attached Media Files: 2021-05/6789/144803/DCCRT_Logo_72020.jpg

Lincoln Co. Annual Emergency Notification Test Message
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/07/21 10:31 AM

Today, May 7th at 11:30am – 1:00pm, Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office is conducting an annual test of our local emergency notification systems.

This message is specifically to test our Flash Alert program utilized to forward daily media releases and urgent information about a response to an event that may require directions specifically to the public for their safety.

No action is required for this Flash Alert message test for local Media Partners.

We have asked the public to participate in our annual test survey to provide feedback on our processes and how they may have received the test messages.  We also encourage all community members to check the “wellness” of their Lincoln Alerts profiles with the tips in this information sheet - English , Spanish 

       Annual Test Survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/KMRLHZG

       Lincoln Alerts: www.co.lincoln.or.us/alerts  

 

Thank you for your assistance.

Virginia “Jenny” Demaris
County Emergency Manager
Lincoln County Sheriff's Office - Emergency Management Division
Office Phone: 541-265-4199
Lincoln County Call Center: 541-265-0621
Email: vdemaris@co.lincoln.or.us
Website: https://www.co.lincoln.or.us/emergencymanagement
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lcemergencymanagement
Lincoln Alerts – Emergency Notifications: www.co.lincoln.or.us/alerts
Media Releases - https://www.flashalert.net/id/LCSO
Language Translation Options:

  • Sheriff’s Office Media Releases via Flash Alert – go to the very upper right-hand corner of the website for translation options.
  • Lincoln County Website – go to the very bottom right-hand corner of the website for translation options.

The Suicide Prevention Coalition of Lane County Seeks Volunteers For Lane County Survivors Project
Lane Co. Government - 05/07/21 8:45 AM

Have You Survived a Suicide Attempt and Want to Share Your Story with Others?

The Suicide Prevention Coalition of Lane County and Lane County Public Health is actively recruiting people who live in Lane County and have survived a suicide attempt to share their story with the community as part of a public awareness campaign.  Participants will work closely with an artist contracted by the Coalition to document their lives through photographs and record their story in an audio interview.  Final stories will be shared in galleries and other public spaces throughout Lane County to shed light on suicide as a public health issue and to provide people in distress with examples of hope and recovery.

“On average 100 people die by suicide each year in Lane County. Additionally, research suggests that roughly 2,000 people attempt suicide and that as many as 20,000 people seriously consider suicide every year in Lane County,” said Roger Brubaker, Suicide Prevention Coordinator with Lane County Public Health.  These data demonstrate that suicide is a relatively common experience in Lane County and one that touches all our lives in some way or another.  “We don’t talk about suicide nearly enough,” said Del Quest, Co-chair of the Coalition and a professor of social work at Pacific University.  “With this project, the Coalition hopes to put a face to the numbers so people can learn about the topic of suicide in a new way and people who may be thinking about suicide themselves can see that others have been in a similar situation and found ways to cope and reconnect with life again.”

Project participants must be at least 18 years of age or older, live in Lane County and have survived a suicide attempt to participate.  Those who want to share their story with others are encouraged to submit their interest by visiting the project webpage lanecountysurvivorsproject.com . The SPCLC is committed to representing diverse experiences about surviving a suicide attempt, with special care in supporting rural, BIPOC, non-English language, LGBTQ+ and veteran participants to safely share their stories.  All candidates will be contacted by program staff to discuss the logistics and realities of participation and to answer any questions they may have.  

Roger Brubaker emphasizes that men are specifically encouraged to participate in the project.  “Men are four times as likely to die by suicide compared to women, however they’re less likely to share their experiences with suicide.  We want any man in Lane County who has survived a suicide attempt to know that they are welcome to join this project and that when you share your story you will be helping other men who may feel they have nowhere else to turn.”

The Suicide Prevention Coalition of Lane County is a group of stakeholders representing various populations and sectors of Lane County including people with lived experience of suicide, schools, healthcare, social services, businesses and more.  The group is chaired by community members and staffed by Lane County Public Health representatives.  The SPCLC’s mission is to implement proactive strategies to bring awareness and education about suicide prevention to people in Lane County.  For more information on the work of the SPCLC and how to get involved click on their website at suicidepreventlane.org

Project Contact: Roger Brubaker – Suicide Prevention Coordinator, Lane County Public Health

Phone – 541-515-4768

Email – oger.brubaker@lanecountyor.gov">roger.brubaker@lanecountyor.gov


Lane County voters: remember to sign the return envelope and return your ballots early
Lane Co. Government - 05/07/21 8:30 AM

Voters are urged to return their ballots as early as possible to ensure they are received at Lane County Elections by the 8:00 p.m. deadline on Tuesday, May 18.

 

In order to be counted, ballots must be received at Lane County Elections by:

  • Mail – Postmarks do not qualify ballots. Voters must mail their ballots with enough time for processing and delivery by the post office. Postage is pre-paid; stamps are not required.
  • Official Drop Boxes – There are 20 official drop boxes located throughout Lane County that will be available to voters until 8:00 p.m. on Election Day (May 18). A list of the official drop box sites is included with each ballot.  

 

“It is incredibly important for voters to be aware of the Election Day deadline,” said Lane County Clerk Cheryl Betschart. “If a voter doesn’t mail their ballot early enough to ensure the Elections Office receives it before the deadline, or fails to get it to an official drop box before 8:00 p.m. on May 18, their vote cannot be counted.”

 

Voters must also remember to sign their ballot return envelopes before mailing or returning their completed ballot back to Lane County Elections.

 

The signature is a security measure used to verify identity. County personnel who have received training in handwriting analysis compare it to signatures in the voter registration record. A ballot may only be counted if the signatures match.

 

Due to COVID-19, the Lane County Elections Office will be open to the public only on Friday, May 14; Monday, May 17; and Tuesday, May 18, Election Day. Check our web page at www.lanecountyor.gov for additional updates concerning office hours. When open, visitors will be required to observe physical distancing guidelines; masks are required. The Elections Office has a small quantity of masks available for visitors that do not have their own.

 

On all other dates, the Lane County Elections Office is closed to walk-ins. Assistance is available over the phone at 541-682-4234 (weekdays from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. and from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. and on Election Day from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.) and via email at elections@lanecountyor.gov. Voters with issues that cannot be resolved via phone or email will be able to make an appointment to visit the Elections Office.

 

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New round of rent assistance opening for applications on Tuesday, May 11
Lane Co. Government - 05/07/21 7:55 AM

Lane County Human Services Division has received State of Oregon Supporting Tenants Accessing Rental Relief (STARR) funding in the amount of $4,071,554.

 

So far, approximately $1.4 million has been allocated and another round of applications is opening on Tuesday, May 11. It is intended to assist tenants who are behind in rent due to financial impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Applications for the new funding will be open on Tuesday, May 11, from 7:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. PST. This application is for Lane County residents with household income at or below 80% Area Median Income. A link to the online application and information phone line will be posted on the website www.LaneCounty.org/RENT.

 

Applicants for STARR 2021 COVID Rental Assistance program must meet the following criteria:

  • Be a renter living in Lane County
  • Have income at or below 80% area median income
  • Experienced loss of income due to COVID-19 related factors, impacted by business closure due to COVID-19, or experienced financial hardship due to COVID-19
  • Or diagnosed or exposed to COVID-19, or have compromised health status due to COVID-19

 

To apply, visit www.LaneCounty.org/RENT on May 11 between 7:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m. PST. Applicants will fill out a short application that should take approximately 5 minutes. Once the application closes, applications will be prioritized based on income, unemployment history, and need. As applicants are processed they will be contacted to fill out the full application online, including uploading documents (cell phone pictures are acceptable) and verifying landlord contact information.

 

While applying online is the quickest way to receive this assistance, those unable to apply online can call Lane County’s Rent Assistance information line on May 11 for assistance completing the application on the phone. The number is (541) 682-3776. Callers can leave a message with their contact information. Interested applicants will be contacted directly to complete the application over the phone. This service is available in English and Spanish.

 

For more information, visit www.LaneCounty.org/RENT.

 

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Forestry department invites public comment on state forest management activities
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 05/07/21 7:30 AM

Salem, Ore. -- The Oregon Department of Forestry is inviting public comment on planned projects, timber sales and other management activities in state-owned forests for fiscal year 2022. These plans lay out the on-the-ground activities expected to take place in the coming fiscal year, such as timber harvests, reforestation, and trail improvements.

Starting Friday, May 7 through Monday, June 21, Oregonians can weigh in on the draft annual operations plans for state forests in the Astoria, Forest Grove, Klamath-Lake, Tillamook, West Oregon, and Western Lane Districts, which includes the Tillamook, Clatsop, Sun Pass and Gilchrist state forests. Draft plans are available at: https://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Working/Pages/StateForests.aspx

 ODF is offering several convenient avenues for those who want to provide input on the draft plans:

By law, state forests must provide economic, environmental, and social benefits to Oregonians. These lands are managed to create healthy, productive forests that provide high-quality habitat, clean water, revenues for rural communities, and recreation opportunities. Overall management policies and goals are established in long-range forest management and implementation plans. Annual operations plans describe activities to achieve the policies and goals laid out in those longer-range plans. Activities that affect fish and wildlife habitat are reviewed by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, while operations that may affect threatened and endangered fish and wildlife habitat are shared with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Common activities included in an Annual Operations Plan include:

  • Timber harvest operations
  • Recreation improvement and maintenance projects
  • Forest road construction, maintenance, and improvements
  • Reforestation/replanting and young stand management activities
  • Habitat improvement for native species
  • Invasive species management

The most useful input speaks to these specific activities and whether they are consistent with longer-range plans, offers suggestions to improve efficiency or effectiveness, corrects errors, provides additional information, and is solution-oriented, understanding that state forests are working forests and by law must provide a variety of economic, environmental, and social benefits.

A public comment process on planned projects, timber sales, and other management activities on the North Cascades District for fiscal year 2022, including extensive restoration efforts on the Santiam State Forest, will be conducted separately.


Thu. 05/06/21
Oregon reports 763 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 5 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 05/06/21 4:16 PM
To make?COVID-19 vaccinations for truck drivers as easy as possible, Anderson’s team visited two truck stops in Linn County
To make?COVID-19 vaccinations for truck drivers as easy as possible, Anderson’s team visited two truck stops in Linn County
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-05/3687/144789/thumb_To_make?COVID-19_vaccinations_for_truck_drivers_as_easy_as_possible_Anderson’s_team_visited_two_truck_stops_in_Linn_County.jpg

May 6, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 763 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 5 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are five new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,514, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 763 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 189,162.

OHA releases latest monthly update on breakthrough cases

Oregon Health Authority has identified 611 COVID-19 vaccine breakthrough cases through May 3, including eight deaths. The number of vaccine breakthrough cases identified in Oregon remains very small when compared to the more than 1.3 million people who have completed their vaccine series against COVID-19.

Vaccine breakthrough cases are defined as instances in which an individual received a positive COVID-19 test result at least 14 days after the completion of any COVID-19 vaccine series.

OHA is not reporting the regions in which the deaths took place. Of the 611 reported vaccine breakthrough cases, 14% (n=89) were observed in individuals who reside in long term care facilities or other congregate care settings.

OHA is now providing updates on breakthrough cases the first Thursday of each month. The current report for May 2021 can be found here.

No media briefing Friday; Dr. Sidelinger to provide video overview  

There will not be a weekly news conference tomorrow but there will be a news conference next week. A short video will be provided via a link in tomorrow’s daily news release to our media colleagues.

Dr. Dean Sidelinger will give an overview of current COVID-19 cases and recent trends in Oregon.

Oregon counties have new indoor capacity limits for indoor recreation and indoor entertainment

Under the direction of Governor Brown, indoor capacity limits in moderate- and high-risk levels are now updated for indoor recreation and fitness and indoor entertainment for Oregon counties. As of Wednesday, May 5, indoor entertainment establishments and indoor recreation and fitness establishments in all Oregon counties may allow the following:

  • Moderate risk: Maximum 20% occupancy or 100 people total, whichever is larger
  • High risk: Maximum 10% occupancy or 50 people total, whichever is larger

Lower and extreme risk capacity limits for these sectors remain the same.

To view the updated capacity limits, please refer to the Sector Risk Level Guidance Chart.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 36,259 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 23,539 doses were administered on May 5 and 12,720 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on May 5.

The 7-day running average is now 30,909 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered a total of 1,706,865 first and second doses of Pfizer, 1,349,096 first and second doses of Moderna and 101,923 single doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines. As of today, 1,353,250 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series. There are 1,902,244 who have had at least one dose.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

To date, 2,062,125 doses of Pfizer, 1,692,720 doses of Moderna and 242,800 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

OHA's dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 328, which is two fewer than yesterday. There are 90 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is seven more than yesterday.

The total number of COVID-19 positive patient bed-days in the most recent seven days is 2,364, which is an 8.7% increase from the previous seven days. The peak daily number of beds occupied by COVID-19 positive patients in the most recent seven days is 351.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (12), Benton (14), Clackamas (38), Clatsop (3), Columbia (9), Coos (3), Crook (14), Curry (4), Deschutes (95), Douglas (13), Grant (3), Harney (1), Hood River (2), Jackson (38), Jefferson (4), Josephine (9), KIamath (31), Lake (1), Lane (70), Lincoln (2), Linn (42), Malheur (5), Marion (72), Morrow (1), Multnomah (115), Polk (20), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (9), Union (1), Wallowa (2), Wasco (2), Washington (107) and Yamhill (20).

Oregon’s 2,510th death is a 69-year-old woman from Josephine County who tested positive on April 4 and died on April 30 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,511th death is a 91-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive on April 28 and died on May 4 at Providence Medford Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,512th death is a 50-year-old man from Klamath County who tested positive on April 20 and died on May 4 at Sky Lakes Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,513rd death is a 63-year-old man from Linn County who tested positive on April 15 and died on May 3 at Salem Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 2,514th death is a 68-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive on April 20 and died on May 4 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Reaching people where they are?

Some of our neighbors may find it challenging to get to a COVID-19 vaccine clinic.?Folks who live in?remote areas. People who can’t get time off work. Individuals who are houseless.?To reach people where they are, local public health workers are getting creative.??

Neva Anderson is an emergency manager and recently led an effort to get truck drivers vaccinated?in?Linn County?where she works.?Commercial?truck drivers?often work long hours and can travel hundreds of miles a day. To make?COVID-19 vaccinations for truck drivers as easy as possible, Anderson’s team visited two truck stops in Linn County,?Loves?in Albany and?Pioneer Villa Truck Plaza?in Halsey,?where they vaccinated 68 drivers on April 9.?Picture of clinic atttached. 

Anderson is also partnering with?Gates Community Church of Christ?in Gates?to make sure folks in that community have convenient access to the COVID-19 vaccine. Anderson said, “Wildfires?devasted the area last year and the church opened its doors to help?coordinate supplies for?people?who lost their homes?and needed the basics to get by, like food and shelter.?Now we are collaborating with them again?so we can provide outreach clinics to folks in the canyon.” That includes vaccinating people at local food banks as they pick up their groceries.??To make?COVID-19 vaccinations for truck drivers as easy as possible, Anderson’s team visited two truck stops in Linn County

Volunteers from the?Linn County Medical Reserve Corp,?Linn County?staff and?Albany Fire Department?emergency personnel are helping with these?vaccination efforts.?

All over the state people are finding creative ways to make the COVID-19 vaccine available. Here are some upcoming clinics:?

Heart of Hospice is holding a drop-in COVID-19 vaccination clinic at The Dalles Senior Center,1112 W 9th Street in The Dalles. The clinic is today, Thursday, May 6 from?5:30 to 6:30 p.m. The Janssen/Johnson & Johnson vaccine will be used. The event is open to anyone and no insurance is required.

Golden Dawn Clinic offers an ongoing COVID-19 vaccination clinic in Portland at 8035 SE Holgate Blvd. They are open Mon-Sat from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Call 503-788-9378 to schedule an appointment.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations? 

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage (English?or?Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.




Attached Media Files: To make?COVID-19 vaccinations for truck drivers as easy as possible, Anderson’s team visited two truck stops in Linn County

STEM Hub Oregon to Host Over 100 Events as Part of Remake Learning Days Across America, the Nation's Biggest Family-Friendly Festival of Learning, Returns in 2021 (Photo)
Future School Lab - 05/06/21 4:08 PM
Remake Learning Days Oregon
Remake Learning Days Oregon
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-05/6831/144786/thumb_RLD_Oregon_Logo_.png

May 6, 2021  

Remake Learning Days Across America (RLDAA) returns this spring in 17+ regions, launching more than 700+ innovative learning events to engage caregivers, parents and kids around the country.

Oregon's network of regional STEM Hubs will host more than 100 event during this learning festival between May 8 and 16, 2021. These events are designed for parents and caregivers to learn alongside their kids and offer relevant and engaging educational experiences for youth of all ages (pre-K through high school). The majority of events are free and are offered virtually, in-person or in hybrid models. 

Oregon’s festival of events will capture the themes of Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, Math and more and include in-person and virtual events such as:

  • KATU Innovation Challenge - Student Finalist Pitches (Virtual) 

https://remakelearningdays.org/event/katu-innovation-challenge-student-finalist-pitches/

  • Oregon Connection Industry Chat - Visit a Wildlife Safari! (Virtual) 

https://remakelearningdays.org/event/virtual-visit-to…life-safari-copy/ 

  • Glendale Community Library - STEAM Week at the Library! (In-Person)

 https://remakelearningdays.org/event/steam-week-at-th…re-stem-thinking/ ‎

Find a complete list of events and registration information here 

Oregon’s regional STEM Hubs create equitable access to real-world STEM experiences for learners across Oregon, igniting students’ passion for STEM.  Oregon’s STEM Hub network was honored as a Learning Forerunner in education by Finland’s HundrED.org in 202.

Remake Learning Days Across America is led by Remake Learning (RL), a network that ignites engaging, relevant, and equitable learning practices in support of young people navigating rapid social and technological change. National partners of RLDAA include PBS Kids, Digital Promise, Common Sense Media, Learning Heroes and Noggin. RLDAA is generously supported by The Grable Foundation, The Hewlett Foundation, Schmidt Futures, Carnegie Corporation of New York and the Ford Foundation. Visit remakelearning.org for more information or follow RL on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. For more information specifically on Remake Learning Days Across America, visit remakelearningdays.org or follow RLDAA on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and the hashtag #RemakeDays. 




 




Attached Media Files: Remake Learning Days Oregon

Tax season coming to a close
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 05/06/21 3:50 PM

The deadline to file state and federal personal income tax returns—May 17—is approaching, and the Oregon Department of Revenue estimates it will receive more than half a million more returns between now and then.

At least 1.5 million Oregonians have already filed their state personal income tax returns. The department is expecting about 2.2 million returns this year.

While most returns are processed without issue, there are a number of reasons returns may get flagged for additional review, including miscalculations on the return, misapplied payments, or missing documentation. Some of these can be corrected automatically, but others may require a request for more information or validation of the information by a staff member.

If your return ends up in manual review status, the best thing taxpayers can do is respond to any requests from the department as quickly as possible. Generally, taxpayers will receive letters requesting additional or missing documentation or asking them to take an identity verification quiz.

Do you owe taxes?

Those who owe taxes must make their payments by the same due date as their return, May 17. Some taxpayers are granted filing extensions, which means their returns aren’t due until October 15. However, an extension to file is not an extension to pay. Interest on taxes due starts accumulating the day after the return is due.

To make a payment:

Online: Make or schedule electronic payments from your bank account or by credit or debit card through Revenue Online at www.oregon.gov/dor.

In person: The department’s field offices can no longer accept cash, but they do still accept payments by check, money order, or credit or debit card by appointment. Cash payments are only accepted at the department’s main office in Salem. Appointments can be scheduled using the department’s self-service tool on the Contact Us page of Revenue’s website.

By mail: If you’re mailing your payment separate from your return, be sure to include a payment voucher so it can be appropriately credited. Visit www.oregon.gov/dor/forms for a blank personal income tax payment voucher (OR-40-V). The department’s website also has a list of mailing addresses for personal income tax payments. To avoid penalty and interest, your payment must be postmarked by May 17.

If you can’t pay your taxes, please contact the department as soon as possible. Based on your financial situation, you may be eligible for a payment plan.

Do you still need to file your return?

File electronically. E-filing is the fastest way to get your tax refund. Taxpayers who e-file their returns and request their refund via direct deposit receive their refund sooner than those who file paper returns and request paper refund checks.

Free e-filing. All Oregon taxpayers preparing their own returns can file electronically at no cost using Oregon’s free fillable forms. There are many other free or low-cost preparation options available for both federal and Oregon tax returns. Some software companies offer free software use and e-filing for eligible taxpayers. Visit the Department of Revenue website to take advantage of the software and free offers and get more information about free tax preparation services.

Earned Income Tax Credit. You may be missing out on a bigger refund if you’re not claiming the federal Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC). Eligibility information is available at www.irs.gov/eitc. Taxpayers who are eligible for the EITC can also claim Oregon’s Earned Income Credit (EIC).

Unemployment exclusion. Unemployment benefits are generally treated as income for tax purposes. The American Rescue Plan enacted on March 11, 2021 allows individuals with modified Adjusted Gross Income of less than $150,000 to exclude up to $10,200 in unemployment benefits at the federal level, which Oregon follows. For taxpayers who already filed before the law was enacted, Oregon is adjusting these returns for the exclusion. If you are one of these taxpayers and have not received a refund or a notice of adjustment by the end of May, please contact the department.

The Department of Revenue continues to expand features available through Revenue Online. Individuals can view letters sent to them by the department, initiate appeals, make payments, and submit questions. Visit Revenue Online to learn more.

To get tax forms, check the status of your refund, or make payments, visit www.oregon.gov/dor or email questions.dor@oregon.gov. You can also call 800-356-4222 toll-free from an Oregon prefix (English or Spanish) or 503-378-4988 in Salem and outside Oregon. For TTY (hearing or speech impaired), we accept all relay calls.

 

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Oregon Values and Beliefs Center Poll: Economic Conditions Statewide and in Communities
Oregon Values and Beliefs Center - 05/06/21 3:02 PM

METHODOLOGY

From April 1-6, 2021, the Oregon Values and Beliefs Center conducted a statewide survey of Oregonians’ values and beliefs, including how they feel about current economic conditions statewide and in their community. The online survey consisted of 600 Oregon residents ages 18+ and took approximately 15 minutes to complete. This survey’s margin of error, for the full sample, ranges from ±2.4% to ±4.0%. The question numbers in this document correspond with the survey questionnaire (Q1-Q4).

KEY FINDINGS

  • Three in ten rate economic conditions in Oregon as excellent (3%) or good (27%). Seven in ten says conditions are only fair (46%) or poor (22%). This is an improvement from a September 2020 DHM Panel survey, when only two in ten rated conditions as excellent (2%) or good (19%). Oregonians making more than $100K per year are more likely to think conditions are excellent or good than those making less (42% vs. 28%) (Q1).
     
  • Oregonians are more likely to think economic conditions in the state are getting worse (34%) than better (22%), while a plurality (39%) feel conditions are staying about the same. However, this is an improvement from September 2020, when only 9% said conditions were getting better (a 13-point jump) and 46% said conditions were getting worse (Q2).
     
  • Oregonians’ ratings of the economic conditions in their community are nearly identical to their ratings of conditions statewide, with three in ten saying excellent (3%) or good (29%), and roughly seven in ten saying they are only fair (44%) or poor (21%). Again, perceptions of local economic conditions improve with higher incomes, with those making more than $100K per year almost twice as likely to say conditions are excellent or good than those making less than $50K (45% vs. 27%) (Q3).
     
  • Similar to their view of the trajectory of economic conditions statewide, Oregonians are more likely to think conditions in their community are getting worse (29%) than better (19%), and a plurality (47%) say things are staying about the same. The belief that conditions are getting better increases with higher income and education levels (Q4).

DEMOGRAPHIC TRENDS

“Identifying what unites us and understanding what divides us.”

  • Oregonians of color and whites rate economic conditions as excellent/good in Oregon and in their communities at roughly equal levels (Oregon: 30% vs. 32%; communities: 32% vs. 35%). However, when it comes to the trajectory of those economic conditions, Oregonians of color are more likely than whites to say conditions are getting worse (Oregon: 33% vs. 39%; communities: 28% vs. 35%)(Q1-Q4).
     
  • For all these economic ratings, urban Oregonians provide higher positive scores than their rural counterparts. Urbanites are twice as likely to rate economic conditions in Oregon as excellent/good (36% vs. 18%) and are twice as likely to say conditions in Oregon are getting better (31% vs. 16%). Also, urbanites are three times more likely to say conditions in their community are getting better than rural residents (27% vs. 9%) (Q1-Q4).   

For additional information, please see attached annotated questionnaire and crosstabs, blog post here, and/or contact the Oregon Values and Beliefs Center.




Attached Media Files: OVBC Full April Crosstabs , OVBC Full April Annotated Questionnaire

Beaverton Woman Charged in April 13, 2021 Arson at Portland Police Association Building
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 05/06/21 2:27 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A federal grand jury in Portland has returned an indictment charging a Beaverton, Oregon, woman with arson after she allegedly set fire to the Portland Police Association building during a riot on April 13, 2021.

Alma Raven-Guido, 19, has been charged with one count of arson.

According to the indictment, Raven-Guido maliciously damaged the Portland Police Association building on North Lombard Street in Portland with fire.

Raven-Guido was arrested without incident by the FBI on May 5, 2021, and made her initial appearance in federal court today before a U.S. Magistrate Judge. She was arraigned, pleaded not guilty, and ordered released pending further court proceedings.

Arson is punishable by up to 20 years in federal prison with a mandatory minimum sentence of 5 years.

Acting U.S. Attorney Scott Erik Asphaug of the District of Oregon made the announcement.

This case was investigated by the Portland Police Bureau with assistance from the FBI and Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives. Assistant U.S. Attorneys Craig Gabriel and Jaclyn Jenkins are prosecuting the case.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

California Man Pleads Guilty for Role in Scheme to Smuggle Endangered and Vulnerable Turtles from the U.S. to China (Photo)
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 05/06/21 1:59 PM
Turtle Photo 4
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EUGENE, Ore.— A Chinese national residing in Los Angeles pleaded guilty today for his role in a scheme to purchase hundreds of endangered and vulnerable turtles in the U.S. and smuggle them via U.S. mail and commercial airline flights to China.

Yuan Xie, 30, pleaded guilty today to one count of conspiring to smuggle goods from the U.S.

According to court documents, beginning in at least May 2017 and continuing until October 2018, Xie conspired with another Chinese national, Xiao Dong Qin, 35, of Shanghai, China, to purchase more than 769 live turtles from reptile dealers in Alabama, California, Florida, Kentucky, Michigan, New Jersey, Nevada, North Carolina, and South Carolina. All of the turtles purchased and smuggled by Xie are protected by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora.

A two-year investigation by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) revealed that in an 18-month period, Xie facilitated the purchase and transportation of approximately 134 Florida box turtles, 178 eastern box turtles, 127 North American wood turtles, 220 spotted turtles, 77 diamondback terrapins, 25 three-toed box turtles, seven yellow-blotched map turtles, and one Blanding’s turtle from his former residence in Eugene, Oregon. USFWS investigators determined the cost of the turtles involved in this investigation exceeded $150,000 and estimated the market value was more than double that amount in the Chinese pet trade.

In November 2018, Xie was arrested by USFWS agents at his residence in Los Angeles.

Xie faces a maximum sentence of ten years in prison, a $250,000 fine and three years of supervised release. He will be sentenced on August 12, 2021 before U.S. District Court Judge Michael J. McShane.

As part of the plea agreement, Xie has agreed to pay $2,233 in restitution to a rehabilitation facility near Chicago and The Turtle Conservancy near Los Angeles for costs associated with the care of turtles intercepted by law enforcement.

Qin was sentenced on February 27, 2020 to two years’ probation and paid nearly $8,000 in restitution.

This case was investigated by USFWS with assistance from the U.S. Postal Inspection Service. It is being prosecuted by Pamela Paaso, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release , Turtle Photo 4 , Turtle Photo 3 , Turtle Photo 2 , Turtle Photo 1

HERC's Evidence-based Guidelines Subcommittee meets online June 3
Oregon Health Authority - 05/06/21 12:50 PM

May 6, 2021

Contacts: Philip Schmidt, 503-383-6079, philip.schmidt@dshoha.state.or.us  (media inquiries)

Daphne Peck, 503-580-9792c.info@dhsoha.state.or.us">herc.info@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

HERC’s Evidence-based Guidelines Subcommittee meets online June 3

What: A public meeting of the Health Evidence Review Commission’s Evidence-based Guidelines Subcommittee

When: Thursday, June 3, 2021, 2-5 p.m.

Where: Online meeting by Zoom: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1601182152?pwd=dHc0MGZHb0wyOHBwUmo2K1h1c2o4Zz09

By landline/touchtone phone:  1 669 254 5252 US 

Meeting ID: 160 118 2152 | Passcode: 710286 

Note: Unscheduled testimony will not be allowed at the meeting. If you think you may want to testify, please complete the survey to sign up at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/herc-public-comment by Tuesday, 6/1/21, noon. If you decide not to testify, you can always decline later. If you need assistance in signing up for public testimony, please call Daphne Peck at 503-580-9792.

Written public comment will be accepted until noon on 6/1/21; submit to C.Info@dhsoha.state.or.us">HERC.Info@dhsoha.state.or.us.

Agenda includes:

  • Review public comment disposition for draft coverage guidance
    • Deep Brain Neurostimulators for Refractory Epilepsy
  • Review draft coverage guidance report
    • High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation Devices (Sources)

For more information about the meeting, visit the committee’s website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/DSI-HERC/Pages/Meetings-Public.aspx. The meeting agenda and materials will be available one week before the meeting. 

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Daphne Peck at 503-580-9792, 711 TTY or c.info@dhsoha.state.or.us">herc.info@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the event. Written comments are also welcome at c.info@dhsoha.state.or.us">herc.info@dhsoha.state.or.us.


Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team - Daily Update - May 6, 2021
Douglas Co. Government - 05/06/21 12:45 PM
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Our local COVID-19 updates represent the coordinated effort of the agencies that make up the DCCRT

 

JOINT INFORMATION CENTER PRESS RELEASE - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – May 6, 2021

DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 RESPONSE TEAM - DAILY UPDATE

 

(Douglas County, Ore.) DOUGLAS COUNTY COVID-19 TEST RESULTS: As of 12:00 pm Today, Thursday, May 6, 2021, there are FOURTEEN (14) people with new positive test results to report since our noon case update yesterday.  The total number of cases of people with positive test results and presumptives in Douglas County is now at 3,211. Currently, there are ELEVEN (11) Douglas County COVID-19 patients that are being hospitalized, four locally and seven out-of-the-area. Our Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, under the direction of the Douglas County Board of Commissioners, continue to devote all resources available to our local COVID response.

 

Douglas County, OR - COVID-19 - Case Update Chart

Date

Sunday

May 2, 2021

Monday

May 3, 2021

Tuesday

May 4, 2021

Wednesday

May 5, 2021

Today, Thursday,

May 6, 2021

Total COVID-19 Cases

3,174

3,177

3,187

3,197

3,211

People w/ Positive PCR or Antigen Test Results

3,019

3,022

3,032

3,042

3,056

Presumptive

155

155

155

155

155

Total Currently Hospitalized

8

13

14

12

11

Total Currently in Isolation

104

102

105

105

101

Total COVID-19 Related Deaths

70

70

70

70

70

Our daily update includes the total number of cases in Douglas County, which combines people with positive test results and presumptives, as well as a breakout of those case numbers. There will be times when a presumptive will move to a positive test result, and our total case number will not change because the case has already been counted.

 

LOCAL CONTACTS AND CASES BEING SUPPORTED IN ISOLATION AND QUARANTINE

Currently, DPHN is supporting 101 cases in isolation, as well as another 428 contacts in quarantine in Douglas County. Isolation is recommended for confirmed and presumptive cases, quarantine is recommended for contacts of confirmed or presumptive cases.  Currently, staff is supporting a total of 529 total contacts and cases in isolation or quarantine.  This number represents a snapshot of the significant amount of work being done locally to help control the spread of COVID.

 

NEW SERIES: COVID-19 VACCINE FACTS VS MYTHS

PART TWO: REASONS FOR GETTING THE SHOT 

We know that some people are fearful, opposed or are not interested in getting vaccinated.  But, we are asking that you seriously consider getting vaccinated.  Just like the development of vaccines in the past for polio, plague, measles, the COVID-19 vaccines are an effective solution to resolving this pandemic sooner, rather than later.  Everyday there is a never-ending barrage of information being distributed about COVID and the vaccines.  Many of the stories are mixed with misunderstandings, myths and conspiracy theories about the COVID-19 vaccine.  We know it is a lot to take in, but as the myths spread widely, so do the virus mutations.  There are a number of popular arguments out there of why you should not get vaccinated, and we wanted to discuss those in our series and allow medical professionals to set the record straight. 

 

Not seriously considering getting the vaccine is a big problem for several reasons:

  • Health experts say we need at least 70-85% of the US population immunized to reach herd immunity. 
  • Herd immunity from this virus would allow us to move forward from all the state and federal mandates.
  • The longer it takes to get to herd immunity, the longer we will be living with the state and federal mandates.
  • The longer people stay unvaccinated, the more chances a virus has to mutate. And if the mutations are significant, they could lead to more troubling strains that might evade vaccines. 
  • This virus is continuing to mutate.  The thing scientists and health officials are the most worried about is that this virus will mutate to the point that immunity induced by natural infection or vaccination doesn't work at all. That is the single most important reason to get the vaccine. 
  • Virus mutations are inevitable and not a good thing.  Mutations could make even a healthy person very sick and cause more undue stress on our already burdened hospital systems.
  • It's possible to reach herd immunity, then lose it. Repeatedly, over and over.  Do you really want to keep running in and out of the perpetual pandemic cycle?  I know we do not.
  • 'Long haulers' are a real thing. This virus is not like any we have seen before and even young healthy people have suffered brain fog, chest pains and shortness of breath months and months after contracting the COVID-19 infection.
  • Young people or health people who consider their risk of getting severely sick from COVID to be low, should know that the long-term consequences can be quite serious. 

 

As with any issue, it is important to make sure you are getting your information from a reputable and qualified source on the topic.  Check your sources and their qualifications.  Just like you would not have open heart surgery performed by a high school baseball coach, you shouldn’t always believe everything you read on the internet…especially when it’s written by a non-medical professional.  We encourage you to talk to a medical professional or call our COVID-19 Hotline if you have questions or concerns.  Providing answers in response to all the misinformation and myths is important.  But, getting everyone that can be vaccinated, vaccinated is the most absolutely critical thing we need to do to end this pandemic before the virus mutates into variants that we can't control with our current vaccines.  #itsyourturn (Information shared in part from Health Journals)

 

DPHN – IT’S YOUR TURN TO GET THE VACCINE!

Douglas Public Health Network launched their “it’s your turn” vaccine campaign, encouraging everyone to step up and take their turn to get their COVID-19 vaccine. 

Everyone over the age of 16 is now eligible to get a COVID-19 vaccine, and we want people to know they are eligible and that we have vaccine available.  Having the majority of our residents vaccinated is the surest road to getting back the sense of normalcy and freedom that we all miss and want. It’s your turn to help us get there!” stated Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, Douglas County Public Health Officer.  #itsyourturn

 

DOUGLAS COUNTY TIGER TEAM’S POP-UP VACCINATION CLINICS

The Douglas County Tiger Team is out and about in the county bringing the COVID-19 vaccines directly to rural areas via our mobile medical vans (MMV) at businesses, farms, fire stations and locations in our smaller remote communities in Douglas County. The Douglas County Board of Commissioners, who have led the charge for our Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team efforts since the beginning, have coordinated with DPHN to organize our local Tiger Team to manage our vaccine outreach efforts through ‘pop-up’ vaccine clinics. 

 

The Douglas County Tiger Team will be hosting FREE POP UP COVID VACCINE CLINICS at the locations listed below.  The clinics are open to anyone 18 years of age and older and preregistration is not necessary:

 

  • Thursday, May 6, 2021: Sutherlin Area: Clinic will be at Timber Valley SKP Park at 800 S State Street in Sutherlin from 10:00 am to 2:00 pm. 

 

If you are interested in having the Douglas County Tiger Team come to your business, fire department, farm or town to provide a pop-up vaccine clinic or if you have any questions about our Douglas County Tiger Teams and want a schedule of their upcoming pop-up vaccination clinics, please call our local COVID-19 Hotline at (541) 464-6550. 

 

UPCOMING AVIVA HEALTH COVID-19 VACCINATION CLINIC

Shared from Aviva Health.  Aviva Health, with the help of local partners (DPHN & Douglas County Commissioners) will be hosting vaccination events at various locations in rural Douglas County.  For more information, or to schedule an appointment or for a list of upcoming clinics, please call Aviva Health at (541) 672-9596.  Next week they will be back in Sutherlin for another COVID-19 Vaccine Clinic. 

 

  • Thursday, May 6, 2021:  Aviva Health’s COVID-19 Vaccine team will be at the Sutherlin Community Center, located at 105 Willamette Street in Sutherlin from 8:00 am to 11:30 am and 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm offering COVID-19 vaccinations to residents aged 16 years of age and older.  Walk-ins also welcomed!

 

COVID-19 VACCINE ELIGIBILITY OPEN FOR EVERYONE 16 YEARS OLD AND OLDER

According to the State of Oregon and OHA, ALL residents 16 years old and older are eligible to get the COVID-19 Vaccine, NOW! Remember, “it’s your turn!” So, get signed up or show up to get your COVID-19 vaccine today!

 

  1. Call and set up an appointment with your primary health care provider or ask them for a referral to another health care provider.
  2. Call and set up an appointment with a local pharmacy.
  3. Sign up for or attend one of the vaccination clinics offered in Douglas County through DPHN, Douglas County, Aviva Health or our Douglas County Tiger Team. 
  4. If you are a member of the Cow Creek Band of the Umpqua Tribe of Indians, please contact to set up an appointment at (541) 672-9405 or log onto https://www.cowcreek-nsn.gov/public-health/
  5. The Roseburg VA Health Care System is setting up appointments for veterans to receive the COVID-19 vaccine.  For more information, call the Roseburg VAMC at (541) 440-1000 or log onto https://www.va.gov/health-care/covid-19-vaccine/.

 

NO ACCESS TO THE INTERNET TO SCHEDULE YOUR VACCINE APPOINTMENT? LOCAL HELP IS AVAILABLE

Not everyone is able to use the internet, a tablet, a computer or a smart phone to schedule a COVID vaccine appointment.  If you or someone you know needs to schedule an appointment for the COVID vaccine, and do not have access to the internet, you can call one of the numbers below to get help scheduling an appointment.

 

  • Call our Douglas County COVID-19 Hotline at (541) 464-6550.
  • Coastal Residents can call the Lower Umpqua Hospital District COVID-19 Vaccine Call Center at (541) 271-2175.
  • U.S. Veterans can call the Roseburg VA Health Care Center at (541) 440-1000.
  • Members of the Cow Creek Band of the Umpqua Tribe of Indians can call (541) 672-9405.
  • Seniors can call Douglas County Senior Services at (541) 440-3677.

 

GETTING YOUR SECOND DOSE OF THE COVID-19 VACCINE IS IMPORTANT  

While we have heard a lot about second dose hesitancy, it is vitally important to for those residents who have received their first dose of the Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine, to make sure that you get and not forgo getting your second dose of the vaccine and complete their vaccination.  It will better ensure your immunity and help to protect yourself and those around you that you love. 

 

If you have already received your first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, here are a few answers to questions about your second dose.

 

  • The latest information shows that you can expect to get your second dose about 4-6 weeks after the first dose.
  • You should have received a vaccination card when you received your first dose that details the brand of vaccine, its lot number, and the date the vaccine was administered.  This card is for your records only, and is not official proof that you have received the vaccine. Proof of your vaccination rests with the State Alert System, which is accessible by medical facilities.
  • You should get your second dose from the same provider or organization from which you received your first. However, the physical address where you receive the second dose may change.
  • You will be notified by the provider or organization that gave you your first dose about where and when you will receive your second dose.
  • I got a first vaccine out of the area; can I get my second vaccine in Douglas County?  The second vaccine dose is “paired” to the first dose, and your second dose will be sent to wherever you got your first dose.  Therefore, except in rare circumstances, you will need to return to where you got your first dose.
  • If you have questions, please contact the provider or organization where you received your first dose.

 

PLEASE CONTINUE TO KEEP YOU AND YOUR FAMILY SAFE

We continue encourage everyone, for the sake of our local businesses, services and residents, to gauge your risk level, and to make the best choice in order protect yourself and those around you from contracting or spreading coronavirus.  We have provided education on the widely proven COVID-19 safety measures, and encourage you to limit your contact with others not from your household, stay home if you are sick, and wear face coverings where recommended. Click here, for a graphic on how to protect you and your family from the spread of COVID-19.  We know how important family, businesses and faith are to you, so we ask that you consider all options available in order to eliminate and minimize the spread of the COVID-19 virus in our communities to help protect the ones you love, the businesses you love and the places you love to go.

 

COVID-19 FACEBOOK LIVE WITH DR. BOB

Tune in on Friday, May 7, 2021 at 4:00 pm for the next Facebook Live with Dr. Bob Dannenhoffer, the Douglas County Public Health Officer.  For future Facebook Events with Dr. Bob, please submit your questions to: ookquestions@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org">Facebookquestions@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org.  Dr. Bob and the DPHN team will do their best to respond to as many questions as they can during the Facebook event.  The Facebook Events are hosted by DPHN on the DPHN Facebook page.

 

STATE AND FEDERAL COVID-19 INFORMATION

It is important to understand that Federal and State Government and their Agencies are the ones setting policy and issuing the guidelines for the pandemic. Locally, we are following the recommended guidance issued by the U.S. Center for Disease Control (CDC) and the Oregon Health Authority (OHA).  If you have questions about the current guidelines or the recommendations, contact the CDC or OHA directly for more information. OHA posts their daily updates at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.  

 

Please do not call 911, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office or Douglas County Offices to report compliance issues with the State of Oregon, OHA or Governor’s orders. The Governor has directed the State offices for Oregon Occupational Safety and Health (OSHA) and the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) to be the enforcement agencies responsible for ensuring restaurants, bars, and other businesses comply with the current State COVID guidelines.  If you have concerns, questions or wish to report compliance, issues contact these state agencies directly:  OSHA: (800) 922-2689 or OSHA website or OLCC (503) 872-5000 or OLCC website.

 

ACCESS TO LOCAL COVID-19 RESOURCES

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer, DPHN and the DCCRT team have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020.  

 

 

 

Local Online Access to Updates

Stay up to date with accurate and local COVID-19 information in Douglas County by visiting the Douglas County Government website or DCGOV Facebook page or the DPHN website or DPHN Facebook page

 

Free Local e-Newsletter Subscription

You can also sign up for the Douglas County e-Newsletter that publishes and sends out the daily update to our subscription base free.  You can sign up for the Douglas County e-Newsletter at www.co.douglas.or.us.  Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners, Douglas County Public Health Officer, Dr. Robert Dannenhoffer, DPHN and the DCCRT have been working hard to cooperatively provide accurate and timely information to Douglas County residents since March 8, 2020. 

 

Douglas County COVID-19 Hotline (541) 464-6550

Your Douglas County Board of Commissioners and DPHN continue to offer a local resource hotline for Douglas County residents for COVID-19. The hotline provides answer to frequently asked questions, basic information and referrals to resources and services. Our local hotline number is (541) 464-6550 and is staffed from 8:00 am to 5: pm, 7 days a week.

 

Aviva Health Offers Vaccine Frequently Asked Questions Webpage

Aviva Health has created an online FAQ page to answer questions related to COVID-19 regarding availability and scheduling.  Log onto https://aviva.health/covid-19-vaccine-faqs/

 

 

COVID Vaccine Call Center at Lower Umpqua Hospital District in Reedsport

Lower Umpqua Hospital District now has a COVID-19 Vaccine Call Center for COVID-19 vaccine information in the Reedsport, Douglas County Coastal area.  The LUHD COVID-19 Vaccine Call Center number is (541) 271-2175, and is available Monday through Friday from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm.

 

###

 

Contact Tamara Howell, Public Information Officer, Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team, (541) 670-2804 cell (541) 957-4896 tjhowell@co.douglas.or.us   

Contact Vanessa Becker, Public Information Officer, Douglas Public Health Network, (541) 817-6552 cell (541) 440-3571 vanessa@douglaspublichealthnetwork.org




Attached Media Files: 2021-05/6789/144775/DCCRT_Logo_72020.jpg

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council meets May 12, 2021
Oregon Health Authority - 05/06/21 12:37 PM

May 6, 2021

Media contact: Aria Seligmann, 503-535-9134, i.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us">ari.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council meets May 12, 2021

What: Public meetings of the Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council.

Agenda: The council will continue its deliberations on policy development of the ARCs and Access to Care grants.

When: Wednesday, May 12, 2021, 1:30 – 3:30 p.m.

Where: Virtual. YouTube link with live captions (English and Spanish https://youtu.be/IVHZ0P36D38

Purpose: The Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council oversees the establishment of Addiction Recovery Centers throughout Oregon. The OAC will hold regular meetings to accomplish the necessary steps to fund and set up the centers.

Read more about the OAC. Read more about Measure 110.

Questions? Contact e110@dhsoha.state.or.us">OHA.Measure110@dhsoha.state.or.us

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Brandy L. Hemsley at 971-239-2942 711 TTY or RANDY.L.HEMSLEY@dhsoha.state.or.us" target="_blank">brandy.l.hemsley@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Financial Advisor Natalie Berning Appointed to Raymond James' Sustainable Investing Advisory Council (Photo)
OnPoint Community Credit Union - 05/06/21 12:30 PM
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PORTLAND, Ore., May 6, 2021. – Natalie Berning, CFP®, Financial Advisor, OnPoint Wealth Management & Investment Services, has been appointed to the Raymond James Sustainable Investing Advisory Council (“the council”), according to Samantha Trebesch, Vice President of Strategic Initiatives at Raymond James and council chair. Raymond James’ approach to sustainable investing is collaborative in nature across all business segments and heavily influenced by feedback from advisors, including the council, which is comprised of a select group of 16 financial advisors across the firm’s affiliation models. Established in 2018, the council’s mission is to enhance the firm’s sustainable investing capabilities and resources made available to the firm’s approximately 8,200 advisors and their clients, according to Kim Jenson, Chief Operating Officer of Raymond James’ Private Client Group and executive sponsor of the firm’s sustainable investing initiatives.

“Positive asset flows continue to reinforce growing interest in sustainable investing, providing our advisors the opportunity to further engage our high-net-worth clients in deeper relationships through impact investing, tying to their philanthropic efforts, and engaging the next generation in the wealth transfer through meaningful conversation around values and legacy building,” said Jenson at the council’s February 2021 meeting.

“We’re very pleased with the progress of the council to date in advancing our sustainable investing insights and platform, namely expanding choice to advisors and clients in building positive impact through their portfolios,” Trebesch added. “We’re excited to welcome Natalie Berning, who brings deep experience customizing successful investment strategies that are based on each client’s individualized priorities and overall plan. Her track record of success and unwavering client service gives those she works with the utmost confidence that they are on the path to achieving their short- and long-term goals.”

“I’m honored to serve on the firm’s sustainable investing council,” said Berning. “Many of my clients in the Pacific Northwest ask how they can invest leading with their values and ideals. They want to know where their money is going and the impact their investment will have on the world around them. Raymond James’ sustainable investing resources have assisted me in guiding my clients, and I am looking forward to joining this group of like-minded advisors.”

Raymond James advisors have access to a variety of sustainable investing vehicles and resources to fit their clients’ needs, including professionally managed portfolios, individual equities and bonds, funds, green bonds, and alternative investments. For more information, visit https://www.raymondjames.com/commentary-and-insights/sustainable-investing-resources.

Investments & Wealth InstituteTM (The Institute) is the owner of the certification marks “CIMA” and “Certified Investment Management Analyst.” Use of CIMA and/or Certified Investment Management Analyst signifies that the user has successfully completed The Institute’s initial and ongoing credentialing requirements for investment management professionals.

ABOUT ONPOINT COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION
OnPoint Community Credit Union is the largest credit union in Oregon, serving over 432,000 members and with assets of $8.2 billion. Founded in 1932, OnPoint Community Credit Union’s membership is available to anyone who lives or works in one of 28 Oregon counties (Benton, Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Coos, Crook, Curry, Deschutes, Douglas, Gilliam, Hood River, Jackson, Jefferson, Josephine, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Morrow, Multnomah, Polk, Sherman, Tillamook, Wasco, Washington, Wheeler, and Yamhill) and two Washington counties (Skamania and Clark) and their immediate family members. More information is available at www.onpointcu.com or 503-228-7077 or 800-527-3932.

About Raymond James & Associates
Raymond James & Associates, Inc., member New York Stock Exchange/SIPC, which has built a national reputation for more than 50 years as a leader in financial planning for individuals, corporations and municipalities, is a wholly owned subsidiary of Raymond James Financial, Inc. (NYSE-RJF), a leading diversified financial services company with approximately 8,200 financial advisors throughout the United States, Canada and overseas. Total client assets are $1.02 trillion. Additional information is available at www.raymondjames.com.

About Raymond James Financial Services
Raymond James Financial Services, Inc. is a financial services firm supporting independent financial advisors nationwide. Since 1974, Raymond James Financial Services Inc., member FINRA/SIPC, has provided a wide range of investment and wealth planning related services through its affiliate, Raymond James & Associates, Inc., member New York Stock Exchange/SIPC. Both broker/dealers are wholly owned subsidiaries of Raymond James Financial, Inc. (NYSE-RJF) a leading diversified financial services company with approximately 8,200 financial advisors throughout the United States, Canada and overseas. Investment advisory services offered through Raymond James Financial Services Advisors, Inc. Total client assets are $1.02 trillion.

About the Financial Institutions Division
The Financial Institutions Division was established by Raymond James in 1987 to provide banks and credit unions with an alternative to traditional third-party investment providers. Raymond James provides full-service securities brokerage and advisory services to financial institutions seeking to compete with the largest banks and securities firms in the country. In addition to a full complement of investment products and services, Raymond James has the ability to deliver investment banking, public finance, research, self-clearing capabilities and wealth management services to both individuals and institutions. Investment products are: not deposits, not FDIC/NCUA insured, not insured by any government agency, not bank guaranteed, subject to risk and may lose value.

 




Attached Media Files: 2021-05/963/144742/Berning_Natalie_linkedin.jpg

Pacific Power announces new grants to support Umpqua Valley communities this spring
Pacific Power - 05/06/21 12:26 PM

Pacific Power announces new grants to support Umpqua Valley communities this spring

Grants were awarded to safety and wellness initiatives aimed at strengthening the region as the COVID-19 pandemic and rebuilding from the Labor Day Storm continues

ROSEBURG, Ore. (May 6, 2021) — Even as COVID-19 vaccines roll out across the country, many communities are still facing challenges from the pandemic and the organizations that support them are still seeing unprecedented demand. For organizations that are also supporting the rebuilding efforts in areas affected by last year’s Labor Day Storm, the demand is even greater.

In spite of the odds, local programs that address critical issues such as food insecurity, homelessness, domestic violence, child abuse, elder issues, mental health and community safety have continued to find creative new ways to deliver help quickly and safely, even while facing additional budget constraints.

As part of the company’s commitment to supporting its communities, PacifiCorp Foundation, a nonprofit arm of Pacific Power, is donating more than $525,000 across the six states it serves. The funding goes to support a total of 209 safety and wellness grants as part of the most recent round of quarterly grants provided by the foundation each year. The next grant cycle is now open through June 15; organizations may apply online.

“We celebrate these heroic organizations that have continued to reinvent and reimagine ways they can help our communities’ most vulnerable,” said Sam Carter, Pacific Power regional business manager for the Umpqua Valley. “Although we see brighter days ahead, Pacific Power remains deeply committed to supporting the work of these organizations, helping to fortify our communities, so they are strong and resilient.”

The following grants were given to Umpqua Valley organizations providing critical safety and wellness programs:

  • Douglas County Sheriff’s Office for the construction of a rescue building in the Umpqua National Forest near Diamond Lake to serve as an incident and command post during search and rescue missions and other emergency situations in this remote area.
  • Salvation Army Roseburg for assisting with COVID-19 relief for vulnerable families and individuals, including rent payments, car insurance, cellphone payments, food and other essential services.

“Here at the Salvation Army, our focus is to help those who are struggling to stay afloat, especially during this pandemic. With the pandemic came fear, but uncertainty soon followed when we saw the county close down completely. We have been working diligently trying to find funds to help our neighbors with necessary bills such as rent and utilities to keep some normalcy,” said Captain Kristy Church of The Salvation Army Roseburg Corps. “We are so thankful for the grant from Pacific Power Foundation to help us with this endeavor. We are blessed to live in this loving community and this support from the foundation will help us further our mission and keep our community moving forward.”

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About the Pacific Power Foundation:

The Pacific Power Foundation is part of the PacifiCorp Foundation, one of the largest utility-endowed foundations in the United States. The foundation was created in 1988 by PacifiCorp, an electric utility serving 2 million customers in six western states as Pacific Power (Oregon, Washington and California) and Rocky Mountain Power (Utah, Wyoming and Idaho). The foundation’s mission, through charitable investments, is to support the growth and vitality of the communities served by Pacific Power and Rocky Mountain Power. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net/foundation.


CEO of United Way of Jackson County Joins Oregon Community Foundation Board of Directors, Representing Southern Oregon (Photo)
Oregon Community Foundation - 05/06/21 12:25 PM
Dee Anne Everson New OCF Board Member PHOTO
Dee Anne Everson New OCF Board Member PHOTO
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Medford, Ore. – May 6 2021 – Oregon Community Foundation (OCF) today announced that the Chief Executive Officer of United Way of Jackson County, Dee Anne Everson, joins the Foundation’s Board of Directors. Ms. Everson replaces outgoing Board member, Sue Naumes, and follows in the footsteps of Lyn Hennion, Bill Thorndike and other community leaders in representing Southern Oregon. She brings expertise in economics, finance, leadership and nonprofit administration.

“Dee Anne Everson will be a terrific addition to the Board, and we are delighted that she is joining us in support of the important work ahead to advance opportunities for all Oregonians,” says Kimberly Cooper, Chair, OCF Board of Directors. “Her expertise and experiences in generating community-led solutions inspired and funded by generous Oregonians align perfectly with OCF’s vision, mission and values, and will help create significant impact as we continue to come together to address the challenges and opportunities facing our communities.”

Ms. Cooper went on to recognize outgoing leader, Sue Naumes. “In this new role, Dee Anne Everson stands on the shoulders of other Southern Oregon giants who preceded her, building on the most recent success of outgoing Board member and immediate-past Board Chair Sue Naumes, whose outsized contributions to the State will be long-remembered. We are immensely grateful to Ms. Naumes for her leadership and dedication to OCF and to Oregonians these many years, and although she will be missed on the Board, she will always remain part of OCF’s extended family. It’s been such a pleasure serving together in support of the greater good.”

Ms. Everson officially joins the OCF Board of Directors today, May 6, 2021, following unanimous Board approval at her first OCF Board meeting. “It is remarkably humbling to help represent Oregon, and particularly Southern Oregon, as a part of OCF’s Board,” says Dee Anne Everson. “I am committed personally and professionally to improving the quality of life for all of us.  And, we can do this.  We’re Oregonians.” Ms. Everson will Chair OCF’s Southern Oregon Leadership Council, as well as serve on the Board’s Community Engagement Committee, and the Equity Diversity and Inclusion Committee.

Ms. Everson also serves on United Ways of the Pacific Northwest Board of Directors, Jackson County Juvenile Justice Committee, Jackson County Threat Assessment Committee and other committees and boards.

“For the past twenty-five years Dee Anne Everson has devoted herself to making Southern Oregon a better place to live, work and play.  She is widely recognized as a change-maker and has earned the respect, trust and affection of her community,” says Amy Cuddy, Philanthropic Adviser and OCF’s Regional Director for Southern Oregon. “Dee Anne’s deep knowledge of the challenges that communities face and her optimistic approach to meeting those challenges will serve OCF and all of Oregon well.”

Ms. Everson was appointed as CEO in 1997, and under her leadership, United Way of Jackson County launched the Day of Caring, Women Living Leadership, the Meth Task Force, Child Abuse Network, the BIG IDEA (100% high school completion for the Class of 2020),  and In This Together, a Southern Oregon suicide prevention campaign.

Ms. Everson has been recognized by Oregon Business Magazine as one of Oregon’s 50 great leaders and was named the Nonprofit Outstanding Corporate Citizen Award from the Medford/Jackson County Chamber of Commerce. She lives in Ashland, Oregon.

About Oregon Community Foundation

Oregon Community Foundation puts donated money to work in Oregon – more than $100 million in grants and scholarships annually. Since 1973, OCF grantmaking, research, advocacy and community-advised solutions have helped individuals, families, businesses, and organizations create charitable funds to improve lives for all Oregonians. Impactful giving–time, talent, and resources from many generous Oregonians–creates measurable change. For more information about OCF, please visit: oregoncf.org.

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Attached Media Files: Dee Anne Everson New OCF Board Member Southern OR NEWS RELEASE 05 06 2021 , Dee Anne Everson New OCF Board Member PHOTO

Pacific Power announces grant to support Oregon Coast Community Action this spring
Pacific Power - 05/06/21 12:23 PM

Pacific Power announces grant to support Oregon Coast Community Action this spring

The funding is part of a series of safety and wellness grants to support communities this spring as the  COVID-19 pandemic continues

COOS BAY, Ore. (May 6, 2021) – Even as COVID-19 vaccines roll out across the country, many communities are still facing challenges from the pandemic and the organizations that support them are still seeing unprecedented demand.

In spite of the odds, local programs that address critical issues such as food insecurity, homelessness, domestic violence, child abuse, elder issues, mental health and community safety have continued to find creative new ways to deliver help quickly and safely, even while facing additional budget constraints.

As part of the company’s commitment to supporting its communities, PacifiCorp Foundation, a nonprofit arm of Pacific Power, is donating more than $525,000 across the six states it serves. The funding goes to support a total of 209 safety and wellness grants as part of the most recent round of quarterly grants provided by the foundation each year. The next grant cycle is now open through June 15; organizations may apply online.

“We celebrate these heroic organizations that have continued to reinvent and reimagine ways they can help our communities’ most vulnerable,” said Sam Carter, Pacific Power regional business manager for the Southern Coast. “Although we see brighter days ahead, Pacific Power remains deeply committed to supporting the work of these organizations, helping to fortify our communities, so they are strong and resilient.”

In Coos Bay, Pacific Power provided a grant to Oregon Coast Community Action to help fund a foster parent support line. This line was developed to safely provide coaching to foster parents during the ongoing pandemic while in-person support was unavailable. This service empowers foster parents to continue their essential work of providing stability and support to vulnerable children.

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About the Pacific Power Foundation:

The Pacific Power Foundation is part of the PacifiCorp Foundation, one of the largest utility-endowed foundations in the United States. The foundation was created in 1988 by PacifiCorp, an electric utility serving 2 million customers in six western states as Pacific Power (Oregon, Washington and California) and Rocky Mountain Power (Utah, Wyoming and Idaho). The foundation’s mission, through charitable investments, is to support the growth and vitality of the communities served by Pacific Power and Rocky Mountain Power. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net/foundation.


Fatal Motorcycle Crash SR 206- Sherman County
Oregon State Police - 05/06/21 12:13 PM

On May 5, 2021, OSP and emergency personnel responded to a report of a motorcycle crash on SR 206 near MP 6 in Sherman County.  Investigation showed the motorcycle operator, identified as James Nordrum (51) out of Minnesota, was northbound when he failed to negotiate a curve and went off a small embankment.  Lifesaving efforts were attempted by bystanders and emergency personnel.  The operator was pronounced deceased at the scene.

OSP was assisted by Sherman County Sheriff’s Office,   North Sherman Fire & Rescue, Moro Fire & Rescue, Sherman County ambulance and  Life Flight.


State Interoperability Executive Council to Meet
State of Oregon - 05/06/21 11:29 AM

State Interoperability Executive Council

The State Interoperability Executive Council (SIEC) will meet Tuesday, May 11, 1:30 – 3:30 p.m. The meeting will take place via teleconference. The meeting is open to the public and comments will be taken from those attending via audioconference.

The agenda and handouts are posted on the council’s website. Instructions for those who wish to attend over the phone are outlined in the meeting agenda.

What:      State Interoperability Executive Council 

When:    Tuesday, May 11, 2021, 1:30pm – 3:30pm

Where:  Via Teleconference

                  Microsoft Teams Link

Audio Call In: 503-446-4951

Pin: 661 692 803#

Who:       Members of the State Interoperability Executive Council 

The SIEC was created under the State Chief Information Officer to be the statewide interoperability governing body and to serve as the primary steering group for the Oregon Statewide Interoperability Communications Plan (SCIP). The SIEC’s mission is to develop and maintain the SCIP, develop recommendations and guidelines for policy, identify technology and standards, and coordinate intergovernmental resources to facilitate statewide public safety communications interoperability.

REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION OF DISABILITIES – Reasonable accommodations, such as assistive hearing devices, sign language interpreters and materials in large print or audiotape, will be provided as needed. In order to ensure availability, please contact Calloway Erickson at the Office of the State Chief Information Office at telephone 503-378-3175, or email calloway.erickson@oregon.gov at least 72 hours prior to the meeting with your request.


$10,000 reward for information on three elk poached near Bend- Deschutes County
Oregon State Police - 05/06/21 10:49 AM
Poached elk near Bend
Poached elk near Bend
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May 5, 2021

BEND, Ore. — The Oregon Hunters Association (OHA) is offering $10,000 for information that leads to an arrest or citation in the case of three elk that were poached west of Bend on or about Oct. 28, 2020.

In early April, OHA Bend, Redmond, Capitol, Josephine, and Mid-Columbia chapters, along with several private donors, pooled resources to increase the reward amount to $6500.  Additional private donations and an infusion of $1,000 from the OHA State Board last week raised the total to $10,000. Several thousand dollars of the reward was donated to OHA by non-hunters who are equally enraged.

OSP Fish and Wildlife Troopers located the cow elk carcass on Oct. 30 after a hunter scouting the Dry Canyon area east of Sisters reported it to the Turn In Poachers (TIP) Line. Troopers then discovered a large bull elk carcass nearby.  The bull elk’s head had been removed as a trophy. Although bull elk were in season at the time, it is a crime to leave carcasses to waste.

Two days later, on Nov. 1, a hunter reported the carcass of a one-year-old male spike elk about 40 yards from where the cow had been found. Based on decomposition, all three animals were shot at or near the same time, and certainly the same day according to OSP F&W Senior Trooper Creed Cummings, who processed the scene.

OHA Vice President Steve Hagan, who oversees the TIP rewards program for the organization, describes the case as upsetting.

“This case has generated outrage in Central Oregon,” he said. “This happened a while back, but we haven’t forgotten about it. Hopefully, this increased reward will help generate leads towards a resolution to this case."

Oregon’s Stop Poaching campaign coordinator Yvonne Shaw agrees. “This is a blatant waste of Oregonians’ natural resources,” she said, “Not only have these animals been removed from legal hunting in season, but they have also been removed from chance encounters with hikers, photographers, and others who appreciate the opportunity to experience wildlife. Poachers take from all of us.”

All three elk were most likely shot on the opening day of the East Central Cascade elk season which ran Oct. 28 through Nov. 1, 2020. Instead of the cash reward, a caller to the TIP Line could opt for six hunter preference points if their report leads to a citation. OSP Troopers would like anyone in the area who heard shots at night or noticed anything unusual on the opening day of the season to call the TIP Line at 1-800-452-7888 or by cell OSP (677) or by email TIP@osp.oregon.gov.

Stop Poaching Campaign
The Stop Poaching Campaign educates the public on how to recognize and report poaching. This campaign is a collaboration among hunters, conservationists, landowners, and recreationists. Our goal is to increase reporting of wildlife crimes through the TIP Line, increase detection by increasing the number of OSP Fish and Wildlife Troopers and increase prosecution. The Oregon Hunters Association manages TIP Line reward funds. This campaign helps to protect and enhance Oregon’s fish and wildlife and their habitat for the enjoyment of present and future generations. Contact campaign coordinator Yvonne Shaw for more information. Yvonne.l.Shaw@odfw.oregon.gov.




Attached Media Files: Poached elk near Bend

Oregon Community Foundation Awards $7 Million to Central City Concern to Open Recovery-Oriented Housing for Homeless People in East Portland, Oregon (Photo)
Oregon Community Foundation - 05/06/21 9:30 AM
Project Turnkey InfoGraphic Courtesy of OregonCommunityFoundation
Project Turnkey InfoGraphic Courtesy of OregonCommunityFoundation
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Portland, Ore. – May 6, 2021Oregon Community Foundation (OCF) today announced Central City Concern (CCC) has been selected to receive a Project Turnkey grant of $7 million for the acquisition and conversion of a 70-room motel located in outer East Portland, Oregon. Project-Turnkey-East Portland will be known as the “CCC Recovery Hotel”. The CCC Recovery Hotel will serve as transitional housing for people who are experiencing or at risk of homelessness and in early stages of recovery regarding substance use and addiction.

"CCC is thrilled to provide this safe, early-stage supportive transitional housing," says Melissa Bishop, CCC's Associate Director of Recovery Housing Programs. “The CCC Recovery Hotel will offer a safe, encouraging environment where residents can begin work on their recovery journeys. We're also especially honored to be serving our Native American community members through our partnership with the Native American Rehabilitation Association."

Referrals for the CCC Recovery Hotel will come from CCC’s substance use and addiction recovery programs, including from CCC’s culturally specific service providers–Puentes and Imani, which serve the Latinx and African American communities. In addition, the Native American Rehabilitation Association (NARA) will provide referrals for up to 15 of the rooms, offering expanded culturally specific recovery housing for Native American community members. This new, transitional housing will provide a compassionate and stable place to those who have struggled with substance use and addiction. 

“NARA is honored and so excited to have this opportunity to serve and to further develop our long-standing partnership with Central City Concern,” says Jackie Mercer, CEO, NARA. “We are very grateful to be able to offer housing and recovery supports to help Native Americans, who as a community, experience extremely high rates of homelessness.”

Key benefits of the Project Turnkey-East Portland, operated by CCC and to be known as the “CCC Recovery Hotel”, include:

  • Safe accommodation for up to 70 individuals.
  • Provision of essentials such as showers, laundry, hygiene items, etc.
  • Supportive services including behavioral health, recovery services, employment, and navigation to permanent housing.
  • An inclusive, culturally competent atmosphere that helps vulnerable community members stabilize to be able to get on the road to recovery regarding substance use and addiction.

Located at 5019 NE 102nd Avenue, in outer East Portland, Oregon, Central City Concern anticipates the CCC Recovery Hotel to open in September 2021.

“Shelter is never the end goal—it’s just a step on the path to stability and housing. The power of the Project Turnkey model is that it offers both shelter and housing in one single investment,” Megan Loeb, OCF Program Officer, Housing, said. “By acquiring motels/hotels as shelter now during the pandemic, Oregon communities can boost their housing stock by converting these properties to permanent housing in the long-term. We continue to see the benefits of this cost-effective model to support Oregon’s housing crisis.” 

Oregon Community Foundation offers support for Oregon’s housing needs along a continuum–from shelter to supportive housing to affordable housing to equitable home ownership–through a variety of tools, including research, grants, advocacy, and low-interest loans. OCF’s administration of Project Turnkey is one example of the innovative, collaborative approaches underway to help more Oregonians find stable, affordable housing.

For a complete list of Project Turnkey grant awardees, please visit Project Turnkey online.

About Project Turnkey

The Oregon Legislature allocated a total of $65 million for Project Turnkey for the purpose of acquiring motels/hotels for use as non-congregate shelter for people experiencing homelessness or at-risk of homelessness. Two discrete funds were provided by the state: one totaling $30 million to be awarded in counties and tribal communities impacted by the 2020 wildfires; and one totaling $35 million for the remaining 28 counties in the state. Oregon Community Foundation is administering both funds through an application and selection process, with guidance from an Advisory Committee of state, local, and community stakeholders. For more information, please visit Project Turnkey online.

About Central City Concern

Central City Concern offers many types of affordable and transitional housing, combined with programs to help people overcome barriers to permanent housing. Each year, CCC serves more than 13,000 people experiencing or at risk of homelessness with affordable and supportive housing, person-centered health care, addiction recovery and employment assistance. To learn more about CCC, please visit: centralcityconcern.org.

About Native American Rehabilitation Association of the Northwest, Inc.

NARA provides education, physical and mental health services and substance abuse treatment that is culturally appropriate to American Indians, Alaska Natives and anyone in need. To learn more about NARA, please visit: naranorthwest.org.

About Oregon Community Foundation

Oregon Community Foundation puts donated money to work in Oregon – more than $100 million in grants and scholarships annually. Since 1973, OCF grantmaking, research, advocacy and community-advised solutions have helped individuals, families, businesses, and organizations create charitable funds to improve lives for all Oregonians. Impactful giving–time, talent, and resources from many generous Oregonians–creates measurable change. For more information about OCF, please visit: oregoncf.org.

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Attached Media Files: Project Turnkey-East Portland Central City Concern NEWS RELEASE 05 06 2021 , Project Turnkey InfoGraphic Courtesy of OregonCommunityFoundation , ProjectTurnkey Projects to Date_MAP_As of 05 06 2021 , ProjectTurnkey-EastPortland_CentralCityConcern_PHOTO_05 06 2021

OnPoint Community Credit Union Shares How to Reevaluate Investment Strategies During and After the Pandemic
OnPoint Community Credit Union - 05/06/21 9:30 AM

The credit union offers tips on investments, including building for retirement and sustainable investing.

PORTLAND, Ore., May 6, 2021—More than a year after the pandemic sent the world into lockdown, workers and retirees remain concerned about the long-term impact of economic shifts on their retirement and investments. A recent report from the Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies finds that one in five U.S. workers are worried about their ability to retire in light of the pandemic—of which only 27 percent are confident in a comfortable retirement. OnPoint Community Credit Union is educating the communities it serves on investment strategies and principles that may guide long-term stability.

“It’s clear the pandemic has shaken people’s confidence in money management and their long-term financial well-being,” said Daniel Bartosz, Financial Advisor, Raymond James Financial Services at OnPoint. “We’re here to provide support and resources to help our members and community understand key investment strategies, so they can make informed financial decisions, build their nest eggs, and look to the future with confidence.”

Below are several important strategies OnPoint recommends to help people with their financial planning needs, even during times of uncertainty.

How to rebuild for retirement

The first step to evaluating your investment strategy is determining if you’re on track to retire at the age you expect while still meeting your lifestyle goals. A retirement calculator can help you determine where you stand. The calculator requires specific inputs to give you accurate feedback, including estimated social security benefits, your current age, retirement age and life expectancy.

If you’re not on track, it may be time to seek help from a local financial advisor. If you currently have investments, a financial advisor will help you adjust your strategy to align with your goals. Strategic changes to your retirement plan may include:

  • Revising your target retirement date
  • Prioritizing 401(k) contributions
  • Maximizing employer matching
  • Minimizing your expenses
  • Timing debt payoffs carefully
  • Adjusting your lifestyle
  • Budgeting more for your savings and investments

A financial advisor can help you determine which strategies are right for you and provide accountability and guidance as you make changes.

How to pick a financial advisor

Below are five traits you want to look for when evaluating which financial advisor is right for you: 

  • They work with you: You should always feel like you are in the driver’s seat. Your advisor should lay out the investment strategy and request your feedback. A financial advisor understands investment strategy, but you know your goals. The best results come from excellent communication.
  • They put your interests first: All the financial proposals they make and strategies they formulate are to achieve your goals.
  • Holistic view of your finances: In addition to recommending an investment strategy, your advisor should look at the tax efficiency of your current investments, advise you on insurance policies, understand your income and budget, and be able to consult on a wide range of investment options.
  • Customized strategy: The strategy developed by your advisor should be well thought out. When your goals change or significant life events impact your retirement expectations, they should help you evaluate these shifts and consider if they require an adjustment to your strategy.
  • They are backed by a team: What happens to your investments if something happens to your financial advisor? Is there someone available to answer your questions and help you with a seamless transition? When you reach out to your financial advisor, you should expect a timely response and be assured the team has the appropriate knowledge to support your goals.

Here are five signs it may be a good time to replace your financial advisor:

  • Poor communication: You can’t reach your advisor to discuss your strategy or your advisor is frequently slow to return your calls or emails.
  • Lack of transparency: Your financial advisor focuses on “hot takes” and “secret sauce” while avoiding transparency about their actions, practices, fees and process.
  • False sense of urgency: Does your advisor tell you that you need to jump on investments quickly, or you may risk losing out on a big opportunity? You should always have the time to make an important decision.
  • Claims exclusivity: If your financial advisor tells you they are privy to investment options or strategies that no one else has access to, they simply are not telling the truth.
  • Goes rogue: Some financial advisors work alone and do their own thing, but that could mean they serve their interests ahead of yours. Make sure your advisor operates as a fiduciary, and understand how your advisor stays accountable. Know that you should always be involved in decision-making.

Risks to your retirement plan

Rely on your financial advisor to plan for these major drivers of financial uncertainty and insecurity:

  • Major life events: A severe health issue for your partner, a child facing foreclosure, or other unforeseen events could lead to dipping into retirement accounts. Before taking this step, you’ll want to discuss the impact on your retirement plan.
  • Higher-than-expected living expenses: Inflation, debt, budget requirements, ongoing expenses and other unanticipated costs may impact your retirement expectations.
  • Rates stay low: As retirement nears, you may move a large portion of investments into less volatile funds. Low interest rates may make it challenging to decide where to invest to ensure adequate returns while protecting your funds.
  • Market downturn near retirement: From the dot-com bubble of the late ‘90s, to 9/11, to the financial housing crisis of 2008, to COVID-19, significant events will happen that can lead to short-term dips in the market and threaten retirement plans. Financial advisors can help you build a plan to take market variance into consideration.
  • Social Security changes: The estimates you see on the Social Security Administration website are not guaranteed. Future events, population shifts or changing priorities could impact your benefits.

How best to handle each of these situations will depend on how close you are to retirement and how far you are from your retirement goal. In each scenario, you have options. Working with a financial advisor can help you determine a course of action.

How to evaluate sustainable investing options

Sustainable investing, also referred to as socially responsible investing, ethical investing, or values-based investing, is an investment sector focusing on companies whose goals positively impact society while refraining from doing harm. They allow you to support social change.  Here’s how to get started:

Step One is to determine the company values that are most important to you, like environmentalism or social justice issues.

Step Two is to decide whether you want to invest on your own or by using a financial advisor. The DIY route means you’ll often need to research each specific investment to ensure it upholds your values before adding it to your portfolio. If you choose to work with a financial advisor, they have tools that can help align your retirement goals with your values.

Step Three is to monitor the progress of your investments, either on your own or with the help of your advisor.

Learn more about the financial and retirement planning resources from OnPoint, or request a complimentary consultation.

ABOUT ONPOINT COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION

OnPoint Community Credit Union is the largest credit union in Oregon, serving over 432,000 members and with assets of $8.2 billion. Founded in 1932, OnPoint Community Credit Union's membership is available to anyone who lives or works in one of 28 Oregon counties (Benton, Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Coos, Crook, Curry, Deschutes, Douglas, Gilliam, Hood River, Jackson, Jefferson, Josephine, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Morrow, Multnomah, Polk, Sherman, Tillamook, Wasco, Washington, Wheeler, and Yamhill) and two Washington counties (Skamania and Clark) and their immediate family members. More information is available at www.onpointcu.com or 503-228-7077 or 800-527-3932.

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Securities offered through Raymond James Financial Services, Inc., Member FINRA/SIPC and are not insured by credit union insurance, the NCUA or any other government agency, are not deposits or obligations of the credit union, are not guaranteed by the credit union, and are subject to risks, including the possible loss of principal. OnPoint Community Credit Union and OnPoint Wealth Management & Investment Services® are not registered broker/dealers and are independent of Raymond James Financial Services, Inc. Raymond James privacy policy. Investment advisory services offered through Raymond James Financial Services Advisors, Inc.

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Any opinions are those of OnPoint and not necessarily those of Raymond James.  Expressions of opinion are as of this date and are subject to change without notice.  There is no guarantee that these statements, opinions or forecasts provided herein will prove to be correct.  Investing involves risk and you may incur a profit or loss regardless of strategy selected.

Raymond James is not affiliated with and does not endorse the entities mentioned above.

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Tip of The Week for May 10, 2021- Safety Tips For Runners
Lincoln Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/06/21 6:42 AM
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  TIP OF THE WEEK

 

Date:          5/6/2021                 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Contact:     Sheriff Curtis Landers

                   541-265-0654

                   s@co.lincoln.or.us">lcsheriff@co.lincoln.or.us

 

 

SAFETY TIPS FOR RUNNERS

Every runner should take a few moments and consider their safety while running.  Running is generally a safe activity, but there are still perils worth considering and preparing for.  For example running at night, while often pleasant due to lower temperatures and decreased traffic, brings with it the added danger of decreased visibility. The weather can pose running safety risks; for example, running in extremely hot or cold weather requires special precautions, in addition to running in inclement weather.

Before the Run

Arrange to run with another person.
Leave word with someone or write down where you plan to run and when you will return.
Carry some I. D. and a cell phone.
Take a whistle with you.
Don’t wear a radio/headset/earphones or anything which distracts you so that you are completely aware of your environment.
Avoid unpopular areas, deserted streets, lonely trails - and especially avoid unlighted routes at night.
Vary the route and the time of day that you run.
Run in familiar areas.  Note the location of neighbors you trust along your route.
Know where police are usually to be found and where businesses, stores, offices are likely to be open and active.

During the Run

 

Always stay alert.  The more aware you are, the less vulnerable you are.  Think about possible escape routes in case of confrontation.
Take notice of who is ahead of you and who is behind you.  Know where the nearest public sites are with some general activity - there is usually safety in numbers.
When in doubt, follow your intuition and avoid potential trouble.  If something seems suspicious, do not panic, but run in a different direction.
Run clear of parked cars, bushes, dark areas.
Run against traffic so that you can observe the approach of automobiles.
If the same car cruises past you more than once, take down even a partial license number and make it obvious that you are aware of its presence (but keep your distance).

If Confronted

Run toward populated areas, busy streets, open businesses.
Ignore jeers and verbal harassment.  Keep moving.
Use discretion in acknowledging strangers.  Be friendly, but keep your distance and keep moving.
Do not approach a car to give directions or the time of day.  Point toward the nearest police or information source, shrug your shoulders, but keep moving.  If you feel you must respond, do it while moving.
Don’t panic and don’t run toward a more isolated area.

For more information and tips, visit our web site at www.lincolncountysheriff.net  and Like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.




Attached Media Files: 2021-05/5490/144752/050621_Safety_Tips_for_Runners.pdf , 2021-05/5490/144752/SAFETY_TIPS_FOR_RUNNERS.PNG

Firefighters Extinguish Industrial Fire In Springfield
Eugene Springfield Fire - 05/06/21 6:35 AM
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Springfield, OR.  Just befor 6:00 PM on Wednesday, Eugene Springfield Fire responded to an industrial fire at Swansoon Plywood in Springfield.  Arriving crews found a fire in the fuel hopper for the plant's boiler system.  Crews worked with Swanson staff to extinguish the fire.  The truck company with its 100' platform is especially helpful in directing large volumes for water in to hard to reach places.  There was no measurable damage to the facility or its functionality thanks to the close coordination and good communication between Swanson's maintenance staff and responding fire crews.  These fires are typically caused by friction in the system that can create an ember in the organic material. 




Attached Media Files: 2021-05/4466/144751/A992B91A-CE30-48BE-BEF2-283E727AC19A.jpeg , 2021-05/4466/144751/78E342C7-8F84-435C-9F25-0FAC0E8A2F03.jpeg

Fire Crews Extinguish Commercial Fire In Springfield
Eugene Springfield Fire - 05/06/21 12:32 AM
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Springfield, OR.  Eugene Springfield Fire crews responded to a report of a fire at Big Lots located at 5790 Main St in Springfield early Thursday morning.  Arriving crews found a fire in the exterior loading dock area with alarms sounding and light smoke in the interior of the building.  The fire was slowed by a sprinkler system allowing crews to extinguish the fire with little damage to the business.  Crews checked the building for any extension of fire in to the building and cleared it of any remaining smoke.  There were reports of 2-3 individuals in the area at the time of the fire.  The cause is under investigation by the Eugene Springfield Fire Marshals Office.




Attached Media Files: 2021-05/4466/144750/93F990E1-84E5-4B60-9EF5-110F01A00711.jpeg